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Sony Winding Down the PSP

Soulskill posted about 6 months ago | from the most-successful-also-ran dept.

Portables (Games) 85

Linnen writes "Sony has started the process of phasing out its PSP handheld console. From The Guardian: 'Shipments to the U.S. ended this year, and they are closing in Japan soon. European stores will see their last arrivals toward Christmas. Launched in Japan in December 2004, it is almost 10 years old – not a bad achievement for a handheld that was almost written off early in its lifespan. ... The console struggled with high piracy levels of its titles, which meant the likes of EA, Activision and Ubisoft were reticent about committing to major development projects. However, the ease with which hackers were able to break the device's security system also meant that it became a favorite with the homebrew development scene, and amateur coders are still producing games and demos for the platform. Some look back on the machine as a failure beside the all-conquering Nintendo DS, but this is unfair. The console sold 80m units, a figure boosted by a series of excellent hardware and featureset updates, including the slimmer PSP-2000 and PSP-3000 models. '"

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Piracy (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#47167041)

The console struggled with high piracy levels of its titles, which meant the likes of EA, Activision and Ubisoft were reticent about committing to major development projects.

"But no one loses anything, when you just make a copy."

Right, guys? Isn't that what you always say?

Re:Piracy (3)

gweilo8888 (921799) | about 6 months ago | (#47167087)

Given that anybody who pirated the content likely wouldn't have paid for it even if they'd not pirated it, this is just an excuse from the likes of EA, Activision, and Ubisoft. (And when was the last time any of the above put out a game that wasn't another tepid dishwater remake or derivative copy of somebody else's game anyway?)

Re:Piracy (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#47167127)

Bullshit. I'd just rather spend my money on drugs than games.

Re:Piracy (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#47167321)

Dumbass, you just proved the GP's point -- whether you pirated the game or not you would have not paid for it. Thus, Pirated copy of game != A lost sale

Re:Piracy (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#47167217)

Given that anybody who pirated the content likely wouldn't have paid for it even if they'd not pirated it.

Is that really true? I'm not much of a gamer, but I am a huge music and film fan. I have a collection a couple of thousand CDs and DVDs and used to spend a large chunk of my paycheck every month on more to listen to or watch. But nowadays, pretty much everything I become interested in is already available as FLAC for music, or DVD/Bluray images for films from filesharing communities, with booklet scans too. So, my interest in actually paying for stuff has waned. From discussions on filesharing communities with forums, it seems like this is common: there's always one guy who is willing to pay for the media, but then he torrents it to several hundred people who have given up on paying for content. A great many of us would have paid for the CD or DVD if we had no other choice, so yes, piracy is a lost sale.

(Posting AC for obvious reason.)

Re:Piracy (5, Informative)

GrumpySteen (1250194) | about 6 months ago | (#47167557)

A great many of us would have paid for the CD or DVD if we had no other choice, so yes, piracy is a lost sale.

Well, no, piracy is not necessarily a lost sale. "A geat many of us would have paid" is not the same as "every one of us would have paid."

Claiming that piracy doesn't hurt sales is a lie, but claiming that every pirated copy is a lost sale is also a lie.

Re:Piracy (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#47168587)

A "lost sale" doesn't even make sense, since they never had the sale to lose to begin with. In order to lose something, you have to own it first. You can't "own" sales that you haven't made yet.

Re:Piracy (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#47169093)

You're an idiot.

By lost sale they mean this:
If they had the perfect DRM which made pirating impossible and was convenient and possibly even gave you physical media like a DVD, they WOULD make more money from sales. They would have all the sales from those who would, for example, buy a game or move and those who pirate but would probably buy it if there was no option.
Company's make less money from sales when people don't buy their product.

Yeah, one reason. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#47168993)

The obvious reason being that you're full of shit and shilling for the MAFIAA.

Re:Piracy (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#47174057)

Is piracy a lost sale? I completely disagree...If I couldn't download it for free, I still wouldn't pay the developers to get the game...

I'm a video game collector. I own 200 legit games for the Original XBOX... I also own about 250 legit games for the XBOX 360. I own about 40 legit games for the PS2... I never bought a single one of them brand new from a store... In fact, I bought or traded for every single one of them from someone else, USED... The developers never get one penny from me. I may as well be a pirate...

Re:Piracy (3, Interesting)

Registered Coward v2 (447531) | about 6 months ago | (#47167313)

Given that anybody who pirated the content likely wouldn't have paid for it even if they'd not pirated it

While that is a standard "piracy has no effect on sales" arguement I don't buy it. While that may be true for some pirates who simply get off having one of every released software title or very expensive products, for many products I bet the allure of free vs. buy is too strong take away free and some probably not insignificant percentage would buy.

this is just an excuse from the likes of EA, Activision, and Ubisoft. (And when was the last time any of the above put out a game that wasn't another tepid dishwater remake or derivative copy of somebody else's game anyway?)

The quality of the product aside it's pretty clear that high rates of piracy relative to sales results in less development and products.

Re:Piracy (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#47167627)

Thinking back to where I grew up (where piracy was the norm, as was sharing everything) most people who pirate software, do so because they can get it for free. Barring any effort, people will naturally assume that anything with DRM isn't free, thus gravitate to whatever is free.

I have enough problems trying to convince family members that "No thepiratebay is not a source of free content from some magical land where everything is free"

I actually buy books, software, games and movies... even if I have seem/used it for free at some other point in my life, because I appreciate having these things. I have several copies of various games because the GOG/Steam/Nintendo/Origin stores don't overlap. If these stores would coordinate so that one license on one platform can be used on another, it would make the secondary piracy excuse "format shifting" go away. The film industry is slowing figuring this out with Ultraviolet and iTunes

Re:Piracy (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#47167737)

The proper question to ask is not "would any pirates at all buy the software if they could not pirate it?"

But instead:

Is the total cost of DRM (including dev/licensing, sales and reputation lost to consumer rage, sales lost to the extra piracy that is motivated by the frustration caused by the DRM, etc.) greater or less than the cost of copies lost to the pirates who only bought it because they couldn't defeat the DRM?

The answer to THAT question is most certainly "no."

Re:Piracy (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#47170799)

The proper question to ask is not "would any pirates at all buy the software if they could not pirate it?"

But instead:

Is the total cost of DRM (including dev/licensing, sales and reputation lost to consumer rage, sales lost to the extra piracy that is motivated by the frustration caused by the DRM, etc.) greater or less than the cost of copies lost to the pirates who only bought it because they couldn't defeat the DRM?

The answer to THAT question is most certainly "no."

Care to show the analysis that brought you to that conclusion?

Re:Piracy (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#47169129)

It is not clear. While piracy may result in less development, it also results in more hardware sales, which in turn result in more development.

Re:Piracy (1)

bentcd (690786) | about 6 months ago | (#47169969)

While that is a standard "piracy has no effect on sales" arguement I don't buy it.

If you don't buy it then you are part of the problem.

(Thank you, thank you, I'll be here all week!)

Re:Piracy (1)

hairyfeet (841228) | about 6 months ago | (#47172445)

Sorry, bullshit. Working in the shop I've met more "Joe Pirate" types than you have had hot meals and ya know what? they pirate several orders of magnitude more than they will EVER use. I know one guy has over 30 spindles of music, how much has he listened to? NONE, because the thousand or so songs he actually listens to are already loaded on his laptop but if he likes ONE song from an artist he feels compelled to get EVERY song by that artist, even if he will never listen to a single one except that one hit he already has on his laptop!

I've seen the same thing in games, both with guys that have every game for every console while playing MAYBE a dozen games out of the whole smash, and with the guys that collect genres like FPS or RPG where again they play maybe 1 out of every 50 that they download, and in movies where they will download every movie in a genre (say horror) or every top 10 movie while watching again MAYBE 1 out of every 50. I don't know whether its a compulsion like hoarding or just a need to collect something but I'd say if you magically made perfect DRM tomorrow there isn't a single pirate that has walked through my shop that would buy more than a handful of the stuff they listen/watch/play all the time and the rest? It would just go into a giant "don't care" black hole never to be seen or heard from again.

Hell even I am guilty of this as I'm addicted to Steam sales and Humble Bundles, I have nearly 200 titles in my Steam, and probably just as much if not more in DRM free formats like GOG and direct downloads from the bundles...how many have I actually played? Maybe a quarter if that, how many have I played more than 10 minutes? Maybe half of those, all the way through? Maybe TEN. So if Humble Bundles and Steam sales didn't exist i would be just as happy as i am now if I would have only bought 10 games, looking at what I've been playing of late 4 RPGs and 6 shooters would be more than enough, so the only difference is those that made the other 390 games would not have a snowball's chance in hell of tempting me with squat as i would have never sampled their wares, that's all.

And at least in my case I can state the opposite is also true, i wouldn't have the entire Joss Whedon collection as well as the Marvel movies if it weren't for piracy, as there was no WB in my area so the first half season of Buffy on P2P got me hooked on Joss Whedon's writing so if it weren't for P2P I wouldn't now have the box sets for Buffy, Angel, Firefly, as well as the Avengers and the Marvel cinematic universe, all because i caught those first episodes of Buffy on P2P. Would I have bought them otherwise? Not a chance in hell, a horror series starring a soap actress and the guy from the Taster's Choice ads? Doesn't sound appealing from where I sit.

Re:Piracy (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#47167123)

Yes and no. While there was piracy on PSP, there was also piracy on DS, and lots of it. At the end of the day, DS was a bigger market and studios wanted to sell to the machine with the bigger install base - it helps, especially when piracy rates are high.

Re:Piracy (4, Insightful)

tom229 (1640685) | about 6 months ago | (#47167231)

My thoughts exactly. Piracy is extremely easy on the DS [supercard.sc] . It's so easy you basically just need to know how to purchase a special cartridge and copy files to a micro sd card.

The DS' success can be attributed to their unique IP, the low price, or the high build quality, but personally I think all these features break down to one thing: kids. DS was/is the platform for kids aged 4-14. You'd be hard pressed to find a kid in this age bracket that doesn't own one. The device is cheap, the games are cheap, you can beat the shit out of the thing and it wont break. It has novelty features like a 3D screen, a wide variety of exclusive titles that directly appeal to kids, and easy to configure parental controls. It's the dream platform for kids... and for parents to buy for their kids. You know... so their not bothering you asking you questions or breaking your things.

Re:Piracy (3, Interesting)

Belial6 (794905) | about 6 months ago | (#47167519)

Pretty fair assessment. We never owned any PSPs, but in our household of three (me, my wife, and our son), we have owned 8 DS products (including our current 3DSes). A couple of of the original DSLs developed bad hinges, but that isn't a big surprise given that they were constantly being opened and closed for 5 years before being replaced with 3DSes.

Re:Piracy (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#47167597)

Piracy on PSP is even easier now that custom firmware 6.60 Pro-C is out. It runs iso's directly from the mem stick. No downgrade necessary either. They probably factored this in the decision to kill it off.

Re:Piracy (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#47167919)

That's been true for many years now. I don't know off-hand when 6.60 Pro-C was released, but your post makes it sound like the ability to rip UMDs and play them straight from a mem stick is a recent (read, this year) development.

Re:Piracy (4, Informative)

Adriax (746043) | about 6 months ago | (#47167293)

The DS and its redesigns (DSlite and DSi) sold over 270 million units in 7 years before being succeeded by the 3DS, while the PSP and its redesigns sold 80 million in 10 years.

No contest there, EA and the like didn't want to waste their time on a relatively tiny userbase.
Piracy is just a handy scapegoat for both lawmakers and sony. Mainly they just didn't want to piss sony off by making it public they think the PSP is a failure not worth developing for.

Re:Piracy (3, Interesting)

trytoguess (875793) | about 6 months ago | (#47167665)

While userbase may be the number one reason to not develop for the PSP, it's likely the ease of piracy was another major concern. Cause lets fact it, free beats paid any day. Doesn't help that piracy was in many ways a superior option since it let you carry multiple games in 1 card and saved battery life by not utilizing the umd drive.

Re:Piracy (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#47173891)

You make it sound like there is only a trivial amount of money involved...

Let's assume every person who bought a DS or a PSP bought just one game...For the sake of round numbers, let's say that game earns $10 profit on each sale... Sure 270 million units generates $2.7billion, but 70 million units still generates $700 million... That's nothing to laugh at even if the software developers never sold another copy of a game ever again... 70 million is not a small user base.

In truth, we know video game sales earn far more than $10 profit for the developer per title, and even if 50% of DS or PSP owners buy games regularly (personally, this number seems higher than 50% to me), this more than offsets the loss due to piracy... Their reasons to shelf the PSP are not based on piracy alone...

Re:Piracy (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#47167309)

While there was piracy on PSP, there was also piracy on DS, and lots of it.

Yes.

At the end of the day, DS was a bigger market and studios wanted to sell to the machine with the bigger install base

Ohmygodyes.

I've only ever physically seen one other person who owned a PSP. Every time I walked through an airport, I saw a number of DS systems. Still do, though it's 3DS now. I try to avoid contact, because nobody has time for a Pokemon battle while trying to make it to a gate.

Re:Piracy (4, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#47167161)

Ubisoft treats all of their customers like pirates, and complains about piracy rates on every medium. They've claimed multiple times that their games have a 99% piracy rate and that's why they need people to download UPlay (their proprietary PC client) and install always-online DRM, even for games that they sell on existing DRM platforms like Steam. Hell, they're still doing the "limited installs with no revocations" DRM scheme on a lot of their games. For instance, let's look at Anno 2070. Let's say, in theory, that I'm at work one day and Anno 2070 goes on sale, and I buy it from my tablet to play when I get home. Just to get the game working, I would have to:

- Start up Steam
- Wait for Steam to log in
- Download the game
- Install SecuROM (still comes with Anno 2070 and has I think 5 installs with no revocations)
- Start UPlay
- Wait for UPlay to log in
- Enter my product code from Steam into UPlay to register it there
- Wait for UPlay to unlock the game on its side
- Wait for UPlay to apply patches since they do it through UPlay and not through Steam
- Play the game

In case you're not keeping track, that's three different levels of DRM - Steam, Ubisoft's always-online DRM, and SecuROM, two of which require logins with separate accounts, to play a single game. Ubisoft hated the PSP (and DS) because they couldn't force DRM onto it. Same goes for Activision and EA. It's not like any of these companies have made a single good game in years anyway.

Re:Piracy (3, Insightful)

PrimaryConsult (1546585) | about 6 months ago | (#47167507)

Thank you for reminding me to make sure I am not purchasing Ubisoft games when I browse the Steam store. Steam is good enough DRM, putting stuff on top of it just wastes everyone's time.

Re:Piracy (1)

lpevey (115393) | about 6 months ago | (#47168071)

I'm convinced this is a big part of why indie games are having a heyday right now. The big developers just don't get it. Haven't bought an Ubi game since I can't remember when. Might "borrow" Watchdogs at some point but would never in a million years buy it or any other Uplay crap. Burned once, never again. I spend loads of money on games all the time and should be their target customer-- but they don't want my business.

Re:Piracy (1)

DuckDodgers (541817) | about 6 months ago | (#47171307)

I had this experience when I bought Heroes of Might and Magic 6 - a game I was looking forward to playing. I couldn't get UPlay to work on my machine, so I got a refund. (I guess that's the one advantage of the crazy DRM - at least they had proof I never got to play the game I bought, so the refund request was fair.)

It's a shame, I have fond memories of Heroes of Might and Magic 3 and 4 and was looking forward to 6 - but not if that's what is required.

I even have mixed feelings about Steam on Linux and SteamOS. Valve does a great job making DRM as low-headache as possible. And I am 100% in moral agreement that people should pay for the content they use. But the moral right for Valve/Ubisoft/Sony/Disney and so forth to get revenue for their content does not offset the moral wrong of writing software and building hardware that interferes with my ability to use computing devices I purchased. You can't battle evil with evil and call yourself the good guys.

Re:Piracy (1)

jelIomizer (3670957) | about 6 months ago | (#47168607)

It's an unprovable claim to begin with.

Re:Piracy (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#47169925)

Of course Sony blames piracy, otherwise they should confess that they made mistakes themselves. Sony messed up the PSP and Vita by its own memory card. They tired to get bigger cut of the game sales by forcing app store games to be cheaper but taking the money from sales of the memory sticks. And if a 32GB memory stick costs four times the price of a MMC, fiasco is ready. Nobody wants to develop games if they get only small fraction of the price.

Re:Piracy (1)

RyuuzakiTetsuya (195424) | about 6 months ago | (#47170811)

Part of the piracy problem on the psp was that the memory card and file system were exposed. Installing pirated games was a snap.

It doesn't surprise me that Sony developed a system proprietary storage mechanism. Granted, the 3DS uses sd cards no problem...

Had to be a fan (1)

Luthair (847766) | about 6 months ago | (#47167055)

Apparently, I thought the console went away years ago personally. I haven't seen or heard of it in years.

Re:Had to be a fan (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#47167105)

Yeah exactly, PsVita is where sony has been focused for like what, 3 - 4 yrs now?

Re:Had to be a fan (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#47167325)

Yeah exactly, PsVita is where sony has been focused for like what, 3 - 4 yrs now?

Or slightly over 2, but yeah, you were close.

Different Perspective (1)

fyngyrz (762201) | about 6 months ago | (#47167357)

As far as I'm concerned, the console "went away" when they came out with driveless units. All those PSP games I had bought? Useless.

So the only PSPs of interest to my family were used early models. Way to do yourself out of sales, Sony. Again. Now they're doing the same kind of thing with the PS4. PS2, PS3 titles? Nope, won't run. Customer? Nope, won't buy. :)

Re:Different Perspective (1)

tlhIngan (30335) | about 6 months ago | (#47167695)

As far as I'm concerned, the console "went away" when they came out with driveless units. All those PSP games I had bought? Useless.

So the only PSPs of interest to my family were used early models. Way to do yourself out of sales, Sony. Again. Now they're doing the same kind of thing with the PS4. PS2, PS3 titles? Nope, won't run. Customer? Nope, won't buy. :)

The PSP pretty much died out when the Vita came out - I didn't know they were still selling them. I didn't see hide nor hair of a PSP since the Vita release (2012), people were talking about how Sony kept last generation around for ages while forgetting the PSP disappeared practically instantly (usually in comparison with how the Xbox original disappeared when the Xbos360 came out).

Of course, they also talk about how "standards friendly" Sony is, ignoring the PSP's memory stick and UMD drive, and the very-proprietary Vita memory cards that cost 2-3 times as much as a micro SD card. Or the proprietary USB cable (thankfully the new Vita Slims use micro-USB).

Sony's handhelds were everything the home consoles weren't - proprietary everywhere.

Heck, the PS4 this generation is funny - everyone loves to tout how "DRM free" it is over the Xbone. Yet the Xbone's DRM scheme had real advantages in ways neither Microsoft, Sony, Valve or others have. Like the ability to potentially resell games. Or share games (Steam now lets you share your entire library, but only one person at a time can use it).

Sure what we gained was the ability to share discs. But digital downloads seem to be the way forward so there's no more discs to share.

No, the Xbone wasn't perfect - the 24 hour requirement was idiotic, and the one-time-use discs were potentially stupid as well, but we threw away the good with the bad. We could've had the nice features of sharing and reselling for digital downloads AND kept the disc sharing and reselling alive.

So now Sony's selling digital downloads of many games for the same price. And they're locked to you.

Re:Different Perspective (2)

khellendros1984 (792761) | about 6 months ago | (#47167749)

The disk-drive PSPs are the best of both worlds, anyhow. Capable of downloading games? Yes. Capable of playing disks? Yes. Capable of ripping those disks to images so that you don't have to carry around a stack of 15 games? Double-yes!

Re:Different Perspective (1)

hairyfeet (841228) | about 6 months ago | (#47171931)

Well to be fair they seriously screwed the pooch when it came to the PS3, which is why you'll never see backwards compatibility with the PS3. the chip they chose, the IBM cell, turned out to be a total dead end that never sold squat for anything else which kept the price of chips high AND they were hell to code for to boot. this is the same problem with the PS2 as the emotion engine is a custom chip that likewise wasn't used in squat but the PS2 and the funky way it was set up in both means you'd have to basically stuff an entire PS2 AND an entire PS3 into a PS4 to have BC. needless to say most folks aren't wiling to pay 3DO prices for a PS4 so no BC.

If it gives you any comfort the odds of either MSFT or Sony going back to custom chips now that they are on X86, where its both easier to code for and which has much higher economies of scale than PPC is insanely low so the PS5 and Xbone Plus 1 will be bc with Xbone and PS4. Although looking at the PS4 arch they MIGHT be able to do PS2 emulation completely in software so there is the possibility of a virtual console store like on the Wii.

Re:Had to be a fan (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#47167459)

A little under 2 1/2 years. In most of the world, it came out in late February, 2012.

Too much competition (1)

Andrio (2580551) | about 6 months ago | (#47167079)

Not just from Nintendo, but from pretty much every smartphone and cheap tablet out there.

Re:Too much competition (3, Informative)

gweilo8888 (921799) | about 6 months ago | (#47167101)

Owning both (I had the PSP long before I ever got a smartphone), I have to say there's no contest. One has a form factor and physical controls conducive to gaming, the other doesn't. (Or at least, not to most games, just to Angry Birds / Candy Crush-type games.)

Re:Too much competition (3, Insightful)

Andrio (2580551) | about 6 months ago | (#47167203)

I'm not a fan of mobile games. They typically have shallow gameplay, no story, no immersion, and 9/10 times they're based on the "freemium" model which sucks. They're designed to be time-wasters. So yeah, "real" handheld gaming systems blow them out of the water. But, sadly, for most people, these mobile games are good enough.

Re:Too much competition (1)

rogoshen1 (2922505) | about 6 months ago | (#47167409)

The interesting thing is, Final Fantasy 3 on android uses the touch screen to simulate joystick/gamepad, and after a really shallow learning curve, is perfectly fine.

I think the real problem is app developers want something they can basically shit out on an appstore, turk up some positive reviews, and make a few dollars. (hey, people are only paying 3 bucks for garbage, so they'll be unlikely to really complain).

On the other side of things, you have the freemium / uber-casual games that want to make as shallow of a Skinner box as they can get away with, again with the express desire to get a few impulse purchases from each 'customer'.

Basically the problem isn't in the platform, it's in the mindset of the developers. there's nothing stopping them from making quality, immersive games (FF3 for example) -- they just choose to be lazy and collect the easy money.

Re:Too much competition (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#47167529)

It isn't just developers a lot of mobile owners aren't willing to drop much money on a mobile title. I've been using mobile devices for three years now and we've probably spent less than $20 between iTunes and the Play Store. Frankly I've seen titles that I know are good and I'd like to play again but then I see $10 (when I probably payed $50 originally) I balk.

Re:Too much competition (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#47169549)

Man, I bought the Witcher on Steam for $2. I don't think any mobile games can match that quality (albeit the title was a few years at that point).

Re:Too much competition (1)

spire3661 (1038968) | about 6 months ago | (#47167689)

I always prefer physical buttons to touch when playing games. Even Hearthstone, with Blizz's famed controls design crew, is quirky and imprecise with touch.

Re:Too much competition (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#47168735)

I always prefer physical buttons to touch when playing games. Even Hearthstone, with Blizz's famed controls design crew, is quirky and imprecise with touch.

If buttons work better than a precision touch screen in a CARD GAME, the game is doing it wrong.

Re:Too much competition (1)

Belial6 (794905) | about 6 months ago | (#47167603)

It doesn't matter that they are good enough for most people. The people that are satisfied with mobile phone gaming are not the people that would buy a handheld console AND games. Most of them wouldn't even buy a console, but when they did, they would buy the console with one game and that was it. We will likely see a small drop in handheld gaming, but not much. Those of us with a 6' stack of games are not the people who are satisfied with phone gaming. We often do play on our phones, but only as a time waster. Not really so much as entertainment.

Re:Too much competition (1)

tepples (727027) | about 6 months ago | (#47169411)

I tried the demo of Pixeline and the Jungle Treasure [google.com] on my Nexus 7 tablet. I couldn't make a lot of the jumps with the on-screen gamepad alone; I had to pair a Bluetooth keyboard.

Re:Too much competition (1)

cdrudge (68377) | about 6 months ago | (#47171185)

They're designed to be time-wasters.

And this point differs from every other game out there how?

Re:Too much competition (2)

tom229 (1640685) | about 6 months ago | (#47167255)

Leave the touch screen computer people to their delusions. Did you know they are completely replacing workstations and laptops any day now?

Re:Too much competition (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#47168801)

Leave the touch screen computer people to their delusions. Did you know they are completely replacing workstations and laptops any day now?

LOL @ touch screen "delusions" yet leaving desktops out of that sentence.

Re:Too much competition (1)

Pinhedd (1661735) | about 6 months ago | (#47167239)

Not necessarily. Smartphones and tablets handle traditional control schemes very poorly. Try playing an FPS on a smartphone, or anything that requires a degree of precision and/or responsiveness. If a game can be designed/redesigned for a touch-screen interface, great. However, many genres simply play better using mechanical controls and the PSP excels at this.

Reimagine for touch (1)

tepples (727027) | about 6 months ago | (#47169431)

If a game can be designed/redesigned for a touch-screen interface, great.

Some people would claim that all worthwhile games can be "redesigned for a touch-screen interface". For example, one could redesign a platformer by removing the exploration element, resulting in Canabalt or Rayman Jungle Run.

Re:Reimagine for touch (1)

Pinhedd (1661735) | about 6 months ago | (#47170337)

Some people are also retarded. Try redesigning a first person shooter for a touch screen. Every touch-screen FPS I have tried is beyond terrible, requiring tons of aim assist and alteration of game mechanics to suit the reduction in player control. Removing content or mechanics to suit an unsuitable control scheme is not "redesigning" anything, it's crippling it.

Re:Reimagine for touch (1)

tepples (727027) | about 6 months ago | (#47171995)

Try redesigning a first person shooter for a touch screen. Every touch-screen FPS I have tried is beyond terrible, requiring tons of aim assist and alteration of game mechanics to suit the reduction in player control.

Fans of mobile gaming would claim that "alteration of game mechanics" is the best course of action in this case. Developers had to alter game mechanics when porting shooters from the PC to the PSP; why should mobile be different? For example, a mobile FPS might be reimagined as a fixed shooter (like Duck Hunt) or a rail shooter (like Area 51).

Removing content or mechanics to suit an unsuitable control scheme is not "redesigning" anything, it's crippling it.

Consider what would have to be removed to port something like StarCraft to a PSP, which has no good mouse substitute.

Re:Too much competition (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#47167295)

Playing a PSP (with it's controls and the games released for it) versus pretty much any cheap tablet or smartphone are two totally different experiences. Obviously the people (and there are an absurd amount of them) who feel the experiences are similar are far too many to argue with.

For those of us who would rather never play a game again then admit smartphones are gaming platforms are still happy with our Vitas, PSPs, and DSs. Vita seems to have reduced the hacking and provided an amazing gaming platform that crushes any smartphone experience.

All in all, 10 years and 80 million units sounds like an amazing success as far as I'm concerned.

I just hope Vita TV v2 includes a UMD slot for my dozens of games I'd love to play on the bigscreen with Vitas extra horsepower.

Re:Too much competition (2)

VGPowerlord (621254) | about 6 months ago | (#47167391)

It kind of annoys me that the Vita TV never reached north America. The Vita games I'm interested in don't actually need touch controls and in Japan its like half the price of the Vita itself.

Umm, yeah? ps vita? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#47167135)

Sony released the ps vita like 3 years ago. This is not exactly news.

Revisionist Bullshit (-1, Flamebait)

sexconker (1179573) | about 6 months ago | (#47167229)

The PSP was NOT written off early into its lifespan. Approaching launch, every major media outlet championed it as the obvious victor in the portable space, expecting the DS to get absolutely fucked. The DS didn't take its first significant lead until the end of 2005, and it wasn't until 2007 that the PSP was written off.

Selling 80 million units doesn't mean shit when you're selling below / near cost and you're not selling software.

Subsequent PSP models were not easily hacked (and I believe the later models remain unhacked today). But if you still want to blame the failure on piracy, how are you going to explain the DS? All DS models, including the DSi, are easily hackable, and piracy was (and still is) absolutely rampant.

The later PSP models didn't represent "excellent hardware and featureset updates", they represented haphazard attempts to lower costs while sacrificing build and component quality, while providing only minor improvements. It took 3 years to get the first revision out and it's main claims to fame were the smaller size and shittier quality screen. And what about the abortion that was the PSP Go or the time wasted on PSP Phone attempts? The Go was roundly rejected. I believe there were a few models of phones branded with Playstation, PSN, or "Xperia Play" that actually got released in various markets, but they obviously bombed as well - none of them actually played PSP games despite the hardware ability and obvious design "similarities" between them and the PSP Go. It was just a sub section of stuff available through PSN (but not the real PSN).

Sony's failure with the PSP was due to ridiculous proprietary storage format and the overall price of the system. Because of the costs, they simply could not get an install base worth developing for. Developing a major title for Vita was a huge risk that rarely paid off. On the other hand, the DS had a PS2-like install base - you could release utter trash and expect a profit.

Re:Revisionist Bullshit (2)

khellendros1984 (792761) | about 6 months ago | (#47167813)

Subsequent PSP models were not easily hacked (and I believe the later models remain unhacked today).

I don't know about the E1000 (a PAL-region barebones PSP), but the PSP-3000 and (I think) the PSP Go are both hackable without actually flashing new firmware. Some of the software signing keys were discovered about 3 years ago. You can sign custom binaries and use those to open the floodgates to whatever else you want.

Re:Revisionist Bullshit (1)

sexconker (1179573) | about 6 months ago | (#47167991)

Subsequent PSP models were not easily hacked (and I believe the later models remain unhacked today).

I don't know about the E1000 (a PAL-region barebones PSP), but the PSP-3000 and (I think) the PSP Go are both hackable without actually flashing new firmware. Some of the software signing keys were discovered about 3 years ago. You can sign custom binaries and use those to open the floodgates to whatever else you want.

If the keys were released 3 years ago that speaks little to the impact on piracy when the revisions were reeleased in 2007 and 2008 - they were moderately successful in preventing piracy because they shipped with the firmware holes plugged. You needed a Pandora battery and Magic Memory Stick as the first step, changing the game from a pure software hack to a hardware + software hack, much like the very first PS3 hacks which required the service mode USB stick.

As far as I know, the modern firmware versions of modern PSPs remain unhacked. If the signing keys were leaked then it's game over, though, unless Sony wants to blacklist the keys and whitelist all prior releases. They did this with the PS3, but that's because people were still making games for it.

Love how my post was modded flamebait. Bring facts to Slashdot get shat on.

It will be missed (1)

werepants (1912634) | about 6 months ago | (#47167291)

The PSP was actually a pretty nice piece of hardware, at least for those of us that grew up when a black and white portable system was a big deal. My old PSP1000, long since hacked, is now mainly used when I get a sudden urge to play FF7. Which is still awesome. If they had come out day one with a bunch of ported PS1 titles available on PSN I think things could've been different.

Re:It will be missed (1)

drinkypoo (153816) | about 6 months ago | (#47168795)

If they had come out day one with a bunch of ported PS1 titles available on PSN I think things could've been different.

The games industry is really beyond frustrating. The only console maker which comprehends the value of its existing library is Nintendo, probably because they hold the trademarks and copyrights on so many of the top-selling games themselves. Sony did the same thing with the Xperia Play that they did with the PSP, which is to say fail to bring out lots of games from the old platform that people would pay for all over again even though they had an emulator and it was basically just printing money. You had to do some light playtesting and then you kick the game out the door. If you have to refund some players or give them some free games no big deal, retrogames are like five bucks a piece these days.

You get what you order, Sony (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#47167297)

Lack of games killed the PSP. I had the console from day one and I bought Loco Roco 1&2, Jack&Daxter, Lumines and Killzone for it. And never saw a single game beside them that I would like to have. Sony also ruined the console by forced system upgrades, so whenever one opened console, there was a 30min upgrade session, just as is the case with PS3. No more Sonys for me, I will updates to my PCs when I like, not when console manufacturer decides to remove some feature.

Metal Gear Acid (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#47167531)

So long Metal Gear Acid.

Who would buy a PSP (1)

EmbassyNerdcore . (3680307) | about 6 months ago | (#47167585)

Just to buy no games for it? Of course piracy kills sales ON A HANDHELD. There's lots of people out there with a PSP and no games actually bought.

A lot of talk about "AAA" publishers but... (1)

ulzeraj (1009869) | about 6 months ago | (#47167629)

sadly lots of good games (yeah Valkyria Chronicles 3) never left Japan.

Re:A lot of talk about "AAA" publishers but... (1)

sexconker (1179573) | about 6 months ago | (#47168021)

sadly lots of good games (yeah Valkyria Chronicles 3) never left Japan.

VC2 and VC3 were the reasons I wanted a PSP. I never ended up getting one because VC3 was never localized.
I couldn't be assed to deal with the fan translation at http://vc3translationproject.w... [wordpress.com] .

Re:A lot of talk about "AAA" publishers but... (1)

gmezero (4448) | about 5 months ago | (#47180553)

Oh then you're really missing out. The fan conversion of VC3 sets the bar for this kind of effort.

Re:A lot of talk about "AAA" publishers but... (1)

sexconker (1179573) | about 5 months ago | (#47180665)

At this point I may just buy the games wherever, then try PPSSPP or whatever that emulator is called.
I'm too busy with Mario Kart 8 at the moment, though.

My old PSP fat is awesome. (4, Insightful)

wierd_w (1375923) | about 6 months ago | (#47168337)

Truly. It is awesome. There are only a few small problems with it.

1) UMD disk is proprietary shit. Had they instead used a mini-dvd, the handheld would have been fantastic. But I realize that this is sony, and that they have delusions of owning the media market, despite having CLEARLY lost on all fronts. No Sony, your memory stick tech will NEVER be more user friendly than SDcard. No Sony, your UMD was never going to surpass mini-DVD. No Sony, your MagicGate bullshit for the vita will never catch on. Sorry. Users have the choice of non-sony things that work with all other non-sony things--- which are just as good if not better, than what you offer-- and are perfectly content to let your bullshit die on the vine. Like Vita is.

You SHOULD have used mini-DVD.
You SHOULD have used Micro-SD.

2) Sony dropped the ball bigtime on game selection for the PSP, and further shot themselves in the foot by failing to give proper dualshock type thumbknobs-- Even the (very excellent!) PSONE emulator (which works with basically every PSONE game, with some tweaking!) is rendered less than fully useful because of the lack of the other thumb knob. I bought my PSP fat explicitly to run CFW on it, so that I could play emulated SNES and NES games on it, and to run homebrew apps on it. (It works just fine as a small ebook reader, and as an email reader. Used it for quite some time before I bought a smartphone. Could check my emails anywhere there was open wifi!)

The reason why this was the SINGLE, ONE AND ONLY reason for that purchase decision? THERE WERE NO GAMES RELEASED FOR THE PSP WORTH BUYING, OR EVEN PLAYING. I have had my hacked PSP for.. Jeeze--- YEARS now. STILL, NOT A SINGLE PSP TITLE ON IT. PIRATED OR OTHERWISE. My choice not to buy games, was because there were no games worth having!

BUT-- Again-- the handheld itself is fantastic!

The screen is behind a very robust and thick slab of plastic that keeps it from getting screwed up. The FAT has an out of this world battery life. I could play an emulated snes game for literally 8 hours straight on a single charge! FANTASTIC! I STILL take the hacked PSP on vacation!

Where Sony screwed up?

Again, where they always screw up, and where they have always historically screwed up, and where they will consistently and forever screw up, until the day they collapse from the inside:

1) They were and still are delusional. They want to believe that we will buy something just for the Sony name. We wont. This carries over on anything tied exclusively to Sony products-- be it MagicGate or MemoryStick memory cards, proprietary spinning disc formats, audio CDs with extra special rootkits--- whatever. Does not matter. If it only works in SonyWorld, while everyone else plays in REALWORLD, SonyWorld will always get the attendence that EuroDisney gets-- which is to say, it isn't really in your best interests to try it, sony. If you want us to invest in something, you have to MAKE it WORTH our while. You have to present something tangibly better than what everyone else offers; It MUST be bigger, better, faster, and be all that and a bag of chips; Complacency will NOT work. This should be immensely apparent to even you guys by now. That means if you offer a console to compete with another quality product released by a competitor, YOU NEED TO OUTSHINE THEM IN EVERY POSSIBLE WAY. Do any less? You will lose. EVERY. SINGLE. TIME. That means having bigger selection, better loading times, better quality gameplay, and all that ball of wax. Giving us a porche that runs on refined plutonium, when there is no real way to get that plutonium, is a good way to waste money engineering a very sexy looking product that nobody will buy. That's where you fucked up with the Vita. Sure, it looks sexy, and probably is a very well designed handheld. BUT YOU DONT HAVE A BIG GAME CATALOG FOR IT. Why spend money on a porche that runs on plutonium, when you can never get the plutonium? Why spend money on a porche that runs on plutonium when you have to deal with deadly ionizing radiation problems and issues with handling the fuel? SAME THING when asking why people would want to buy your consoles when they cant buy games for it (because they dont exist!), and why they would want to buy your consoles when they have to deal with poisonous customer experiences for the few titles that actually do exist. You make porches that run on plutonium to compete with VW Beetles that run on saltwater. The VW Beetle isnt all that fancy, but is well made, and it has a nearly endless surplus of fuel that can be used in it. Cost of ownership is low, and ease of use is very high. People will pick the VW Beetle over your porche every single time.

2) They consistently, without fail, refuse to listen to their user base-- They ignore allowing the easy/open development of software for their devices, and wonder why more open platforms that are easier to code for get all the developers. Here's a hint Sony. IT ISNT PIRACY. If you put a huge ass list of silly secret handshakes involving dancing while naked and slathered in peanut butter-- JUST to get the SDK for your platforms-- NOBODY IN THEIR RIGHT MIND THAT ISNT A PEANUT BUTTER NUDE DANCING FETISHIST IS GOING TO DEVELOP FOR YOUR PLATFORMS! Nintendo started to feel that pretty strongly recently with the epic huge failure of their Wii-U console. Those tools actually thought we would buy a "Slightly upgraded" version of a console that was obscolete the day it hit engineering, 10 years ago, just because it had their name on it. (Nevermind the shitty controller.) Nintendo has a huge list of simple games for the Wii, but they too shot themselves in the foot with poor selection with the Wii-U by refusing to do proper compatibility, and by pissing off developers with retarded peanutbutter naked dancemove handshakes that they only extend to their most specialest of friends. (Really nintendo, your requirements for getting an SDK are absurd. Go fuck yourselves. Go fuck yourselves into obscurity.)

So, Again, My old PSP Fat is AWESOME. It really is!

Too bad you fucked up an awesome handheld with your typical, insane, delusional, and peanutbutter nude dance fettishism-- SONY.

Dont be afraid to let people develop software legitimately for your devices that arent games! Nintendo allowed Opera to dev the Opera Browser cart for the DS! You could just as well have allowed ebook reader app makers to make ebook reader apps for your PSP, or allowed people to make email clients, or any number of other, useful pieces of software for your handheld! But NO. You thought small. You took a good handheld, and stunted it, on purpose, then wondered why it didnt grow. You are idiots. You have always been idiots. You will always be idiots until you wake up and realize that you cant control the universe, and HAVE to play with others to win in the modern world.

Look at Google and Android. A smartphone is more than just a phone. It's a compass. It's a GPS with interactive maps. It's a Fillet-o-fish finder, It's a camera, it's a chat client, ITS ANY FUCKING THING YOU MAKE IT INTO-- BECAUSE THERE IS AN APP FOR FUCKING EVERYTHING.

AND IT IS FREE TO DEVELOP FOR, WHICH IS WHY THERE IS AN APP FOR FUCKING EVERYTHING.

Sony-- Your killer app is to make a porche that everyone can drive, that runs on saltwater, like your competitors.

Make a handheld gaming console that is beautiful and polished, efficient, and made for gaming-- but versatile, and open to develop for. Dont try to be a smartphone though-- We already have mature offerings for that. Make a game console, that just so happens to run "free" apps--- the counter to current smartphones that are phones that just so happen to run "free" games. Allow advert based revinue streams like Google does. People dont have to sign multimillion dollar development contracts with you for you to make money with your products. Google is fucking HUGE compared to you. Look how they do that, and copy them! Stop being neurotic morons and play in the real word! Let your game console be useful as a bluetooth remote control for stuff like toy cars or airplanes-- with an open API/SDK to use it that way-- Let people FIND uses for your offering! ENCOURAGE tinkerers and small time developers. Get your money up front with a monetized advert stream, like apple and google does.

If you do, you will win.

Re:My old PSP fat is awesome. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#47169471)

There are several Linux/Android based handhelds which are exactly this. It started with the GP32 and GP2X (later Wiz / Canoo) and they gained quite a following. Today the alternatives are the NVidia Shield (bulky, but has Android on a powerful GPU) , and the planned successor of the OpenPandora (this one didn't do well due to production issues).

Problem with the above was snobs saying their PSP/NDS could do all that. Kind of true, but the difference is these are completely open platforms. No dedicated (good) first-party games though.
 

Re:My old PSP fat is awesome. (1)

newsdee (629448) | about 6 months ago | (#47169475)

(reposting as I accidentally sent AC)

There are several Linux/Android based handhelds which are exactly this. It started with the GP32 and GP2X (later Wiz / Canoo) and they gained quite a following. Today the alternatives are the NVidia Shield (bulky, but has Android on a powerful GPU) , and the planned successor of the OpenPandora (this one didn't do well due to production issues).

Problem with the above was snobs saying their PSP/NDS could do all that. Kind of true, but the difference is these are completely open platforms. No dedicated (good) first-party games though.

Android audio latency (1)

tepples (727027) | about 6 months ago | (#47169489)

One practical problem is that Android has far longer audio latency (minimum time between touch and audio feedback) than the dedicated handheld systems. This screws with the rhythm of certain activities in certain games. For example, the NES game STREEMERZ: Super Strength Emergency Squad Zeta is a lot harder on EMUya (NES emulator for an Android-based set-top box) than on an NES due to audio latency messing with grapple timing. Rhythm games are right out. Or does the Shield have a low-latency audio API that some other Android devices lack?

Action 52 and (other?) malware (1)

tepples (727027) | about 6 months ago | (#47169485)

Great. You're about to arouse both CronoCloud and BasilBrush.

If you put a huge ass list of silly secret handshakes involving dancing while naked and slathered in peanut butter-- JUST to get the SDK for your platforms-- NOBODY IN THEIR RIGHT MIND THAT ISNT A PEANUT BUTTER NUDE DANCING FETISHIST IS GOING TO DEVELOP FOR YOUR PLATFORMS

I guess the console makers' rationale is that if a developer has the resources to work around "absurd" requirements to get an SDK, it's more likely to have the resources to make a game that's better than Action 52. Perhaps you don't remember the crapfest that was the Atari 2600 library in 1983-1984, but it nearly brought down video gaming entirely in North America. Being selective about who is allowed to develop for a platform is console makers' way of ensuring "better quality gameplay, and all that ball of wax." That said, Sony has reportedly dramatically loosened up who's allowed to develop for PS4 and PS Vita; searching the web for "Pub Fund" will pull up articles about its recent indie developer outreach efforts.

[Android] IS FREE TO DEVELOP FOR, WHICH IS WHY THERE IS AN APP FOR FUCKING EVERYTHING.

Including an app for stealing users' personal information. Whenever mobile malware makes the news, it's almost always on Android, not iOS, and not the game consoles (except for "taihen" and "r0mloader" [pocketheaven.com] way back in the early DS homebrew days).

Re:Action 52 and (other?) malware (1)

wierd_w (1375923) | about 6 months ago | (#47170917)

Android is just one example, there's also apple's model, if you prefer.

still an open and easy to use sdk, but comes with a locked down store model in the device ecosystem, where they act as a content filter. (admittedly, a less than perfect one, but still.)

if you are worried about garbage multicart type offerings poisoning the well, then an apple approval process analogue would do just fine. just leave a way to sideload, and all is golden.

the point is to build up the desirability of the console, so that AAA game studios have incentive to target the platform. they dont want to sink money into development and post production expenses on a title for a platform the market is ignoring. (even when that problem is a chicken and egg type one.) allowing the device to be versatile and friendly for a variety of applications helps bootstrap the process of getting AAA attention, because people will be buying the handheld from a larger market angle, meaning there is a bigger potential market for thier games.

stupidly saying "No, this is a handheld game console only, and you have to be THIS BIG to play!" is how you get left behind in today's world.

Flappy this, Flappy that (1)

tepples (727027) | about 6 months ago | (#47172159)

just leave a way to sideload, and all is golden.

Publishers see "just leave a way to run illegal copies, and all is golden."

the point is to build up the desirability of the console, so that AAA game studios have incentive to target the platform.

On the other hand, perhaps some AAA publishers don't want to share a platform with "the riff-raff" for fear of their products being lost among the me-too knockoffs that flood both Google Play Store and Apple's App Store. Case in point: Try searching these stores for "Flappy" and seeing which games other than dB-Soft's [wikipedia.org] show up.

Re:My old PSP fat is awesome. (1)

ShakaUVM (157947) | about 6 months ago | (#47169641)

>THERE WERE NO GAMES RELEASED FOR THE PSP WORTH BUYING, OR EVEN PLAYING.

Final Fantasy Tactics was released for the PSP well before it was re-released on the PS3, and it had very nice artwork added to it that made the game a lot better, that didn't get put into the PS3 re-release (IIRC).

Tactics Ogre and Dissidia were also good games for the PSP, from what I hear.

Re:My old PSP fat is awesome. (1)

Sockatume (732728) | about 6 months ago | (#47170287)

Metal Gear Solid: Peace Walker is the best Metal Gear game since 2005's MGS3. It's also excellently suited to handheld gaming.

Re:My old PSP fat is awesome. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#47178361)

>My choice not to buy games, was because there were no games worth having!

Not sure if troll? Lumines, Wipeout and Ridge Racer were all launch-ish titles that were amazing for a handheld at the time. Perhaps you needed to play them a decade ago to appreciate them, but you cannot say with a straight face there was no PSP worth having.

Re:My old PSP fat is awesome. this? Insightful?!?! (1)

gmezero (4448) | about 5 months ago | (#47180515)

This is what qualifies for insightful these days? Really, this is just a spastic rant at Sony by someone who readily admits they buy no software for the system and use it as nothing more than a portable emulator for pirated 20+ year old console games.

The PSP had some amazing titles for it... some examples of just UMD releases to name just a few (and I'm not even counting several Mini's and other digital only titles, including PS1 games):

Patapon 1 & 2 (3 not so much)
Castlevania: The Dracula X Chronicles (3 excellent Casltevania games in one)
Gunpey
Little Big Planet
Phantasy Star Portable 1 & 2
Ridge Racer
Space Invaders Extreme
Ys series of games ...and best of all, you can get a component cable for the PSP and hook the system directly to your TV to play at 480P.

As for the rant about the Vita memory cards. The idea is not to get people on a new standard. The idea is to completely lock the Vita down and put the breaks on the rampant piracy the PSP had regardless of the reasons for the piracy.

psp owner hear (1)

luther349 (645380) | about 6 months ago | (#47170535)

well winding it down makes sense they haven't made any first party games in years not sense vita. and its been off the shelves nearly as long. the main issue of course was in its 10 year run it had very few must buy games. the hardware for the time was epic it pretty much was a low res ps2 in terms on how far they could push the games stomping the gba and ds into dirt in terms of raw power. the main issue was in fact sony when something good did come out sony never even tossed ads it was for the psp. some of witch where games like crises core metel gear peace walker Resistance god of war and so on thers a pretty good slecten of awsome ones. it also had tons of jrpgs and even a phantasy star mmorpg well 2 of them and portable 2 was pretty dammed good. but it also got alot of trash that nobody would whant to buy or play much like the original ds did. also the main reason psp kept getting titles end of life was the fact vita sales suck and still do and most vita owners are playing original psp titles due to its own lack of games. and yes fps fans did hate the fact it lacked dual anlong or so they calmed yet i don't see vitas flying off the shelves lol.
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