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Some Users Find Swype Keyboard App Makes 4000+ Location Requests Per Day

timothy posted about 6 months ago | from the now-where-are-you dept.

Input Devices 191

New submitter postglock (917809) writes "Swype is a popular third-party keyboard for Android phones (and also available for Windows phones and other platforms). It's currently the second-most-popular paid keyboard in Google Play (behind SwiftKey), and the 17th highest of all paid apps. Recently, users have discovered that it's been accessing location data extremely frequently, making almost 4000 requests per day, or 2.5 requests per minute. The developers claim that this is to facilitate implementation of 'regional dialects,' but cannot explain why such frequent polling is required, or why this still occurs if the regional function is disabled. Some custom ROMs such as Cyanogenmod can block this tracking, but most users would be unaware that such tracking is even occurring." Readers in the linked thread don't all seem to see the same thing; if you are a Swype user, do you see thousands of location requests, none, or something in between?

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This sounds more like incompetence... (4, Insightful)

Torp (199297) | about 6 months ago | (#46912065)

... than malice.
Or malice (location tracking) plus gross incompetence in implementation.

Re:This sounds more like incompetence... (4, Insightful)

mrxak (727974) | about 6 months ago | (#46912073)

Either way, I'm glad I don't use Swype.

Either way (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46912083)

I'm glad we still use cans and string in our office...

Re:Either way (4, Insightful)

mrxak (727974) | about 6 months ago | (#46912107)

Hey, at least those cans and string aren't draining our batteries unnecessarily and uploading our every move to some company doing who knows what with it.

Re:Either way (2)

TDyl (862130) | about 6 months ago | (#46912189)

I can track you - I just follow the string to find you wherever you are. (What *are* you doing in that closet?)

Re:Either way (1)

ganjadude (952775) | about 5 months ago | (#46912965)

little do you know that I have tapped your can and string communications with my own string!

Re: This sounds more like incompetence... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46912117)

SwiftKey does the same thing so either stick with default or get screwed.

Re: This sounds more like incompetence... (2)

Minderbinder106 (663468) | about 5 months ago | (#46912493)

I checked my Privacy Guard settings on my CM11 Nexus 5 and SwiftKey has never accessed my location data.

Re:This sounds more like incompetence... (5, Interesting)

TheRaven64 (641858) | about 6 months ago | (#46912145)

The Google Keyboard for Android sends what you're typing to Google servers 'to improve suggestions,' so I don't think that asking for your location a lot is the worst invasion of privacy of a mainstream on-screen keyboard app. The AOSP keyboard also requires a phenomenal list of permissions, including the ability to download files without notification, read contacts, modify or delete contents of USB storage and view accounts on the device. No idea why it needs all of these things - I wouldn't mind so much if it had access to all of my data for improving predictions if it didn't also have the ability to make network connections.

Re: This sounds more like incompetence... (3, Informative)

robmv (855035) | about 6 months ago | (#46912217)

download files without notification: dictionary updates
read contacts: suggestions
modify or delete contents of USB storage: I don't know why it needs this one, store dictionary outside private app directory?
view accounts on the device: suggest your email address

Re: This sounds more like incompetence... (3, Interesting)

TheRaven64 (641858) | about 6 months ago | (#46912475)

download files without notification: dictionary updates

Could be bundled as part of the application, updated via the normal mechanism, without requiring it to have a permission that allows it to send data remotely ('download' can mean an HTTP GET with a really long query).

read contacts: suggestions

Most of the time, I'm not typing a contact's name so this sounds like it would lead to a lot of false positives. I've never seen it suggest a name that isn't a common English name though, so it doesn't seem to actually need this.

modify or delete contents of USB storage: I don't know why it needs this one, store dictionary outside private app directory?

If that is the case, it's bad design.

view accounts on the device: suggest your email address

It doesn't seem to ever do that for me...

Re:This sounds more like incompetence... (1)

Lumpy (12016) | about 6 months ago | (#46912229)

Which is why the hacker keyboard is on mine. it doesnt do any of this crap.

Re:This sounds more like incompetence... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46912291)

Input is slow as fuck on Hacker's Keyboard. With Swype I can do 60+ WPM, rivalling most peoples' keyboard typing speed.

Re:This sounds more like incompetence... (1)

mrxak (727974) | about 6 months ago | (#46912351)

I'm honestly asking here, but how much typing do you actually need to do on your phone?

Re:This sounds more like incompetence... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46912405)

Not the same anonymous coward, but a lot. I'm rarely even at my computer anymore outside of doing actual programming. General browsing, email, chatting, and so on all get done on my phone while I'm out and about.

Re:This sounds more like incompetence... (1)

allo (1728082) | about 5 months ago | (#46912563)

use the aosp one.

Re:This sounds more like incompetence... (1)

knarf (34928) | about 5 months ago | (#46912947)

Just put it behind the firewall, no more requests to Google. Use something like privacy guard (in CM) or a similar 'datawall' to keep it from your personal data. Disable location, who needs it anyway? The mere fact that these devices can be tethered to your every personal detail does not mean you should - or want.

Don't use a factory distribution. Build one yourself, or use a build from somewhere you trust. Root your phone. Use a firewall. Use a 'datawall'.

For those of you inclined to start proselytizing for Apple or Microsoft (or any other brand) I'd say wake up and smell the coffee. The difference between Android and 'the others' is that on Android you have a choice. On Apple you don't, you just drink the Cool Aid. Same on Microsoft.

Of course even a self-built Android distribution still uses closed source binary blobs for all sorts of stuff, including the much maligned radio/modem which often has total control over your device. So... if it is a tablet device you wanted... take one without a WAN interface. One less leak to stop...

Re:This sounds more like incompetence... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46912525)

I am not sure I am. I thought this might explain why my Moto G is draining the battery like crazy whenever the location service was used. But swype is not even installed. Maybe other apps have that bug, too.

Re:This sounds more like incompetence... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46912085)

I do not think so. If it would be incompetence, at the moment of testing, the testdatabase would show a large numbers of records immediately.

Location tracking is big business.

Re:This sounds more like incompetence... (2)

TrollingForHostFiles (3613155) | about 6 months ago | (#46912087)

Read their FAQ about
"Living language"
This data mining ain't
Excess baggage!

BURMA SHAVE

Re:This sounds more like incompetence... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46912125)

Malicious incompetence is the best kind.

Re:This sounds more like incompetence... (1)

sumdumass (711423) | about 6 months ago | (#46912127)

Does the app send the location data anywhere?

Outside of a small delay, it probably would be just fine only looking up the location when the app is first opened and when it opens every 5 hours or so. Maybe even less- especially when the regional function is turned off.

2.5 times a minute is definitely tracking in the literal sense. They would know everywhere you went and probably even when you went to the restroom assuming you had the phone in your pocket. I run wigle every once in a while and while I would expect it to update the location data often, I don't think it checks the location near as much as swype seems to. That is of course if those reports are true.

Re:This sounds more like incompetence... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46912133)

Yeah, sounds like it was a bug more than malicious.

More to the point, if the app actually sends any files TO them, then it'd be a problem.

Just sounds like a horribly inefficient coding problem left since it was of no importance to fix. Or forgotten. Or not noticed.

Re:This sounds more like incompetence... (2)

Nikker (749551) | about 6 months ago | (#46912197)

According to Google Play Store this app has about 40K installs. We are saying that 40K x (60x60x24) x 2.5 = 8,640,000,000 rows added per day is something that not even the DBA noticed?

That's a bit of a stretch.

Re:This sounds more like incompetence... (2)

Nikker (749551) | about 6 months ago | (#46912265)

Mistake on my math that would have been 2.5 / second, the real number would be:

40,000 x (60x24x2.5) = 144,000,000 rows per day (still quite a bit).

Re:This sounds more like incompetence... (1)

msauve (701917) | about 5 months ago | (#46912671)

Swype comes standard with a lot of phones (although not necessarily the default keyboard. For example, many Samsung Galaxy S4s come with it pre-installed. And they've sold 40 million of those.

Your first try was probably more accurate, even if the math was wrong.

Re:This sounds more like incompetence... (1)

andydread (758754) | about 5 months ago | (#46912773)

Has it been shown that the app has actually been uploading or storing any data? or is it just simply polling the GPS subsystem for location information?

Regional dialects (2)

jones_supa (887896) | about 6 months ago | (#46912097)

"Regional dialects". :D What an explanation.

Re: Regional dialects (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46912105)

As if swiftkey is any better...

Re: Regional dialects (1)

Minderbinder106 (663468) | about 5 months ago | (#46912507)

CM11 Privacy Guard on my phone shows that SwiftKey has never accessed my location data.

Re: Regional dialects (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46912615)

Nevertheless it connencts a lot to *.kontagent.net and *.softlayer.com.

Re:Regional dialects (1)

Charliemopps (1157495) | about 6 months ago | (#46912201)

You need to understand that this application is trying to anticipate what you're trying to type before you type it. If you're at a stop&go and you start to type "I'm getting..." your next word might be Gas, Beer or robbed but it's probably not going to be "ready for work" that would be more likely if you were at home.

So by saying "regional dialects" they might mean far more specific regions than you're thinking and they just communicated it very poorly.

Re:Regional dialects (1)

jones_supa (887896) | about 6 months ago | (#46912243)

Aha!

Re:Regional dialects (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46912499)

Aha!

Not having access to your regional dialect information, you'll have to actually complete that thought for the rest of us to understand you.

Re:Regional dialects (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46912251)

"communicated it poorly", as in, "Have no idea how to communicate at all?"

"dialect" refers to language, not a place. Please stop making excuses for lies.

(With, of course, the caveat -- did they communicate this precise word?)

Re:Regional dialects (1)

K. S. Kyosuke (729550) | about 5 months ago | (#46912497)

"dialect" refers to language, not a place. Please stop making excuses for lies.

Actually, a dialect is an umbrella term for a specific variety of a language, and just happens to be most often associated with places of L1 acquisition. (Varieties linked to social strata (sociolects) or individual people (idiolects) and others are also recognized.)

Re:Regional dialects (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46912857)

Hey bigmouth: You're being called out http://slashdot.org/comments.p... [slashdot.org]

Re:Regional dialects (2)

Bing Tsher E (943915) | about 6 months ago | (#46912267)

Yes, but no matter where you are if you're in an 'update' on some social networking thing, the logical choice is "I'm getting stupid" so no further scanning is necessary.

Re:Regional dialects (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46912899)

what you are describing would be useful for something like swiftkey, but with swype you have to complete the whole word before it will give you suggestions (picking the correct one by default pretty consistently)

it does that based purely on the pattern of your swyping and a dictionary, its not context aware.

Re:Regional dialects (4, Informative)

BasilBrush (643681) | about 5 months ago | (#46913197)

You need to understand that this application is trying to anticipate what you're trying to type before you type it. If you're at a stop&go and you start to type "I'm getting..." your next word might be Gas, Beer or robbed but it's probably not going to be "ready for work" that would be more likely if you were at home.

That's quite a fairy tale you've constructed there to excuse a spyware app on your favoured phone platform.

Re:Regional dialects (1)

TheGratefulNet (143330) | about 6 months ago | (#46912307)

regional dialects, my ass!

well, bless their hearts.

Re:Regional dialects (1)

allo (1728082) | about 5 months ago | (#46912575)

yeah, because you totally want to use the local dialect, as soon as you are there.

A shoddy Android app in the Google store? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46912103)

Shocker.

They don't call it SWYPE for nothing! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46912123)

You get what you see!

people actually pay for Swype? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46912159)

I always have to disable it because it sucks

Re: people actually pay for Swype? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46912919)

it came default on my samsung, and after a bit of getting use to i love it.

its very fast and allows for pretty sloppy operation while still getting the correct word first time.

Can someone blow the lid on Android Apps? (5, Insightful)

Tasha26 (1613349) | about 6 months ago | (#46912163)

Each time an App wanted to update in the last 6 months, it was to increase its access to areas of my Samsung phone that I thought were completely un-necessary for it to work properly. Makes you wonder who in the Google Store is rubber stamping the ok on such Apps! When will privacy groups wake up and start lawsuits against App makers and/or Google? Maybe it will fist require a popular tech website to run a Top-10 Worst Privacy Infringing Apps in Google store.

Re:Can someone blow the lid on Android Apps? (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46912203)

Each time an App wanted to update in the last 6 months, it was to increase its access to areas of my Samsung phone that I thought were completely un-necessary for it to work properly. Makes you wonder who in the Google Store is rubber stamping the ok on such Apps! When will privacy groups wake up and start lawsuits against App makers and/or Google? Maybe it will fist require a popular tech website to run a Top-10 Worst Privacy Infringing Apps in Google store.

When will privacy groups come to aide your suffering of gross stupidity? Don't hold your breath.

No one is twisting your arm to download, install, or use these apps. YOU are doing that every time you agree to install or update the dame thing.

And I'm sorry, but this should be of no surprise to anyone that any "free" app installed on damn near anything these days wants to track you in some way, shape, or form that has little or nothing to do with the app itself.

How the hell do you think Google became a household name. They sure as shit didn't do it selling lollipops.

Re:Can someone blow the lid on Android Apps? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46912535)

> And I'm sorry, but this should be of no surprise to anyone that any "free" app installed on damn near anything these days wants to track you in some way

I am sorry to bust your well thought out rant, but unfortunately paid for apps are not any better. They tend to be just as infested by tracking, and just show adds less frequently. Even Disney paid apps are a complete disgrace on the privacy front.

Re:Can someone blow the lid on Android Apps? (0, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46912601)

Dear Caveman, You will find the following instructions very helpful:

- Locate your dot-matrix brick phone

- Forcibly insert it in your asshole

- Dial yourself.

- Repeat.

Re:Can someone blow the lid on Android Apps? (4, Interesting)

jones_supa (887896) | about 6 months ago | (#46912207)

Maybe it will fist require a popular tech website to run a Top-10 Worst Privacy Infringing Apps in Google store.

Could as well flip it around and instead make a third party give a "Privacy Gold Star" for apps that don't infringe your privacy and don't require unnecessary permissions from the phone operating system.

Re:Can someone blow the lid on Android Apps? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46912869)

Being the person who continually checks the apps on that list for permission changes between updates sounds like a fascinating job that will pay really well.

Re: Can someone blow the lid on Android Apps? (1)

l2718 (514756) | about 6 months ago | (#46912213)

I agree that are asking for absurd permissions, but I don't see the store as responsible for policing app permissions. Rather, you and I do so by refusing those updates and by not installing the apps on the first place.

If most consumers don't care, then we who do need to live in the "long tail"; mainstream apps won't cater to us.

Re: Can someone blow the lid on Android Apps? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46912253)

It's probably that most users don't understand or recognize the implications of the added permissions

Re: Can someone blow the lid on Android Apps? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46912425)

This is exactly it. Slashdotters will know and can mitigate. The average android user absolutely will not. They may understand 'Location Services' etc. They don't know that company is probably tracking your every move, they may understand 'Access to contacts' but not that the company can now just suck in their friends lists and activity.

Re: Can someone blow the lid on Android Apps? (1)

Rob Simpson (533360) | about 5 months ago | (#46913057)

The store doesn't offer any means of sorting by permissions or hiding apps that request permissions you don't want to give. Trying to find the one good solitaire app or simple flashlight app requires individually clicking on several dozen apps to find the one that doesn't want any permissions. Several will ask for your GPS, phone book, calendar, and full internet access.

Re:Can someone blow the lid on Android Apps? (3, Informative)

Solandri (704621) | about 6 months ago | (#46912331)

If you're rooted, you can install XPrivacy [xda-developers.com] . It doesn't try to block these apps, it just spoofs the data. So if I haven't given Swype permission to access location data, it will just get fed random locations all over the world every time it thinks it's getting my location.

Re:Can someone blow the lid on Android Apps? (1)

Barsteward (969998) | about 6 months ago | (#46912477)

yes, but its still fucking with your battery life..

Re:Can someone blow the lid on Android Apps? (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46912463)

In the early 00's the requirement for having a firewall and an antivirus on your average Windows desktop PC went from 'good practice' to 'mandatory' as the number of malware types and exploits on the web exploded.
With Android, it is swiftly thus becoming 'mandatory' to root your phone and install XPrivacy (or similar). Most people just have not realised yet quite how badly they need it.

Re:Can someone blow the lid on Android Apps? (4, Informative)

quetwo (1203948) | about 5 months ago | (#46912529)

Hate to break it to you -- there is no human intervention required to publish to the Google Play Store, unlike the Apple App Store. The time from the last compile to the app being live in the store is about 15 minutes. So, to answer your wonder -- there is a lonely robot rubber stamping the ok on all those apps...

Downloader beware!

Re:Can someone blow the lid on Android Apps? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46912591)

there is a lonely robot rubber stamping the ok on all those apps...

Ah, so that's what Marvin's latest job is. No wonder he's depressed.

Re:Can someone blow the lid on Android Apps? (4, Interesting)

nblender (741424) | about 5 months ago | (#46912595)

This is one of the things I hate most about Android (having recently switched from an iphone to a Nexus5). I tried to install flashlight app but the top 5 or 10 all wanted egregious access to my phonecalls, instant messages, or full network access. I gave up.

Later I read a slashdot comment from an Android app developer who said shortly after making his app available in the Play Store, he started receiving messages from individuals offering to pay him a per-download commission on his app if he would consent to linking their "library" in with his app... It was a very attractive commission... So that explains the requests for access to unreasonable things... I don't know how this is different in IOS-land... Maybe the apps just get that access without anyone knowing? Or maybe someone at the App store decides whether a flashlight app needs access to instant message logs ...

:P (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46912173)

Call me when it's 9000

Battery Life (1)

ClaraBow (212734) | about 6 months ago | (#46912185)

Has anyone, who uses these apps, noticed diminished battery life?

Re:Battery Life (2)

dotancohen (1015143) | about 6 months ago | (#46912219)

I have! About three weeks ago I noticed that my battery was drained before the end of the day, whereas until that time it would last me two full days. I have been using Swipe since well before then, though, so if this is related then the 'feature' was just recently implemented.

This is on a Samsung Note 3.

Re:Battery Life (1)

dotancohen (1015143) | about 6 months ago | (#46912305)

I just went through the Swype settings to see where "Regional Dialects" is configured, and I don't see it.

Re:Battery Life (2)

postglock (917809) | about 5 months ago | (#46912883)

I just went through the Swype settings to see where "Regional Dialects" is configured, and I don't see it.

It's actually called "Living Language". It's under "My Words" in the settings.

Re:Battery Life (2)

hyades1 (1149581) | about 5 months ago | (#46912649)

My buddy rooted his Android phone because of this kind of behaviour. He didn't have Swype, but there were at least seven or eight apps that came installed on his S4 constantly trying to phone home.

Once he rooted the phone and got rid of all the crapware, his battery life increased by something in the 5 to 10 percent range. And that's a conservative estimate.

Onr reason more to not use it (5, Informative)

houghi (78078) | about 6 months ago | (#46912199)

If anytime, they should only do that when I launch it the first time. And otherwise, it should look at the setings my phone is using and ONLy as a way to sufets what you want, not to set it.

Mind you, they are not the only ones who think language and location are related. Among others, Google does this too. It does not look at my browser settings (which are in English) but instead guesses from my IP what language I should prefer. I live in Belgium aand guessing the language by location is wrong a LOT of the times.

There is a reason why my browser setting is in English. That is because I WANT it in English. And just because I visit my parents in Spain or my sister in Germany or friends in the USofA does not mean there is any change in preferece in my language.

To me it is broken by design.

Re:Onr reason more to not use it (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46912423)

Sorry but you have to fight against the masses who don't even know there is a setting to set the language.

Re:Onr reason more to not use it (1)

K. S. Kyosuke (729550) | about 5 months ago | (#46912509)

There is a reason why my browser setting is in English. That is because I WANT it in English. And just because I visit my parents in Spain or my sister in Germany or friends in the USofA does not mean there is any change in preferece in my language.

You're basically asking for an "I am Heinrich Schliemann" checkbox in the settings. ;-)

Re:Onr reason more to not use it (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46912851)

Hey bigmouth: You're being called out http://slashdot.org/comments.p... [slashdot.org]

lol, android (0)

thetoadwarrior (1268702) | about 6 months ago | (#46912239)

I assume apple patented security because Google goes out of it way to implement it on android.

gps is 1hz... just over an hour of data? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46912281)

when you consider that gps runs at 1hz... that's just over one hour of data. Maybe that corresponds to an hour of usage per day ie it is polling at 1hz while being used? Do they need that? no....

MultiLing (4, Informative)

B2382F29 (742174) | about 6 months ago | (#46912293)

I am using multiling keyboard which allows swype input and doesn't even need network permission nor anything else than the user dictionary. https://play.google.com/store/... [google.com]

Re:MultiLing (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46912531)

I am using multiling keyboard which allows swype input and doesn't even need network permission nor anything else than the user dictionary.

https://play.google.com/store/... [google.com]

I'll second this suggestion. When I found out the keyboard that came with my tablet (FlexT9) was no longer in development because Nuance bought Swype, I went looking for alternatives since I was stuck on a software dead-end otherwise, and MultiLing was the one I ended up liking the most.

Decent defaults but extremely configurable. In addition to swipe, it has a split keyboard mode for thumb typing, options can differ in portrait and landscape, and it can be resized on-the-fly to use more or less screen space while in use. Plus multiple dictionaries (including a "linux dictionary" with completion for shell commands and more), many keyboard layouts (4- and 5-row qwerty, number only, dvorak, colemak, etc.), easy access to extra keys (function, sysrq, ins/break/del, arrows, esc, tab, math symbols, etc.), and some other things I can't think of or don't use. You can change the colours, key sizes, spacing between keys, even the roundedness of the key corners.

All this and it's a <1mb download (+700kb with the English dictionary). Plus the dev updates it often with bug fixes and features, so it's constantly improving.

it's not perfect, but easily one of the best keyboards I've used while still being fast and lean.

It's becoming more and more clear.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46912311)

That we need real competition in the app stores, on Android and iOS. The defacto monopoly that these stores have on their respective platforms is doing a real disservice to users, and at their expense. With no competition, developers are stuck paying 30% on all transactions for, and within, an app. Users are stuck wading through mostly uncurated piles of nonsense, with almost no tools to really find the gems among the cruft.

Imagine if Apple and Android were forced to open up the market place. Rather than just going to the app store, you'd have an option of downloading various other stores. They'd have the option of different pricing, and curating what apps they'd have "stocked". Want great games that won't violate your privacy? Go to a store that really screens what they sell, that works with developers to understand what their apps are doing and delivers on their promises. Want yet another knock off garbage app that does nothing while tracking your location? Visit the Apple app store or Android app stores, where each app is automatically evaluated and run for about 3 seconds before it's accepted (or rejected) by an automatic script.

No one would be happy if there was just one store in town where you'd have to do all your shopping. Even if you were happy with that scenario, the fact that most stores still have competition that pushes your one stop shop to have what you want means you benefit from competition. Why do we accept this monopoly on our mobile devices?!
 

Re:It's becoming more and more clear.. (4, Informative)

nogginthenog (582552) | about 6 months ago | (#46912383)

Android can already do this. The Amazon App store and F-Droid (FOSS) are 2 options.

Re:It's becoming more and more clear.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46913105)

Really? Try finding either one of those on the Google Play store. Most users aren't going to go google for alternatives, open up the settings and change it to accept it from "unknown sources" (scary) etc. Google (and Apple) should be required to make it easy to find and install alternative stores.

Re:It's becoming more and more clear.. (1)

magarity (164372) | about 5 months ago | (#46912727)

Competition in just the stores? No, I want competition in the base install that doesn't void the warranty via rooting. The devices come with all kinds of crap installed in a way that makes them un-installable - just "stoppable".

Achat Nike TN Requin 2014,Nike TN Requin Homme (-1, Troll)

fewrfwedfwedw (3641163) | about 6 months ago | (#46912329)

Achat Nike TN Requin 2014,Nike TN Requin Homme pas cher Features and History of the New Balance 991 Running Shoe oday with the 993 models. With sleek styling and prominent NB logo design, the "heritage" models are signature shoes for New Balance. Models subsequent to the 990 have been improved upon with new innovations for performance and comfort. In 2001 a new gray color New Balance 991 model came out for women. The new style still maintained the technical features using ABZORB?and ENCAP? It remains part of the Supportive Cushioning Segment offered by New Balance. The New Balance 991 continues to be manufactured in the US. All styles in the "heritage" collection are made in the United States. New Balance maintains five factories in New England and 25% of their shoes sold in the United States are manufactured completely in the USA. The New Balance 991 remains a popular style for its looks and performance. Since it has the stability technology built-in, it is perfect for runners who want cushioning and control with the Made in USA label.Nike Tn Requin [frpersonnes.com] This article was written by the Webmaster of Shoechampion.com New Balance 991 New Balance 991 articles and buying guide For another great article about the New Balance 991 go to New Balance 991 womans

Not available for Windows Phone (2)

Aphadon (3402087) | about 6 months ago | (#46912345)

Unlike what the summary claims, Swype is not available on Windows Phone. Microsoft will however be rolling out their own, similar keyboard soon as part of 8.1. Hopefully one that doesn't do 4000 location requests per day.

Re:Not available for Windows Phone (1)

postglock (917809) | about 5 months ago | (#46912893)

Unlike what the summary claims, Swype is not available on Windows Phone.

Sorry, you are absolutely right. I just got that info from the Wikipedia page [wikipedia.org] . I should have checked the source.

Re:Not available for Windows Phone (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46913243)

It will only do 100 location requests per day. Do you feel better?

Bad Design? (2)

miller701 (525024) | about 6 months ago | (#46912361)

Why doesn't the OS keep track it it's moving of not (all those wonderful sensors) and then have the app ask the OS for the location? If it's sitting on my desk, it shouldn't need to check it's location every 24 seconds.

nike tn 2014 - Chaussure Tn Pas Cher,Chaussures Tn (-1, Troll)

fewrfwedfwedw (3641163) | about 6 months ago | (#46912413)

nike tn 2014 - Chaussure Tn Pas Cher,Chaussures Tn New Balance has been proudly manufacturing shoes in the United States since the early 1900s. With its first insoles designed for factory workers, to the latest performance models, and even the heritage styles like the New Balance 991, these shoes have made comfort and speed a winning combination on the track and off. Nike Tn Requin [addfrtn.com] In 1982, New Balance came out with its signature running shoe, the 990, which took the running world by storm. Its sleek design and comfort sole became popular with athletes as well as becoming a style trend. The eighties saw a rise in popularity of the sport of running. Shoes like the 990 and subsequent New Balance 991, were available to the general public for a reasonable price. The New Balance shoe became a fashion staple. The basic 990 model evolved over the years and in 2000, the New Balance 991 was introduced. Created in sizes for both men and women, the 991 updated the original 990 model with more ABZORB?in the forefoot and the heel area. The stability that the 991 provides is perfect for pronators, runners whose ankles tend to lean inward. The stability

nike tn 2014 Nike Store France - Site Officiel N (-1, Offtopic)

fewrfwedfwedw (3641163) | about 6 months ago | (#46912419)

nike tn 2014 Nike Store France - Site Officiel Nike sole helps control overpronation for a better stride.The cushioning of the 991 is padded enough to maintain comfort and support. Using ENCAP?in the heel of the New Balance 991 further helps with cushioning. The New Balance 991 is one of the companies "heritage" styles which began with the popular 990 and continues today with the 993 modelsNike Tn Requin [frpersonnes.com] . With sleek styling and prominent NB logo design, the "heritage" models are signature shoes for New Balance. Models subsequent to the 990 have been improved upon with new innovations for performance and comfort. In 2001 a new gray color New Balance 991 model came out for women. The new style still maintained the technical features using ABZORB?and ENCAP? It remains part of the Supportive Cushioning Segment offered by New Balance. The New Balance 991 continues to be manufactured in the US.

Swype is NOT available for Windows Phone (1)

ericloewe (2129490) | about 6 months ago | (#46912459)

Windows Phone has a similar solution, but it's Microsoft's own implementation.

Re:Swype is NOT available for Windows Phone (1)

postglock (917809) | about 5 months ago | (#46912897)

Yes, sorry, you are absolutely right. I just got that info from the Wikipedia page [wikipedia.org] . I should have checked the source.

Re:Swype is NOT available for Windows Phone (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46913177)

Thank you very much for your submission, I'd never have known about this except for this /. 'story'. I've just switched over to "multiling" as suggested in posts above, much better. :^)

Posting AC because I've modded here.

Use privacy tools (1)

bulbbulb (923755) | about 5 months ago | (#46912543)

That's why people used lbe privacy manager, pdroid earlier (both are more or less dead) and now there is another way out - XPrivacy. I don't think standalone games or keyboard apps such as Swype should be able to read my identification like imei, serial or msisdn (number), network id, location, bookmarks, contats, sms, etc. etc. and then possibly report this info over internet. Block everything - leave access only to parts it's supposed to get (like clipboard, storage). It's even more terrifying to see what completely unrelated to their functionality content top gmarket apps like facebook or candy crush saga are trying to acces and how frequently. Latest CM roms have some privacy controls embedded. That's good but still not enough.

"... regional dialect" -- because money talks (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46912555)

The conversation is between searchers and the money in your wallet.

The search tool is to locate your money, and invite it to leave you and come live with whichever searcher is closest near you. That could be Aisle A North, or Aisle C Middle, or Deli Counter --- each one has its own dialect.

Kind of like Putin, ya know, find the people whose language you prefer and make them yours.

Wait, you didn't think search was for _you_ to find _things_, eh? That's so 1990. Search is to find _you_.

Tell news (1)

allo (1728082) | about 5 months ago | (#46912557)

I tried years ago the trial, saw the permission. When i saw that it was used all the time (LBE Privacy Guard. Use XPrivacy today), i uninstalled it.

Try SwiftKey, the swipe is better than Swype, anyway.

Fact Check (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46912621)

Swype is a popular third-party keyboard for Android phones (and also available for Windows phones and other platforms).

I know it's popular to bash Microsoft and their products, but Swype is not available for Windows Phone. Windows Phone 8.1 adds a "Word Flow Keyboard [windowsphone.com] ", but it is developed by Microsoft as part of their OS. Third party developers cannot create keyboards for Windows Phone.

But you don't have to take my word for it. Currently Windows Phone does not support Swype [swype.com] .

Re:Fact Check (2)

postglock (917809) | about 5 months ago | (#46912905)

Yes, sorry, a few people picked up on this. I just got that info from the Wikipedia page [wikipedia.org] . I should have checked the source.

Can you comment on beta? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46912667)

Just curious if you can comment on beta, in well, beta.

nike air max tn nike shox r2 r3 (-1, Flamebait)

fewrfwedfwedw (3641163) | about 5 months ago | (#46912821)

Features and History of the New Balance 991 Running Shoe All styles in the "heritage" collection are made in the United States. New Balance maintains five factories in New England and 25% of their shoes sold in the United States are manufactured completely in the USA. The New Balance 991 remains a popular style for its looks and performance. Since it has the stability technology built-in, it is perfect for runners who want cushioning and control with the Made in USA label. nike tn pas cher [frnouveautn.com] This article was written by the Webmaster of Shoechampion.com New Balance 991 New Balance 991 articles and buying guide For another great article about the New Balance 991 go to New Balance 991 womans

Tn Requin,Tn Requin Pas Cher Site Officiel, (-1, Flamebait)

fewrfwedfwedw (3641163) | about 5 months ago | (#46912833)

Fast-paced lifestyle created vary of speed. Eating fast, walking rapid, running speed up, and also the rise of fast culture. People have no patient in daily life, since airplane spend one day from east to west, requirement of rocket become necessary. Since then the innovation of firewire used in Nike Shoes really get people to turly experience the feeling of riding the rocket. This becomes the key to success. http://www.frtnokey.com/ [frtnokey.com] Since 1970s, innovation of firewire used in Nike shoes, from Nike Air to Nike shox, almost each pair of Nike shoes is used such advanced high technology. Nike Flywire technology utilizes high-strength threads that act like cables on a suspension bridge, delivering engineered support precisely where it's needed. This revolutionary technology transforms how footwear is engineered by reducing the amount of material required for the upper of a shoe to the bare minimum without compromising on durability or integrity and support. With firewire using inside of Nike shoes, speed up is the part of Nike function, which really easy seen in Nike shox. Same as Nike Air Max ivent as basketball shoes, Nike shox expand their market in running and also skateboarding

I like swype but (1)

Maxo-Texas (864189) | about 5 months ago | (#46912911)

For the last year (roughly), it's autosuggestions have gotten worse- not better. Sometimes it suggests a word I've never even heard of over a much more common word. It even puts the common word in the auto complete/correction list.

But repeatedly auto complete/correcting it doesn't seem to dissuade it from choosing the weird word.

Bandwidth eater (1)

nurb432 (527695) | about 5 months ago | (#46913257)

Aside from the stupidity, it could be costing you.

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