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First Arrest In Japan For 3D-Printed Guns

timothy posted about 5 months ago | from the illegal-objects-around-the-world dept.

Japan 274

PuceBaboon (469044) writes "Earlier today (Thursday), police in Kawasaki, Japan, arrested a man for violation of the firearms control law. He was apparently in possession of five, 3D-printed handguns, two of which were reportedly capable of firing normal rounds (although no actual bullets were found). The suspect was arrested after releasing video of the guns online. Japan has very strict gun control laws and, whether or not the suspect actually appeared in the alleged video, he may just have signed himself up for some serious porridge."

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274 comments

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Hey Tim (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46948145)

A person is violating gun ownership laws and gets arrested.

How is this news for /. ?

Re:Hey Tim (5, Funny)

ciderbrew (1860166) | about 5 months ago | (#46948163)

it's in 3D

Re:Hey Tim (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46948415)

it's in 3D

So I need glasses to fire the gun now ?

Re:Hey Tim (4, Insightful)

skipkent (1510) | about 5 months ago | (#46948173)

If guns are illegal in Chicago why do businesses use bulletproof glass?

Re:Hey Tim (1)

The New Guy 2.0 (3497907) | about 5 months ago | (#46948203)

Belt and suspenders protect. 1. No gun allowed here, and 2. If there is one, it's safer to stay indoors.

How thick is the glass behind glass behind that female anchor of E! News on her Chicago-area set?

Re:Hey Tim (3, Informative)

Rosco P. Coltrane (209368) | about 5 months ago | (#46948211)

Because when guns are outlawed, only outlaws have guns.

Re: Hey Tim (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46948251)

That old hackney phrase.
Where you outlaws get those guns?
Oh from good guys in states where it is legal to sell them in bulk.

Re: Hey Tim (2)

Markvs (17298) | about 5 months ago | (#46948267)

That old hackney phrase. Where you outlaws get those guns? Oh from good guys in states where it is legal to sell them in bulk.

I disagree with your insinuation that the US Government are the good guys in this case. (Think "Fast & Furious".)

Re: Hey Tim (1)

guises (2423402) | about 5 months ago | (#46948853)

I realize / hope that you're joking, but to be abundantly clear: the US Government doesn't sell guns to individuals. Not during the Fast & Furious operation or ever. They do sell guns to states sometimes - e.g. Iran / Contra.

Re: Hey Tim (3, Insightful)

Rosco P. Coltrane (209368) | about 5 months ago | (#46948317)

Where you outlaws get those guns?

What a silly question. Cocaine is outlawed too: how come there are so many junkies?

Re: Hey Tim (1)

beschra (1424727) | about 5 months ago | (#46948435)

How many legal sources of cocaine are there in the US?

Re: Hey Tim (1)

CanHasDIY (1672858) | about 5 months ago | (#46948499)

How many legal sources of cocaine are there in the US?

Big ol' Whoosh.

Re: Hey Tim (1)

rockout (1039072) | about 5 months ago | (#46948961)

I think the 'woosh' is yours. Parent is pointing out that there are states where it's ridiculously easy to buy guns, and those guns can easily be transported to areas where gun ownership is more restricted. However, the same is not true of cocaine, which can't easily be bought legally.

Re: Hey Tim (2)

CanHasDIY (1672858) | about 5 months ago | (#46949039)

No, parent is asking a silly question, that ignores grandparent's point - cocaine is completely illegal in the US, and there are no legal sources of it, yet a lot of people still manage to get their hands on the substance, thus negating the assumption that gun crime rates in states that ban firearms is a direct result of being adjacent to states that do not.

Re: Hey Tim (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46949219)

there are no legal sources of it

You were saying [sigmaaldrich.com] ?

Re: Hey Tim (2)

JDeane (1402533) | about 5 months ago | (#46949291)

Besides if it gets too hard to buy or import them, you could always build them.

A nice 1911 copy could probably be made in a fairly small shop these days with a PC and some decent metal working machines. I am not a gun smith but if they could make these in 1911 it doesn't seem like much of a tech barrier to just clone them now.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/M... [wikipedia.org]

Re: Hey Tim (1)

CreatureComfort (741652) | about 5 months ago | (#46948831)

Obviously not enough.

Legalize it, tax it, and regulate it. Better questions would be: How many illegal distilleries are there in the US? How many illegal firearms manufacturers are there in the US?

Re: Hey Tim (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46949333)

How many legal sources of cocaine are there in the US?

Every single pharmacy in the US is a legal source of cocaine.

All you need is a prescription.

Re: Hey Tim (1)

CrimsonAvenger (580665) | about 5 months ago | (#46948329)

Oh from good guys in states where it is legal to sell them in bulk.

Since it is illegal to sell firearms across state lines (you can only legally buy them in your State of residence), people selling them in bulk in another State are NOT "good guys"....

selling firearms state-to-state (was Re: Hey Tim) (1)

WillAdams (45638) | about 5 months ago | (#46948483)

You can sell firearms across state lines just fine --- the transaction just has to take place at an FFL in the state-of-residence of the purchaser and be legal in the destination state.

Re:selling firearms state-to-state (was Re: Hey Ti (2)

operagost (62405) | about 5 months ago | (#46948677)

And of course, that means undergoing a background check.

Re: Hey Tim (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46948459)

The same logic should be applied to the sale of pot in Colorado and Washington.

Re: Hey Tim (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46948789)

Where you outlaws get those guns?

The BATFE of course [wikipedia.org] !

Re: Hey Tim (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46949043)

Where you outlaws get those guns? Oh from good guys in states where it is legal to sell them in bulk.

They get them wherever it's cheapest and easiest. If you outlaw them throughout the US, they get them from Mexico. If you close the borders, they get the parts in their local hardware store. Guns are easier to make than drugs. Significant gun control is an even worse disaster than the war on drugs.

When will you morons learn that you can't fix social problems by fiat or autopen?

Re:Hey Tim (5, Funny)

Thanshin (1188877) | about 5 months ago | (#46948303)

But if outlaws are ostracized, only ostriches will have guns.

Re:Hey Tim (1)

Sockatume (732728) | about 5 months ago | (#46948325)

And the lawmen.

Re:Hey Tim (1)

guises (2423402) | about 5 months ago | (#46948867)

What is the point of this? It's a tautology. It brings nothing to the conversation.

Re:Hey Tim (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46948229)

Cause Japanese are way more civilized than the rest of us!

Ever been to Tokyo? Greater Tokyo had almost 35 million people packed
on the edge of a stamp and... there is essentially no violent crime. Everything
looks clean, new, and well-kept. Also great and safe public transportation!
Japanese are so polite and nice...

Re:Hey Tim (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46948299)

There is plenty of violent crime in Japan. The difference between their violent crime and violent crime in the United States is that Japan's guns laws are very highly restrictive. I can still remember reading an interview a gaming website did with a mid-level yakuza, who they had play Yakuza 4. He remarked that none of the actual yakuza use guns, because the cops there will arrest on sight if they see someone carrying one. Instead, they tend to snatch people off the streets and use the $5 wrench approach.

I also wouldn't be surprised if the violent crime rate in Japan, especially by organized crime, is under-reported. One of the main slang terms for the yakuza translates to "the office", a remark on how big of an institution organized crime is in the country, to the point where it's almost like a business.

While I'm sure the yakuza don't account for 100% of violent crime there, I'd be willing to bet they account for quite a bit.

Re: Hey Tim (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46948353)

Underreporting may be an issue, but the reported violent crime rate in the US is about 11x higher than Japan so that would require over 90% of violent crimes going unreported to reach the level of the US (assuming 100% reporting in the US).

Re:Hey Tim (1, Flamebait)

qbast (1265706) | about 5 months ago | (#46948529)

>

I also wouldn't be surprised if the violent crime rate in Japan, especially by organized crime, is under-reported. One of the main slang terms for the yakuza translates to "the office", a remark on how big of an institution organized crime is in the country, to the point where it's almost like a business.

Ah yes, country X doing better than USA as measured by statistic Y ? Of course the statistic must be false!
USA! USA! USA!

Re:Hey Tim (0)

jittles (1613415) | about 5 months ago | (#46948641)

>

I also wouldn't be surprised if the violent crime rate in Japan, especially by organized crime, is under-reported. One of the main slang terms for the yakuza translates to "the office", a remark on how big of an institution organized crime is in the country, to the point where it's almost like a business.

Ah yes, country X doing better than USA as measured by statistic Y ? Of course the statistic must be false! USA! USA! USA!

Well it is difficult to measure the violent crime statistics in jurisdiction A versus jurisdiction B when they may have completely different definitions of what is considered a violent crime. I do not know enough about Japan to comment on that matter, but it does make it easier to cherry pick stats when the laws are not the same.

Re:Hey Tim (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46948725)

I'm not saying it's false. What I'm saying is that the parent to my post claimed that there is "almost no" violent crime in Japan, which is likely untrue. At no point did I claim that under-reporting makes Japan's violent crime rate as high as that of the United States - it merely points to the idea that there is, in fact, violent crime there. There are plenty of factors that ensure the US's violent crime rate will always be higher, including:

- Proliferation of guns

- A larger amount of the population likely to join gangs. Japan has the Dowa people - a minority group whose ancestors lived in specific areas and had jobs that made them "untouchable", similar to India's social caste of the same name. Many employers will outright refuse to hire the Dowa people on the grounds that they have relatives in the yakuza.. which causes them to join the yakuza because the yakuza will "hire" them with no questions asked. The United States, on the other hand, has tons of low-income inner city areas (Detroit, Chicago, parts of LA and New York) where the kids who live there are exposed to gangs and gang violence from birth and usually wind up joining the gangs because they don't feel that they have any other choice.

- The US hasn't ever truly suffered the consequences of violence as a nation on the scale that Japan has. Sure, we had 9/11 and Oklahoma City, but they had WWII.

So no, all I'm saying is that Japan is not some kind of near-violence-free utopia, as the person I was replying to seemed to suggest.

Re:Hey Tim (0)

stenvar (2789879) | about 5 months ago | (#46949113)

Ah yes, country X doing better than USA as measured by statistic Y ? Of course the statistic must be false!

The statistic is actually right: the violent crime rate is lower in Japan than in the US. Your error is in assuming that that's automatically a good thing.

There are many statistics on which the US is clearly better than other nations. We make different tradeoffs from Europe and Japan. But some politicians like to tell the lie that we can have all the benefits that Europe and Japan gain through their policies without paying the steep cost they are paying.

USA! USA! USA!

Yup. I have live in Europe and Asia, and I don't want the US to turn into them.

Re:Hey Tim (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46948795)

I would not be surprised if you're making exaggerations to justify your world view about guns.

Japan's violent crime rates are orders of magnitude less than that of the US. They've got their own justice system and social problems, but violent crime is not one of them.

Re:Hey Tim (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46948237)

There's actually a Subway restaurant in Chicago that has bullet-proof glass in front of the counter like a s*itty gas station or something --

http://chicago.cbslocal.com/2014/04/24/bulletproof-subways-a-sign-of-violent-times/

Re:Hey Tim (4, Insightful)

Stuarticus (1205322) | about 5 months ago | (#46948289)

Because you can buy one five miles away and there's no border control?

Re:Hey Tim (2)

jimbolauski (882977) | about 5 months ago | (#46948653)

Guns are illegal in Mexico and they have boarder control yet the bad guys get guns, cocaine is illegal in the US yet addicts still get cocaine, even prisons with very high security can't stop contraband from coming in. Unless you think the answer is tighter control of law abiding citizens then prisons have over prisoners there is no way to stop criminals from committing crimes.

Re:Hey Tim (2)

Stuarticus (1205322) | about 5 months ago | (#46948731)

Guns are illegal in Mexico and they have boarder control

I really don't see what the room rental market has to do with it.

Re:Hey Tim (1)

dave420 (699308) | about 5 months ago | (#46949193)

If what you say is true, then criminals in every single country would be armed to the teeth with all the guns they want. As they are not, you're must be missing something quite important. You also must remember that when a criminal's potential victim has no gun, the criminal doesn't need a gun, and so won't want the increased cost and risk of actually having one. Cocaine and other drugs are public health issues, based on human psychology and physiology (substance abuse, etc.), so comparing the two simply because they are illegal is oversimplifying things to the point of nonsense.

It's not about stopping crime, it's about ensuring when crime does happen, it's as easy to walk away from as possible.

Re:Hey Tim (1)

interkin3tic (1469267) | about 5 months ago | (#46948315)

Guns aren't illegal in Chicago. You just can't buy a gun in Chicago thanks to scaremongering about Chicago's crime rate* and the predictable response from voters: to be scared into ceding some rights to politicians.

* There are pretty rough areas, yes, just like any major city in the US. And yes, the number of murders is higher than zero, which is bad but to be expected. And yes, the total number of people murdered by guns seems shockingly high until you adjust for population, at which point it looks very much average for an American city. The fact that everyone is convinced the crime rate is really high in Chicago is about the only thing unusual about the situation.

Re:Hey Tim (1)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | about 5 months ago | (#46948395)

Chicago is a slightly curious case: city-wide, it has been getting safer, more slowly than some would like; but steadily, for some years. However, some of the parts that were always pretty nasty have actually been getting worse, they just aren't large enough or worse enough to drag down the citywide average.

The nicer bits were never as rough as 'Chicago's image suggested, and they've been improving. The rougher areas, though, earned the nickname 'Chiraq' honestly and messily.

Re:Hey Tim (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46948881)

The difference is that the crime has been moving to the suburban areas. Chicago itself might be having lower statistics, but the outside neighborhoods that the gangs have been pushed to have skyrocketing crime rates.

If one takes the total (Chi-town + neighborhoods) into account, the crime rate is worse than in the past. It is just the gangs have been pushed out of the areas where statistics are being gathered.

Re:Hey Tim (2)

MozeeToby (1163751) | about 5 months ago | (#46948361)

Because there's no border security, customs, or bloody great big oceans between Chicago and areas where guns aren't outlawed?

Re:Hey Tim (1)

internerdj (1319281) | about 5 months ago | (#46948225)

3D printing and a hotbutton political topic.

Re: Hey Tim (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46948763)

same guy here

tim, you're everything that is wrong about /.

Next (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46948185)

Japanese police arrest a man for having a pipe, nail and hammer.

Re: Next (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46948259)

Guns are not a constitution right in most countries.

of a truly grave nature (4, Funny)

nimbius (983462) | about 5 months ago | (#46948199)

This porridge, while thick and creamy, may also in fact come with maple syrup and fresh berries or should he plead guilty, a knob of butter and a dash of salt as would be the law in japan as it applies to sentencing and conviction within the bounds of the criminal porridge system. The whole grain oats, enriched generously with folate and iron, would serve to deter even the most wanton of breakfast criminal.

Re:of a truly grave nature (1)

Sockatume (732728) | about 5 months ago | (#46948275)

Someone better track down the True Scotsman, he'll figure this out.

(Yes, I know what it means.)

Re:of a truly grave nature (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46948279)

I enjoyed this muchly, if only a markov chain could get up to this standard.

Re:of a truly grave nature (1)

SpankiMonki (3493987) | about 5 months ago | (#46948753)

The whole grain oats, enriched generously with folate and iron, would serve to deter even the most wanton of breakfast criminal.

Oat porridge? Maple syrup? Berries 'n butter? I doubt it. Plain okayu [wikipedia.org] (with salt for good behavior) is what's on the typical prison menu in Japan.

Perhaps you were thinking of the Canadian system, eh?

Re:of a truly grave nature (1)

the_other_chewey (1119125) | about 5 months ago | (#46949049)

The whole grain oats, enriched generously with folate and iron, would serve to deter even the most wanton of breakfast criminal.

It's been well established that cereal offenders aren't deterred by palatal punishment. Oats don't make them quake.

Hurray for Japan (0, Troll)

PvtVoid (1252388) | about 5 months ago | (#46948235)

Maybe this sort of thing contributes to why Japan had a murder rate of 0.4 per 100,000 people [un.org] in 2009, compared to the U.S. rate of 4.4 (Afganistan, for the record, had a murder rate per 100,000 of 2.4 in 2008).

It's long past time for the U.S. to stop setting firearms policy based on the paranoid fantasies of a bunch of brain-damaged rednecks.

Re:Hurray for Japan (4, Insightful)

internerdj (1319281) | about 5 months ago | (#46948309)

Or perhaps it is because they have an entirely different culture? One where violence had a severe cost just two generations ago, just about the same time had all cultural celebration of violence stomped out by foreign influence, and at the same time their national defense was overseen by an entirely different country so there was no nationalistic need to push any type of propoganda for desiring a career relating to violence on its young men. Assuming you could snap your fingers and make all the guns go away in America, you still haven't solved the underlying problems of undertreatment of the mentally ill, mistreatment of the poor, and the prevailing attitude that I'm not responsible for my own actions.

Re:Hurray for Japan (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46948631)

Came here to post this.

Left regretting I have no account, so can't mod you up.

Re:Hurray for Japan (4, Insightful)

Type44Q (1233630) | about 5 months ago | (#46948745)

just about the same time had all cultural celebration of violence stomped out by foreign influence

You're rather unfamiliar with Japanese culture, aren't you...

Re: Hurray for Japan (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46949223)

Well, they love apparently love animated sexual violence, and fhate whales. Point taken.

(Fuck you whaaaales)

Re:Hurray for Japan (4, Informative)

Nexus7 (2919) | about 5 months ago | (#46948773)

By your own premise, once you "snap your fingers and make all the guns go away in America," then the people suffering from "problems of undertreatment of the mentally ill, mistreatment of the poor, and the prevailing attitude that I'm not responsible for my own actions" will not be able to shoot anyone. Thus the murder rate would go down (since you imply it is because of these problems, and not the availability of guns, that people shoot people).

Re:Hurray for Japan (2)

Thanshin (1188877) | about 5 months ago | (#46948327)

Murder rates won't change anyone's mind. Those who are for gun control will think they are proof of their side while those who are against it will take them as precisely the reason to own a gun to protect oneself in a violent country.

Re:Hurray for Japan (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46948467)

Murder rates won't change anyone's mind. Those who are for gun control will think they are proof of their side while those who are against it will take them as precisely the reason to own a gun to protect oneself in a violent country.

I am for gun control because I don't want the citizenry (as in law abiding citizens) to have guns as simple as that. As for the criminals, well there is the police, the fbi etc... to counter them. Most gun accidents/mass shootings are carried out by law abiding citizens, not career criminals. That's the truth.

Re:Hurray for Japan (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46948571)

I'm against gun control because I want the citizentry to have guns as simple as that. For the citizenry, if the police can properly keep criminals with illegal guns in line well it should be even easier for them to do so with law abiding citizens. Mass shootings are a small percentage of gun deaths and fatal accidents are more likely to occur with a swimming pool than a firearm. That's the truth. See how that works? In civil society we should now compromise by trying to come to a common ground where we both feel some modicum of safety, but that isn't how we do things in current US society.

Re:Hurray for Japan (2)

YrWrstNtmr (564987) | about 5 months ago | (#46948635)

"...mass shootings are carried out by law abiding citizens"

You want to rethink that statement a little?

Re:Hurray for Japan (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46948817)

"...mass shootings are carried out by law abiding citizens"

You want to rethink that statement a little?

No. Think about Columbine, or other mass shootings. Who the hell carries them out ? Career criminals, or plain people/teenagers/young adults that happen to have lawfully acquired guns (by their parents) and one day just need the let the steam off ? And when that day comes they commit such atrocities. Or how about people that are laid off and want to get revenge by killing your ex collegues ? Or what about military servicemen that go one a shooting spree in their home bases in the US ? Are they criminals before the deed ? Of course not. Only after the deed they become criminals. But up to that point they aren't. Just your lawfull citizen.

A career criminal is different. If I have to point that out well you're being dumb/obtuse on purpose.

Re:Hurray for Japan (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46949347)

So what you're saying is, lock up all law-abiding citizens.
To be more serious, none of your points about Columbine are true. Harris and Klebold did not acquire the guns legally, they were not plain people/teenagers/young adults, and both had run-ins with the law before the shooting.

Re:Hurray for Japan (2)

dave420 (699308) | about 5 months ago | (#46949229)

He's simply stating that up until the point the crime was underway, the shooter was not acting illegally, so all the NRA hysterics about protecting "innocent gun owners" means absolutely nothing. Plus every single one of the guns used in these crimes was, at one point, legally sold to a responsible, legal gun owner. Obviously gun owners can't be trusted, as their guns fall into the hands of criminals. You can't have it both ways.

Re:Hurray for Japan (1)

lagomorpha2 (1376475) | about 5 months ago | (#46948399)

Maybe if you wanted to at least attempt to compare like to like you should compare Japan's murder rates to the murder rates for Japanese Americans.

Re:Hurray for Japan (2)

operagost (62405) | about 5 months ago | (#46948595)

Maybe it's because their police treat the people in their community like patrons, and build courteous relationships with them?

Maybe it's because Japanese culture is ingrained with a respect for authority?

Maybe it's the tentacle porn?

Re:Hurray for Japan (5, Insightful)

jimbolauski (882977) | about 5 months ago | (#46948851)

Mexico has a tight restriction on guns yet their murder rate is 23.7, Switzerland where every adult over 18 is issued a true assault rifle has a murder rate of 0.7. It is not the gun laws that cause problems it is the culture. Lets stop punishing the people that do the right thing based on delusions and the desire to control the population.

Re:Hurray for Japan (1)

TheDarkMaster (1292526) | about 5 months ago | (#46948967)

Exact. Current laws against guns only serve to prevent the population from react against attempts of aggression coming from the government itself or from the 1% overlords (the true government in some sense). Because no law will prevent criminals from having guns, as always.

Cue "freedom" NRA nuts in 3.. 2.. 1... (2, Insightful)

mwvdlee (775178) | about 5 months ago | (#46948281)

Because guns don't kill people. People with guns kill people.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/L... [wikipedia.org]

Re:Cue "freedom" NRA nuts in 3.. 2.. 1... (-1)

CrimsonAvenger (580665) | about 5 months ago | (#46948311)

Let's see. Toy guns, no ammo. Nope, he's not going to be killing anyone with that. Unless he hits them over the head with the toy guns.

And yes, I consider 3D printed guns to be toy guns. They're not even up to Saturday Night Specials or zip-gun yet....

Re:Cue "freedom" NRA nuts in 3.. 2.. 1... (2)

Calinous (985536) | about 5 months ago | (#46948411)

If the "toy guns" are perfectly able to shoot one effective bullet (even while disintegrating themselves after that), then I'm not considering them toy guns. By the way, I think a 3D plastic gun was able to shoot 8 bullets before being too damaged to function (a 3D plastic rifle fired 14 rounds)
      And where would you draw the line between toy guns and "real" guns? 3D printed in plastic = toy. 3D printed in plastic with one metal part? With two metal parts? With multiple metal parts? Handmade on a lathe?

Re:Cue "freedom" NRA nuts in 3.. 2.. 1... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46948449)

Please define function in this context. Successfully expel a bullet or successfully expel a bullet in the intended direction within a reasonable grouping?

Re:Cue "freedom" NRA nuts in 3.. 2.. 1... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46948565)

A single bullet in the general direction is more than enough for an armed robbery.

Re:Cue "freedom" NRA nuts in 3.. 2.. 1... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46949103)

Doesn't matter. If it can fire in the intended direction, I don't want it pointing at me. If it can't fire in the intended direction, I don't want it pointing anywhere.

Re:Cue "freedom" NRA nuts in 3.. 2.. 1... (0)

oic0 (1864384) | about 5 months ago | (#46948667)

When its more dangerous than a pipe with endcap. Anyhow, their gun laws are draconian.

A better homemade gun (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46948671)

A 3D-printed gun will only fire a few rounds - sure. A piece of steel pipe will fire many more, and is a lot cheaper than a 3D-printer. Outlaw steel pipe while we have a chance!

For something really practical - a 3D-printed gun mechanism using a steel pipe barrel. Strong where needed, with all the tricky mechanical parts made effortlessly on that printer.

Re:Cue "freedom" NRA nuts in 3.. 2.. 1... (2, Insightful)

Major Blud (789630) | about 5 months ago | (#46948345)

Yet Japan, the country mentioned in the article, has a much higher suicide rate than the United States despite their strict gun control policies. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/F... [wikipedia.org] And no, I'm not in the NRA.

Re:Cue "freedom" NRA nuts in 3.. 2.. 1... (1)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | about 5 months ago | (#46948419)

Easy access to guns is a factor in suicide rates (largely because suicide attempts made with guns typically work, while there are a lot of ineffective attempts by non-firearm users). In terms of attempt rate, though, I don't think that there's much correlation of any sort(unless you buy the theory that some of the stupider acts of violence, with extraordinarily high risks and minimal rewards, are basically suicide for violent people, the 'suicide by cop' and such).

Re:Cue "freedom" NRA nuts in 3.. 2.. 1... (1)

Major Blud (789630) | about 5 months ago | (#46948451)

That's an interesting point. I'd like to see the comparison of rates of "attempted suicides" between the two, but that sort of data is going to be impossible to find.

"Easy access to guns is a factor in suicide rates"

Not sure I understand what you're going for here, since the Japansese suicide rate is clearly higher than that in the US although they have fewer firearms.

Re:Cue "freedom" NRA nuts in 3.. 2.. 1... (1)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | about 5 months ago | (#46948717)

Sorry, I didn't make that clear: given a constant attempt rate, the firearm supply will strongly affect the resulting suicide rate. Guns are very good at what they are designed to do, while many of the DIY methods that people try are just plain ineffective, slow enough to permit medical response, or otherwise defective.

A sufficiently large difference in attempt rate can (and in this case does) swamp the effects of greater success rates; but people with easy access to explicitly lethal instruments succeed more often. (And it doesn't have to be guns, rural agricultural areas may have easy access to nasty organophosphate pesticides, say, but the US has easy access to guns and comparatively childproofed consumer goods, so here it's probably guns.)

Re:Cue "freedom" NRA nuts in 3.. 2.. 1... (1)

Calinous (985536) | about 5 months ago | (#46948691)

Unsuccessful suicides are very expensive on the medical system...

Hold on here! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46948655)

Japan does have a log of Bullet trains that are used often in suicides, so I kind of have to disagree with you there.

Re:Cue "freedom" NRA nuts in 3.. 2.. 1... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46949127)

Suicide rates are linked to easy access to an effective means of performing it. The US has guns, Japan has tall buildings (The US has tall building too, but a greater percentage of the population is rural). Outside that, you also have to look at cultural influence. Failure and shame are bigger issues in Japan.

A look at per capita gun rates across the US shows a correlation with suicide rates. This could happen with other things besides guns, but guns are the big one in the US. I don't think a gun ban is the solution (its too late once the guns are out there), but people should think before keeping a gun it the house. Have someone with a history of depression, mental illness, a teenager, don't keep a gun in the house. Or, at least lock it.

Re:Cue "freedom" NRA nuts in 3.. 2.. 1... (2)

Warbothong (905464) | about 5 months ago | (#46948397)

Because guns don't kill people. People with guns kill people.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/L... [wikipedia.org]

The groupings that emerge when ordered by homicides per 100,000 is interesting. The most dangerous seem to be quasi-dictatorial republics in the Americas. Unsurprisingly this includes the USA.

Re:Cue "freedom" NRA nuts in 3.. 2.. 1... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46948497)

The US has a high rate of intentional gun-related deaths (defense, murder, suicide, etc) when compared to other countries. But most statistics I have seen also show the number of intentional deaths that are not related to guns is also high when compared to the statistics of other countries. This suggests, to me, that guns make the intentional deaths easier to do but there are one or more underlying issues that lead to an increase in the number of homicides and suicides. While the 'guns don't kill people' line is frequently mocked by gun-control advocates and over-used by gun-rights advocates, there is some truth in the statement.

Re:Cue "freedom" NRA nuts in 3.. 2.. 1... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46948621)

A ticking timebomb with 0:03 on the timer doesn't kill people; everybody should be allowed to have one.
A ticking timebomb with 0:02 on the timer doesn't kill people; everybody should be allowed to have one.
A ticking timebomb with 0:01 on the timer doesn't kill people; everybody should be allowed to have one.
etc...

Re:Cue "freedom" NRA nuts in 3.. 2.. 1... (1)

jittles (1613415) | about 5 months ago | (#46948743)

Because guns don't kill people. People with guns kill people. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/L... [wikipedia.org]

Interesting to note that India has one of the largest populations and the lowest rates of gun violence in the world. It's not like India is violence free, though. We hear all the time about brutal gang rapes of women. And those are only the ones that get reported internationally because they are committed against foreign tourists. So this would suggest that a low rate of gun violence does not imply a safer society, and that there is a cultural influence to violence as a whole.

Re:Cue "freedom" NRA nuts in 3.. 2.. 1... (5, Insightful)

Charliemopps (1157495) | about 5 months ago | (#46948805)

You mean to tell me, in a country where guns are illegal, the number of deaths resulting from guns is lower? I'm shocked!

all kidding aside, lets have some real numbers:
The United States has the highest rate of gun ownership in the world... by a HUGE margin:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/N... [wikipedia.org]

We have twice as many guns per person as almost every other country on earth.
If Guns = murder, then we should also have the highest murder rate right?

We don't:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/L... [wikipedia.org]
We actually have a fairly low murder rate compared to most of the world depending on how you judge it. In comparison to our closest neighbor Canada we're a tad higher... but hey, they're Canadians, the only disputes they get in are over the shape on their bacon.

If you're going to have an argument, clouding it with made-up data just makes people not listen to you. The problem with the gun control crowd is their goal is an unconstitutional outright ban and they make no attempt to hide that. Every gun control law isn't passed to limit gun deaths, they're passed in an attempt to ban guns. If the NRA could trust the gun control advocates, I think they'd be a little more co-operative. Increased background checks and required safety classes I think everyone could agree on. But when the anti-gun-nuts then use those background checks to delay and prevent people who are legally allowed to carry a weapon, those people get pissed and just flat out oppose any regulation. The gun regulation problems in this country are just as much the fault of those trying to pass the laws as they are the ones that oppose them.

Check your chart again (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46949105)

You might want to sort that chart by rate and look at the countries with higher and lower rates.

As for slightly higher than Canada?

Canada has 1.6 murders /100,000 people and the US is 4.8 / 100,000

That's not slightly higher, that's 3 times as high!

Re:Cue "freedom" NRA nuts in 3.. 2.. 1... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46949261)

There are nuts an both sides, but most advocates just want some reasonable restrictions like background checks and the restriction on sale of particularly deadly weapons. Those with higher magazine capacity for instance.
The second amendment has a lot of precedent for striking down anything remotely resembling a ban. Justices tend to follow precedent, and not even the most liberal is likely to uphold a national ban. Firearms dealers use fear to sell guns. "Celebrate your 2nd amendment rights, while you still can." Heard that from a gun show ad 6 years ago (around the time of Obama's inauguration). What has happened with gun control? Nothing. Firearms sells were setting records though.

Re:Cue "freedom" NRA nuts in 3.. 2.. 1... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46949469)

Why are suicides and shootings by police included in this statistic? Most of the anti-gun people I've met are in favor of a right to die, and don't want to disarm the police.

He broke the law (1)

timmy-ku (2991705) | about 5 months ago | (#46948387)

He broke the law and then told on himself. Plastic guns are stupid and so are laws.Once I had a cop threaten to arrest me if I didn't mow my lawn YET the same day I was firing metal home built guns on lawn. The officer called them fascinating.

LOL (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46948429)

"I can’t complain about the arrest if the police regard them as real guns"

Not just the police, every 3D printing nutcase regards them as more lethal than a nuclear bomb. And definitely the future. I mean just look at those things. Not a single bullet was ever fired by any of them, but they could have!

They're vaguely gun-shaped plastic cake decorations.

What exactly is a gun? (1)

Rick in China (2934527) | about 5 months ago | (#46948829)

With 3d printing, I suppose you can print something which would be capable of firing a bullet, but not look or seem anything like a gun. A box perhaps. Would that still be a gun? I don't know if laws define guns as what most people traditionally think of - a handgun shape is very recognisable and 3d guns look similar...at what point does it become a gun, and at what point is a piece of plastic just a toy? If he printed a box with a cylindrical hole in it and a mechanism to pound into the centre of the cylinder, would it also be a gun?

Re:What exactly is a gun? (1)

TheDarkMaster (1292526) | about 5 months ago | (#46949037)

Well, you can make a gun with just a metal pipe of the correct diameter, some reinforcement and something as firing pin, even simpler and cheaper than a 3D printed thing. But do not expect intelligence from the politicians.

Re:What exactly is a gun? (1)

stenvar (2789879) | about 5 months ago | (#46949165)

The law in the US is roughly that if it functions like a gun, it must look like a gun (it's probably the same elsewhere). Gun laws contain definitions like:

The term “any other weapon” means any weapon or device capable of being concealed on the person from which a shot can be discharged through the energy of an explosive,

That's why guns all look the same. In the 19th century, people built guns in lots of shapes in order to conceal them.

Comma, Comma, Comma (4, Insightful)

omnichad (1198475) | about 5 months ago | (#46948905)

He was apparently in possession of five, 3D-printed handguns, two of which were reportedly capable of firing normal rounds (although no actual bullets were found)

The commas...I just don't understand...

Kawasaki (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46948963)

After reading the summary I suddenly had the urge to start a brand of alcoholic beverage called Kawaaisake. I'd sell it in really cute little bottles.

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