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Why Does Amazon Want To Sell Its Own Smartphone, Anyway

Unknown Lamer posted about 6 months ago | from the pay-to-be-the-product dept.

Businesses 60

curtwoodward (2147628) writes "Amazon is well-established as an e-commerce and cloud computing pioneer. So why do its ambitions include a bigger push into consumer electronics, including a long-rumored leap into the very competitive smartphone market? In a word, control — of data, consumer profiles, and royalties on purchases."

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Bottom pop up ads on slashdot (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46877487)

What's with the new bottom pop up ads on slashdot?

They're annoying as f**k.

And I thought that with Beta slashdot had reached the limit in how to piss off readers but nooo....

Re:Bottom pop up ads on slashdot (0)

binarylarry (1338699) | about 6 months ago | (#46877505)

Whats beta slashdot?

Re:Bottom pop up ads on slashdot (4, Interesting)

alex67500 (1609333) | about 6 months ago | (#46878415)

A stillborn, hopefully...

Re:Bottom pop up ads on slashdot (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46880489)

Yeah, I've run with adblock disabled on slashdot.org for a long time to support the site, but I am about done with that now.

Drones, baby. (2)

B33rNinj4 (666756) | about 6 months ago | (#46877543)

It'll be easier for their drones to find me if I have an Amazon phone.

Re:Drones, baby. (5, Funny)

ILongForDarkness (1134931) | about 6 months ago | (#46877703)

They'll come preloaded with heartrate monitors. When you die the drones will come for you like Valkeries.

Re:Drones, baby. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46877753)

For processing so we can be fed to the warehouse staff? Or do I have to sign up for Prime for that?

Re:Drones, baby. (1)

Sporkinum (655143) | about 6 months ago | (#46879465)

USDA Prime.

Re: Drones, baby. (1)

Type44Q (1233630) | about 6 months ago | (#46880499)

Soylent Prime. :)

Well (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46877589)

They already sell Kindle tablets, so why not a smaller (physically) one.

I have a Kindle HDX 8.9 - it has more pixels on its screen than I can get on any computer monitor under $600

Re:Well (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47001355)

No, it does not. 2560 x 1440 monitors are under $500 now.

Smart customers can avoid being exploited for data (3, Interesting)

CRCulver (715279) | about 6 months ago | (#46877605)

I bought a Kindle Paperwhite [amazon.com] not too long ago and while I am happy with the technology and have become a voracious reader for the first time in years, the platform obviously is ultimately meant to allow Amazon to sell you e-books to read on it, sell advertising to third parties, and gather data on what you are reading and how both for itself and for third parties.

However, while they can probably depend on a majority of their customers to be sheep, they make it surprisingly easy to avoid all that. The Kindle is jailbreakable, so if you get the slightly cheaper version that shows advertising, you can disable that. You are not dependent on Amazon, but can put content from anywhere on it (such as pirate ebook sites). Keeping the Kindle in Airplane mode all the time means it can't communicate over wifi on how you are using the device, and you don't lose anything really if you are getting your ebooks from places other than Amazon, because the built-in web browser is crap for anything anyway.

So perhaps Amazon is growing into an all-consuming monster of Big Data and advertising, but I hope they continue to make it easy for us nerds to opt out.

Re:Smart customers can avoid being exploited for d (4, Insightful)

Charliemopps (1157495) | about 6 months ago | (#46877689)

Amazon understands piracy. Is so damned easy to order books on my Kindle I don't even bother to download them even though it'd save me $8. It's just not worth me getting out of my reading chair and dinking around with it. I can search for the book, click a button, viola. The prices aren't crazy and I can get my books when I want them. If the music and movie industries did something similar I'd probobly start paying them again as well. But when they still think they can manipulate how, when, and where I watch their content... force me to watch inane previews, bribe my TV manufacturer to limit its features... all just to extort the maximum profit out of me, it's just easier to pirate it.

Re:Smart customers can avoid being exploited for d (5, Informative)

Kardos (1348077) | about 6 months ago | (#46877783)

Except that you have no control over whether that book will remain on your Kindle. You just have to have faith that your books won't be revoked for $SomeRandomReason.

Famous example: http://www.nytimes.com/2009/07... [nytimes.com]
More recent example: http://digitaljournal.com/arti... [digitaljournal.com]

Re:Smart customers can avoid being exploited for d (2)

CRCulver (715279) | about 6 months ago | (#46878435)

While the poster above you presumably does not have control since he gets books from Amazon delivered directly to the Kindle over its 3G or wifi connection, Kindle owners do have control over their content if, as I said, they just keep in the device in airplane mode all the time. When you buy an ebook from Amazon -- or simply get it from a pirate site as is just as easy -- it's a normal, ineffectively DRMed file and you can move it to a plugged-in Kindle in USB mass storage mode. With the wifi connection off, Amazon has no way of knowing what is on your device or "revoking" it.

Re:Smart customers can avoid being exploited for d (2)

albeit unknown (136964) | about 6 months ago | (#46878521)

I used to worry about that, but, for books, I realized I just don't care. Only novels are acceptable for me to read on a Kindle. Technical materials must be in paper form or PDF. Once I've finished reading a novel, with very few exceptions, I'll never read it again. If I do, I'll find a hard copy. Life is too short for obsessive hoarding.

Re:Smart customers can avoid being exploited for d (1)

Kardos (1348077) | about 6 months ago | (#46878941)

I'd find the book "rental" via Amazon/Kindle would be more palatable if the price were lower - $1 per novel would put it into the "ok, fine, it's just a rental" category (despite being more expensive than a library ..). A cursory look finds kindle versions are 80-90% of the price of a dead tree version. That's not a sufficient discount to surrender control.

Re:Smart customers can avoid being exploited for d (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46881001)

How many times do you generally read a novel you purchase? The minor risk that I won't be able to re-read a book some years from now because Amazon has folded or otherwise stopped honoring my purchase is an easy price to pay for the convenience. I enjoy the look of a well stocked home library as much as the next guy, but why really hoard stacks of books you will never open again?

Re:Smart customers can avoid being exploited for d (1)

imnotanumber (1712006) | about 6 months ago | (#46907883)

How many times do you generally read a novel you purchase? The minor risk that I won't be able to re-read a book some years from now because Amazon has folded or otherwise stopped honoring my purchase is an easy price to pay for the convenience. I enjoy the look of a well stocked home library as much as the next guy, but why really hoard stacks of books you will never open again?

There are other uses for the books. I regularly lend, to friends, some dead tree books that I bought more than ten years ago. Many were bought from Amazon...

Re:Smart customers can avoid being exploited for d (1)

quonsar (61695) | about 6 months ago | (#46879697)

Except that you have no control over whether that book will remain on your Kindle. You just have to have faith that your books won't be revoked for $SomeRandomReason.

Oh yes I do. I strip the DRM and keep copies on my computer. Easy as pie. I bought 'em, they are MINE.

Re:Smart customers can avoid being exploited for d (1)

tlhIngan (30335) | about 6 months ago | (#46879971)

Except that you have no control over whether that book will remain on your Kindle. You just have to have faith that your books won't be revoked for $SomeRandomReason.

Why is it that the purveyor of walled gardens is the last to get in on this? Apple's never removed content from people's devices. Sure, they've removed content, but if you have a backup copy (on your PC, say), it remains perfectly usable, even installable on new devices. All content too - music, movies, TV shows, books, apps.

It seems every OTHER store that isn't "Evil Apple" has done the whole "Delete From Your Library" thing - Google Play, Amazon, Steam (yes, Steam has disabled and removed games from people's libraries).

Sure, Apple COULD follow them, but why is it in the 10+ years of DRM stuff being sold by Apple, everyone else decided they'd exercise the power. And most of the examples have been around for shorter periods of time than Apple's DRM offerings!

I'd find the book "rental" via Amazon/Kindle would be more palatable if the price were lower - $1 per novel would put it into the "ok, fine, it's just a rental" category (despite being more expensive than a library ..). A cursory look finds kindle versions are 80-90% of the price of a dead tree version. That's not a sufficient discount to surrender control.

It turns out the vast majority of the price of a book is NOT in the printing or distribution. In fact, it's under 10% of the price is actually due to the deadtree nature of the book. All the rest of the money goes to the author, the editor, the indexer (if the book has an index), the person who makes the table of contents (if one exists), the typesetter, the artists (cover, etc), marketing and many other bits of work involved in publishing a book. In fact, the authors role is to deliver a manuscript, and everyone else's role is to fix that up into a book (authors are not expected to need to do tables, indicies, spelling, non-content art, etc).

Of course, for self-publishers, they have to do it all, which is why self-publishing pays more.

Re:Smart customers can avoid being exploited for d (1)

Charliemopps (1157495) | about 6 months ago | (#46880007)

Thats fine, if they do that I'll just pirate it. I'm paying for the convenience of not having to go find the damned book.

Re:Smart customers can avoid being exploited for d (1)

trawg (308495) | about 6 months ago | (#46880255)

This is one of the reasons I have not bought into the Amazon ecosystem.

GP is right - Amazon have largely solved piracy for the majority of users by simply making it way easier. As an avid reader and someone that has been almost exclusively reading e-books since about 2005, I love the idea of the Amazon ecosystem.

But I can't bring myself to buy a book that I then don't own. I understand the revoking is, when considered as a percentage of books, tiny - but the point is /it can happen/. I don't want their DRM scheme to magically deactivate my book collection one day.

I know I can buy the books and strip the DRM - but then I'm back at the start and it's no longer easier to use the Amazon ecosystem. Users might as well just pirate it to - as usual - get a superior product.

I made the decision to not buy DRM'ed products ever a while ago. Unfortunately this greatly limits my ability to buy e-books - many publishers/retailers don't clearly distinguish between DRM-free and DRM on their sites, despite apparently supporting them both (I still haven't figured out how to reliably buy DRM-free Tor books; I don't know if I am stupid or what).

Re:Smart customers can avoid being exploited for d (1)

ArcadeMan (2766669) | about 6 months ago | (#46879657)

Amazon understands piracy. Is so damned easy to order books on my Kindle I don't even bother to download them even though it'd save me $8. It's just not worth me getting out of my reading chair and dinking around with it. I can search for the book, click a button, viola. The prices aren't crazy and I can get my books when I want them. If the music and movie industries did something similar I'd probobly start paying them again as well.

Buying books from Amazon is easy but buying music from Apple is too complicated?

Re:Smart customers can avoid being exploited for d (1)

Charliemopps (1157495) | about 6 months ago | (#46879983)

I wouldn't know since I don't own an Apple computer. iTunes doesn't support Linux, and using it via windows nearly drove me insane with rage. My kindle doesn't even require a computer... just wifi. How would I get that music into my car? I'm sure there are answers to all these questions, but if they want my money they need to make it easier to buy the music than simply copying it to a USB stick and carrying it out to my car.

Re:Smart customers can avoid being exploited for d (1)

ArcadeMan (2766669) | about 6 months ago | (#46883445)

You don't need a computer to access the iTunes Store, it can be accessed via an iPod touch, iPhone or iPad. So I'm guessing you're an Android user. But you can also purchase music from Amazon, almost the same way you can buy from the iTunes Store, so what's the problem?

Re:Smart customers can avoid being exploited for d (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46883559)

You don't need a computer to access the iTunes Store, it can be accessed via an iPod touch, iPhone or iPad. So I'm guessing you're an Android user.

But you can also purchase music from Amazon, almost the same way you can buy from the iTunes Store, so what's the problem?

iTunes sucks.
Can you buy and use stuff from Apple without using itunes? I don't have to install an app on my PC to use my amazon music. It works directly on my roku and other gizmos.

Re:Smart customers can avoid being exploited for d (1)

ArcadeMan (2766669) | about 6 months ago | (#46883775)

Buy from Apple without iTunes, an iPod touch/iPhone/iPad? No.

But they've been selling regular, non-DRM'ed AAC files for years now. The tunes play without any problem in my Nintendo DSi.

But music videos, TV shows and movies are still DRM'ed, AFAIK.

Re:Smart customers can avoid being exploited for d (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46887281)

Buy from Apple without iTunes, an iPod touch/iPhone/iPad? No.

But they've been selling regular, non-DRM'ed AAC files for years now. The tunes play without any problem in my Nintendo DSi.

But music videos, TV shows and movies are still DRM'ed, AFAIK.

I'm an idealist, not a martyr, so Amazon and Steam are tolerable to me in a way that Apple is not.

iTunes was an abomination on the PC and it still installs almost a half dozen other programs with it unless you catch check boxes, some of which come back with every update. It's another crapware suite to me. I'll trust them when I trust Sony and EA with root on my systems. Amazon dropped DRM on music before Apple so they win on that front too. I've installed the Amazon app on some systems, but even if I don't I can get it via the browser.

no this isn't true. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46883405)

The Kindle is jailbreakable,

Aside from misapplying the term "jailbreak" (which is not particularly applicable to Android devices-- do you mean the bootloader is unlocked? Root is available? You can replace the OS? Sideloading is possible? etc. "jailbreak" is a catch-all term used for iOS.), it is not true that the Kindle allows alternative version of Android to be installed.

You may be aware that the Kindle, Kindle 2, and Kindle HDs do run cyanogenmod and other third party OSes, but that is only due to exploits of the locked bootloader. The original Kindle tablet did not have a locked bootloader, but the 2, and HDs did.

For those that may be confused by the term "locked bootloader" -- it basically means that upon being turned on, the hardware will only start with a bootloader that has been digitally signed by Amazon. The bootloader then begins a multi-stage boot (loading the kernel, ramdisk, and operating system), where each step in the chain checks the digital signature of the next step to make sure it is signed by Amazon as well.

Note that a locked bootloader is not the same as "rooting" (ie, gaining root/admin access), which allows you to do privileged stuff within the OS without replacing it.). Also, there is also a way to hook into the boot process when it's still running at root-level to load extra desired stuff (aka "safestrap"), but this is not the same unfortunately as booting your own OS from scratch as suggested in the OP.

The Kindle HDX has a heavy beefed-up locked bootloader that is unlikely to be overcome, though you are welcome to try [xda-developers.com] .

I hope they continue to make it easy for us nerds to opt out.

They have never made it easy, except in that first unlocked Kindle. The others had the locked bootloaders opened due to flaws in their implementation. That is unlikely to be possible in the future.

Re:no this isn't true. (1)

CRCulver (715279) | about 6 months ago | (#46883505)

Fine, the Kindle allows "rooting", then. When I got my Kindle, I was immediately able to install a modified firmware that would allow me to use third-party applications (I particularly wanted Djvu support). Had I bought the cheaper Paperwhite that shows ads, I could have disabled that as well.

Re: no this isn't true. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46885329)

Okay but understand that this was only due to "security" holes and Amazon can and will close these whenever it feels like it. Don't expect to stay rooted forever. The locked system gives Amazon 100% control to close these holes in such a way that you either submit to their authority or the system becomes unbootable.

In other words the kindle is NOT a nerd friendly platform and that you think it is is a testiment to Hashcode and others who have found holes, albeit temporary ones, in the system of Amazon's control methodology.

Better to not support such anti freedom platforms IMO. Eventually you'll be find yourself locked in without any options. Nexuses are unlockable by default fwiw.

Ponies! (1)

rvw (755107) | about 6 months ago | (#46877625)

Wait until they sell ponies. Then you become the Amazon [wikipedia.org] !

No really!!! How long will it take before you become their pony? When will you be the drone? When will they get you to deliver their goods and be happy about it?

Re:Ponies! (2)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46877729)

Have you seen Amazon's Mechanical Turk?

Re:Ponies! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46878113)

About as long as it takes fanboys who cry "Freedom!!!" to become the self-censoring lapdogs of the biggest non-government data mining company in the world? That's my guess.

Re:Ponies! (1)

mrchaotica (681592) | about 6 months ago | (#46879907)

Which one are you talking about? Google, Facebook, Amazon, Visa, Equifax/Experian/Transunion, ...?

Re:Ponies! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46879699)

If I become a Pony, I want to be Fluttershy. Yay!

Apple (2)

sunderland56 (621843) | about 6 months ago | (#46877635)

Didn't people ask the same thing when Apple, a computer company, started selling portable music players? And then again when they started selling phones?

Re:Apple (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46877799)

Why does a company known for its search engine put out a mobile OS and their own mobile devices? Why doesn't anyone ask that around here?

Hey, same as Google! (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46877649)

But we don't dare speak badly of teh Googles!! here.
 
Google wants you to see their ads and mine your data. You are the product. Scream it from the rooftops! As much as we hear this endless drone about Facebook and we can see where Amazon can make the same move the truth of the matter is that Google is currently the industry leader in selling all your data to their customers. Even Facebook can't imagine the kind of data mining that Google does and Amazon can't imagine the exposure that Google gives to vendors (including Amazon) through not only search hits but also mining your data from resources like Gmail and GooglePlus.
 
And guess who's seeing all of your mobile data if you're running stock Android?
 
GOOGLE!!! Second only to the NSA.

Apple, Google, Amazon... (1)

ArcadeMan (2766669) | about 6 months ago | (#46879715)

I don't care who it is, but the first company to give me a free-to-use, no monthly fee smartphone is getting me as a customer.

Re:Apple, Google, Amazon... (1)

ArcadeMan (2766669) | about 6 months ago | (#46879789)

I don't care who it is, but the first company to give me a free-to-use, no monthly fee smartphone is getting me as a product.

FTFM

Of course it's data (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46877787)

Slightly off-topic but I haven't seen it discussed here. Posting anonymously b/c I feel dumb asking this: Is the entire purpose of the Amazon FireTV, Chromecast, etc. just to have a device in your home to snoop on your Internet usage? I'm thinking of setting these up on either guest wi-fi or doing some shit with VLANs.

Amazon's push into smartphones (5, Insightful)

Sp4rkyJ0n3z (2550184) | about 6 months ago | (#46877859)

Amazon is a giant now, but so was RadioShack back in its prime time. RadioShack is struggling now, because they did not adapt their retail stores to new consumer needs. Adaptation is necessary. What is a business' number one resource? People. This is important, because Amazon is huge and the majority of the population are well aware it exists. How does a well known company get more clients? By predicting their specific needs. Smartphones collect data that can be used to predict these things. Google has this figured out, and make money by referring customers, and not by selling any products. Amazon already has invested in mobile technology via its Kindle series, so a logical step would be to expand to cell phone technology so they can start their data mining.

needs (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46878479)

By predicting their specific needs.

Predicting needs is easy: food, water, air, medical and sex.

All the data collection and analyzing shit is to try to get people to buy wants - shit they don't need.

Remember, our ecnomy is 70% consumption and aside from true needs, the rest takes marketing to get us to think we need tham.

Re:Amazon's push into smartphones (1)

ArcadeMan (2766669) | about 6 months ago | (#46879809)

RadioShack is struggling now, because they did not adapt their retail stores to new consumer needs.

Is it really what happened? Or are they struggling because the makers are now getting their parts from places like eBay and AliExpress? There's only so many parts that a hardware store can physically stock.

How long until they become a carrier/ISP? (1)

swb (14022) | about 6 months ago | (#46877939)

Given the kinds and amount of data they want to move to end users, either directly via video or audio streaming/downloads or indirectly from their cloud infrastructure, having an "Amazon Device" only seems to be part of the equation.

With the future of net neutrality seriously in doubt and rent-seekers like Comcast holding their customer base hostage it seems like it would make sense for them to try to get into that market, too.

Google is approaching this, albeit teasingly and slowly to probably not scare regulators as much as anything else.

Gatekeeper (1)

countach (534280) | about 6 months ago | (#46877969)

Every company and his dog would like to be the gatekeeper for your data. Only the top tier technology companies can take a shot at it: Google, Apple, MS, Amazon.

Portable checkout terminal (2)

MasterOfGoingFaster (922862) | about 6 months ago | (#46878075)

I suspect Amazon sees the smartphone as a portable checkout terminal. Rather than leave it open to any competitors, they want to own the OS and get a peek at what you're looking for. It's also a consumption device, and is the hook to selling movies, books, etc. It may be the case that they really don't want to be in the smartphone business, but fear what a competitor might do.

expand or die (1)

minstrelmike (1602771) | about 6 months ago | (#46878679)

Amazon's business model is actually still the same as any startup--expand or die.
Going into a new area such as smartphones keeps investors interested.
If they stopped expanding into new areas and technologies, then shareholders would start expecting them to make a profit and that has yet to happen at Amazon.

Re:expand or die (3, Interesting)

mlts (1038732) | about 6 months ago | (#46879759)

In a previous /. topic, it was stated that shareholders want growth above everything, and that a firm with a market niche that was profitable was considered far less attractive than one that was operating at a net loss, but was expanding into new markets and buying out other companies [1].

Amazon is playing the market quite smartly. Shareholders want growth, Amazon is giving them what they want. I wouldn't be surprised to see an Amazon MP3 player (although that market is a tired one), if it kept the shareholders thinking the company was "growth-focused".

[1]: Maybe it is a good thing long-term. Buy companies like IBM or GE that are established and have stocks paying dividends, and hold those until this "growth" fad dies off and the stocks of functioning companies becomes mainstream again.

Wall-E was a documentary (1)

Voyager529 (1363959) | about 6 months ago | (#46878731)

Amazon = Buy 'n Large. I think that answers this and basically any other question about Amazon, ever.

Here's a suggestion to Amazon (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46879139)

Hey Amazon, why don't you get your APPS right before you think about designing a whole phone. Your iOS apps suck and crash a lot and Android doesn't even have all the apps that Apple has. You've been making Kindle Fires for years! Put out an Amazon Seller app for Android already.

You know what, never mind. It's extremely unlikely I'd ever use your phone anyway.

Re:Here's a suggestion to Amazon (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46879383)

Yeah, you'd rather be data mined by Google. Way to take one for the "open source" lie... er, I mean team.

Amazon did try to build a smart phone before (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46880203)

Not sure where I read it but I recollect a while back Amazon did attempt to build a phone and the project failed. Not sure exactly but there were battery life issues and and problems. So this could be Amazon phone rev 02.

Because of Google Play Store (1)

hackajar1 (1700328) | about 6 months ago | (#46880693)

I cannot stream Amazon Prime on any of my devices without having to side load Amazon Prime Video. That is 20 mil (in US) devices Amazon is not actively on right now.

Sex (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46880985)

It's all about the penis.

Ha ha

Trusting Amazon vs. Trusting Google (1)

dublin (31215) | about 6 months ago | (#46884275)

In several conversations recently among various tech, marketing, and entrepreneurial/business types here in Austin, there has been near universal agreement on the following really interesting points of perception:

1) Google used to be trusted, but definitely is not trusted anymore. They have blown their trust and probably can never earn it back. A surprising number of people who were comfortable "running their company" on Google until recently are now actively looking for other alternatives, as they are too dependent on Google, and now see a need to begin to move away at least partly, if not entirely. Not a single person in these discussions trusted Google to "not be evil" and misuse or sell their information if it's to Google's benefit to do so. Even here in Austin, where many of us would love the speed of Google Fiber, many were hesitant, fearing that this would give Google too much control and access. Android and Chrome are also impacted by their being fully in the Google fold.

2) Although Amazon actually has *more* (and more accurate/valid) data on each of us, they have not (to date, anyway) abused that in any substantial way. Everyone agrees that Amazon "could be really scary", but isn't, since they are only using our personal data on our own behalf, and that data (at least the personal data we care about) stays within Amazon's walls. Amazon has also proven to be a trustworthy partner on the AWS side of the fence, too, which has earned them the trust of the tech guys. The general opinion of Amazon is that "they 'get' making things easy". Amazon's customers are wary, but trusting, so far. The fact that they do trust Amazon made several of them wish for an Amazon alternative to iOS and Android on both phone and tablets. Although they would like to see it, there is little expectation that Amazon will do general-purpose phones or tablets well enough to be viable competition.

3) Microsoft is now more trusted than Google. This is staggering. At the same time, I have only have slight qualms about putting information into OneNote that I absolutely would not want or trust Google to have. The CEOs of two marketing firms that had been on the road to being Chromebook shops are in the now hedging with a transition to Microsoft Surface instead.

4) Apple is not trusted all that much, either, but convenience and superior product design and usability seem to be overriding those concerns. There is a small (but much larger than I expected) portion of iOS device users that do not use iTunes and/or the AppStore except when they have to. iCloud, in particular, seems to be very untrusted, except by Mac users, who again seem to have a arrangement of convenience.

You can argue about whether or not these perceptions are valid or justified, but one thing is clear - this is a seismic shift in the perceived trustability of the largest Internet players.

Re:Trusting Amazon vs. Trusting Google (1)

dublin (31215) | about 6 months ago | (#46884395)

BTW, all Amazon would have to do to get me onto their phone platform would be to build a modern WebOS phone (or something that works like it.) We still desperately need a platform that is really web-centric (web apps were first-class under WebOS - all of the "native" apps, including the dialer, were just web apps themselves that happened to be pre-loaded on the phone or tablet.)

That, and it really ticks me off to have brain damage on the iPhone that was elegantly fixed 20 years ago in PalmOS. (Including really easy stuff like week views for calendars and easy datetime stamping of notes entries...)

DRTFA (1)

Jeslijar (1412729) | about 6 months ago | (#46896019)

Oh I couldn't possibly imagine any reason why amazon would want to break into the smartphone market at all. The Kindle Fire isn't overly successful with their own app store enabled and the google app store stripped out. They don't sell kindles at a loss so they can reap huge profits from their chunk of a digital content sale. No sir.

Come on.

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