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Russia Quietly Passes Anti-Blogger Law

Unknown Lamer posted about 6 months ago | from the just-in-time-for-cold-war-2.0 dept.

The Media 284

randomErr (172078) writes "Russia is tightening its grip on free speech and freedom of the Internet by creating a new 'bloggers law'. This policy follows the pattern set by China, Pakistan, Turkey, and Iran." Any site with more than 3000 daily visitors will be required to register and be held to a number of restrictions, quoting the article: "Besides registering, bloggers can no longer remain anonymous online, and organizations that provide platforms for their work such as search engines, social networks and other forums must maintain computer records on Russian soil of everything posted over the previous six months."

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Happy Communist Day from The Golden Girls! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46939763)

Thank you for being a friend
Traveled down the road and back again
Your heart is true, you're a pal and a cosmonaut.

And if you threw a party
Invited everyone you knew
You would see the biggest gift would be from me
And the card attached would say, thank you for being a friend.

Re:Happy Communist Day from The Golden Girls! (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46940117)

> cosmonaut

Got the right country this time.

Beatings will continue until... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46939775)

Beatings will continue until... Moral improves or I kill you and take your stuff.

Re:Beatings will continue until... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46939867)

"Morale" there's an e at the end

Re:Beatings will continue until... (1)

tomhath (637240) | about 6 months ago | (#46939915)

I think "Moral" is appropriate here, or a lack thereof.

Re:Beatings will continue until... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46940535)

Shouldn't it be morality then?

Re:Beatings will continue until... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46939955)

You are obviously working at the DNC.

I bet Democrats look at Putin with envy. They'd like nothing better than to eliminate those pesky bloggers who keep bring up embarrassing facts.

Re:Beatings will continue until... (3, Informative)

fustakrakich (1673220) | about 6 months ago | (#46940271)

I bet Democrats look at Putin with envy.

Maybe the "conservative" ones [newrepublic.com] , but it shows much more strongly inside the republican sect.

Re: Beatings will continue until... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46940383)

Putin is just doing to free speech what Democrats want to do to the second amendment. Although granted, speech is a far more dangerous tool than a gun.

Re:Beatings will continue until... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46941069)

We have liberals trying to now get an amendment passed to repeal the first amendment, under the guise of campaign finance reform. Its even worded to keep it open ended so what is in the amendment will allow Congress to trample the first amendment without limit (Basically it repeals the first amendment with fancy wording)
Then we have idiots like you who are trying to blame others for it.
story [foxnews.com]

Re:Beatings will continue until... (1)

desdinova 216 (2000908) | about 6 months ago | (#46941157)

could you please provide another or additional non fox news related source.

Re:Beatings will continue until... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46941187)

There are no other news sources. There's the White House, and Fox.

Russia you were so close (5, Insightful)

SocietyoftheFist (316444) | about 6 months ago | (#46939815)

Enjoy your slide back in to totalitarianism.

Re:Russia you were so close (5, Insightful)

willie3204 (444890) | about 6 months ago | (#46939861)

If only they had the tools the NSA has.. They wouldn't even have to make it public!

Re:Russia you were so close (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46939929)

Because the NSA has a history record of arresting blogger dissidents.

Re:Russia you were so close (4, Informative)

Luckyo (1726890) | about 6 months ago | (#46940027)

No, they just pass the information to the police that handles that job.

Look at what happened to all the Occupy members. Funny how all the important people in the movement were found very accurately by police forces across the country.

Re:Russia you were so close (4, Interesting)

FriendlyLurker (50431) | about 6 months ago | (#46940393)

No, they just pass the information to the police that handles that job.

Look at what happened to all the Occupy members. Funny how all the important people in the movement were found very accurately by police forces across the country.

Found, and crucified:
Occupy Wall Street on Trial: Cecily McMillan Convicted of Assaulting Cop, Faces Up to Seven Years [democracynow.org]
Why Did FBI Monitor Occupy Houston, and Then Hide Sniper Plot Against Protest Leaders? [democracynow.org]

Like this dick authoritarian move by Russia, China et al. actions speak louder than words: The United States is not alone in being afraid of democracy... real democracy. Which starts with the more outspoken amongst us rallying together, writing blogs about the social problems we face, proposing solutions, attending OWS type events to agitate peacefully for positive change. Just too bad all those things that make common peoples lives better also happen to conflict with the goal of accumulating even more wealth for the richer parts of society. See graph: 12-country 1975-2007 chart of share of income growth going to The 1% [wordpress.com] .

Re:Russia you were so close (1, Insightful)

mi (197448) | about 6 months ago | (#46940853)

Khmm:

Occupy Wall Street on Trial: Cecily McMillan Convicted of Assaulting Cop, Faces Up to Seven Years

vs.

Which starts with the more outspoken amongst us rallying together, writing blogs about the social problems we face, proposing solutions, attending OWS type events to agitate peacefully for positive change.

Emphasis mine, of course. The two paragraphs contradict each other. Please, try again.

Re:Russia you were so close (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46940505)

Funny how none of the Occupy members I actually know were subjected to this.

Re:Russia you were so close (1)

CanHasDIY (1672858) | about 6 months ago | (#46940667)

Funny how none of the Occupy members I actually know were subjected to this.

Probably because they weren't nearly as important to the movement as they managed to convince themselves.

Re:Russia you were so close (1)

phantomfive (622387) | about 6 months ago | (#46940825)

Look at what happened to all the Occupy members

To most of them, including me, nothing.

Funny how all the important people in the movement were found very accurately by police forces across the country.

What? If you know that they are important, then why wouldn't police be able to find out? You're not special, you know.

Re:Russia you were so close (1)

Luckyo (1726890) | about 6 months ago | (#46941011)

"All the IMPORTANT people".

Emphasis mine.

Re:Russia you were so close (2, Informative)

mi (197448) | about 6 months ago | (#46940841)

No, they just pass the information to the police that handles that job.

None of those arrested because of the NSA tip-off [reuters.com] were arrested for their speech. It may or may not be in violation of the 4th Amendment, but not of the 1st.

Look at what happened to all the Occupy members.

What happened? Where do I look? For such a highly-moderated comment, you are offering surprisingly few links. Was anyone prosecuted for mere speech? Assaulting a police officer [democracynow.org] — yeah, that's more likely...

Funny how all the important people in the movement were found very accurately by police forces across the country.

Police may not be able to find every criminal, but finding any criminal they really set their minds on — that they could do for decades now. And, certainly, "the important people" of an infamous movement qualify. Hardly a surprise.

Re:Russia you were so close (1)

Luckyo (1726890) | about 6 months ago | (#46941037)

It's fairly easy to make any person into a criminal under US law. That's what it's designed for, like laws in most imperial states with need of control over belligerent citizens. All you need to do is locate them and then throw a book at them as the legal experts like to put it.

Re:Russia you were so close (1)

IamTheRealMike (537420) | about 6 months ago | (#46940971)

They pass their information to the military that assassinates them instead. Is this meant to be better?

Re:Russia you were so close (2)

Albanach (527650) | about 6 months ago | (#46940513)

Is the impact of this really limited to Russia? LiveJournal is now based there and, while I'm sure it is used much less today than ten years ago, it must still host a large number of accounts belonging to bloggers in the US and elsewhere. Will real names now need to be attached to these accounts, or will their owner's real names need to be passed to the Russian authorities?

Re:Russia you were so close (2)

CrimsonAvenger (580665) | about 6 months ago | (#46940813)

Is the impact of this really limited to Russia? LiveJournal is now based there and, while I'm sure it is used much less today than ten years ago, it must still host a large number of accounts belonging to bloggers in the US and elsewhere.

No, it's not. My wife has been using LiveJournal for a dozen years. She's started moving all the content off there and onto an American hosting service.

Re:Russia you were so close (2)

mi (197448) | about 6 months ago | (#46940961)

If only they had the tools the NSA has.. They wouldn't even have to make it public!

Yes, yes. And Joseph McCarthy was just as bad as Lavrentiy Beria... Ergo, America is just as bad — nay, worse than Russia...

Re:Russia you were so close (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46939949)

Is that really so strange? In Italy we have the same law and it is purported as something good and beneficial to public order!!

Re:Russia you were so close (1)

Noah Haders (3621429) | about 6 months ago | (#46940127)

What's so good and beneficial about public order?

Re:Russia you were so close (1)

fustakrakich (1673220) | about 6 months ago | (#46940201)

Well, if you're rich, you need their labor to keep you that way, and to feel safe...

Re:Russia you were so close (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46940279)

Well, if you're rich, you need their labor to keep you that way, and to feel safe...

To keep calling them "rich" is a self-limitation. There are many forms of power. Wealth is only one of them. It's the *powerful* who are causing all the conflict and misery on this planet. This planet that, ever since the dawn of the Industrial Revolution, has had the ability to feed, clothe, and shelter every last man, woman, and child many times over.

Re:Russia you were so close (1)

Noah Haders (3621429) | about 6 months ago | (#46940397)

what about disease? surely disease isn't the fault of the rich. and you can't say there's any limitations on vaccinating your children or getting health care, in the US or other advanced nations. it's only in poor countries where they go out of their way to stop vaccinations, and get polio instead.

Re:Russia you were so close (1)

fustakrakich (1673220) | about 6 months ago | (#46940623)

...surely disease isn't the fault of the rich...

But we give them too much control over the price of medicine.

Re:Russia you were so close (1)

rubycodez (864176) | about 6 months ago | (#46940723)

surely disease isn't the fault of the rich.

oh really, who dictates treatment for diseases causing any significant amount of money, physicians or insurance companies? who pushed the family physican who quickly took care of emergent issues into the large healtchare chains? who wages war for profit and to control resources, causing starvation, disease, death, maimings?

Re:Russia you were so close (1)

davydagger (2566757) | about 6 months ago | (#46940901)

Do you really want a talk about access to healthcare in the USA.

Because its not always affordable.

Then we get to the bulk of research being done by for profit companies for the most expensive treatments to prolong end of life diseases by six months or so, or fix boner problems in old men.

So yes, there are some pretty harsh limits on healthcare, and medical research, imposed by monetary restraints.

Re: Russia you were so close (2)

O('_')O_Bush (1162487) | about 6 months ago | (#46940377)

It isn't strange for Italy at all. Their whole justice/politician system is so corrupt and jacked up that it seems perfectly in line with Russia's.

Re:Russia you were so close (1)

pla (258480) | about 6 months ago | (#46940445)

Is that really so strange? In Italy we have the same law and it is purported as something good and beneficial to public order!!

Somehow, I don't really think you'll get very far trying to use the Italian legal system as a role model for "good and beneficial" these days.

Now, if only they could have found a way to pin the L'aquil earthquake on Knox' Satanic orgies, well, then we could talk. But as it stands, they just look silly.

Re:Russia you were so close (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46940365)

you misspelled "our" (you typed "yours")

Re:Russia you were so close (1)

Virtucon (127420) | about 6 months ago | (#46940405)

I wouldn't call it a slide, more like a drop but then again they weren't that far away from it to begin with so the landing won't be too hard.

NSA Provides a Service! (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46939831)

Russia outsources the record-keeping to the sites with a 6-month retention schedule. NSA relieves the sites from the need to keep the records by doing it themselves, and keeps them forever. Which one is more business-friendly?

In Soviet Russia... (5, Funny)

NoNonAlphaCharsHere (2201864) | about 6 months ago | (#46939843)

Here in America, we have it much easier. The NSA does all that recordkeeping for us.

Re:In Soviet Russia... (2, Funny)

jbmartin6 (1232050) | about 6 months ago | (#46940047)

In Soviet Russia, your blog posts YOU!

Re:In Soviet Russia... (1)

jittles (1613415) | about 6 months ago | (#46940335)

Here in America, we have it much easier. The NSA does all that recordkeeping for us.

The NSA is doing all that record keeping for Russia also. They've just decided its cheaper to do in house than to outsource that labor to an NSA mole. That's the real reason behind this law.

The new Red Curtain... (1)

phillk6751 (654352) | about 6 months ago | (#46939869)

....To keep the CIA out

Re:The new Red Curtain... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46940025)

More likely to keep Putin and his pack of jackals in power.

No. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46939919)

Companies that operate within the purview of the "free" internet -- what remains of it -- need to take a stand against these sorts of regulations, and the conditions which foster them. The construction of borders to divide the internet into faux representations of old-world nation-states should be discouraged at the highest level, specifically because it leads to this form of destructive interference.

The old powers are so afraid of the capabilities and ambitions of a unified human voice that they're desperately strangling the life out of free expression on the internet, all over the world. This cannot function without the support of the major economic players in the internet sandbox. Against the kind of power that we, as a people, can bring, through those players, tyrants and oppressors cannot stand... we've seen it happen, and that's why they are sweating bullets.

Re:No. (1)

MightyMartian (840721) | about 6 months ago | (#46940169)

I'd say you're wasting your time in Russia, and worse probably endangering yourself in the process.

Obligatory Godwin's Law (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46939927)

Is it really Godwin's Law if it's true? Maybe like libel; it's bad, but truth is a defense (except in the UK)
http://www.historylearningsite... [historylea...site.co.uk]

this would never happen in america. (3, Informative)

nimbius (983462) | about 6 months ago | (#46939953)

Here in america we have journalistic freedom of speech. If you oppose US foreign policy or help expose secret illegal government programs we find it to be patriotic and sacrosanct. Moxie Marlinspike once helped a foreign journalist expose illegal american programs and he certainly wasnt ever targeted for random detention in airports because that would be unamerican. We never secretly spied on the New York Times when they reported on the NSA's illegal activities either, because thats not what america stands for. Heck, we once had a famous American blogger named Anwar al-Awlaki who had a really controversial opinion of the american government but did we use a robotic drone to kill him and his son with a missile while he was in Yemen? of course not.

Re:this would never happen in america. (0)

NoNonAlphaCharsHere (2201864) | about 6 months ago | (#46939995)

If you oppose US foreign policy or help expose secret illegal government programs we find it to be patriotic and sacrosanct.

Tell that to Edward Snowden.

Re:this would never happen in america. (4, Informative)

Sarten-X (1102295) | about 6 months ago | (#46940029)

I suspect you have a broken sarcasm detector.

Re:this would never happen in america. (1)

Scutter (18425) | about 6 months ago | (#46940031)

They don't have sarcasm where you're from?

Re:this would never happen in america. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46940151)

They don't have sarcasm where you're from?

Well, kind of... most Americans have rather poor sarcasm detectors. A few of them go to Europe, learn all about sarcasm and when they go back home they get all kinds of witty ideas like, "going a whole day pretending they've never heard of Jesus" . Unfortunately that has a tendency to end badly.

Re:this would never happen in america. (1)

Noah Haders (3621429) | about 6 months ago | (#46940199)

Knock knock Who is it? A drone A drone who? Whoooooooosh!

Re:this would never happen in america. (4, Insightful)

MightyMartian (840721) | about 6 months ago | (#46940193)

And yet the newspaper in the US that publish details from Snowden's leaks are not being hauled into court.

Re:this would never happen in america. (1)

macbeth66 (204889) | about 6 months ago | (#46940983)

Shush, you! Don't ruin a good story about how the press is censored in the US.

And I love these books; "The Top Censored Stories and Media Analysis of YYYY" Um... Wait. Why are these books censored? Ah! These stories weren't censored, nobody gave a damn. Governments don't need to censor when the public is kept fat and lazy.

Re:this would never happen in america. (4, Interesting)

IamTheRealMike (537420) | about 6 months ago | (#46941005)

There's no point for the administration to go fry big names like the NY Times or Washington Post when all they were doing is re-reporting material already obtained by foreign press.

Now imagine what would have happened if Snowden had provided his materials only to the NY Times. Oh, wait, we don't have to imagine. We know what would have happened because previous leakers did that, only to find the NYT was already under the thumb and they chose not to publish. In fact Snowden explicitly said he wasn't going to trust American media to publish things about the NSA because they had a history of self censorship in this regard, causing them huge embarrassment.

Re:this would never happen in america. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46940231)

The problem with Edward Snowden wasn't that he blew the whistle on some very overreaching NSA programs. If that's all he did, he likely wouldn't have had to leave, but he did the same thing the NSA is doing. He unleashed NSA documents without scrutiny, the same kind of blanket inclusion the NSA has been doing. Unfortunately, that included many very legitimate programs the NSA has, which are now worthless, and does leave us dramatically more exposed.

Re:this would never happen in america. (1)

SuricouRaven (1897204) | about 6 months ago | (#46940439)

And what else could he have done to get people aware? If he'd just gone up to a news organisation and said he had proof the government was spying on citizens but he couldn't show it to them, he'd have been politely turned away and laughed at behind his back. The documents are the proof - without them, he'd just another foil-hatter.

Re:this would never happen in america. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46940863)

GP said the documents showing NSA overreach should have been released. The problem is that many, many other documents revealing legitimate intelligence gathering were also handed over (or sold) to China and Russia.

Re:this would never happen in america. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46940429)

Did you READ the rest of the post?

Re:this would never happen in america. (1)

Jahoda (2715225) | about 6 months ago | (#46940805)

Whoooooooosh!

Re:this would never happen in america. (1)

Starvingboy (964130) | about 6 months ago | (#46940149)

Ouch.

Re:this would never happen in america. (2)

Threni (635302) | about 6 months ago | (#46940321)

" You could let 1% of the people have all the nation's wealth. You could help your rich friends get richer by cutting their taxes. And bailing them out when they gamble and lose. You could ignore the needs of the poor for health care and education. Your media would appear free, but would secretly be controlled by one person and his family. You could wiretap phones. You could torture foreign prisoners. You could have rigged elections. You could lie about why you go to war. You could fill your prisons with one particular racial group, and no one would complain. You could use the media to scare the people into supporting policies that are against their interests."

Re: this would never happen in america. (2)

rwa2 (4391) | about 6 months ago | (#46940571)

Old Russian joke:

American: foolish Russian. Because of my first amendment rights, I can stand in front of the White House and criticize the US president.

Russian: What are you talking about? I can do that too!

Ahh good! (4, Insightful)

Sycraft-fu (314770) | about 6 months ago | (#46940911)

I was worried for a minute that there might be a discussion about a country other than the US on Slashdot. However no need to fear, the egocentric dipstick brigade is on it, making sure to try and steer any and all discussion back to America. I mean we can't possibly want to talk about the rest of the world, nobody is from there, nobody cares what happens. Instead let's make sure to focus any and all discussion on America. That's the only way!

Seriously, knock it the fuck off. There is a wider world out there, and some of that world visits Slashdot. They might be interested in some stories about thing other than the US. Heck, for that matter people in the US might be interested in stories about the rest of the world since it is all interconnected.

I get really tired of the ego brigade on /. that has to try and steer every single conversation back to the US. Story about Russia? Talk about how the US is worse and then rail on about that. Story about Canada? Talk about how it would be if the US did it and then rail on about that. No matter what the story, move the discussion back to the US.

Just stop it. If there's a topic about Russia, well let's talk about that. If that doesn't interest you, kindly keep your silence so that people can talk about it. If the NSA spying interests you, then comment in those discussions, of which there are many.

Slashdot is an American site and thus American centric in its reporting but it is not US exclusive. Stop trying to make it that way. Your ego can deal with something not being about the US once and awhile.

"Evil men have no songs." (1)

korbulon (2792438) | about 6 months ago | (#46939977)

'How is it, then, that the Russians have songs?'

-- Nietzsche

Re: "Evil men have no songs." (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46940173)

Re: "Evil men have no songs." (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46940241)

But evil men do have songs! "No-one knows what it's like to be the bad man, to be the sad man behind blue eyes. No-one knows what it's like to be hated, to be fated to telling only lies. But my dreams, they aren't as empty as my conscience seems to be."

Not to mention that Darth Vader and Emperor Palpatine had one of the coolest marches ever (and if you check it out, you'll see that it can blend beautifully with the USA Presidential March).

That's a squirrley definition of free speech. (5, Insightful)

quietwalker (969769) | about 6 months ago | (#46940137)

In the US, free speech is a blacklist-based phenomenon. There's a few things that are illegal to say - like 'Fire' in the theater - for example. If it's not listed, it's probably fair game, and you can't be jailed for it. Thus; westboro baptists and illinois nazis.

In many places in the world, it seems like the definition of free speech refers to the fact that there's a government-approved whitelist - here are the things you are allowed to talk about/say, anything not on the list are disallowed and legal offenses. Anything that's not explicitly on the list (and often times, even if it is) is subject to prosecutions. Heck, it's standard in these places to claim that opposing political parties are, by their language alone, seditionists, and have them locked up. In part, this is why there's outrage against the US that we allow hate speech and open protest; in other countries, that requires a mandate by the government, explicit approval.

Even in western, supposedly enlightened countries, there are onerous restrictions; check out slander laws in England, Germany's stance on anything Nazi-related, or France's many, many restrictions - for example, it's illegal to criticize a public employee (though I have no idea if it's actually enforced).

Calling this 'free speech' is like calling tax laws in the US 'voluntary taxes'.

What we're describing here is not a "tightening grip on free speech". It's just "additional regulations" on a locked down system where participating is the exception, not the rule. The only thing free about it is that one is "free" to follow all the rules, or shut up.

Re:That's a squirrley definition of free speech. (1)

devent (1627873) | about 6 months ago | (#46940607)

Free speech is the right to voice your opinion, and not to induce panic and harm people. There are no white/black lists, each country have just different understanding of what is covered by free speech rights. If you shout "Fire" in a theatre where is no fire, it is not free speech, but you want to harm people. You want that people panic and rush out of the theatre. How is that free speech? Likewise, slander is not free speech because you want to harm people. Your rights end where it starts to infringe on other people rights.

That being said, it have nothing to do with the Blogger-Law in Russia. Putin have a long history of jailing opposing voices to his politics. I really worried for Russia, maybe it looks to China to get inspiration to solidify power.

Re:That's a squirrley definition of free speech. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46940787)

There's a few things that are illegal to say - like 'Fire' in the theater - for example

Funny, I can't seem to find such an exception in the First Amendment.

You can try and get me for property/person damage from any ensuing riot.
You can try and get me for attempting to incite a riot.
You can probably even try and get me for disrupting the show.

But you should absolutely, positively, never allow people to be taken away for the mere fact that they opened their mouth and let words come out. The moment one exception not explicitly mentioned in the constitution is allowed, you've just paved the way for more and more. All they have to do is claim that what you said was "obviously" a danger to others, and boom, you're on your way to prison. Nevermind that all you did was express disgust with our government, and your intent to vote them out of office. That is totally a danger to others. Why, it might incite panic, rioting, dogs and cats living together!

Re:That's a squirrley definition of free speech. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46940789)

France's many, many restrictions - for example, it's illegal to criticize a public employee (though I have no idea if it's actually enforced).

No. I am French and I have never heard of this law. And about 65 millions other french people, probably, never heard of this law.

Don't worry (1)

jfdavis668 (1414919) | about 6 months ago | (#46940187)

Edward Snowden will leak everything from Russia soon

Russian Nazi Pirates? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46940197)

Seriously, could the combine three memes in a worse possible way?

We need to nuke these fuckers and just park our tanks there on the self-lighting glass surface.

Re:Russian Nazi Pirates? (1)

Virtucon (127420) | about 6 months ago | (#46940381)

It could be worse. They could be Naked Russian Nazi Pirates and I don't know about you but have you seen the majority of Russian Women? Yikes!

Re:Russian Nazi Pirates? (1)

ThatsDrDangerToYou (3480047) | about 6 months ago | (#46940509)

It could be worse. They could be Naked Russian Nazi Pirates and I don't know about you but have you seen the majority of Russian Women? Yikes!

What, they aren't all exceptionally hot tennis players? Is my TV lying to me?

Re:Russian Nazi Pirates? (1)

CanHasDIY (1672858) | about 6 months ago | (#46940761)

It could be worse. They could be Naked Russian Nazi Pirates and I don't know about you but have you seen the majority of Russian Women? Yikes!

What, they aren't all exceptionally hot tennis players?

Of course they aren't, don't be so naive!

Some of them are Milla Jovovich!

End of Blogging in Russia (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46940207)

Nobody will want to blog in Russia with these new regulations and that is the point. It is to shut down freedom of speech. Would you blog if you thought the police could come and arrest you for anything the authorities might take offense to even if it wasn’t' against the law technically speaking? How would you like to be closely watched all the time just because you blog? Would you like to be denied jobs and housing because of your opinions on the government? I think not. Putin is showing his true colours and they are fascist. Welcome to the new Soviet Union 2.0.

Re:End of Blogging in Russia (1)

pla (258480) | about 6 months ago | (#46940569)

Would you blog if you thought the police could come and arrest you for anything the authorities might take offense to even if it wasnâ(TM)t' against the law technically speaking?

On the flip side of that, you can expect to see a ton of new Russian-language blogs spring up in "Iowa".

Funny how the internet works like that. You can only ban anonymity or censor certain types of content to the extent that you can lock down every single point of access.

Re:End of Blogging in Russia (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46940797)

Putin will try. Believe me he will try. The Great Firewall of Russia coming soon.

Re:End of Blogging in Russia (1)

IamTheRealMike (537420) | about 6 months ago | (#46941017)

It's not the end of blogging in Russia. What it means is that Russians who want to blog will blog on sites hosted outside the country, where all traffic is run through SSL.

flaw in the plan (1)

slashmydots (2189826) | about 6 months ago | (#46940243)

So if they don't register and do blog anonymously and hide their IP, how are they going to catch them? In other words, this does nothing and the Russian gov doesn't know how the internet works.

Re:flaw in the plan (1)

Jason Levine (196982) | about 6 months ago | (#46940465)

Except, now the mere act of making a blog post or a Twitter comment or a Facebook update will be illegal if you have over 3,000 followers, are somewhat anonymous (i.e. use a screen name and not your real name), and don't register. Then, since you've done something illegal, the government will have "just cause" to track you down and arrest you. Never assume that you can't be tracked down by anyone ever. All it takes is one slip and the government will have their "dangerous blogger."

Re:flaw in the plan (1)

CRCulver (715279) | about 6 months ago | (#46940519)

So if they don't register and do blog anonymously and hide their IP, how are they going to catch them?

VKontakte has for years now required giving a mobile phone number (in Russia, your ID goes into a government database when you purchase a SIM card) to sign up, to prevent anonymous commentary then. The same may already be true of LiveJournal, one of the country's most popular blogging platforms. There will always be a few people who have the savvy to stay anonymous, but a lot of the small-scale bloggers presently exposing local corruption are not particularly knowledgeable about computers and wouldn't be able to safely use e.g. Tor. So, government efforts really do pose a risk to Joe Blogs in Russia.

Russia is simply USA's future (2, Insightful)

AndyKron (937105) | about 6 months ago | (#46940267)

Russia is simply USA's future. Prepare!

Music Please (1)

m0s3m8n (1335861) | about 6 months ago | (#46940307)

Meet the new Stalin, same as the old Stalin.

Re:Music Please (1)

guacamole (24270) | about 6 months ago | (#46941251)

You don't know what you're talking about. Putin has been in the office of President of Russia or Prime minister for over 15 years. Is he authoritarian? yes. But next Stalin? Please.

By the time Stalin completed his first 15 years as the leader of Soviet communist party, he already managed to murder millions of Soviet people. Stalin's great purge of 1937, resulted in the murder of over 600,000 people while millions of people starved to their deaths in the Holodomor.

"Surgery of Thuggery" vs. the Intelligencia (4, Insightful)

retroworks (652802) | about 6 months ago | (#46940457)

Putin remains very "popular". Hitler was "popular". 97% of people don't really need or use their freedom of speech to an extent that it threatens the establishment.

On a hopeful note, historically, Hitler's tightening control produced "brain drain" among his most talented scientists and engineers. Societies which resort to these kinds of controls usually fail to keep apace with modernization. It's the fallacy of "surgery of thuggery". When totalitarians intend to surgically intimidate just a few vocal intelligencia, their "tools" or administrative enforcers (gestapo) are too clumsy and over-reach, intimidating brilliant people in unintended manners. This same thing happens in the USA business regulatory environment, if a state government gives too much authority to its regulators, businesses move elsewhere.

Re:"Surgery of Thuggery" vs. the Intelligencia (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46940769)

I liked this line of reasoning until you made it about "helping the job creators" and adding some anti-regulatory snark.

We are at a time with rampant deregulation and we are suffering for it. This isn't about picked-on businesses suffering under regulation, this is about greedy assholes who will move heaven and earth for profit, to the detriment of their employees and consumers of their product. That's completely different from the pressure placed on scientists.

We need things like regulations and unions because business has no morality; and left to their devices they will do anything they see fit.

Dangerous Internet (1)

SuperTechnoNerd (964528) | about 6 months ago | (#46940611)

I'm so glad that some countries have the courage to deal with this internet thing properly. I mean really folks, we can't have people running around spouting their ideas, disrupting the natural order of society. It's about time some one took affirmative action against this abomination that is the internet. The though of ordinary people saying what they want, doing what they want, making what they want, and OMG sharing what they want - It's just crazy! The internet needs people with a higher purpose to control, filter, and even dismantle this thing that is so poisonous to society. My god man, giving people free reign on the internet is like giving a machine gun to a baby! Wake up people!

Workaround: Load balancing? (1)

GameboyRMH (1153867) | about 6 months ago | (#46940613)

Say you have 100 different blogs with different names, different usernames for the admin, slightly different looks etc. but they all conveniently re-blog the same content. Next, you have a domain name that points to a load-balancing server which hosts no web content, but redirect the traffic so that none of these blogs hit the control quota. If one approaches the quota, the load-balancer will detect it and shut that particular blog down. A single-source DoS attack won't work against this system because that's only one unique visitor who just really likes the site :-)

But I'm just being a smartass. The best solution is to host the blog on a darknet and use a non-Russian darknet portal site to allow convenient (but not anonymous or secure) web access.

Easy solution... (1)

Beavertank (1178717) | about 6 months ago | (#46940641)

Every foreign search engine, blogging platform, or other covered entity just blocks all Russian originated IPs. Homegrown solutions may spring up to replace them, but the hassle ought to at least take this from "quietly" to "amid widespread condemnation and protest from Russians". Plus, who wants to be complicit in this kind of stupid BS?

As opposed to the USA (1)

davydagger (2566757) | about 6 months ago | (#46940713)

where EULAs are now law, and most major social networks require you to post your full name, as per EULA

This is a scary policy that is following the west.

3,000 daily hits? Yeah sure. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46940737)

I'm sure Russian agents will create robots to make sure **EVERY** blog will hit that 3,000 daily hit minimum in order for everyone to fall under this registration requirement.

On the surface it will sound reasonable but in actuality it will be a blanket law.

What is the calculation? (1)

Jakzillahr (3644957) | about 6 months ago | (#46940781)

thats not only cost for Disk space, that will cost freedom if they find anything anti RUS won't it?

No mention of the IRS (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46940945)

Fortunately, there's no mention of the Russian equivalent of the IRS going after those who don't adhere to the proper, Obama/Putin POV. That's only for U.S. bloggers and their non-profit kin.

NGO (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46941057)

That is, in part, due to the fact that the US is using social medial programs run through NGOs overseas and to subvert foreign governments. I participated in Darpa research that seemed to indicate this and that it was to be much more sophisticated as time goes on.
One way is to look at it as propaganda channels with an AI. The US population is also being studied and acted upon in this regard, to what extent is unknowable as it is no doubt under secret and non democratic laws with the usual national security excuse, we need to be protected from knowing...

Russia's affecting my buying decisions (1)

Fencepost (107992) | about 6 months ago | (#46941237)

I have a client that we're going to be getting some software for - not a major purchase, none of the alternatives being considered are even over $300. Of the two leading options, one is produced by a Russian firm, and that alone is making me less likely to choose it.

Admittedly in this case there aren't any major differences in functionality, and we may end up with the Russian one after all if testing shows its interface is easier to use/train on, but it's the first time I recall actually looking into and considering where the software is being created.
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