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Grad Student Makes Nanowires Just Three Atoms Thick

samzenpus posted about 3 months ago | from the lets-get-small dept.

Technology 32

Science_afficionado (932920) writes "A Vanderbilt University graduate student, working at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, has discovered a way to create nanowires capable of linking transistors and other components made out of the monolayer material TMDC. His accomplishment is an important step toward creating monolayer microelectronic devices, which could be as thin and flexible as paper and extremely tough."

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A *CHINESE* !! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#46897267)

Beware, the graduate student is a *CHINESE* !

If he brings his knowledge back to his home country China would be leaps and bounds ahead of the USA in technology !!

Re:A *CHINESE* !! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#46897303)

Where do you think the nanowire filled products are going to be built?

Re:A *CHINESE* !! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#46897361)

I'm John Kerry and I approve this post.

Re:A *CHINESE* !! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#46897443)

Where do you think the nanowire filled products are going to be built?

Texas! \o/

Re:A *CHINESE* !! (4, Funny)

gl4ss (559668) | about 3 months ago | (#46897543)

Where do you think the nanowire filled products are going to be built?
Texas! \o/

sure, but they'll be 3inches thick. because as you know...

Re:A *CHINESE* !! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#46897749)

Thicker is better.
And nobody is more thick than a Texan.
Cue evidence in 3... 2... 1...

Re:A *CHINESE* !! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#46899485)

You have never been to Kansas I see. Go up there once in a blue moon and nothing beats the corn fed women there.

Re:A *CHINESE* !! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#46897831)

Dude! America is made in China.

Re:A *CHINESE* !! (1)

destinyland (578448) | about 3 months ago | (#46898595)

Maybe next, someone at Vanderbilt can build us the internet...

Where is the more in the 'read more' link (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#46897277)

I clicked the read more link but there is nothing more than the summary I feel cheated!!

Oh btw ditch those god damn'd video ads at the bottom of every page they open even when I don't click the link

Bit of a bugger (2, Funny)

Hognoxious (631665) | about 3 months ago | (#46897411)

Bit of a bugger really, he was trying for cheese on toast.

awesome (2)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#46897413)

But who gets the patent benefits.

Re:awesome (1)

Dr_Barnowl (709838) | about 3 months ago | (#46897465)

I came in to post exactly this ; is he going to be like the guy who invented blue LEDs [japansociety.org] and sue to get some tiny fraction of reasonable compensation for his discovery?

Re:awesome (1)

wonkey_monkey (2592601) | about 3 months ago | (#46897515)

It should be patently obvious.

Re:awesome (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#46897545)

Why does it have to be patented?

Re:awesome (1)

StripedCow (776465) | about 3 months ago | (#46897775)

Because, when eventually, somebody figures out how to make this technology work in a production environment, they will receive the $$$.

It is a bit like patenting "flying cars", before the actual technology is there.

Re:awesome (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#46897809)

well, except that he actually has a flying car to show for...

Re:awesome (1)

gnupun (752725) | about 3 months ago | (#46898011)

If it is patented, his university will get most of the licensing fees and he'll get a plaque...

Re:awesome (1)

jimbolauski (882977) | about 3 months ago | (#46898073)

There is a good chance that they won't receive much from this finding. 20 years seems ambitious from initial discovery to production.

Re:awesome (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#46898141)

Correction to your sig: the less you know, the more money it will cost you to get the work done.

Re:awesome (1)

jimbolauski (882977) | about 3 months ago | (#46898213)

Time doesn't equal cost it equals money. So the less you know the more money you will have to do the same work.

Re:awesome (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#46897941)

Probably the university itself. Hey, remember when corporations did research at their own expense, like in the 1960s? Corporations have wised up since then, they socialize the boring, profit-less research to university students! Clever clever!

And the nerds fight each other for the chance to pay for the privilege out of their own pockets!

Re:awesome (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#46901279)

But who gets the patent benefits.

Since the primary funding for the research was provided by the US Department of Energy's Office of Science, the patent should be in the public domain.

But what do I know.

Where will we see it first? (2)

rmdingler (1955220) | about 3 months ago | (#46897987)

This technology could be exploited to produce new generation electron microscopes that utilize e-beam lithograghs with reduced splatter,

and it has real promise to further the development of even tinier integrated circuits,

it will probably end up being marginalized to manufacture paper thick television monitors.

monolayer material? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#46898335)

Wiki has nothing on TMDC, first I ever heard of it, would it kill you guys to explain or link to what TMDC is?

Is it really a wire? (0)

140Mandak262Jamuna (970587) | about 3 months ago | (#46898363)

Can you call something that thin a wire.

Anyway Mattel would be interested in it. That company feels the waists of barbie dolls are not yet thin enough to induce self loathing and bad body self image in all the girls.

My suggestion... (1)

koan (80826) | about 3 months ago | (#46898451)

Is take a deep breath and enjoy it because if nano particle, tech, wire, and what not becomes main stream we will all have to wear expensive mask to breath or live in sealed domes.

All tiny tech of this nature is an anathema to lungs and various other body parts.

calling out the grad student (4, Insightful)

Goldsmith (561202) | about 3 months ago | (#46899163)

I will reserve my general snark regarding nanotechnology to highlight the fact these guys are putting the grad student up front and acknowledging that he really did all the work.

Could it be? An ethical professor? Professor Pantelides, Vanderbilt and Oak Ridge deserve a ton of credit for breaking the traditional assignment-of-credit mold here. Good job guys.

Re:calling out the grad student (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#46899907)

Maybe the technology is untested, so they are putting him up front and center so they can hang him out to dry if the results ultimately fail to meet expectations.

Re:calling out the grad student (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#46901133)

No kidding. (From a grad student sick of dealing with unethical professors)

More info (2)

godel_56 (1287256) | about 3 months ago | (#46904393)

More info from TFA:

Lin made the tiny wires from a special family of semiconducting materials that naturally form monolayers. These materials, called transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs), are made by combining the metals molybdenum or tungsten with either sulfur or selenium. The best-known member of the family is molybdenum disulfide, a common mineral that is used as a solid lubricant.

Other research groups have already created functioning transistors and flash memory gates out of TMDC materials. So the discovery of how to make wires provides the means for interconnecting these basic elements. Next to the transistors, wiring is one of the most important parts of an integrated circuit. Although today’s integrated circuits (chips) are the size of a thumbnail, they contain more than 20 miles of copper wiring.

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