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Should We Eat Invasive Species?

timothy posted about 4 months ago | from the will-ponder-this-over-some-nutria-mousse dept.

Earth 290

The Washington Post's Energy & Environment section raises today the question of whether the best way to control certain invasive species is to eat them. The biggest success story on this front in the U.S. has been the lionfish; it destroys the habitat of some other fish in the areas where it's been introduced, but it turns out to be a palatable food fish, too. Its population has gone down since the start of a concerted effort to encourage it as a food, rather than just a nuisance. The article touches on invasive species of fish and crustaceans, but also land animals and plants. I know that garlic mustard (widespread in eastern U.S. forests) is tasty, and so are the blackberries all over Seattle.

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On that note (5, Funny)

rmdingler (1955220) | about 4 months ago | (#47087383)

Let's hope the rest of the earth's species don't adopt this plan to control the invasive naked apes.

Re:On that note (1, Redundant)

goombah99 (560566) | about 4 months ago | (#47087397)

tasty corn fattened bacon flavored apes.

Re:On that note (2)

davester666 (731373) | about 4 months ago | (#47088019)

OMG...people are bacon flavored! Yum. Time to go shopping.

Re:On that note (-1, Troll)

Jmc23 (2353706) | about 4 months ago | (#47088045)

The sad thing about the 'flavour' of bacon, is that most USians are refering to the taste of the preservative, but they don't know that.

Re:On that note (5, Insightful)

TrekkieGod (627867) | about 4 months ago | (#47087495)

Let's hope the rest of the earth's species don't adopt this plan to control the invasive naked apes.

I assure you that they try. All the time.

We're not at the top of the food chain because the other species are nice to us. Or because we're nice, for that matter.

Re:On that note (4, Funny)

houghi (78078) | about 4 months ago | (#47087577)

We are NOT on top of the foodchain. The housecat is. They have us trained to bring them food.

Re:On that note (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47087649)

Hehe...Not in China though :D

Re:On that note (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47087869)

That's just sick that you let your food boss you around. Around here, we only feed the cat enough to make it fat enough to eat. You are one dumb human if you let some lower species train and command you.

Re:On that note (5, Insightful)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | about 4 months ago | (#47087519)

Let's hope the rest of the earth's species don't adopt this plan to control the invasive naked apes.

At a population level, the reverse might actually be true:

One of the few tactics that any species large enough to gun down faster than it can reproduce, or touchy enough that you can just set its habitat on fire, can embrace to survive, and even thrive, is to be docile and tasty. Humans go crazy for that, and promptly allocate massive amounts of effort, and delicious calories, to encouraging your population to increase dramatically. Sure, then they put a captive-bolt stunner into your brain and chop you up for parts; but being a darwinian winner isn't about quality of life...

Re:On that note (3, Insightful)

Shakrai (717556) | about 4 months ago | (#47087559)

Plenty of species have benefited from humans without becoming primary sources of food for them. Easy example: Cats and Dogs. Other examples: Squirrels, pigeons, and rats.

Re:On that note (4, Funny)

ArcadeMan (2766669) | about 4 months ago | (#47087647)

Other example: my roommate.

Re:On that note (2, Informative)

tyme (6621) | about 4 months ago | (#47087671)

Shakrai [slashdot.org] wrote:

Plenty of species have benefited from humans without becoming primary sources of food for them. Easy example: Cats and Dogs. Other examples: Squirrels, pigeons, and rats.

Except that cats [wikipedia.org] , dogs [wikipedia.org] , squirrels [backwoodsbound.com] , pigeons [greatbritishchefs.com] , and rats [go.com] have all been (or are) on the menu.

Re:On that note (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47088093)

Except that you ignored the key word in GP's post: primary.

Re:On that note (2)

JMJimmy (2036122) | about 4 months ago | (#47087543)

I vote the submitter of this article starts by eating some Cane Toad eggs.

Re:On that note (5, Interesting)

Shakrai (717556) | about 4 months ago | (#47087545)

Let's hope the rest of the earth's species don't adopt this plan to control the invasive naked apes.

Homo sapiens is pretty tough prey. We're tough enough catch and kill on an individual basis, on a group basis it becomes virtually impossible, even if you take away our technology.

The only predators that can kill humans in comparative safety are ambush predators (salt water crocodiles) and predators more adapted to their environment than we are (sharks). The former are probably the biggest man eaters on the planet and the latter don't regard us as optimal prey, because we're not energy dense enough for them (insert obese American joke here) when compared to their preferred prey.

Re:On that note (0)

JMJimmy (2036122) | about 4 months ago | (#47087619)

And we die by poisonous snakes, spiders, scorpions, jellyfish, plants; disease carriers like rats, cockroaches, etc; And just about anything that we poke/prod/otherwise mistreat that has large claws/horns/etc or that is just large enough to pummel us to death like apes, elephants, and even kangaroos.

Humans die easily in the wild, it's our technology that keeps us safe.

Re:On that note (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47088085)

Edit: Humans not raised in the wild die easily in the wild.

Re:On that note (5, Funny)

Jmc23 (2353706) | about 4 months ago | (#47088073)

Yeah, a bunch of zombies walking around staring at the tiny screens in their hands while wearing earbuds. Real tough prey there.

The only way humans would survive is IF you took their tech away!

Re:On that note (2, Insightful)

ColdWetDog (752185) | about 4 months ago | (#47088263)

The only predators that can kill humans in comparative safety are ambush predators (salt water crocodiles) and predators more adapted to their environment than we are (sharks).

You're forgetting mosquitoes (and other insects). When you calculate the biomass of the things, the number of humans killed or injured by insects and the ecological footprint of them, they win.

"Please -- not green ..."

Re:On that note (1)

mrmeval (662166) | about 4 months ago | (#47087587)

Bring it. I have charcoal and hunger as my superpower. I am more than just a bloodmouth carnist and my stomach is a mass grave.

Re:On that note (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47087653)

Some have. Mostly single cell parasites like malaria.

Re:On that note (1)

wooferhound (546132) | about 4 months ago | (#47087685)

I like my invasive species with garlic mustard widespread in Eastern U.S. forests

Re:On that note (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47087887)

We're almost there, you can beat a monkey to death with a wooden mallet and eat its brains for about 10 grand, yes I'm serious.

blackberries in seattle? I'm Shocked. Shocked (5, Interesting)

goombah99 (560566) | about 4 months ago | (#47087385)

every year seattlites eat all the blackberries they can pick. The only thing that cut that down was when people began spraying them. But you cold not possibly get more people eating them, and that didn't dent the population in 50 years. On the otherhand no thinks of them as invasive in the sense they were not natural to live there. the pacifc northwest is berry country. Just a thorny nuisance you have to keep cut back when it encroaches walkways not unlike choking vines on trees.

Re:blackberries in seattle? I'm Shocked. Shocked (1)

hoboroadie (1726896) | about 4 months ago | (#47087453)

They are the Africanized Bees of the Rubus World. -The nastiest thorns, crowding out the friendlier native species, but the fruits are larger and more numerous.
Better than Hedera by far, but not really welcome in a balanced environment.

Re:blackberries in seattle? I'm Shocked. Shocked (5, Interesting)

demonlapin (527802) | about 4 months ago | (#47087499)

There is a solution to this problem: goats. Turn all that thorny nuisance into yummy meat and cheese.

The problem is (3, Insightful)

publiclurker (952615) | about 4 months ago | (#47087507)

You can eat all of the blackberries you can get to and the plant is still there.

Re:Himalayan Blackberries (1)

hoboroadie (1726896) | about 4 months ago | (#47087629)

Plus five insightful. [wikipedia.org] Mechanical control is difficult but effective, The canes grow, then the next year they fruit, and the next year they die. It makes a hell of a mess, and gets harder to clear as time goes by, burying, then killing anything else in the area. Like Kudzu. Spraying Glyphosate is an ugly, but popular option. I favor the Flamethrower. [wikipedia.org]

Re:Himalayan Blackberries (5, Interesting)

wezelboy (521844) | about 4 months ago | (#47088027)

I loathe the Himalayan Blackberry. The berries, while large and numerous, are bland. They store a lot of energy in their roots quickly, so once they get a foothold, they send out shoots everywhere- especially after you cut them back.

Goats are the best remedy. I had a single goat clear an acre of 8-10' tall bramble in a span of a few months. For good. They eat new shoots as soon as they appear until the blackberry roots have expended all their stored energy.

If you don't have a goat, then you must remain vigilant. I have a zero tolerance policy towards blackberries. If I see one on my property, it dies.

Re:blackberries in seattle? I'm Shocked. Shocked (5, Insightful)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | about 4 months ago | (#47087531)

Given that 'being eaten' is the plan for plants that go to considerable metabolic expense to produce attractive fruits or berries, those probably aren't good candidates for this strategy. (Admittedly, humans probably excrete more of the seeds into the water treatment plant than birds do, so they probably aren't the ideal customer; but fruits are still the deliberately expendable seed carriers, not life-critical components.)

Re:blackberries in seattle? I'm Shocked. Shocked (2, Interesting)

gl4ss (559668) | about 4 months ago | (#47087631)

50 years?

just wait another 50 years and it's a staple of the eco habitat in seattle and you'll be fined for poisoning them.

thats what I wonder about the lionfish population, if they eat them to almost extinct in the area.. and it takes 10 years to do so, will greenpeace tell you to quit eating them?

Re:blackberries in seattle? I'm Shocked. Shocked (5, Interesting)

IonOtter (629215) | about 4 months ago | (#47087641)

Blackberries can be controlled, you just have to invest a little time. Basically? When you pick, tie a small ribbon on the branch you got it from. At the end of the growing season, cut out anything with a ribbon on it, because that vine will never produce fruit again, it will only become a "stringer", which spreads to produce more vines.

This way, the plant can be controlled and kept to one area. But again, you have to invest time, which not many people have a lot of these days.

Re:blackberries in seattle? I'm Shocked. Shocked (1)

scarboni888 (1122993) | about 4 months ago | (#47088139)

Why you gotta waste time with a ribbon and coming back later?

Pick the berries then chop the shit down immediately right then and there.

Re:blackberries in seattle? I'm Shocked. Shocked (4, Funny)

freeze128 (544774) | about 4 months ago | (#47088281)

That sounds pretty complicated. I would just install a Blackberry Enterprise Server, and that would easily control all my blackberries.

Re:blackberries in seattle? I'm Shocked. Shocked (3, Funny)

Xtifr (1323) | about 4 months ago | (#47088317)

Blackberries can be controlled

Indeed! In our back yard, they are losing the battle against the ivy and bamboo! :)

Re:blackberries in seattle? I'm Shocked. Shocked (1)

owlstead (636356) | about 4 months ago | (#47088111)

You don't need to eat them all. Just turn them into jam and distribute. I'll happily eat the jam.

Invasive feral cats (1)

dbarron (286) | about 4 months ago | (#47087395)

I'm waiting for recipes....anyone ? :)

Re:Invasive feral cats (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47087489)

I'm sure your local chinese takeout has a few

Re:Invasive feral cats (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47087505)

I'm waiting for recipes....anyone ? :)

Just put the [thing] in a pot for a while. Add salt to taste.

Cooking is soooooooo easy.

Re:Invasive feral cats (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47087533)

Feed them to the pigs, eat the pigs.

Re:Invasive feral cats (1)

myowntrueself (607117) | about 4 months ago | (#47087617)

Feed them to the pigs, eat the pigs.

I wonder if that would work for cane toads?

My guess would be either the pigs would be poisoned by the cane toads or their meat would become poisonous.

Re:Invasive feral cats (2)

IonOtter (629215) | about 4 months ago | (#47087655)

The crows have figured out how to deal with cane toads.

They started out by eating them alive, through the mouth, but figured out gutting them was easier. [sciencealert.com.au]

Re:Invasive feral cats (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47087569)

Australians have come up with a novel solution to the millions of feral cats roaming the outback – eat them.
The felines are the descendants of domestic pets and kill millions of small native animals each year.

A recent Alice Springs contest featured wild cat casserole. The meat is said to taste like a cross between rabbit and, perhaps inevitably, chicken.

But wildlife campaigners have expressed their dismay that Australia’s wild cat now finds itself on the nation’s menus.

Feral cats are one of the most serious threats to Australia’s native fauna.

They eat almost anything that moves, including small marsupials, lizards, birds and spiders.

The woman behind the controversial cat stew recipe has said Australians could do their bit to help the environment by tucking into more feral pests, including pigeons and camels.

But it was a recipe for feline casserole that impressed some of the judges at an outback food competition in Alice Springs.

Preparing this unusual stew seems simple enough.

The meat should be diced and fried until it is brown. Then lemon grass is to be added along with salt and pepper and three cups of quandong, which is a sweet desert fruit.

It is recommended that the dish be left to simmer for five hours before being garnished with bush plums and mistletoe berries.

Marinated moggie was not to everyone’s taste. One of the competition judges found the meat impossibly tough and had to politely excuse herself and spit it out in a backroom.

Wild cats are considered good eating by some Aborigines, who roast the animals on an open fire.

i have eaten cat and racoon and both are good as hell

Re:Invasive feral cats (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47087679)

They eat almost anything that moves, including small marsupials, lizards, birds and spiders.

That's exactly why cats cannot cause an extinction on a continent: since cats are opportunistic hunters, they will hunt whatever they find. As the number of specimen of an edangered species goes to 0, so will the number of them killed by cats who will settle for now easier to find prey. Only specialized hunters that only hunt a few species will go out of their way to find the last few remaining specimen.

Re:Invasive feral cats (2)

ColdWetDog (752185) | about 4 months ago | (#47088297)

It is recommended that the dish be left to simmer for five hours before being garnished with bush plums and mistletoe berries.

And here is the one line answer on how to eat pretty much anything: boil the crap out of it until you render it to component molecules. Sprinkle something less offensive over it.

Ice cream for desert.

What's not to like?

Re:Invasive feral cats (2)

ShanghaiBill (739463) | about 4 months ago | (#47087623)

I'm waiting for recipes....anyone ? :)

A cat can be substituted for possum in any recipe. You can sample a wide variety of possum and other varmint dishes at West Virginia's annual Road Kill Cookoff [pccocwv.com] . You can check Wikipedia for a summary of laws and regulations [wikipedia.org] concerning collecting and consuming road kill in other states.

Or.. (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47087403)

Make their parts 'magical', like rhino horn and tiger penis.

Re:Or.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47087673)

Then what would the Burmese python have (invasive and something of an apex pedator in the glades of South Florida?

Re:Or.. (1)

timothy (36799) | about 4 months ago | (#47087935)

Could it make magic boots, purses, and car trim? I don't know whether python skin is suitable for that, but I know some snakeskin is.

I know some varieties of snake are quite tasty; perhaps python soup with pearls of barley could be served at a programming convention ...

timothy

Ailens (2)

nurb432 (527695) | about 4 months ago | (#47087405)

lets hope they dont follow that rule when we branch out, after we have used up the earth's resources.

( yes i know, that technically in time the earth will recycle everything we dont take with us, but we wont have that sort of time to wait )

Re:Ailens (3, Insightful)

iggymanz (596061) | about 4 months ago | (#47087491)

we aren't using up any resource even in the short term. Helium? most of it just vented from natural gas wells, never collected. just a nat gas engineering problem. Potassium and phosphorous? 2.5% and 0.1% of lithosphere, just an chemical engineeing problem.

Re:Ailens (1)

nurb432 (527695) | about 4 months ago | (#47087611)

Who said short term? I didn't.

Kudzu (1)

hoboroadie (1726896) | about 4 months ago | (#47087415)

I have trouble clearing Himalayan Blackberries because of folks that seem to think they can't get enough fruit from the massive patch on the other side of the fence. Fools.

Re:Kudzu (1)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | about 4 months ago | (#47087607)

I have trouble clearing Himalayan Blackberries because of folks that seem to think they can't get enough fruit from the massive patch on the other side of the fence. Fools.

M9A1-7. Just be sure to practice looking innocent before using.

Re:Kudzu (1)

ColdWetDog (752185) | about 4 months ago | (#47088315)

Thermite. Lower profile. Sterilizes the ground.

As a bonus, it's a good test to see if your local SWAT team is awake.

Kudzu for Energy (1)

Bing Tsher E (943915) | about 4 months ago | (#47087427)

Somebody should get working on using the biomass of Kudzu as an energy source. When something just won't go away, figure out a use from chopping it down.

Re:Kudzu for Energy (1)

hoboroadie (1726896) | about 4 months ago | (#47087529)

Kudzu is edible.

Re:Kudzu for Energy (2)

overshoot (39700) | about 4 months ago | (#47087605)

Never mind energy [1] -- goats love it. They can actually snarf it down faster than it grows (which is a trick, let me tell you, in the Gulf States.)

Kudzu-fed goat milk cheese is perfectly good stuff, or you can just let them feed their kids. Which not long afterward become cabritos. Nom!

[1] Long-term sustainability issue here unless you return the non-fuel sludge to the area to restore minerals. Not so much of a problem with goats excreting all over place.

Don't see why not. (2)

blackicye (760472) | about 4 months ago | (#47087429)

If they're palatable and economically harvestable, they're prime candidates for om nom nom nom.

The Chinese have a saying that roughly translates to: "If it swims, crawls or flies and its backbone faces the Sun, it's edible."

Lots of invertebrates and crustaceans that don't meet that criteria also still make it to the table. Heh.

Re:Don't see why not. (1, Insightful)

CRCulver (715279) | about 4 months ago | (#47087555)

Could you cite that this is an actual Chinese saying? I have only heard this kind of quotation repeated as a racial slur by Westerners. The Duke of Edinburgh, for instances, has been reported by several sources to have once said "If it has four legs and is not a chair, has wings and is not an aeroplane, or swims and is not a submarine, the Cantonese will eat it."

Re:Don't see why not. (1)

Atomic Fro (150394) | about 4 months ago | (#47087643)

I've worked with a few Chinese. When we've gotten comfortable with each other enough to be non-pc they've said

When westerners discover a new animal, they look at it in amazement and want to make it their pet. When Chinese discover a new animal, we try to think of the best way to cook it.

Re:Don't see why not. (3, Informative)

aevan (903814) | about 4 months ago | (#47087693)

It's a Cantonese saying "Anything that walks, swims, crawls, or flies, with its back to heaven is edible.", used in South China. It backdates to the 1800s. It's been referenced in some cookbooks (e.g. "The Chinese Kitchen" by Eileen Yin-Fei Lo), and is known/used by some Chinese, and not others.

Cue supposition based on some searching: the area traded heavily with the West during that time. Take the exotic delicacies and dishes concocted by chefs, add in a language/culture barrier,good old prejudice, and the loss of context in repetition...I can easily imagine it's a Western generalisation/mild slur that got repeated and adopted and over time became adopted as a regional motto of sorts (i.e. isn't 'known' in the Mandarin areas, just the Cantonese south).

Could be waaay off though.

Re:Don't see why not. (2)

sexconker (1179573) | about 4 months ago | (#47087925)

But could you cite a single species that falsifies the statement?

I'd go farther. Eat endangered species (4, Interesting)

Karmashock (2415832) | about 4 months ago | (#47087451)

Not in the wild but cultivated.

The cow, the chicken, the pig... these animals have no natural habitat anymore really... yet are in no danger of dying of. Neither for that matter is the domesticated dog or the house cat or the gold fish.

All small endangered animals can be bred as pets or food. By all means, protect their habitat in the wild but that is no guarantee that they will survive as a species. Maintain them as pets or food in our society though and they'll live as long as we continue to do that.

As for large animals... encourage farmers to take care of a couple. Seriously, a cattle rancher could take in a few rhinos. Have a special pen for them. Make the whole thing tax deductible until there's some way to recoup the cost. These people breed BILLIONS of animals in captivity. We could do the same with rhinos, elephants, etc.

Right now one of the things hurting these species is that its very hard to legally own them.

An animal that belongs to no one will not be protected. We've seen this in Africa where the wild animals are prey for poachers. However, if you give the animals to the local villages and make the animal's survival the villager's responsibility they suddenly stop getting eaten or killed for their ivory.

This is the solution.

Anything else will likely harm these species more, waste time, waste money, and accomplish very little.

Re:I'd go farther. Eat endangered species (1)

overshoot (39700) | about 4 months ago | (#47087691)

The cow, the chicken, the pig... these animals have no natural habitat anymore really

I'll grant you chickens. As for the other two -- you've obviously never visited Texas.

Re:I'd go farther. Eat endangered species (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47087859)

THIS SO MUCH.

I have no idea why other animals aren't being bred like mad, and specifically to also add some variety to our plate.
It is less of a problem in quite a few countries, but in so many places in the west, there are the all too common meats like turkey, chicken, beef, pork and such, but nothing really exotic.

An odd couple of animals and some initial help to get it kickstarted and it could really improve numbers of so many species.
Keep tax deductions on it until it grows to secondary groups through trade, maybe even a 3rd generation, bam, enjoy your considerably larger numbers of species AND a new food source.
Some animals aren't farmed for very specific reasons, such as them being too hard to farm, but the biggest reason was they weren't efficient to farm, which was only a legacy reason because it was a problem back in the stupid ages when we never had technology to help, plentiful food sources to feed and ways to keep things healthy. These are mostly non-issues now, other than another average day managing the finances.
It COULD be done very easily these days. It is entirely feasible to farm so many species out there that were abandoned for the easy ones.

Endangered, lesser endangered species and generally desirable species could all go in to this, in that order of course.

Re:I'd go farther. Eat endangered species (2)

Karmashock (2415832) | about 4 months ago | (#47087891)

We've already done it to great success with the buffalo. They are commercially bred, butchered, and sold around the US. We have a few herds around the country that are each individually able to sustain the species indefinitely.

Re:I'd go farther. Eat endangered species (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47088047)

We've already done it to great success with the buffalo. They are commercially bred, butchered, and sold around the US. We have a few herds around the country that are each individually able to sustain the species indefinitely.

Are you refering to the Bison? I haven't seen many buffalo in America.

The invasive species have a name, Mexicans. (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47087455)

and they have a higher fat content than Americans according to recent news. Better use a meatloaf pan or foil with an open grill.

Every species was an invasive species at one time. (2)

Daniel Dvorkin (106857) | about 4 months ago | (#47087479)

So in that sense this is the most elegant natural solution.

Re:Every species was an invasive species at one ti (2)

jklovanc (1603149) | about 4 months ago | (#47087863)

The difference being that natural selection is a slow process. What people are doing is causing a much faster change in the ecosystem by moving species around to places they did not evolve in. What we are doing is not a natural process.

Well... if this were adopted worldwide... (-1, Flamebait)

Essequemodeia (1030028) | about 4 months ago | (#47087493)

..white people would have been extinct centuries ago.

Nutria (4, Informative)

spudnic (32107) | about 4 months ago | (#47087511)

They tried this a couple of decades ago in South Louisiana with the nutria. It turns out people weren't waiting in line to eat real life ROUSes. (Rodents Of Unusual Size)

Now the state offers a $5 bounty [nutria.com] per nutria tail turned in.

Kudzu (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47087855)

And there's Kudzu where I live. It's not very tasty.

It was introduced here in the South East for erosion control by the farmers.

Unfortunately, it chokes off trees and other indigenous plants.

And then there are the asshats who buy exotic creatures like pythons and release them into the wild when they get too big.

Re:Kudzu (1)

reboot246 (623534) | about 4 months ago | (#47088269)

Kudzu is very tasty. You must not be cooking it right. Use only the tender young leaves and remember to put some fat in the pot when you boil them.

The nice thing is that tomorrow you'll have a brand new batch of tender young leaves to eat.

Driving a species to extinction (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47087513)

If you can keep the harvest local relatively, you can replentish this as a source of food and nutrition. Introducing these invasive species to a global market, you will destroy the source.

blackberry? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47087515)

isn't that a smartphone or PDA? http://us.blackberry.com/

I guess there are a lot of blackberries at the high tech campuses in and around Seattle.

Needs salsa? (-1)

eyepeepackets (33477) | about 4 months ago | (#47087539)

I hear Mexicans taste terrible and Hondurans are even worse: Not a good idea.

at one time... (1)

Connie_Lingus (317691) | about 4 months ago | (#47087583)

...every species was an "invasive" species to the established ones in the particular eco-system.

sure..of course eat them...uhh that's how things work on mudball Earth.

Learn from the felines. (1)

berchca (414155) | about 4 months ago | (#47087699)

This is certainly how my cat handles invasive species...

Difficult. (1)

nospam007 (722110) | about 4 months ago | (#47087747)

Eating blackberries won't dent the proliferation, especially not if you poop in the forest.

Apparently bears do it too, but nobody ever saw them doing it.

Japanese Knotweed f'rinstance... (2)

jpellino (202698) | about 4 months ago | (#47087783)

The typical muni approach is to mow it down - this actually promotes spread.
Knotweed produces an amazing mono-floral honey. It compares to buckwheat honey and black sage honey.
It gets a PR spin as "bamboo honey".
Haven't had it as a veggie yet, but it gets some good reviews.

Isn't that why the invasive species was introduced (1)

joeflies (529536) | about 4 months ago | (#47087785)

now I don't have a complete case history for all invasive species but I do recall reading that in one case the fish that was introduced was from the local population wanting to eat a fish that was non-native and otherwise unavailable, so they imported the live fish into the local region

Do you mean non-whites? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47087817)

Since they certainly are 'invasive species' in WHITE countries. Still, it's the AFRICANS who were cannibals, not white people. And the scum from Papua New Guinea - what a bunch of geniuses they are...

(Cue knee jerk screams of the 'magic word' - 'racist', from brainwashed cretins...)

Garlic Mustard, much beyond the east (2)

damn_registrars (1103043) | about 4 months ago | (#47087837)

That weed is at least as far west as the central plains states, and it is spreading quickly. Unless we can train some indigenous critters to start eating it our forests are in danger from what it does to the soil. Even though it is rather tasty we can't possibly eradicate it ourselves just by pulling and/or eating it.

Hell, no! (1)

K. S. Kyosuke (729550) | about 4 months ago | (#47087911)

I'm not intent on eating members of the species Arion vulgaris any time soon.

Of course we should (1)

digitalhermit (113459) | about 4 months ago | (#47087919)

I live in South Florida. Lionfish is available with just a short drive down to the keys. It has a good taste and even better, no guilt whatsoever. I think it's just natural that we should eat them. BTW, Florida lobster down this way (they call them crawfish up in the Northeast :/ ) were once so plentiful that it was given to prisoners. If it's edible, someone will find a way to eat them.

Too bad about kudzu.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47087949)

A few parts of kudzu are edible, but the *taste* is like sucking spinach flavored snot.

Yes, but ... (1)

Rainsoaked (97334) | about 4 months ago | (#47087959)

Only if they are edible.

Xenophobic? (1)

tomk12 (649586) | about 4 months ago | (#47088005)

Is it only me who thinks that all this talk about "invasive species" is fundamentally xenophobic and recist?

How about evangelical Christians? (4, Funny)

AndyKron (937105) | about 4 months ago | (#47088067)

Can we eat evangelical Christians? They're pretty invasive.

Oh, wow! (1)

cascadingstylesheet (140919) | about 4 months ago | (#47088121)

You mean, treating environmental issues pragmatically instead of as a new religion works better? Who knew?

Feral pig is excellent, but takes getting used to. (2)

hey! (33014) | about 4 months ago | (#47088245)

Here in Boston we don't have a feral pig problem, but we do have gourmet butcher shops that sell game and exotic meat. I've tried feral pig and it's good, but intense -- intense enough that I wasn't sure I liked it at first. The best way I can describe it is "extremely piggy".

I'll explain. Imagine on one hand a cooked chicken breast. Imagine on the other hand a regular, commercial pork chop. There's a clear difference between the two, but it's ... subtle. Now imagine a place far beyond the other hand, where the difference is as subtle as being whacked in the face with a shovel. In an era where pork is marketed as "the other whtie meat" the distinctive flavor of pork has been toned down to the point where nobody will be offended, but feral pig is unabashedly swine-y. Not everyone will like it. By *I* do.

According to the article feral pigs reproduce so successfully in many places that it would be impossible to put a dent in the populations through hunting, but I choose to call that "sustainable". Trying to eat these animals into oblivion (if you can stomach them) is an environmental "can't lose", especially if you count the environmental cost of industrial scale hog farming. I'm very happy to pay some guy from Texas to remove the problem from his ranch and send it up here so I can put it on my plate.

Just wait a few hundred years (3, Insightful)

lowkster (546516) | about 4 months ago | (#47088251)

Honey bees are an invasive species. They were brought to the Americas in the 1600's. Now people are panicking about colony collapse and trying to save this invasive species. I thought that is how nature works, life seeks out new and better environments to grow in. Does it matter if a bee is blown across the ocean by a hurricane or carried over by a Spaniard? Or if a mussel makes to the great lakes on the bottom of a tanker or on a piece of drift wood?

Give Me More (3, Interesting)

Jim Sadler (3430529) | about 4 months ago | (#47088261)

Florida has a lovely python population and they can be eaten or made into boots. We have tilapia in abundance. We have the the snake head fish from the orient as well as peacock and rainbow bass and also some species of piranha. I welcome all of these invaders. We also have armadillos and iguanas both of which also are good eating. All in all i want more. I wish the jumping silver carp as well as the big head carp would invade Florida big time. Poison toads are killing a few pets but other that and one nasty, African snail that can actually eat the plaster off your exterior walls i tend to love the exotics. They are fun to catch and some get really large. And we don't even want to get into the good things that Kudzu vine can do if properly used. We have invasive bamboos which are also wonderful. Some items seen to be a curse tend to become valued. The dreaded zebra mussel in the Great Lakes has become a great food source for sturgeon and the water is cleaner for having them. Lampreys were cursed and considered an emergency and now people cook and eat lampreys. Frankly i think the fight against most invasive species simply creates jobs for public employees.

Won't work everywhere (1)

sir-gold (949031) | about 4 months ago | (#47088289)

The majority of invasive species in Minnesota (other than fish) are pretty much inedible, because they were brought here by accident (emerald ash borer) or as decoration (eurasian water milfoil, buckthorn, etc), and were never intended to be a food source

YES! 74 (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47088379)

Bureaucratic and developwment 8odels and sling or table
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