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What Happens If You Have a Heart Attack In Space?

Soulskill posted about 2 months ago | from the dr.-mccoy-will-fix-it dept.

Medicine 83

An anonymous reader sends this story about medical research in zero-gravity environments. Many earth-based treatments need to be adapted for use in space, and anatomical behaviors can change in subtle and unpredictable ways as well. This research aims to protect astronauts and future generations of space-goers from conditions that are easily treatable on the ground. The ultrasound machine the students are testing would be well suited for space missions. It is light and compact, requires very little medical training to use, and the probe can stay in the body for 72 hours at a time. But the technology has only ever been used on Earth, and no one knows whether it would function correctly in zero gravity. The most significant concern is that microgravity will cause the probe to drift out of position. The team's mentor, cardiac surgeon and space medicine specialist Peter Lee, tells me that an ultrasound probe that sits in the esophagus is an ideal diagnostic tool for extended spaceflights. "If an astronaut far from Earth were to have a cardiovascular event, or for some reason became incapacitated and had to be on a ventilator, there's no imaging currently available [in space] that provides continuous images of the heart," he says. "You can use [external] ultrasound, but the technician has to be there the whole time to hold it on the chest."

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Today? (3, Insightful)

Known Nutter (988758) | about 2 months ago | (#47311879)

You've got yourself a serious set of problems any number of which will kill you, including the heart attack.

Re:Today? (4, Funny)

Travis Mansbridge (830557) | about 2 months ago | (#47312671)

One thing's for certain: no one can hear you scream.

Re:Today? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47313167)

One thing's for certain: no one can hear you scream.

Also, remember to not get the "space special". [youtube.com]

Hm (0)

Intrepid imaginaut (1970940) | about 2 months ago | (#47311899)

I'm thinking first world problems here.

Find the pause button on your forks folks.

Re:Hm (4, Funny)

geekoid (135745) | about 2 months ago | (#47311929)

what, you mean all those obese astronauts?

Re:Hm (2)

Dcnjoe60 (682885) | about 2 months ago | (#47314393)

what, you mean all those obese astronauts?

Obesity adds to the probability that one might experience a heart attack, but the non-obese are not immune. There are approximately 720,000 heart attacks in the US each year. But one's weight is only one risk factor and not even the largest one. Autopsies on soldiers killed in Vietnam showed that many of those 18 to 20 year olds, who were in very good physical condition had 20% blockage of their coronary arteries. Believing that heart attacks only impact the obese is why so many people ignore the signs of heart problems until it is too late to do anything about it.

Re:Hm (1)

findoutmoretoday (1475299) | about 2 months ago | (#47322707)

I thought underweight is a better predictor, like in a BMI of 18 (healthy) is more morbid than a BMI of 36 (morbidly obese)

huh (3, Insightful)

msauve (701917) | about 2 months ago | (#47311925)

If, after going through space flight qualification screening, you still have a heart attack - you would have died on the ground anyways. Count it as the last checkmark on your bucket list.

Re:huh (3, Interesting)

geekoid (135745) | about 2 months ago | (#47311933)

You don't know that.. Going to space may have been what set it off.

Re:huh (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47311977)

Choices have consequences. Deal with it.

Re:huh (1)

msauve (701917) | about 2 months ago | (#47312007)

Maybe. If you're one of the hundreds of people (out of billions) who have had the opportunity to go into space, count your lucky stars while you're there.

None have diied of a heart attack so far, and there's no reason for the great unwashed to fund research/technology to handle some future hypothetical event. If that's an issue for you, simply don't volunteer. No one has ever been forced onto a ride to space, non-humans excluded.

Re:huh (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47312027)

>>count your lucky stars while you're there.

If you're having a heart attack in space, I reckon all the starts you can see are pretty unlucky.

Re:huh (1)

EzInKy (115248) | about 2 months ago | (#47312351)

None have diied of a heart attack so far, and there's no reason for the great unwashed to fund research/technology to handle some future hypothetical event. If that's an issue for you, simply don't volunteer. No one has ever been forced onto a ride to space, non-humans excluded.

Exactly! It way too early to worry about anything except perhaps to screen out those most likely to have an MI during spaceflight.

Re:huh (1)

tlambert (566799) | about 2 months ago | (#47312799)

Exactly! It way too early to worry about anything except perhaps to screen out those most likely to have an MI during spaceflight.

That's OK; I'll just use a stolen ladder.

Re:huh (1)

JazzLad (935151) | about 2 months ago | (#47314899)

Borrowed ladder [duckduckgo.com]

:)

Re:huh (1)

EzInKy (115248) | about 2 months ago | (#47312335)

Then that is where research should be focused, how to better screen those who are apt to have a heart attack in space. Better biometric data recorders ;perhaps?

Re:huh (1)

gstoddart (321705) | about 2 months ago | (#47315619)

Except, by the time a space agency is going to send you into space, your vitals have been measured 75 different ways, on numerous occasions, over an extended period of time. And then done over and over again.

If an astronaut had a heart attack in space -- every test available to modern medicine which was performed on them missed it as being probable. It costs way too much money to send people into space to miss things like that.

So, if all of that stuff missed it, and you had one, I should think it may well kill you. Because it will come completely out of the blue with no signs of it being possible. (Well, I guess micro gravity itself could be a factor)

I should imagine the vital statistics and internal organs of astronauts are pretty heavily measured and monitored long before you ever end up in space, so they're not going to miss any likely causes.

Re:huh (1)

wisnoskij (1206448) | about 2 months ago | (#47311999)

I think it is more like. If, after going through space flight qualification screening, you still have a heart attack, some very serious shit must be going down. If you are at that pinnacle of health, it would pretty much require a shock to your heart to throw it off its rhythm.

Re:huh (5, Insightful)

Sasayaki (1096761) | about 2 months ago | (#47312029)

It's actually not about that. It's about not having a corpse up in space.

Seriously. A dead body is a significant biohazard and in the cramped, oxygen rich, closed-system environment of a spaceship having a corpse floating around is a serious biohazard. That thing's not going to stay in one piece; it's going to rot, break up, liquefy, and all in zero gravity.

If the crew starts breathing in dead guy, they too are in a lot of trouble.

These ships don't have a morgue or any way to properly dispose of a body. Although the idea of a "burial in space" is appealing, by simply casting the body out into the void, the problem is that this has its own problems. Assuming the vehicle's crew are capable of spacewalks, and they may not be, it's an unplanned excursion which takes up a surprising amount of resources, most notably time. Sure, the body would burn up for most vehicles -- the shuttle sees a temperature of around 1500 C for 15 to 20 minutes which I'm confident would do the job -- but it's a non-trivial exercise. They can't just open the window and toss 'em out.

Then there are the side effects, on crew morale least of all (the types of people picked for these missions tend to be hardy, very pragmatic folk who understand the risks and more than intelligent enough to realise this event was completely unavoidable and they're in no danger), but to the ground crew morale (who often feel extremely protective of the crew and are often, it's said, more nervous and frightened than the actual crew themselves), and to the broader space program in general.

There's also the broader financial implications. Training astronauts is EXPENSIVE. Research on keeping them alive, especially if such research can lead to other medical breakthroughs, is money well spent. Sure, that one guy is never going to fly into space again, but the ground crew for any mission is vast and tends to include other former astronauts. If he dies up there, we lose his experience and skills set, which we've paid a lot of good money for.

Re:huh (3, Interesting)

viperidaenz (2515578) | about 2 months ago | (#47312197)

Shove them in a big zip-lock bag. Rot contained.
Make it opaque, so no one can see dead rotting guy.

Re:huh (1)

mjwx (966435) | about 2 months ago | (#47312609)

Shove them in a big zip-lock bag. Rot contained.
Make it opaque, so no one can see dead rotting guy.

That sounds like its a good idea until someone opens the bag to make sure Frank was really dead.

Re:huh (2)

Threni (635302) | about 2 months ago | (#47313699)

If you want to make sure he's dead, chuck him out of the nearest airlock!

Re:huh (1)

GNious (953874) | about 2 months ago | (#47315411)

yeah, I'm thinking, "Use the OUTSIDE of the spacestation as cold-storage for any corpses"...

Re:huh (1)

Sasayaki (1096761) | about 2 months ago | (#47314375)

Does your average voyage contain a zip-lock bag big enough to house a body?

Weight is a huge concern for space voyages. It's something like $10,000 a pound. Quite a lot for a even a simple bag that doesn't have a dual, or tri, purpose.

I know nuclear submarines don't have airtight bags big enough to hold a body and they're much more free with what they can bring aboard. I was reading an article about one where a guy, what do you know, had a heart attack and died while they were submerged for a long duration. They ended up having a "feast" as a wake, because they cleared out one of the food freezers and chucked him in there.

Re:huh (1)

Enigma2175 (179646) | about 2 months ago | (#47316417)

Does your average voyage contain a zip-lock bag big enough to house a body?

Weight is a huge concern for space voyages. It's something like $10,000 a pound. Quite a lot for a even a simple bag that doesn't have a dual, or tri, purpose.

I know nuclear submarines don't have airtight bags big enough to hold a body and they're much more free with what they can bring aboard. I was reading an article about one where a guy, what do you know, had a heart attack and died while they were submerged for a long duration. They ended up having a "feast" as a wake, because they cleared out one of the food freezers and chucked him in there.

Yes, the big zip-lock back is called a space suit and most missions will have several onboard.

Re:huh (2)

LordLimecat (1103839) | about 2 months ago | (#47312215)

They have an airlock for a reason, dude. They can "just toss the body out the window".

All of the other problems you mention are in no way unique to astronauts; you would get the same problem in an IT field.

Re:huh (1)

Hamsterdan (815291) | about 2 months ago | (#47312283)

A dead body hitting a spacecraft at those speeds would probably not end that well

Re:huh (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47312479)

That's why sane people would not launch the guy inside a future torpedo in the exact same orbit they're in and keep the same orbit until being hit. They'd open the hatch and let it go. The body would not be going at "those" speeds, relative to the station, since they would not attach a jetpack to it. More likely, though, the body would be brought back to Earth to feed maggots.
Contrary to popular belief, space zombies are not common since very few space stations stay on ancient burial grounds for long.

Re:huh (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47317311)

since very few space stations stay on ancient burial grounds for long.

That only works for pets. Just have to watch out for zombie Laika!

Re:huh (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47312235)

"If the crew starts breathing in dead guy, they too are in a lot of trouble."

Unless they like that sort of think, of course.

Re:huh (1)

Hamsterdan (815291) | about 2 months ago | (#47312277)

If I was lucky enough to get in space (and die in the process), I would be honored to have a space funeral, be it launched into space, back to earth and burn up in the atmosphere, or launched into a photon torpedo while Saavik cries...

Re:huh (5, Insightful)

ColdWetDog (752185) | about 2 months ago | (#47312307)

If you think that there isn't a file somewhere in the depths of the Manned Flight Operations Manual (or whatever idiot acronym that NASA gives it) detailing exactly what you are supposed to do with a dead body, you're crazy.

They've thought of things you haven't thought of to think of.

Death is a pretty obvious one.

Re:huh (1)

jd2112 (1535857) | about 2 months ago | (#47312437)

If you think that there isn't a file somewhere in the depths of the Manned Flight Operations Manual (or whatever idiot acronym that NASA gives it) detailing exactly what you are supposed to do with a dead body, you're crazy.

They've thought of things you haven't thought of to think of.

Death is a pretty obvious one.

Ground Control to Major Tom,
Your circuit's dead. Is something wrong?
Can you hear me Major Tom?
Can you hear me Major Tom?

Re:huh (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47315223)

Yup! They'll have aprocedure for this!

ex. A micrometeriod through the head/heart on a space walk is the first thing that comes to mind. Instant death.

Re:huh (1)

DigiShaman (671371) | about 2 months ago | (#47315247)

Soylent Green...in SPACE! That's one way to advance recycling technology.

Re:huh (1)

Issarlk (1429361) | about 2 months ago | (#47313153)

If only they had some sort of airtight full body suit up there in their spaceship. They could put the dead body in it until they can dispose of it. That's really too bad the dozen (hundreds?) of scientists and engineer didn't think about it.

Re:huh (1)

Dcnjoe60 (682885) | about 2 months ago | (#47314449)

The other issue is to consider is long term space travel. It is likely that if space missions are for years, that people may die for any number of reasons, not just a heart attack. In addition, when people die, it usually isn't a nice clean thing. It's not just decay, which takes some time, but also that various orifices open and what they were holding back is let loose. In the closed environment of a space ship, you simply can't just mop up the mess, particularly in micro-gravity.

Re:huh (1)

MTEK (2826397) | about 2 months ago | (#47314563)

But it doesn't have to be a problem. If engineers can figure out a way to recycle urine . . .

Bio Warfare (1)

DarthVain (724186) | about 2 months ago | (#47315601)

Another problem with the simply ejecting a body into space is that of collisions. It isn't something that has any kind of propellant. Explosively decompressing an airlock isn't going to give it all that much of a velocity. That icy 100kg body is going to be wiping around earth at 17,000km/h, and would do all kinds of damage to anything it comes in contact with. In addition, I would imagine that doing so might also require course corrections, equal and opposite reaction and all of that. For any kind of duration, likely you could just strap the body to the outside until you can bring it back to earth. Then again not sure how great that is for moral. Though to be honest, I would be bet there is likely parts of the space station that enclosed, but either open to vacuum or unheated, like for science experiments etc... which might be simpler to use as a makeshift morgue. Has there ever been any deaths in space? It is likely pretty rare, but I am sure there is a procedure for it, just like everything else.

Re:huh (1)

PJ6 (1151747) | about 2 months ago | (#47320747)

Sure, the body would burn up for most vehicles -- the shuttle sees a temperature of around 1500 C for 15 to 20 minutes which I'm confident would do the job

According to Randall Munroe [xkcd.com] , the corpse wouldn't burn up on re-entry.

Duh. (1)

oldhack (1037484) | about 2 months ago | (#47311991)

You die.

Re:Duh. (1)

gargleblast (683147) | about 2 months ago | (#47312311)

Well the normal procedure is to leap 500,000 feet into the air, and scatter yourself over a large area.

Re:Duh. (1)

Lehk228 (705449) | about 2 months ago | (#47312391)

in space.

Re:Duh. (2)

oldhack (1037484) | about 2 months ago | (#47312679)

What are you, a patent writer?

in space... (1)

l0n3s0m3phr34k (2613107) | about 2 months ago | (#47312025)

no one can hear you scream "I'm having a heart attack!" Right now, you'd probably die if it was severe enough. Honestly, I think the higher risk would be from a stroke; zero-g might cause random blood clots to dislodge. The article doesn't mention this device actually getting deployed yet; their still testing it on the Vomit Comet. After what our guys did during Apollo 18 though, I'll put money down on them fabricating some type of defibrillator from the ISS itself. Since your in free-fall zero G, you might get lucky and have a longer time period since your heart doesn't need to pump nearly as hard; or that might screw up your internals even more! As Dennis Leary said "we just don't know". We probably should be inducing heart attacks in mice up there to see what happens.

I kinda find it hard to believe that NO ONE has sent a single defibrillator up there by now, just from a risk-assessment standpoint. Even though we send all our astronauts through rigorous health checks pre-flight, some of our astronauts are pushing 65-70. We've sent up student projects, a small defib doesn't weigh much. I have a feeling that a heart attack victim would fare well in a Soyuz emergency landing, if they even could in a rapid enough time frame.

Re:in space... (1)

viperidaenz (2515578) | about 2 months ago | (#47312201)

Random blood clots dislodging and going through your heart can cause a heart attack.

Re:in space... (1)

Opportunist (166417) | about 2 months ago | (#47312325)

I could see how in the confined quarters of a space station/capsule, with a lot of devices around you that may not react too well to it, handling a device that gives off an electrical spark might not really be in the interest of anyone...

Re:in space... (1)

Goerofmuns (3697419) | about 2 months ago | (#47313451)

Especially in a pure oxygen environment!

Re:in space... (1)

canadiannomad (1745008) | about 2 months ago | (#47315209)

Pure O2 is toxic. Just saying...

Redundancy, of course! (2)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | about 2 months ago | (#47312041)

Would there be any substantial anatomical issues presented by cracking the subject open and implanting a failover heart (maybe a pediatric one, to save weight, and since it's not the base-load heart or anything) if you are so worried about the primary one conking out?

I can see that transporting an entire failover astronaut, and getting him to swiftly and effectively take over the tasks abandoned by his dying comrade, might present payload capacity and psychological issues; but if it's just an extra heart and nobody dies, those should be substantially mitigated...

Re:Redundancy, of course! (3, Funny)

ColdWetDog (752185) | about 2 months ago | (#47312339)

Other than the fact that it has never been done, no problemo. Space is not exactly where you are supposed to do cutting edge (please excuse the pun) medical research. You have clearly never dealt with an Institutional Review Board [wikipedia.org] or you wouldn't think to bring up such silly ideas.

Next, you'll want to send lawyers into space, just to see if they really need to breath oxygen.

Re:Redundancy, of course! (1)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | about 2 months ago | (#47313581)

Oh, I was thinking of doing it preemptively, before they left, rather than trying to operate in space (Just imagine all the horrid blood globules floating merrily around the OR in zero gravity, and probably ending up hiding behind important instrument panels... Loathsome).

We already aggressively train and screen the humans we send into the harsh environment of space. Should we be planning to do anything more ambitious, or risky, it seems only logical to consider sending better-than-humans, rather than enough hardware to keep ordinary ones functioning.

CPR (1)

istartedi (132515) | about 2 months ago | (#47312045)

The first chest compression might work a bit, but then you go flying across the room. The shock from hitting the bulkhead might provide another stimulation to the heart, but after that you'd probably just roll up into a ball or something and drift around a bit. Of course none of the other astro/cosmo/($silly_name_for_each_country)nauts would be so foolish as to do it that way, so I don't know why I mentioned it... maybe because it seemed funny at that particular instant.

Of course they'd pin you to the wall first, then do chest compression. It might work.

Then you'd be dead weight for the rest of the mission, even though you're alive.

Of course I'm assuming a lot here. I assumed that you meant "in space, inside a spacecraft or station". If you meant just "in space", then you'd probably just die, and maybe be just a bit happy that the heart attack happened before all the other stuff that happens when you're in space without protection.

Of course you could have meant "in space in a space suit during an EVA" in which case the answer goes back to "just die" since there's probably no practical way for your fellow $silly_name_for_each_country"naut" to perform any kind of CPR.

Of cource it's all pure speculation because space agencies do all kinds of physical tests BEFORE SENDING PEOPLE UP for this very reason. At some point of course, they'll lower their standards for money so some old guy with a weak heart can go up, or space travel might become common enough and then we'll see the first heart attack in space. It will probably end up as described above.

Finally just to be a bit pedantic, I know all heart attacks are not killers that knock you out. Some are just pain and weakness with no loss of consciousness. They'd give you an aspirin for that and treat you when you get down. Duh. The intent here is mostly to be Funny.

CPR (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47312241)

A modified Heimlich Maneuver for CPR could probably be used in space in an emergency. That way, at least both of you would stay relatively still.

Re:CPR (1)

ColdWetDog (752185) | about 2 months ago | (#47312349)

A modified Heimlich Maneuver for CPR could probably be used in space in an emergency. That way, at least both of you would stay relatively still.

They tried that in the 1900's - wasn't too successful. Besides people tend to vomit during and after a Heimlich maneuver. Not exactly kosher inside a spacecraft.

Re:CPR (3, Interesting)

istartedi (132515) | about 2 months ago | (#47312397)

I'm guessing that the modification would be to reach around from behind and do compression on the chest instead of below the sternum. In other words, not a Heimlich, but a way to do chest compression in zero-G without the aforementioned difficulty of maintaining stability. That's actually a pretty good idea, although it probably still doesn't solve the EVA problem. I don't think anybody can perform a Heimlich, modified or otherwise, in those bulky suits.

Re:CPR (1)

necro81 (917438) | about 2 months ago | (#47313891)

The first chest compression might work a bit, but then you go flying across the room. The shock from hitting the bulkhead might provide another stimulation to the heart, but after that you'd probably just roll up into a ball or something and drift around a bit.

The Hollywood fairy tale of CPR, or a sudden thump to the chest, causing someone's heart to start beating again is just that - a fairy tale. Even today, with CPR knowledge relatively widespread, most people that have a heart attack (i.e., the heart actually stops beating) will die of it. The purpose of CPR is to keep the rest of you - principally your brain - properly oxygenated until definitive medical care (drugs, defibrillator, oxygen, stents, etc) can properly revive you. The notion that astronauts are going to perform CPR on one of their colleagues for several hours, through re-entry, and all the way to a hospital is laughable. Even if the astronaut survives, all that's left would be a turnip that can breathe.

Re:CPR (1)

Russ1642 (1087959) | about 2 months ago | (#47315293)

CPR to save drowning victims has a success rate above zero.

More important question... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47312101)

What Happens If You Shit Your Pants in Space?

Re:More important question... (1)

viperidaenz (2515578) | about 2 months ago | (#47312211)

Depends what you had for lunch.

Re:More important question... (1)

Opportunist (166417) | about 2 months ago | (#47312331)

Ask Buzz Aldrin. Though the story ain't too ... tasteful. Let's just say a "floater" in space is even worse than it is on Earth...

Re:More important question... (1)

sa1lnr (669048) | about 2 months ago | (#47313331)

You get a floater.

Built-in resuscitator, please (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47312125)

If I were going into space, I'd like to have an implanted cardioverter-defibrillator, which is also connected to diaphragm/chest muscles to force breathing.

There are too many failure modes where death can happen during repressurization, and I'd like my body to have some help to get restarted for a few minutes.

Re:Built-in resuscitator, please (1)

EzInKy (115248) | about 2 months ago | (#47312389)

Wouldn't it be much more expedient to only allow those who don't worry about such things to go into space? This really is such a low priority issue it is almost laughable. There is so much more important survival factors to focus research on instead of wasting it whether someone with undected artheroscralosis survives.

Ultrasound solved (1)

statemachine (840641) | about 2 months ago | (#47312159)

"You can use [external] ultrasound, but the technician has to be there the whole time to hold it on the chest."

Use a strap.

Why wasn't that the follow-up question?

Astronaut James Irwin had a heart attack on moon (5, Interesting)

DanDD (1857066) | about 2 months ago | (#47312207)

From Wikipedia on James Irwin [wikipedia.org] :

The astronauts' physiological vital signs were being monitored back on Earth, and the Flight surgeons noticed some irregularities in Irwin's heart rhythms.[9] Irwin's heart had developed bigeminy.[10] Dr. Charles Berry stated to Chris Kraft, deputy director of the Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC) at the time: "It's serious, [i]f he were on Earth. I'd have him in ICU being treated for a heart attack."[10] Endeavour's cabin atmosphere was 100% oxygen when in space, so it was decided that he was in no serious danger by Dr. Charles Berry.[10] Specifically, "In truth,...he's in an ICU. He's getting one hundred percent oxygen, he's being continuously monitored, and best of all, he's in zero g. Whatever strain his heart is under, well, we can't do better than zero g."

Re:Astronaut James Irwin had a heart attack on moo (2)

ColdWetDog (752185) | about 2 months ago | (#47312359)

Funny thing is now we would ignore it. We used to get excited about bigeminy and did all sorts of dangerous, useless things. Now it's just used to scare medical students.

Excuse Me Butt (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47312217)

In the NASA Mercury Days the astronauts did have a "wire up the Kazoo!" meaning anus.

Not a happy thing this.

Prescreening still best (1)

EzInKy (115248) | about 2 months ago | (#47312317)

At this stage of the game it would probably make more sense to limit space travel to those with the lowest risk factors rather than waste money on treatment. First and foremost, research today should be 100% geared to how to successfully and consistently move humans from this planet to another. Treatments for the less than healthy can wait until that is accomplished.

Why? (1)

kazekirifx (2647275) | about 2 months ago | (#47312435)

There are already tons of things that can kill you on the ground. Medical professionals should focus on those, rather than the tiny fraction of human beings who will ever have a chance to experience space travel.

Laughable Phantasmagoria (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47312543)

"In Space ... Your Die."

Looks like some intern at the White House is getting a "cigar" from Obama.

Well well, is the intern a "he" a "she" or "it" ?

Does Obama ... Care ?

Is Holdren worried about "Population" ?

Can the EPA really smell CO2 ?

?

mo5d up (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47312549)

itW a break, if

You go to heaven faster (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47312849)

:)

What if you died? (1)

opus_magnum (1688810) | about 2 months ago | (#47312881)

Where would they put your corpse?

Re:What if you died? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47313407)

Where would they put your corpse?

Uh probably somewhere outside.

Yes, that's correct, no one can hear you scream. However, everyone can still smell you rot.

Re:What if you died? (1)

JazzLad (935151) | about 2 months ago | (#47315695)

I thought it was established that the body was put in a photon torpedo tube & shot out into space ...

Dammit Jim... (1)

fleabay (876971) | about 2 months ago | (#47312911)

I'm a doctor, not a theorist.

One word... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47313169)

Velcro.

This may be simplistic, but (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47313217)

Could they not just sticky-tape the probe on the outside somewhere?

Interesting question (1)

JeremyMorgan (1428075) | about 2 months ago | (#47313371)

I have never given that much thought, but why wouldn't they fit them with a wearable defibrillator? That would at least help with V-tach and V-Fib situations. Though I'm not sure those operate in zero gravity either.

Huh? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47313535)

[...]there's no imaging currently available [in space] that provides continuous images of the heart

Actually, there's no imaging currently available on earth that provides continuous images of the heart. No one on Earth with a heart attack has continuous echocardiogram (ultrasound) imaging done throughout their stay on Earth. Electrocardiogram leads (measuring the electrical activity of the heart) work just as well in space as on Earth and have been used for decades.

Also, an ultrasound probe in the esophagus for any extended period of time is going to cause continuous pressure upon the walls of the esophagus, causing ulcerations and potentially perforation.

Was the guy interviewed even a medical doctor?

Alternatively.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47313991)

Q: What happens when you take a dump in your pants at the bottom of the ocean ?

Free fall broke my cat scanner (1)

linear a (584575) | about 2 months ago | (#47315037)

I tested free fall on my cat scanner for 5 seconds and it's now completely non-functional. Nearly free fall I should say, a little net gravitational force on it near the 5 second mark due to air resistance.
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