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Study: Stop Being So Cynical, You Could Give Yourself Dementia

timothy posted about 5 months ago | from the yeah-right-grandma dept.

Medicine 153

concertina226 (2447056) writes "Scientists from the University of Eastern Finland have found that people who have high levels of cynical distrust are three times as likely to suffer from dementia in later life, than those who have more faith in other people. Their study is the first of its kind to look at the relationship between cynicism and dementia. Entitled: 'Late-life cynical distrust, risk of incident dementia, and mortality in a population-based cohort', it is published in the latest issue of the journal Neurology. Over a period of eight years, the researchers studied 1,499 people, who all had an average age of 71. The participants were given tests for dementia and a questionnaire to measure their level of cynicism, based on the Cook-Medley Scale."

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There's a relationship... (5, Insightful)

Morphine007 (207082) | about 5 months ago | (#47118971)

... but is it cause and effect? Or effect and effect? Could the very high levels of cynical distrust be a result of some malady that eventually causes the dementia?

Re:There's a relationship... (1)

AmazingRuss (555076) | about 5 months ago | (#47119115)

It's probably because the robots stole their medicine.

Re:There's a relationship... (1)

SpankiMonki (3493987) | about 5 months ago | (#47119781)

Look, everyone knows robots eat old people's medicine for fuel. If they didn't have an Old Glory plan, that's their problem.

Re:There's a relationship... (2)

Bite The Pillow (3087109) | about 5 months ago | (#47119687)

The study ends with "more research needed", so it really hasn't proven anything, let alone cause and effect.

Of course, that doesn't prevent people from mentioning correlation and causation to feel smarter. Obviously the headline is from the article author, and has nothing to do with the study. Just as obviously, "could" is used precisely because the link is only demonstrated, not understood.

That said, cynical people rarely exercise their brains to understand the world, and that lack of use mirrors other pathways to dementia. A little critical thinking every day is good for you, certainly. Jumping to the obvious "cos corporate interests" or "duh NSA" is no brain work at all.

Pay attention to the cynical responses here and elsewhere, and it will make sense shortly. Of course, making sense does not also make something true. But it is a step better than being written off as correlation and therefore unworthy of news or discussion.

Re:There's a relationship... (0)

CanHasDIY (1672858) | about 5 months ago | (#47119791)

That said, cynical people rarely exercise their brains to understand the world,

Care to expound on that? Because it seems dubious - from what I can tell, even Einstein was a fairly cynical dude:

“Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity; and I'm not sure about the universe.” [goodreads.com]

Re:There's a relationship... (4, Interesting)

uncqual (836337) | about 5 months ago | (#47120163)

You are confusing being "cynical" with having a "closed mind".

I suspect cynical people likely think things through more than those who are very trusting.

Those that are very trusting don't see a need to question and think deeply about things other people say, do, or offer (which is why they end up falling for various scams) until after they get screwed and then, in my experience, they don't learn much from it. Cynics, on the other hand, don't accept something to be true just because someone said it and therefore have to evaluate and think about most everything they hear -- making them think and exercise their brains. Also, when they get screwed in spite of their due caution, they tend to think back as to what they missed about the situation that would have prevented them from getting into it.

Of course, you probably shouldn't trust my insight on this as, being a cynic, I am probably biased (but only cynics will understand that or care about that).

Re:There's a relationship... (2)

Grishnakh (216268) | about 5 months ago | (#47120945)

Non-cynical people are also known as "gullible".

They probably believe silly things like "the US government is the 'good guys'", "the police are good guys with just a few bad apples and don't violate peoples' rights on a regular basis", "corporations are run by good people who want to improve society", etc.

Re:There's a relationship... (1)

jelIomizer (3670957) | about 5 months ago | (#47120855)

That said, cynical people rarely exercise their brains to understand the world

What makes you think so? People often call me cynical, but really, I just take history and logic into account. When I decide if it would be a good idea for the government to have a certain power, I recall some history to see if anything similar was abused in the past, or if the power would be easily abused.

It seems people often accuse people who use their brains of being "cynical."

Jumping to the obvious "cos corporate interests" or "duh NSA" is no brain work at all.

And yet, for some things, that is probably the answer.

Re:There's a relationship... (1)

Austerity Empowers (669817) | about 5 months ago | (#47119799)

Think of all the governments, corporations and rich people that'd profit from THIS!

Re:There's a relationship... (4, Insightful)

bluegutang (2814641) | about 5 months ago | (#47119919)

I'd guess that cynical or distrustful people end up with lesser social connections to other people, a factor which has already been linked [alz.org] to dementia.

Re:There's a relationship... (3, Funny)

XARG (188455) | about 5 months ago | (#47119923)

... but is it cause and effect? Or effect and effect? Could the very high levels of cynical distrust be a result of some malady that eventually causes the dementia?

You have just increased your dementia chances.

Re:There's a relationship... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47120237)

just remember, it's not really dementia if the world has gone crazy.

Re:There's a relationship... (1)

Mr D from 63 (3395377) | about 5 months ago | (#47120685)

No, there is no cause and effect relationship determined. It seems likely to me that the same condition that predisposes one to mental stresses/cynicism also could impact overall health.

In order to demonstrate cause and effect, they would need a control group of cynics, half of which somehow changed their outlook to a positive/trusting one, the other half remaining cynics, and then see if results differ. I somehow doubt that can be pulled off.

Re:There's a relationship... (1)

DigiShaman (671371) | about 5 months ago | (#47120787)

The brain suffers atrophy when not exercised. So when a person becomes cynical, they become pessimistic and and eventually apathetic. I believe that apathy is what causes atrophy of the brain. Just let go... Nothing else matters.

Re:There's a relationship... (1)

Grishnakh (216268) | about 5 months ago | (#47120963)

Apathy is what happens when the cynical person gets old enough to realize they have no power to change things for the better. The root of the problem is the non-cynical people who support the corruption in society, causing the cynical people to be cynical in the first place and eventually give up.

Re:There's a relationship... (1)

matbury (3458347) | about 5 months ago | (#47120929)

...and the divorce rate in Maine correlates directly with margarine consumption, and the number of people who drowned by falling into a swimming pool correlated with the number of films Nicholas Cage appeared in, etc.

Correlation isn't causation: http://www.fastcodesign.com/30... [fastcodesign.com]

Re:There's a relationship... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47121053)

Probably effect and effect if the paranoid SlashDerps are any indication. It's clear that many people here have cognitive difficulties leading to severe mistrust of their own elected officials.

This is also seen in Conservatives who share the same paranoia regarding government, and say all kinds of idiotic things. It's all poor-quality brains.

Re:There's a relationship... (2)

hey! (33014) | about 5 months ago | (#47121179)

Well, here's one possible effect and cause scenario that occurred to me.

Start with a healthy person who has a generally positive view of humanity. That doesn't mean he believes every human is good and honest; he relies on his critical thinking to know when an offer is too good to be true and his social perception to sense when someone is trying to put one over on him.

Now give him some brain damage so that his critical thinking and social perception don't work so well any longer. How does he react? He falls back on simple, generalized rules. Since he can no longer tell a dishonest man or scheme from an honest one, he takes the default position that everyone and everything is dishonest.

You can see this at operation in the country. I've lived over fifty years in this country and cynicism is at an all-time high. But strangely enough, so is credulity. We've become a nation of cynical suckers.

Pointless (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47118977)

Read the actual study. It's a possible correlation (of a very few people). There is no clear indication of causation.

Correlation is not causation (1, Insightful)

gweihir (88907) | about 5 months ago | (#47118995)

Seems these people and the OP have already given themselves stupidity...

Re:Correlation is not causation (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47119063)

Arghhh. I have this news story all over my facebook and I wrote the same thing. What if cynicism is just an early warning sign of dementia? It doesn't mean if you decrease cynicism that you decrease dementia. (Of course that COULD be true, but we'd need a controlled study to prove that.)

Re:Correlation is not causation (4, Insightful)

nospam007 (722110) | about 5 months ago | (#47119661)

"What if cynicism is just an early warning sign of dementia?"

We used to call it a cranky old fart.

Re:Correlation is not causation (2, Informative)

ShanghaiBill (739463) | about 5 months ago | (#47119303)

Seems these people and the OP have already given themselves stupidity...

To be fair, the causation implied by the idiotic headline in both the summary, and TFA, did not come from the study [neurology.org] . The authors were very careful to say that the effects were only "associated".

Re:Correlation is not causation (1)

CanHasDIY (1672858) | about 5 months ago | (#47119803)

Seems these people and the OP have already given themselves stupidity...

To be fair, the causation implied by the idiotic headline in both the summary, and TFA, did not come from the study [neurology.org] . The authors were very careful to say that the effects were only "associated".

Presumably, the same way owning a car and getting audited by the IRS are "associated."

Self fulfilling prophecy (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47119007)

Reading about bogus 'studies' like this makes me more cynical than ever, thus giving me dementia.

Re:Self fulfilling prophecy (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47121411)

CHEER UP FFS!

Ill just take this with a pinch of salt (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47119023)

As having not read TFA Ive no idea what they are trying to sell me

Re:Ill just take this with a pinch of salt (1)

maxwell demon (590494) | about 5 months ago | (#47120043)

Probably green jelly beans. [xkcd.com]

That's just what they want you to think... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47119031)

...those sneaky bastards.

That explains Fox News' audience (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47119055)

Damned if you do, damned if you don't in my opinion.

I find that hard to believe... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47119059)

First, wait what was I talking about?

Meh (5, Funny)

AthanasiusKircher (1333179) | about 5 months ago | (#47119097)

Just about all studies are crap anyway. Why would this one be any different?

Re:Meh (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47119201)

haa haa, funny :)

Re:Meh (1)

AnontheDestroyer (3500983) | about 5 months ago | (#47119549)

So is your response. So are all these responses! So is your response.

90% of everything is crap. This law is recursive. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47120833)

90% of everything is crap. This law is recursive.

Or maybe... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47119117)

... all those cynical bastards were faking dementia just to fuck with the study.

Why? (1)

andywest (1722392) | about 5 months ago | (#47119121)

Why should one not be cynical? The human race has never given cause for one to be otherwise. Besides, cynicism is not necessarily related to hostility or anger, which makes the Cook-Medley test nonsensical.

Unless, of course, that the study calls 'cynicism' is not cynicism at all.

Re:Why? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47119213)

Besides, cynicism is not necessarily related to hostility or anger, which makes the Cook-Medley test nonsensical.

It's related to stupidity, though. If you look at smart guys like Linus Torvalds or John Carmack, they are quite wide-eyed optimists with a smile on their face. General cynicism is not necessary for great things to happen.

Re:Why? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47119373)

Evidence indicates it's the other way 'round: cynicism is related to intelligence. The higher the IQ, the higher the rate of depression due to "human nature"; contemplating and understanding of what humans are, and how we ultimately "work", sets off the chain-reaction leading to depression. It appears to me that 'cynicism' and 'depression related to existential views' would be the same--or at least closely related--mechanisms.

Re:Why? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47119493)

Hmm, interesting. Maybe I was too quick with my comment. I certainly can see that side to it, too.

Re:Why? (1)

CanHasDIY (1672858) | about 5 months ago | (#47119825)

You should have claimed the comment was satire, because for satire it's pretty good.

Now knowing that you were not being satirical, I have to wonder about your logical process... Do you make a habit of saying stuff about topics you're completely ignorant of? To wit, anyone who's heard anything Torvalds has said publicly would know that he's clearly a very cynical person.

Re:Why? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47119227)

I agree. Humans are shitty evil little things. I don't trust them one bit. I don't even talk to them anymore. At least, not in person.

Re:Why? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47120263)

But you talk to your cats and plants every day. That would explain your vocabulary.

Re:Why? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47120601)

Hey, loneliness will do that to you. It's not like I don't have a deep desire for human interaction; rather, I know where it leads, and that it is ultimately not worth it.

Re:Why? (1)

xevioso (598654) | about 5 months ago | (#47121435)

But it is bad for you. Loneliness, especially in older adults, has been shown to have negative health impacts.

Re:Why? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47119253)

That's the saddest thing I've ever heard.

Re:Why? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47119391)

Smarmy fuck.

Re:Why? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47119563)

Do you know what 'smarmy' means?

Re:Why? (1)

xevioso (598654) | about 5 months ago | (#47121481)

I believe it is an adjective describing how jelly or marmalade feels on bread?

"I accidentally misplaced my hand while making a peanut-butter and jelly sandwich and now it feels all smarmy."

Re:Why? (2)

Bite The Pillow (3087109) | about 5 months ago | (#47119823)

A prejudice towards cynicism, that is pre judgement before the facts are known, robs you of the opportunity to process and analyze new info. If every fact were dismissed as "selfish bastards", you would be in the same pattern of disuse as anyone else on the path to dementia.

Controlling for various thing means that of the people who use their brain in similar ways, cynics who process less information developed more symptoms of disuse.

Dismissing these results without consideration may have been humor, but it matches the dismissive cynic well enough that the replies and moderation do not currently recognize it as such, which is why it deserves a response.

Re:Why? (1)

hoboroadie (1726896) | about 5 months ago | (#47119827)

I don't have cynical distrust, I have cynical disdain. I believe incompetence explains more of the problems that we have than actual malignant evil. That's not to say that Human Society and the Entire World is not being ruined by them, but its only a very few doing the real harm.

Meanwhile... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47119175)

Those who are gullible and trusting continue to be exploited and abused by their fellow man. People aren't born cynical. They've had their trust betrayed repeatedly and, quite rationally, conclude that humans cannot be trusted.

Meanwhile... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47120281)

You know you are a dip-ship when you call people 'humans'. Like that distinction needs to be made, ever. Unless you are comparing humans to non-humans (in sci-fi) like robots.

Watch less TV, talk to more PEOPLE.

Re: Meanwhile... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47120731)

You know what's REALLY stupid? Caring why somebody uses a particular word when the word used is clear and unambiguous and everybody else understands what's being said.

That, and crafting a narrative around why someone chooses a word--one that of course reinforces your smug feeling of superiority for apparently being a 'people person'.

BS (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47119265)

I don't believe it.

Or ... (4, Funny)

gstoddart (321705) | about 5 months ago | (#47119313)

Maybe people who blindly trust everyone never get identified as having dementia, because they just go along with everything you say?

Now get off my lampshade!

Re:Or ... (2)

CanHasDIY (1672858) | about 5 months ago | (#47119835)

Maybe people who blindly trust everyone never get identified as having dementia, because they just go along with everything you say?

Yea, OK, that sounds good...

Average age? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47119337)

How come "all had an average age of 71" ? What's your average age? Is it different from mine?

Re:Average age? (1)

maxwell demon (590494) | about 5 months ago | (#47120101)

My average age is exactly half of my actual age. I'm speaking about the time average, of course.

Re:Average age? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47120231)

"All had an average age" is correct, because "average age" is a property of the group "All". It would be incorrect to say "each had an average age" because that would be referring to individuals having a property only applicable to a group.

alcohol and caffeine? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47119347)

Did they take into account the relative levels of alcohol and caffeine consumption between the two groups into account?

Nothing reduces cynicism like sitting back and sipping a good single malt scotch.

Re:alcohol and caffeine? (1)

HornWumpus (783565) | about 5 months ago | (#47119999)

Fins drink like fish, this is an important factor left out.

This is only Part 1 of the study (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47119453)

Part 1 is that cynicism causes dementia.

The second part of the study, to be released next month is that they have developed a new variety of loganberry (available for a very reasonable price) which will significantly extend life expectancy, and improve performance in the bedroom.

Wait (3, Interesting)

xdor (1218206) | about 5 months ago | (#47119543)

So critical thinking leads to dementia?

Or do we notice more when people with high mental function lose it than those who never had good thinking skills in the first place?

Re:Wait (3, Informative)

emacs_abuser (140283) | about 5 months ago | (#47119579)

Critical thinking is not the same thing as being cynical.
You can be skeptical without being cynical.

Re:Wait (4, Funny)

gstoddart (321705) | about 5 months ago | (#47119649)

You can be skeptical without being cynical.

I doubt it. :-P

Re:Wait (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47120449)

Being skeptic, you will realize you can't get drunk only with water, unlike all the rest of trusting flock.

Re:Wait (1)

gstoddart (321705) | about 5 months ago | (#47119613)

So critical thinking leads to dementia?

Well, see, you use up all of your brain's lifespan by using it too much.

So by the time you get older, your brain is all worn out.

By not applying critical thinking, you save up your brain for later in life. ;-)

(NOTE: this is sarcasm for those of you who can't think critically)

Re:Wait (1)

maxwell demon (590494) | about 5 months ago | (#47120139)

(NOTE: this is sarcasm for those of you who can't think critically)

The smiley at the end already said so. But of course this is Slashdot, so stating it twice may be appropriate. ;-)

Re:Wait (1)

LWATCDR (28044) | about 5 months ago | (#47119821)

You keep using that word but I do not think you know what it means.

Critical Thinking == "You should try this water it has smaller molecules so it hydrates you faster!". Ummmm No it doesn't smaller molecules and no it will not.

Cynical == most what people post in the comments of slashdot. It is almost and example of critical thinking or higher mental functioning.

Stupid == We need solar and wind to reduce our dependance on foreign oil.

Re:Wait (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47119939)

We DO need to reduce our dependance on foreign oil, or any oil really.

Re:Wait (1)

LWATCDR (28044) | about 5 months ago | (#47120179)

And thankyou for playing
1. I never said we shouldn't reduce our use of oil.
2. Only 3% of all electricity in the US is generated by using oil. Please check for yourself. Just Google US electrical power by source.
3. Solar and wind are used to make electricity. Which is as shown above not really generated with oil.
4. You assume that I am anti solar and or wind. I am not but they do not replace oil.
5. You might try to justify your statement by saying that we could use electric cars... Well yes but again that would reduce our use of oil but where the electricity comes from is the not cause for the reduction in the use of foreign oil. Unless people start building oil fired plants to make the power for cars which would be dumb with all the natural gas we have.
6. You assume that Solar and Wind advocates will not lie to you... If they say that Solar and Wind will reduce our dependence on foreign oil it is a lie.
7. You assumed you knew the truth and were not willing to question it.... And I bet you pride yourself on being a skeptic and critical thinker...

A conversation is not a syllogism. (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47120757)

A conversation, even online, is not a syllogism.

Conversation requires context and shared assumptions. Of course those are often not shared, not fully understood, there can be willful disagreement, misunderstandings, and simple sloppiness.

All of this activates the typical Slashdot amateur logicians and philosophers who set out to 'prove' the other person is ignorant, stupid, evil or all of those. A pointless exercise repeated ad nauseum.

Of course the statement you posted is 'stupid'. (technically it simply not a logically valid argument.) It is trivially 'stupid' because the word 'need', in a logical sense, allows any alternate possibility. (A stealth version of affirming the consequent.) We could reduce our dependence on foreign oil by killing 90% of the population. Oil dependence - problem solved. Oops! New problems.

TLDR: It's all in the assumptions. And yours are wrong.

Further reading: GEB, to see how even syllogisms fall apart or spiral out of control without SOME shared context and assumptions.

Re:Wait (1)

maxwell demon (590494) | about 5 months ago | (#47120155)

Stupid == We need solar and wind to reduce our dependance on foreign oil.

No, equalling that statement with "stupid" is stupid.

Re:Wait (1)

LWATCDR (28044) | about 5 months ago | (#47120575)

And thank you for playing.
Less than 1% of the electricity generated in the US is from oil. Solar and Wind only generate electricity.
So well under 1% of all oil is used to generate electrical power. It was less the 2% of all oil in 2004 and has gone down to under 1% of the oil used in the US.

http://www.eia.gov/tools/faqs/... [eia.gov]

And you just flunked your skeptic and critical thinking test.
1. You assumed you knew the truth.
2. You failed to question the truth.
3. spouted off without doing any research.
4. You trusted without question those that told you that Solar and Wind would reduce our dependence on foreign oil when it is less than 1% of our oil use.
5. I am willing to bet that you are proud of your critical thinking skills and consider yourself an enlightened skeptic yet you showed none of those skills.

BTW Solar and Wind compete more with coal which is a good thing.

I don't trust the authors of this article (4, Funny)

freezin fat guy (713417) | about 5 months ago | (#47119665)

What's their angle?

Re:I don't trust the authors of this article (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47120075)

What's their angle?

Unfortunately, they have completely forgotten.

Re:I don't trust the authors of this article (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47120187)

What's their angle?

Apparently more than 90 degrees.

Re:I don't trust the authors of this article (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47121227)

Scare their employers critics?

the original cook-medley test (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47119673)

http://www.cardia.dopm.uab.edu/study-information/nhlbi-data-repository-data/cardia-documentation/year-05-exam-3

Quick! sombody tell Alex Jones! (2)

FudRucker (866063) | about 5 months ago | (#47119733)

that guy blathers extremely cynical conspiracy theories 24/7/365 and all those poor fools stupid enough to listen are doomed to dementia

Well.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47119913)

I'm fucked.

The chicken and the egg? (2)

Rambo Tribble (1273454) | about 5 months ago | (#47119943)

I might posit that cynicism is a coping mechanism for the dementia-impaired.

To prevent fire, burn everything ahead of time (4, Funny)

Atrox666 (957601) | about 5 months ago | (#47120079)

If you're optimistic in this world you are already delusional so how would they tell if you're suffering from dementia?

Re:To prevent fire, burn everything ahead of time (1)

DocSavage64109 (799754) | about 5 months ago | (#47120907)

That's a very good comment, though some people seem to live charmed lives, so it's understandable that they would be optimistic.

Eastern Finland have found that .. (1)

Chrisq (894406) | about 5 months ago | (#47120125)

Eastern Finland have found that people who have high levels of cynical distrust are three times as likely to suffer from dementia

But can you trust the Finns?

Re: Eastern Finland have found that .. (2)

GungaDan (195739) | about 5 months ago | (#47120943)

Huck, maybe, but definitely not his pap.

It Never Fails . . . (1)

hduff (570443) | about 5 months ago | (#47120355)

What is exercised the most becomes the strongest.

Re:It Never Fails . . . (2)

cellocgw (617879) | about 5 months ago | (#47120645)

What is exercised the most becomes the strongest.

Sadly, about half the population has learned they have one muscle which never gets stronger (or bigger) no matter how much they exercise it.

OK, I'll stop with the Jr. High School humor.

Things which may be confounded with cynicism (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47120421)

1. Stress
2. Alcohol/Drug Use
3. Depression
4. Nutrition/Excercise

I don't need to worry about dementia later in life (1)

Joey Vegetables (686525) | about 5 months ago | (#47120471)

... I'm pretty demented now!

Really? (2)

Simulant (528590) | about 5 months ago | (#47120577)

Tell you what... If you stopping making up misleading headlines I'll try and not be so cynical about them.

Maybe I'm Just Cynical ... (2)

ilparatzo (3627897) | about 5 months ago | (#47120595)

I might just be cynical [har har har], but there is something about a group saying "hey, if you don't just trust what people are telling you, you will one day become crazy". I would rather end up a little crazy in my later life than become too optimistic. A little bit of cynicism keeps you from being taken advantage of too much.

It's like the government funding a study that finds that if you question what the government says or does, you're more likely to end up with Alzheimers. So you better stop complaining and believe everything we say.

Just keep drinking the Kool-Aid... (4, Funny)

mschaffer (97223) | about 5 months ago | (#47120661)

Just keep drinking the Kool-Aid. Apparently they put anti-dementia meds in it.

Fuck you you worthless scum (1)

gelfling (6534) | about 5 months ago | (#47120683)

Keep your hippy happy bullshit to yourself. Seriously, fucking die screaming.

Not trustworthy... (1)

Zalbik (308903) | about 5 months ago | (#47120687)

Call my cynical, but I don't trust any studies from the University of Eastern...refrigerator!

Whelp... (1)

ilsaloving (1534307) | about 5 months ago | (#47120967)

I'm screwed.

Avoiding dementia drives me to dementia (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47121091)

So, let me get this straight.

1. I don't want dementia
2. So, according to some article somewhere (SAS), I should engage in reading, writing, and other various activities to keep my mind active (See the "Keeping the mind active to protect from Alzheimer's and dementia" on http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/263769.php, for example)
3. So, I read. I mix my reading up with fiction, quasi-fiction, and scientifically based nonfiction. It doesn't matter very much what it is I read, it pretty much all suggests that everybody is just doing what's best for themselves. Try it yourself. Try to think about what motivates any person you've ever met. I always find they have some personal reason driving them, whether it's immediately apparent to everyone or hard for they themselves to even determine.
4. Therefore, thanks to my quest to prevent dementia, I've become cynical.
5. Then, I happen upon this article (in my quest to keep my mind reading so I don't get dementia): http://www.ibtimes.co.uk/study-stop-being-so-cynical-you-could-give-yourself-dementia-1450422. Let me see which social networking sites I should share this article with so all my friends can come visit this site. Oh, look, the article has no less than 9 ads embedded on the single page - some of which seem to be very related to recent Google searches I've performed. Hmm, is someone trying to make a buck off me by summing up one single scientific study which was just published yesterday? Wait, that is just me being cynical.
6. Then, I figure it all out. Cynicism does, in fact, lead to dementia. Dementia is my mind's way of telling me, "That's it. I give up. Everything really is shit. You do what you want, but I'm shutting down. Good luck trying to figure anything out in this batshit crazy world, jackass."
7. Then I forget everything and slowly die the same miserable death I was trying to avoid in the first place. Go figure. No wonder I'm so cynical...

I'll just book my reservation at the nursing home now. Why wait until I'm 71?

I am a cynical idealist (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47121201)

What do you think about that?

The War Nerd's take (1)

drdrgivemethenews (1525877) | about 5 months ago | (#47121245)

People are always telling me I'm "cynical", whatever that means. I mean, either you're right or you're wrong; and if you're right, how is that "cynical"?
                -- Gary Brecher, the War Nerd

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