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Implant Injects DNA Into Ear, Improves Hearing

Soulskill posted about 6 months ago | from the assimilating-individual-organs dept.

Biotech 34

sciencehabit writes "Many people with profound hearing loss have been helped by devices called cochlear implants, but their hearing is still far from perfect. They often have trouble distinguishing different musical pitches, for example, or hearing a conversation in a noisy room. Now, researchers have found a clever way of using cochlear implants to deliver new genes into the ear — a therapy that, in guinea pigs, dramatically improves hearing (abstract)."

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Say What? (1)

Jerry Rivers (881171) | about 6 months ago | (#46828067)

Needles in the ears? =:O

So the guinea pigus can now (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46828075)

distinguish different musical pitches? That's good.

Re:So the guinea pigus can now (1)

sexconker (1179573) | about 6 months ago | (#46828617)

Wheek wheeek wheek weheek wheek wheeek wheek wheeek!

That must be some seriously rich guinea pigs (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46828077)

Many humans can't afford a top of the line hearing aid.

Re:That must be some seriously rich guinea pigs (1)

SJHillman (1966756) | about 6 months ago | (#46828227)

Many humans can't afford top of the line *anything*. Sufficiently advanced hearing aids can be affordable if you go through the right channels (HINT: anybody but an audiologist)

Re:That must be some seriously rich guinea pigs (3, Informative)

umafuckit (2980809) | about 6 months ago | (#46828715)

A cochlear implant is not a "hearing aid", which is a microphone and speaker inside the ear canal. A hearing aid is basically a modern ear trumpet, because it drives the cochlear with sound waves via the ear drum. A cochlear implant, on the other hand, is a neural prosthesis. Electrodes are surgically inserted into the cochlear and "sound" is delivered via direct electrical stimulation that drives the auditory sensory neurons. These devices allow people who would otherwise be 100% deaf to hear, assuming that their auditory nerve is intact and the innervation of the cochlear is still present. The problem, however, is that these implants have relatively few electrodes (of the order of 10 or so) and this results in a distorted picture of the world. Here are details with photos of the surgery [brown.edu] .

Re:That must be some seriously rich guinea pigs (1)

Moheeheeko (1682914) | about 6 months ago | (#46828477)

welcome to a for-profit healthcare system.

BUTTGOAOT (1)

For a Free Internet (1594621) | about 6 months ago | (#46828085)

can't you hear me now, I am the secret desires of the future in hte form of a waffle.

never works (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46828257)

No matter how much DNA I put in my girlfriend's ear, she still can't hear me yelling "turn your head dammit!"

I wonder if this would help... (1)

rusty0101 (565565) | about 6 months ago | (#46828365)

...those with hearing loss related tinnitus. (At least some sufferers are experiencing the ringing related to their nervous system treating the lost frequency spaces as 'always on' to generate the ongoing ringing.)

Re:I wonder if this would help... (1)

mellon (7048) | about 6 months ago | (#46828417)

Wouldn't that be nice? Unfortunately, their technique doesn't actually work—the nerve cells die off after six weeks. Sigh. Hopefully they will figure out why and fix it... :}

use hearing protection now (4, Informative)

lophophore (4087) | about 6 months ago | (#46828397)

This is an article about "hearing loss." Much hearing loss is preventable.

Use hearing protection now.

Use hearing protection when running your leaf blower, weed whacker, power sander, lawn mower, and especially when making like a war-mongering imperialist at the shooting range. Use hi-fi hearing protection at rock concerts and loud clubs.

Once your hearing is damaged, it is not recoverable, unless you become The Bionic Woman -- and for about 50% of us, that is pretty much completely impossible.

Hearing protection is cheap. I like the Etymotic ER20 for rock concerts. Maybe I look silly wearing them. But... I can still hear after the show. I really don't care if people think I look silly. I've been to some literally deafening rock concerts, and my ears have suffered for it... Now I always bring (and wear!) my ear plugs to shows, And I use hearing protection when running noisy power equipment.

Re:use hearing protection now (1)

albeit unknown (136964) | about 6 months ago | (#46828521)

Also: Not just power tools - hammering nails or anything else. Sharp blows are terrible for your hearing because your inner ear bones don't have time to adjust and attenuate the signal.

Re:use hearing protection now (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46828597)

and especially when making like a war-mongering imperialist at the shooting range.

No, tell us how you really feel.

Re:use hearing protection now (1)

mellon (7048) | about 6 months ago | (#46829089)

Yup, also when riding a motorcycle. Speaking from experience...

Re:use hearing protection now (1)

ArsonSmith (13997) | about 6 months ago | (#46830373)

Speaking form experience causes hearing loss now? Don't experience so loud then.

Re:use hearing protection now (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46829271)

Hearing protection is cheap. I like the Etymotic ER20 for rock concerts. Maybe I look silly wearing them. But... I can still hear after the show. I really don't care if people think I look silly. I've been to some literally deafening rock concerts, and my ears have suffered for it... Now I always bring (and wear!) my ear plugs to shows, And I use hearing protection when running noisy power equipment.

I just use standard earplugs, but I'll talk to a hearing professional about what I should be using next time I go to a concert.

Last time I went to a concert, someone made fun of me for wearing earplugs. She stopped after I mentioned that I'd ruptured an eardrum at a concert.

Never again.

Re:use hearing protection now (1)

phantomfive (622387) | about 6 months ago | (#46829755)

such a true post.

Re:use hearing protection now (2)

techno-vampire (666512) | about 6 months ago | (#46830163)

I have a classic artillery notch, and there's no way this is going to help me. My hearing loss, btw, isn't from rock concerts, it's a long-term effect of my being exposed to too much outbound shore support back in '72. Yes, when I was topside I had proper hearing protection. Alas, I slept in the forward berthing compartment two decks down and about 50' back from the 5"/54 gun mount, and nobody realized that we should have been using ear plugs down there. One morning, I woke up and found out that there'd been a 40 round bombardment, and I hadn't woken up even once, which will tell you something about how adaptable people are. About the only good thing here is that it's Service Connected, so the VA can't charge me for any hearing-related service, such as giving me hearing aids.

That being said, I think this is a wonderful thing, because I'm sure that there are millions of people out there who can be helped by it.

Re:use hearing protection now (1)

Alejux (2800513) | about 6 months ago | (#46830821)

"Once your hearing is damaged, it is not recoverable"

Isn't the whole point of the article to show us that that statement is wrong?

This is what regenerative medicine is all about. A decade or two from now, you'll see that a lot of the problems we face now with "irreversible" damage to the body and loss of tissue, will be treatable and made reversible by regenerative medicine. That includes damaged ears, ligaments, bones, skin, and a bunch of other tissues and organs.

Re:use hearing protection now (1)

turp182 (1020263) | about 6 months ago | (#46832363)

I wish my parents had told me this before I caused permanent tinnitus during my later teenage years going to concerts and playing in a band (back when I thought it was cool that my ear were ringing three days after the Iron Maiden concert...).

I protect my ears now, but I will never experience silence again, just the ringing.

Hell with hearing better.... (2)

Lumpy (12016) | about 6 months ago | (#46828667)

Cure Tinnitus... more people suffer from that infernal ringing than anything else....

Re:Hell with hearing better.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46829339)

Some of us not through our own doing, either. (Someone used to drag me around by my ears when I was about 5 years old. That cunt ruined my hearing.)

Double standard (3, Funny)

Dancindan84 (1056246) | about 6 months ago | (#46828719)

Sure, but when I inject DNA into someone's ear I get put on the sex offender registry.

Re:Double standard (1)

Guppy (12314) | about 6 months ago | (#46830993)

Sure, but when I inject DNA into someone's ear I get put on the sex offender registry.

Aural Sex will give you Hearing AIDS.

Re:Double standard (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46837989)

Sure, but when I inject DNA into someone's ear I get put on the sex offender registry.

Aural Sex will give you Hearing AIDS.

That was awesome.

Hurry it on up then (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46830071)

It's about time I ditched these cochlear implants for something better.

I, for one, (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46830299)

welcome our new guinea overpigs.

Cochlear hair cells (1)

renfrow (232180) | about 6 months ago | (#46830487)

How similar are the 'hair' cells in the cochlea to regular hair? Two things come to mind: Rogaine(TM) and hair plugs. Maybe injections of Rogaine into the cochlea would prove fruitful. Or transplanting those fine hairs you have in various places into the cochlea will do the trick. I suffer from general hearing loss, and also have a brick wall at 3600hz... nothing after that. I would LOVE to be able to hear music as others hear it.

Farscape is now! (1)

cyn1c77 (928549) | about 6 months ago | (#46830647)

Exciting!

Slashdot sociopaths (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46830771)

The usual sickening responses from the emotionless, sociopathic Slashdot crowd.
No video of the torture these poor animals suffered, why? Imagine if it were YOU having your ears destroyed so that somebody could experiment on you.
Oh, wait... you can't do that, because you can't feel the suffering of others.

As someone with cochlear damage... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46831071)

this is great news. After a sudden idiopathic loss in one ear, I've pretty much accepted that I will never regain the lost range, but anything that pushes towards restoration of the dead/damaged cells is great news in my eyes.

Ménière's syndrome? (1)

ocularsinister (774024) | about 6 months ago | (#46831143)

I suffer from Ménière's syndrome (tinnitus, hearing loss and balance problems - sometimes *severe* balance problems!). Once again, I find myself hopeful that this might be a miracle cure but I'm really not sure. If this does work, can it be used to improve balance too? Of all the symptoms, not being able to stand up and/or randomly falling over are much worse than the hearing loss (and I speak as someone who loves music!) or even the tinnitus.

I don't get it (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46831329)

Do I put a guinea pig in each ear, or just the one?

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