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Smartphones To Monitor Schizophrenics

samzenpus posted about a month ago | from the is-the-phone-watching-me? dept.

Medicine 99

the_newsbeagle writes Psychiatrists have realized that they can collect vast amounts of data about their patients using smartphone apps that passively monitor the patients as they go about their daily business. A prototype for schizophrenia patients is being tested out now on Long Island. The Crosscheck trial will look at behavior patterns (tracking movement, sleep, and conversations) and correlate them with the patient's reports of symptoms and moods; researchers hope the data will reveal the "signature" of a patient who is about relapse and therefore needs help.

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99 comments

The onion predicted it (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a month ago | (#47279879)

Maybe we should have explained to psychiatrists that Is The Government Spying On Schizophrenics Enough? [youtube.com] was a joke, not a roadmap.

The government *IS* a schizoid ! (-1, Troll)

Taco Cowboy (5327) | about a month ago | (#47279903)

Since the government itself *** IS *** a schizoid, it is treating all the other people as suspects

It is doing everything it can to protect itself, including intruding into the every day life of ordinary citizens

Re:The government *IS* a schizoid ! (0)

Hognoxious (631665) | about a month ago | (#47279911)

[David Brent Voice] Words with the same first six letters are synonyms. Fact.

Re:The government *IS* a schizoid ! (1)

wonkey_monkey (2592601) | about a month ago | (#47279915)

Hah! I'm nicking that.

Re:The government *IS* a schizoid ! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month ago | (#47280233)

DICE SUCKS!!! I are mAked gramor aNd SpellIng mistaKS FOR NAJIS!!! RATE ME TROLLS!

The onion predicted it. (1)

unterhunde1 . (3700873) | about a month ago | (#47280125)

I have a few szo relatives. The onion nailed it. The paranoia of hidden cameras and whispers leading to hidden cameras and whispers.

Re:The onion predicted it (1)

Opportunist (166417) | about a month ago | (#47280257)

I AM NOT PARANOID!!!!

Because if you are THEY notice it immediately!

controlling words (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a month ago | (#47279917)

They are psychiatrists and yet oblivious to their own word choice pyschology.

researchers hope the data will reveal the "signature" of a patient who is about relapse and therefore needs help.

These people are still human beings with dignity aren't they? or are they just diseased chattled to be mitigated?
How about:

researchers hope the data will reveal the "signature" of a patient who is possibly experiencing symptoms and therefore might want help.

If they understood anything about the patients they are supposedly helping, they would know that your attitude and intentions makes a big damn difference.

Re:controlling words (5, Insightful)

cascadingstylesheet (140919) | about a month ago | (#47279947)

These people are still human beings with dignity aren't they? or are they just diseased chattled to be mitigated?

When, say, your daughter suddenly takes off for Florida, convinced that she will succeed in her new life as a monkey trainer, because the voices in her head said so, then she does need help. Period.

There are blunt ways to put it, and sugar coated ways to put it, but the brain is malfunctioning and it needs help.

Re:controlling words (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a month ago | (#47279969)

Your brain is malfunctioning and you need help. You don't believe me? That's because your brain is malfunctioning and you need help!

The entire fraudulent pseudoscience of psychiatry depends upon circular reasoning? You only think it does, because your brain is malfunctioning and you need help!!

Re:controlling words (1)

flyneye (84093) | about a month ago | (#47280103)

Oh , a little left brain hiccup from time to time never hurt anyone. But it does convince one that the television is watching them, the government is make-believe and the closet has an entrance to hell. Oddly you end up making a lot of left turns doing anything, but the medication is to die for.

Re:controlling words (1)

jenningsthecat (1525947) | about a month ago | (#47280187)

...But it does convince one that the television is watching them, the government is make-believe and the closet has an entrance to hell.

Except for the 'closet' part, that sounds like a disturbingly accurate description of today's reality...

Re:controlling words (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month ago | (#47285295)

Well you've clearly never been in MY closet then!

Re:controlling words (3)

RabidReindeer (2625839) | about a month ago | (#47280355)

Your brain is malfunctioning and you need help. You don't believe me? That's because your brain is malfunctioning and you need help!

The entire fraudulent pseudoscience of psychiatry depends upon circular reasoning? You only think it does, because your brain is malfunctioning and you need help!!

Except that schizophrenics generally know that their brain is malfunctioning. And they're not happy about it. They may reject help, but they know they're not normal.

Now when a state-appointed psychiatrist declares that you are insane because you don't love this most perfect of all nations, that's a different matter.

Re:controlling words (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a month ago | (#47280651)

Indeed, I used to be schizoaffective and I made the mistake of coming in for help. The treatments themselves seemed to be designed to make the problem worse as they mostly underscored how differently my brain works from the model they're using. They also were trying to force me to buy into a reality that was just as non-existent as the one they were trying to get me to give up.

The point here is that if doctors want to get people to come in for treatment, they need to exercise some judgment and professionalism. It still would have caused serious issues in my life, but I would have been done by now and not needing help. Right now I'm working through all the damage that the incompetent professionals did. And doing it on my own because it's damn hard to find a competent doctor that looks past the diagnosis to see what's actually going on.

Re:controlling words (1)

machineghost (622031) | about a month ago | (#47282275)

Sometimes people trying to help you can't unless you let them. Try finding a good therapist (which might take a few attempts) and then once you find someone you can develop trust with try working with doctors. But remember, when your perception of things is distorted, it can be easy to see malice or incompetence when honest and qualified people face a difficult problem like mental illness.

Re:controlling words (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month ago | (#47284049)

What I found was that they did a shit job of listening. And anything I did tell them would wind up on my record where it would be used as rationalization not to listen in the future. The fact that this would wind up in my record is the main reason why I'd be very suspicious of letting them monitor me. The fact that the data might get leaked would be of secondary concern.

There are definitely good doctors out there, but wading through the incompetents is a challenge. Some health insurers don't even employ people that are competent to treat this sort of major disorder.

Re:controlling words (1)

RabidReindeer (2625839) | about a month ago | (#47290843)

What I found was that they did a shit job of listening. And anything I did tell them would wind up on my record where it would be used as rationalization not to listen in the future. The fact that this would wind up in my record is the main reason why I'd be very suspicious of letting them monitor me. The fact that the data might get leaked would be of secondary concern.

There are definitely good doctors out there, but wading through the incompetents is a challenge. Some health insurers don't even employ people that are competent to treat this sort of major disorder.

The whole field of mental health is about at the level of making fire by banging 2 rocks together, and all the fancy coats and drugs and gadgets and medical wards don't make it any less so, anymore than the proverbial lipstick on a pig. I've seen a lot of improvement over the last 100 years (no, not by living through all of them!) but there's a long, long way to go.

Mental health treatments are appallingly subject to fads, and have been all the way back to Freud and Jung. I'm not totally intimate with the field, but even from a comparatively distant viewpoint, I've seen about 4 different waves go by just in my lifetime and each one seemed to be a one-size-fits-all application.

Another thing is that while most psychologists I've known seemed pretty well-balanced, the psychiatrists all seemed to have a few rivets loose. And some of them with so many loose screws that their attitude towards people in general would seem likely to aggravate certain conditions among the patients themselves (I never cared for the word "client". It's a weasel word, and besides, you try to cure patients. Clients sounds too much like repeat business).

I have no explanation as to the general instability of psychiatrists. It may be simply because while a medical doctor may accidentally kill a patient, a psychiatrist has to worry about accidentally inciting a patient, er, "client", to kill themselves. Or it could simply be that the profession attracts the mentally shaky people in the same way that technology attracts autistics and introverts. All I can do is report what I've seen.

On top of all that, in the state where I live, you can refuse mental health treatment completely unless you're a clear and present danger to yourself or to the community, and even then compulsion is limited. But humans, even the sanest of them (assuming such exist) are perverse creatures, and in some cases a person will "protest too much". Meaning that they desperately want treatment, but don't want to be seen voluntarily seeking it. In other words, want to be "forced" to be treated. I knew someone of that stripe and it was very frustrating. The prohibitions on forcible treatment exist for a reason; because the process is too easily abused. But there's this Catch-22 area where you have people like my friend who won't get regular treatment and the very widespread situation where people on meds get feeling better and stop taking the meds that were making them feel better and relapse.

Also, if you want paranoia, seek mental health through your employer's Human Resources provided facilities. How much of the normal doctor/patient confidentiality you lose when you do so is unclear to me, but I do know that HR - and your personnel record - will know more than is comfortable.

Re:controlling words (2)

DNAtsol (678504) | about a month ago | (#47280607)

Me thinks someone did not do so well in psych 101. Just because you do not understand something does not mean it is a pseudoscience. There is plenty of biomedical (e.g., structural and functional brain studies), behavioral, and genetic research that converge on the same conclusions, conducted by people with big egos who have no interest is propping up other peoples cute little pet theories. In other word, the science of psychological disorders is cut-throat and you better have evidence to support you're claim or else you will be intellectually mowed down and decapitated. This is not a tiny self-contained group of people patting each other on the back and playing a game of "Yes, and...". These are not members of the Lone Gunmen.

Re:controlling words (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month ago | (#47282321)

Me thinks someone did not do so well in psych 101. Just because you do not understand something does not mean it is a pseudoscience.

There is plenty of biomedical (e.g., structural and functional brain studies), behavioral, and genetic research that converge on the same conclusions, ...

Not really, no I just did psych 101 and had a minor nervous breakdown trying to do the assignments precisely because this is not the case and I came from a nice happy applied science background where the conclusions are that clear cut and the maths just works.

Which isn't to say this stuff is pseudo science -- far from it that you have to grapple with the problems following and consider them is precisely what makes psychology a science and not a voodoo pseudo science like economics -- but fundamentally the field is dealing with constructs that are measured by proxies, how you define the constructs and choose which proxies to use messes shit up. Take depression, do you use subjective self reporting or objective physical measures?

Well you want to stick with objective measures, then you have moar evidence amrite?

Cool, so if you're sticking with objective measures then one common proxy for measuring depression (in combination with other physical measures) is weight loss.

Sounds fair enough right, after all one symptom of depression is loss of appetite. With me so far?

Sounds reasonable right, except that now all else being equal simply gaining weight now makes a person less depressed.

Well crap

Psychology is full of problems like this, that's what makes it interesting.

Re:controlling words (4, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about a month ago | (#47281317)

>The entire fraudulent pseudoscience of psychiatry

You bought this andi-psychology Scientology crap? Fuck you.

I was born with an inability to synthesize serotonin, and lived in a Hell of chronic severe major depression for 54 years until somebody invented a drug (Viibryd) that turned my life from hopeless anxious suffering to a thriving and much more pleasant existence that now makes me glad that I DIDN'T kill myself all through those years.

Some psychology is bogus, some practioners are bad at it or quacks, but not all psychology can be dismissed because you don't want to address your own issues and find denial and anti-scientism an effective avoidance technique.

Again, fuck you.

Re:controlling words (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month ago | (#47283611)

Let me guess, you're another mentally ill individual who self medicates in marijuana and are convinced that all of psychiatry is a fraud and a conspiracy.

People like you are a dime a dozen, and it's my taxpaying dollars that will go towards your eventual incarceration, medical supervision, and care. Thanks for nothing.

Re:controlling words (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month ago | (#47284273)

Let me guess, you're another mentally ill individual who self medicates in marijuana and are convinced that all of psychiatry is a fraud and a conspiracy.

People like you are a dime a dozen, and it's my taxpaying dollars that will go towards your eventual incarceration, medical supervision, and care. Thanks for nothing.

Dude, you do realize this is at least as paranoid as the post you're replying to, and with maybe even a touch more of a persecution complex

Pink Elephant on Parade (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month ago | (#47285329)

He's Republican or even worse, Libertarian. The craziness is just a side effect of drinking all that koolaid!

Re:controlling words (1)

MillionthMonkey (240664) | about a month ago | (#47284311)

Lots of people accuse psychiatrists in general of running a fraudulent pseudoscience. Aside from the issue of whether it's true or not, the accusations seem mostly to come from people who have recently stopped taking their meds cold turkey.

Re:controlling words (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month ago | (#47280089)

When, say, your daughter suddenly takes off for Florida, convinced that she will succeed in her new life as a monkey trainer, because the voices in her head said so, then she does need help. Period.

My daughter trained long and hard to be a monkey trainer in Florida, you insensitive clod. She's got college loans to pay off and the Florida Zoo happens to pay well.

You need your head examined!

Re:controlling words (3, Interesting)

flyneye (84093) | about a month ago | (#47280097)

I am doubtful of the smartphones role in this. One must be able to carry the phone without believing it is SPYING on you for the men who want to control you.
I can see smartphones being discarded or traded and the best laid plans of ex-spurts falling to poo.

Re:controlling words (1)

TapeCutter (624760) | about a month ago | (#47280137)

The met someone who was quite badly afflicted, it came out when he was dumped by a girl at age 17. He developed this thing for sneaking off and climbing trees during thunderstorms, he went missing about a decade ago, he lived on the south coast of NSW, the cops found his abandoned car in nearby bushland (dotted with gold rush era mine shafts), recent heavy rain meant dogs and human trackers had nothing to follow. AFAIK, he's still missing.

Socialising with the mentally ill can be difficult but it's often what they need most. So a word of warning from personal experience, if you do find yourself in a social setting with a schizophrenic who starts losing the plot, then whatever you do, do not offer them a bong hit thinking it will calm them down. If you have a conscious then at a minimum you will be obliged to confess your ignorance to the ambulance crew, you will then be subjected to a short lecture in just how stupid you are by an angry psychiatric nurse, followed by a full-length repeat performance from the wife.

because the voices in her head said so, then she does need help.

Yes, she needs help to deal with them, but the standard approach is to try and get rid of the voices. I think this woman's alternative view [youtube.com] of the voices in her head is worth listening to.

Re:controlling words (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month ago | (#47280685)

That's true. I'd been badly abused and neglected as a child so a lot of the normal pathways through my brain just didn't exist. After years of groups I did eventually gain the ability to coordinate the left and right sides of my brain, but then the health insurer cut the program completely so I made very little progress after that point.

I still have a few issues, but for the most part I'm OK and haven't needed medication in years.

Uh what? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month ago | (#47285343)

Are you saying that THC causes the episode to get worse? I don't think I've ever heard that before.

Re:Uh what? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month ago | (#47287653)

I did a quick review of the literature and the abstracts and media hype [phdcomics.com] claim that, but from what I could garner from reading the actual papers there are two key points. Firstly, that thc can cause transient psychotic symptoms, viz. freaking out for a bit. Secondly, honesty in self-reporting thc usage increases the odds -- by values varying between around up to the 2 to 1 mark -- of being diagnosed as having a a long term freak out catagorized as a psychotic episode (as opposed to say intense affect) and being diagnosed as a schizophrenic.

Re:controlling words (0)

Opportunist (166417) | about a month ago | (#47280253)

And now let's try without the thinkofthechildren strawman, can we?

Re:controlling words (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month ago | (#47280551)

You seem a bit emotional - you need help.

You seem a bit slow - you need help.

Your ambitions are wrong - you need help.

Your political opinions are wrong - you need help.

Your purchasing habits are wrong - you need help.

It's taken centuries of abuse of the mentally ill (and the mentally well, for that matter) to gradually come to the conclusion that this sort of paternalism is both cruel and entirely ineffective. I've helped close relatives through mental illness, and from my own experience and following the MH professionals who have helped out, I learned that it simply doesn't work to tell anyone what they "need" except when they're at the point of causing serious, permanent harm to themselves - and even then the most effective approach long-term is to talk people through their options.

The thing is that "need" is based on goals. And goals are individual. In particular, it's very rare for "voices in her head" alone to motivate someone to take off suddenly to Florida to become a monkey trainer - people who are mentally well make poorly-planned arrangements all the time and we don't assume that one little thing has caused it, but a gamut of personality and environmental factors. If someone's voices are overwhelming them then they should have help made available to them to deal with those voices, but they don't necessarily need anything except when you view their lives in your terms.

Re:controlling words (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month ago | (#47280681)

When, say, your daughter suddenly takes off for Florida, convinced that she will succeed in her new life as a monkey trainer, because the voices in her head said so, then she does need help. .

Although it would be awesome to train monkeys in Florida.

Re:controlling words (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month ago | (#47281481)

I've LIVED in Florida, and believe me, a LOT of those monkeys need training...

Re:controlling words (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month ago | (#47284021)

These people are still human beings with dignity aren't they? or are they just diseased chattled to be mitigated?

When, say, your daughter suddenly takes off for Florida, convinced that she will succeed in her new life as a monkey trainer, because the voices in her head said so, then she does need help. Period.

There are blunt ways to put it, and sugar coated ways to put it, but the brain is malfunctioning and it needs help.

I'm going to say something horrible here, but it is true so remember it, the problem here for you is that your daughter wants to go to florida. not the voices in her head.

This isn't to say that the voices in her head aren't a problem, or are; either way, the problem for you is what she wants to do, not the voices in her head.

Maybe she does need help, maybe she needs a bit of help to become a zookeeper, for example http://www.biology.ufl.edu/undergraduates/ZooKeeper.aspx

Or maybe not, but think about this; the phrase "You need help" is not helping as such, it's an almost ironic statement by which one disclaims responsibility to help personally.

Re:controlling words (1)

kruach aum (1934852) | about a month ago | (#47280009)

I wish psychiatrists could stop you from getting upset on other people's behalves.

Re:controlling words (1)

flyneye (84093) | about a month ago | (#47280105)

Good psychologists offer therapy for that.

Re:controlling words (1)

jenningsthecat (1525947) | about a month ago | (#47280201)

"Getting upset on other people's behalves" - isn't that called 'empathy'?

Re:controlling words (1)

Opportunist (166417) | about a month ago | (#47280259)

Nope. It's called "having no life of your own so you feel the pressing urge to meddle with those of others".

Gotcha (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month ago | (#47285359)

Just like you do on /. gotcha!

Re:controlling words (1)

Stewie241 (1035724) | about a month ago | (#47280383)

I'm sure that when they develop sensors to detect attitude and intentions the psychiatrists will avail themselves of it.

From what I gathered in the article this was about patients and/or their families coming to a doctor for help and using this as a tool for the doctor and patient to manage the patient's condition together.

This reminds of the article about Target's ability to tell if a shopper is pregnant (http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2102859/How-Target-knows-shoppers-pregnant--figured-teen-father-did.html).

The data being collected is obviously a typical outworking of an internal state. It seems useful in providing the psychiatrist with a clue as to when it might be a good idea to call in and checkup on a patient, or to have a family member drop in.

And yes, these are human beings with dignity. And obviously, there are complications with this particular condition that make things difficult, but if I had this condition I could imagine myself in my healthier times being interested in setting up a support system to prevent me from harming myself and/or others and ending up in the hospital.

telescreens sure are tiny (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month ago | (#47279927)

Turning off your telescreen, I mean phone, is a sure sign of mental illness. Don't turn off your phone, Mike. Yes you, Mike, I'm talking to you.

Sure, that will help (3, Insightful)

domin_smog (3510581) | about a month ago | (#47279961)

Giving a paranoid person a sense s/he is being observed 24/7...

Re:Sure, that will help (1)

qbast (1265706) | about a month ago | (#47279975)

Sure it will help. If they are *actually* observed 24/7 then they are not really paranoid anymore, just rational. See? Instant cure.

Re:Sure, that will help (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about a month ago | (#47280149)

It may seem like a joke, but I have met people diagnosed with paranoid schizophrenia for whom wearing loud clothes makes it rational that everybody is watching them, and alleviates the anxiety somewhat. If people get used to the fact that they are being observed 24/7, that their phones are always tapped by NSA/GCHQ, and that all their web activity is being watched to see if they are doing anything wrong, then it will make the paranoid delusions more rational. We'll never know for sure how far we are from that scenario, but if someone ten years ago insisted that the NSA were doing what they are, as we know from recent leaks, they would have been regarded as paranoid. That psychiatry at present just categorises symptoms and medicates with pills, rather than trying to understand what is happening in the mind of the person affected doesn't help.

Re:Sure, that will help (1)

TheCarp (96830) | about a month ago | (#47281351)

There was a great writeup a while back which I haven't found in years, but described various neurotransmitters and what low/normal/high levels of each correspond to in terms of subjective experience. I could kind of see how this would work.... if you naturally are in a state of mind where you interpret everyones actions as relating to you "they are all looking at me" ...then having a story to connect that to "of course they are, this shirt is amazing"; then it changes the character of the experience.

Wow the things people come up with, that really is clever mind hacking. Its almost like finding a trail of ants into your house and using strategic food placement to disrupt them and direct them elsewhere.

Re:Sure, that will help (1)

Opportunist (166417) | about a month ago | (#47280265)

Yeah, just 'cause you're paranoid doesn't mean THEY ain't out to get you!

Re:Sure, that will help (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month ago | (#47281021)

Yeah, just 'cause you're paranoid doesn't mean THEY ain't out to get you!

Stay alert! Trust no one! Keep your laser handy! Happiness is mandatory! You are happy, aren't you, Citizen? Trust the Computer! The Computer is your Friend!

Sometimes I think that those all-night tabletop gaming sessions were just preparation for reality...

Dangerous idea; locking patients up in a dragnet (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a month ago | (#47279965)

I think it's important to realize here that a lot of people with psychological problems will refuse to get any help if psychiatrists in general are going to insist installing spyware on their wearable electronics. Maybe not so much because they don't trust the psychiatrist with the information, but more because it's relatively easy for others (government, police, spouses and family with technologically smart kids or in general people who don't have the same context as the psychiatrist has on his patient) to peek at the data too. Without a trust-relationship with the psychological helper I'm afraid people with psychological problems will not open up at all and will prefer hiding. Schizophrenia patients (among others) aren't necessarily stupid enough not to understand that monitoring software on their smartphone can and will most likely be abused for completely other purposes than improving the quality of the patient.

Useful Technology (5, Interesting)

HangingChad (677530) | about a month ago | (#47280017)

As someone who used to answer the 911 psych calls for our volunteer FD in a rural area, a voluntary app like this could be really useful. Where we lived back then first responders were the only regular checks a lot of the psych cases ever got. By the time someone called 911, they were way off the sanity reservation. Then law enforcement got involved and packed them off to primary care. They'd stabilize on their meds, the hospital would cut them loose because they didn't have insurance, sometimes with a couple days worth of meds, and we'd start the cycle all over again. Anything that would alert medical personnel that someone was having a problem and find a way to get them some help before we got a call that they were chasing cows around in the pasture bare ass naked would be a good thing.

I learned that rural areas are full of crazy people because the cost of living is lower and they could be crazy and not bother as many people. It was kind of surprising to find out how many of our neighbors were genuinely, seriously out there howling at the moon loony tunes (technical medical jargon).

Re:Useful Technology (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month ago | (#47280043)

we got a call that they were chasing cows around in the pasture bare ass naked

What else is there do in rural Middle-Of-Nowhere?

Re:Useful Technology (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month ago | (#47280171)

Does such an app help fix the lack of insurance then?

Anyway, I'll believe that there is some use, possibly a lot of use. But who owns the data, who decides to start monitoring, who gets to monitor, and all that... all open questions with serious, long-term implications far outside just this one thing. Just because you can collect data, even if it is highly useful to someone, somewhere, somewhen, possibly you, right here, right now, doesn't mean you should.

Pretty soon we'll see that we've been collecting way too much data and even though some of it will have been highly useful at the time, all that data may turn out to be damaging later. This is a problem. This is something we need to learn how to deal with, as for now, we certainly cannot.

Re:Useful Technology (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month ago | (#47280323)

we got a call that they were chasing cows around in the pasture bare ass naked

Sounds like fun! Sitting solitary bare-ass naked in the dark playing Black Oops or World of Warcud for hours on end would be considered civilized, normal behavior?

Life ain't nothing but a funny, funny riddle, Thank God I'm a country boy. [youtube.com]

Re:Useful Technology (1)

gstoddart (321705) | about a month ago | (#47282117)

before we got a call that they were chasing cows around in the pasture bare ass naked

Wait, we're not supposed to do that? :-P

My biggest concern is if someone is getting a little into the area where they're going to start exhibiting some of the symptoms of schizophrenia, remembering to bring their phone with them isn't going to be a priority.

And then I question if this only really helps well funded/supported, well insured people or not. Not everybody who suffers from schizophrenia has really great access to such programs.

I thought they already did (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a month ago | (#47280019)

Don't phones already monitor schizophrenics? And satellites. And TVs. And the radio. And the people on the bus. And dental fillings. And the neighbours dog. They're all monitoring 24/7.

Re:I thought they already did (1)

Opportunist (166417) | about a month ago | (#47280267)

I wonder if that's some kind of "humoring the patient". Next, we'll start a program where we will call those pretending to be Napoleon "Sire".

Re:I thought they already did (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month ago | (#47280431)

Why would you refer to a 19th century Frenchman with a 14th century English title?

Re:I thought they already did (1)

Opportunist (166417) | about a month ago | (#47281995)

Umm... because that's how he wanted to be addressed?

Re:I thought they already did (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month ago | (#47281657)

Anthro... /s

It's not paranoia if they're really out to get you (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month ago | (#47280033)

And they are.

Schizophrenia, not schizophrenic (2)

Jason Goatcher (3498937) | about a month ago | (#47280039)

Um, not to be an ass, but a schizophrenic is someone who is suffering the symptoms of schizophrenia in a major way. When we're stable we simply suffer from schizophrenia. If someone is schizophrenic they definitely need to be hospitalized, but if it's just schizophrenia, not so much.

Not already? (1, Funny)

AndyKron (937105) | about a month ago | (#47280083)

Doesn't our government do that already?

Paranoia? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month ago | (#47280129)

This will only fuel the fire of paranoid schizophrenics.

R.D. (1, Insightful)

PopeRatzo (965947) | about a month ago | (#47280131)

If you're not schizophrenic, you're not paying attention.

Re:R.D. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month ago | (#47303429)

online bus booking (-1, Offtopic)

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Couterproductive (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month ago | (#47280165)

It seems to me that installing a tracker device would not benefit those with paranoid schizophreny, but rather exacerbate their condition. Such a devie would render me paranoid.

You think that's a good idea? (2)

Opportunist (166417) | about a month ago | (#47280269)

It already takes a lot of work to convince paranoid schizophrenics to trust their psychiatrist enough to open up to him. And now that person who they finally tentatively trust should start to do exactly what the patients think their "enemies" are doing to them?

Really? That's a good idea?

I guess I'm further from understanding the human psyche and psychology altogether than I thought...

Re:You think that's a good idea? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month ago | (#47281687)

It already takes a lot of work to convince paranoid schizophrenics to trust their psychiatrist enough to open up to him. And now that person who they finally tentatively trust should start to do exactly what the patients think their "enemies" are doing to them?

Really? That's a good idea?

I guess I'm further from understanding the human psyche and psychology altogether than I thought...

It's almost as if you'd need somebody with training and judgment to decide if they should push this particular therapeutic tool on each specific patient. Too bad we make all the psychiatrists treat every patient exactly the same way or this might be more helpful.

Analysis (1)

opine (3682421) | about a month ago | (#47280307)

Is blocking app permissions seen as a sign of relapse for paranoid schizophrenics?

Sounds great! Unless.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month ago | (#47280313)

That'll go over well with the paranoid schizophrenics.
911 operator: "Yes, sir, your phone is watching you."

Redundant (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month ago | (#47280327)

I thought that was what library cards was for.

yes but (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month ago | (#47280343)

Can I put this on my coworker's phone?

Won't work with people with Multiple Personalities (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month ago | (#47280367)

Android is by design, a single user OS.

Re:Won't work with people with Multiple Personalit (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month ago | (#47281415)

You can't, use commas properly.

Mental Health in the community (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month ago | (#47280389)

Note: I live in rural North East England. I have Schizophrenia. My meds and social care are provided for free by the NHS (National Health Service).

Care in the community is provided by NHS staff (Consultant Psychiatrists, Mental Health Nurses, (Approved or Standard) Social Workers and Project Workers) in a team called the "Community Assertive Outreach Team". In theory through regular contact between staff and patients (called clients these days), staff intervene before people totally lose the plot.

My point is this: smartphone monitoring should supplement, not replace, Care in the Community.

clever (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month ago | (#47280395)

Yep, thats a good way to treat paranoid prosecutory delusions, actually start prosecuting them, so that its not a delusion any more

WELDING 101 (1)

Jim Sadler (3430529) | about a month ago | (#47280637)

Try to get a paranoid schizophrenic to carry a phone that collects his information. Obviously you would have to weld the smartphone to the guy as it is the very first thing he would focus on getting out of his life. A substantial number of mental patients feel that nothing at all is wrong with them or that they just have an insignificant, tiny, issue.

Re:WELDING 101 (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month ago | (#47284669)

Try to get a paranoid schizophrenic to carry a phone that collects his information. Obviously you would have to weld the smartphone to the guy as it is the very first thing he would focus on getting out of his life. A substantial number of mental patients feel that nothing at all is wrong with them or that they just have an insignificant, tiny, issue.

http://com1300.dedalon.net/S_10_files/TheDoubleBindTheory.pdf

Maybe they're right, I dunno

I feel like the summary is missing it's ending (1)

dkman (863999) | about a month ago | (#47280665)

... so a black van can roll up, grab them, and cart them away.

People WITH Schizophrenia (0)

krisyan (2812943) | about a month ago | (#47280895)

The headline here should read "People WITH Schizophrenia". Because even though they have a significant mental illness they are still people and not one dimensional characters. Also, I somehow doubt you'll get a bunch of people with paranoia going along with this.

Bottle in front of me, or, Frontal Robotomy (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month ago | (#47281219)

Newsflash, shrinks: Smartphones are already monitoring everyone. For more than one party, including pre-crime predictors and predictive programmers, and schizzies are not the only programmatically predictable, so best mind your P's an Q's.

Maybe someone non-spook needs to monitor mental health contractors and politicians?

In other news, Goggle announces compact fMRI scanners to be integrated into their popular Goggle(tm) cyborg assisted living accessory.

Re:Bottle in front of me, or, Frontal Robotomy (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month ago | (#47281389)

"In other news, Goggle announces compact fMRI scanners to be integrated into their popular Goggle(tm) cyborg assisted living accessory."

and the remotely field programmable carotid SRI injector, of course.

Wait, isn't that what Facebook is for? (1)

microsquishy (3480229) | about a month ago | (#47281235)

n/t

SmartPhones (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month ago | (#47281465)

Problem is they need to carry both an Android and Apple phone....

First thing: break your phone (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a month ago | (#47281559)

When my schizophrenic brother was having his attacks, he used to think the wiring in the walls, appliances, metal shelves, silverware, anything metal was either talking to him (bleed-through he calls it) or emitting radiation. Several violent episodes where this went on and on.

So during an episode, pretty much the first thing he'd do was throw all these items out in the yard and break his cellphone in half. You'd know for sure he was having issues was when the phone went dead.

Lost an iPhone and several flip phones that way. I ended up getting him a Blackberry. They are cheap on eBay. No other reason. He can trash them all he wants.

By the way, it turns out most appliances don't like being thrown out in the yard. This illness is incredibly destructive to the people involved and to their property.

1984 (1)

fgouget (925644) | about a month ago | (#47281683)

Governments have realized that they can collect vast amounts of data about their citizens using smartphone apps that passively monitor the citizens as they go about their daily business. A prototype for opponents is planned to be tested out soon on Long Island. The Tia trial will look at behavior patterns (tracking movement, sleep, and conversations) and correlate them with data gathered from past opponents; researchers hope the data will reveal the "signature" of a citizen who is about fall off the one true path and therefore needs help.

Hmm. I'm in two minds about this. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a month ago | (#47282191)

Hmm. I'm in two minds about this.

The "Influencing Machine" in Schizophrenia (3, Informative)

meehawl (73285) | about a month ago | (#47282319)

Designing a machine to invisibly spy on schizophrenics. What could possibly go wrong? On the Origin of the "Influencing Machine" in Schizophrenia [wikipedia.org]

The schizophrenic influencing machine is a machine of mystical nature. The patients are able to give only vague hints of its construction. It consists of boxes, cranks, levers, wheels, buttons, wires, batteries, and the like. Patients endeavor to discover the construction of the apparatus by means of their technical knowledge, and it appears that with the progressive popularization of the sciences, all the forces known to technology are utilized to explain the functioning of the apparatus. All the discoveries of mankind, however, are regarded as inadequate to explain the marvelous powers of this machine, by which the patients feel themselves persecuted.

LOL (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month ago | (#47283205)

This will fix their paranoia for sure.

My phone is a giraffe (1)

gelfling (6534) | about a month ago | (#47283725)

So I don't know what you're talking about.

Re:My phone is a giraffe (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month ago | (#47284117)

where is the microphone?

Paranoia? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month ago | (#47283981)

Am I the only one being forced to beta with this particular article? I had to mess with it to get in classic mode.

Where have they been for the last 10 years? (2)

jbmartin6 (1232050) | about a month ago | (#47284777)

Google, the NSA, and others have realized that they can collect vast amounts of data about people using smartphone apps that passively monitor them as they go about their daily business

FTFY

Re:Where have they been for the last 10 years? (1)

jbmartin6 (1232050) | about a month ago | (#47284785)

Nuts, missed that this was redundant. Sorry gentle readers!

DISGUSTING (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month ago | (#47285925)

For the record i find this disgusting. Given that "treatment" for schizophrenia is often given involuntarily i can imagine people being forced to be involved in this program. It's an complete infringement on a persons privacy. It's bad enough that the doctors have no idea how to fix the problem other than prescribing pills which cause significant side effects possibly even causing long term damage, it's bad enough that the hospitals keep data on record for years without the patients consent. This program should be shut down because because the powers that be cant be trusted. I propose that whoever is making this app be monitored 24/7 and whoever approves of using this app should have their lives monitored 24/7 too. Maybe then the fucker thats making the thing will have second thoughts about what he/she is doing.

damn (0)

strstr (539330) | about a month ago | (#47286579)

problem is the bastards use the mental health system like it's to assault and terrorize a person. so if the nuts who actually make use of this program self report something their psychiatrists will have them locked up in a nut ward, whereby they lose their freedom to live. also drugging and damaging these peoples brains is common ...

if I was a schizophrenic why the fuck would I volunteer to participated in some quack's program of 24/7 remote surveillance for this type of shit?

http://www.obamasweapon.com/ [obamasweapon.com]

Re:damn (1)

Frosty Piss (770223) | about a month ago | (#47338323)

I've been fucking your mother, and we've been talking about throwing you out of the basement so we can make it into a sex dungeon. What do you think?

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