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Ask Slashdot: Correlation Between Text Editor and Programming Language?

Soulskill posted about 4 months ago | from the fortran-and-a-stack-of-recycled-construction-paper dept.

Programming 359

tyggna writes: "The flame wars of different shells and text editors have long been established, but my question is this: are text editors and various languages linked? Do the majority of Ruby programmers use Emacs? Are most Perl programmers using vim?

Please post your editor and language of choice in the comments."

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

Uh, sure.. (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47336243)

Some editors are more useful or even custom tailored for specific languages or functional areas, and naturally people who use those languages or work in those areas tend to gravitate towards them.

Some languages (like java) are almost unusable without one of several popular editors, which deal with a lot of the boilerplate and let you navigate around the kind of "a million small pieces" type code you get with java. You can code java in vim if you want to, but working on a large java project with vim is probably not a common practice (I'm sure several counter-examples will be provided below).

Apple is probably the king of the designated editor group, with microsoft coming in at a close second. These are relatively closed stacks and have purpose built (and pretty decent) tools to work with them, so most people do.

And then some languages (scripting languages, c/c++) are edited commonly with just about everything.

Outside specific editor features designed with a specific language in mind, or tools which require a specific editor, I don't think anything drives someone to use one generic editor over another one of similar capability. People chose vim vs emacs for non-language specific reasons (for example: number of attached hands).

Also this is a really lame question. Does anyone really care about editor flame wars any more? People use what they like, what works, or what they are mandated to.

Re:Uh, sure.. (5, Insightful)

1s44c (552956) | about 4 months ago | (#47336275)

I think we should close the comments here. The parent covered all the important points.

Re:Uh, sure.. (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47336493)

No, he missed at least one reason why scripting and c/c++ languages are commonly edited with just about anything. They're too complex or lack the proper hints to allow easily creatable intelligent tooling. Another factor is timing. Developers starting on Emacs/VI when there was nothing else around kept with those tools. Newer developers grab the newer tools and stick with those. I'd bet the older languages are more commonly edited in text editors compared to newer languages. The exception to this is when one first starts learning to program. Most people start out on a text editor because a full IDE looks too complex.

Re: Uh, sure.. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47336655)

Quite clearly you have never programmed with script languages nor c / c++ or you would know that there are several very good IDEs for these languages. The reasoin scripting languages are edited with just about anything is because they are quite legible without fancy editor support, and also because, well, they are sometimes used for scripting relatively small tasks. IDEs start to be usefull if you have larger projjects

Re:Uh, sure.. (2, Insightful)

TheRealMindChild (743925) | about 4 months ago | (#47336291)

Apple is probably the king of the designated editor group, with microsoft coming in at a close second

Wut. Visual Studio is light years ahead of any other IDE anywhere

Re:Uh, sure.. (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47336315)

I meant as far as having a "one true editor".

Visual studio is popular for windows development, but there are also plenty of popular alternatives.

Does anyone do any kind of development for apple without using xcode? I've never even heard of another editor in common use on apple.

Re:Uh, sure.. (4, Insightful)

thewebsiteisdown (1397957) | about 4 months ago | (#47336363)

Apple is probably the king of the designated editor group, with microsoft coming in at a close second Wut. Visual Studio is light years ahead of any other IDE anywhere

This is the correct answer. IDGAF what anyone says about it, VS has no equal. That debugger is as close to magic as I've seen a computer come.

Re:Uh, sure.. (2)

sideslash (1865434) | about 4 months ago | (#47336699)

I agree (as a regular VS, Xcode, and Eclipse user, in addition to Xamarin Studio and others) that Visual Studio is the awesomest IDE, but it's only fair to add that the "E" part has actually regressed a little in recent years. For example, they dropped support for macro recording/playback. I'm guessing their excuse was that they rewrote everything and didn't get around to it, but still... *grump* *grump*

Re:Uh, sure.. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47336411)

You evidently do not use Visual Studio.

Here is a snapshot of my workday:

1) Open a VS solution
2) Go and get a cup of coffee
3) Get back to find that VS, and Visual Assist which attempts to make it usable (and unless you shut most of it off fails abysmally), are just finishing parsing solution
4) Do some work on a few files
5) Build, and watch in despair as VS's incremental build determines that it needs to rebuild a startling number of files in a totally different project (there are no circular dependences; I have no idea why it does this, but it does, on a daily basis)
6) Cancel build, and go for a cup of coffee while VS hangs
7) Get back to find VS still hanging and make the mistake of moving the mouse over the screen, at which point the dreaded "Visual Studio is busy" dialogue appears in the System Tray and then VS crashes
8) GOTO 1 and avoid step (7)
9) Undo some pending changes
10) Watch VS hang and make the mistake of moving the mouse over the screen, at which point the dreaded "Visual Studio is busy" dialogue appears in the System Tray and then VS crashes
11) GOTO 1 and avoid steps (7) and (9)
12) Work, suffering the endless rebuilds of dependencies, and shelve at the end of the day (using the equally fantastic TFS, which I'm certain stands for Total Fucking Shit because it sure as fuck doesn't provide much of a foundation for our team)

There is no Earthly way Microsoft use VS to develop VS, or it wouldn't be such a stinking pile of shit that chokes so horrifically with large projects. I haven't even mentioned the useless abortion which is "Intelli" "Sense". I shut as much of it off straight away. What the fuck is the point of a setup that takes about five minutes to fail to find the definition or declaration of a method, and attempts to be friendly by repeating compiler warnings, verbatim, on the same fucking page as the compiler warnings themselves are shown? I would love it if we could use anything else. *Anything* else. I'd even use NetBeans. Only VS's surprisingly spiffing debugger provides any relief to the incessant irritations of my working day.

Re:Uh, sure.. (4, Informative)

thewebsiteisdown (1397957) | about 4 months ago | (#47336521)

We use visual studio constantly, every day, usually with multiple large projects open per box at a time, building to Debug, pushing and pulling from git repo's, and being really productive in the process. Apparently running it on a 486 with 256mb of RAM is, well, your fucking problem. Get a box that can support and IDE, or use notepad. There are hundreds of thousands of VS users that can call bullshit on your rant.

Re:Uh, sure.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47336645)

Did you post to right thread dude?

Re:Uh, sure.. (2)

hermitdev (2792385) | about 4 months ago | (#47336705)

I've used VC6, VS2003, 2005, 2008, & 2013. VS is perfectly fine & performs well for C#. 2008 and earlier absolutely sucked for C++ (I've not done C++ in VS2013), because of intellisense, which you cannot turn off. You're writing code, trying to invoke a function, and intellisense kicks in and you're stuck waiting for minutes, while the UI is hung, for it to give you suggestions on what I already know I want to do. To boot: you cannot disable it. The C# experience is quite different, and the IDE was a pleasure to use for that. The debugger, regardless of the language is still one of the best I've used. For C++, give me vim any day.

Re:Uh, sure.. (1)

AaronLS (1804210) | about 4 months ago | (#47336631)

Granted VS can be pretty annoying, it shouldn't be hanging crashing that much. Extensions, even the really cool looking ones, have stability issues. I used to have more issues until I ditched almost all the extensions I had installed.

Do you have it setup to get-latest from TFS on solution open? I only get latest before I checkin to verify that there are no conflicts. This minimizes changes and dependency rebuilds. Sure YOU didn't change anything, but if you have it configured to get latest when you open solution, you are bound to get other peoples changes in dependencies.

Why Cancel at #6? That's only going to put you back at #1. You're making an annoying problem into an impossible never ending problem. Was your plan to cancel the build, and then have a stern talking to with the compiler and ask it not to compile dependencies? Only way you are going to control that is to reference DLL's instead of projects, which obviously isn't a solution, but point being if it decides for whatever reason it wants to compile a dependency, you aren't going to make things better cancelling the build.

Re:Uh, sure.. (5, Insightful)

DataPath (1111) | about 4 months ago | (#47336427)

Obviously false.

Emacs comes with a built-in psychoanalyst - a critical feature for any experienced developer. Especially one using Emacs.

Visual Studio lacks such a feature, so the logical conclusion is that developers using Visual Studio are simply inexperienced.

Although, to be fair, Emacs isn't properly an IDE, it's an OS that comes with IDE features.

Re:Uh, sure.. (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47336701)

And there's even a vi plugin for it that turns it into a text editor!

Re:Uh, sure.. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47336579)

Visual Studio is Microsoft garbage. The fact that it's proprietary software means that it's automatically trash in my eyes. Same for Apple's trash.

Re:Uh, sure.. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47336673)

You are a stupid fuck wit, you mouth breathing neck beard.
Fuck you I hope you catch fire and die.

Or even better, don't die and live a life of constant pain.

Re:Uh, sure.. (1)

Nutria (679911) | about 4 months ago | (#47336321)

(for example: number of attached hands).

This was written to satirize the number of huge emacs chords, but is actually a valid point: since I only have one hand capable of keyboarding, emacs is a non-starter for me.

Re:Uh, sure.. (1)

halfdan the black (638018) | about 4 months ago | (#47336619)

WHAT!?!?!

Apple is probably the king of the designated editor group, with microsoft coming in at a close second. These are relatively closed stacks and have purpose built (and pretty decent) tools to work with them, so most people do

If anything, Windows is the absolute king of languages that CAN ONLY BE USED IN THIER IDE. Take a look at Visual Basic, completely tied the VB mouse clicky clicky IDE, then of course there used to be a company called Borland which also made mouse clicky clicky languages like Delphi, a variant of Pascal that was locked to an IDE, I think they also tried to do the same with a version of C++. Then of course, there was Microsoft MFC which was so bad that that they had to write an IDE to even use it.

Uh, sure.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47336733)

I know I'm seriously alone on this one, but on occasion I do vb.net in vi (slickedit)

Emacs, vi, IDE (3, Insightful)

mrflash818 (226638) | about 4 months ago | (#47336249)

In that order.

Re: vi, Emacs or IDE (1)

bobbied (2522392) | about 4 months ago | (#47336333)

In that order.

FIFY.... (IMHO)

Everybody doing Linux work needs to know VI, at least well enough to get Emacs running. If you want to do an IDE, you are going to need X which used to require editing that huge config file where I used VI. Why bother with Emacs, unless you write LISP code anyway... Syntax highlighting? Does that even work in the terminal version?

Re: vi, Emacs or IDE (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47336391)

Why would you run any editor but GNU Emacs on a GNU/Linux system? Vi is not GNU.

Re: vi, Emacs or IDE (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47336543)

I use Linux not some retarded attenion whoring called "GNU/Linux".

Re: vi, Emacs or IDE (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47336713)

Really? You're using some kind of BSD userland then I guess.

Re: vi, Emacs or IDE (1)

naris (830549) | about 4 months ago | (#47336653)

Because, back in the day on unix and xenix systems vi was often the only option other than ed and you got used to it...

Re: vi, Emacs or IDE (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47336669)

If I could run Linux without having to use anything the smelly RMS touched I would be much happier. My god is that thing disgusting.

Just thinking about the GNU mascot (that hideous looking goat thing with the faggy smile on it's face... smiling like RMS just rimmed it) is enough to induce nausea.

Re: vi, Emacs or IDE (2)

Anrego (830717) | about 4 months ago | (#47336393)

There's always nano :)

Re: vi, Emacs or IDE (2, Funny)

TheRealMindChild (743925) | about 4 months ago | (#47336481)

Linux "experts" love to hate on nano because you don't need a cheat sheet to just start using it

Re: vi, Emacs or IDE (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47336509)

There's always nano :)

Text editor of the gods.

nano vs pico flames (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47336523)

Nano! How dare you mention nano. pico is WAY better.

Re: vi, Emacs or IDE (1)

bobbied (2522392) | about 4 months ago | (#47336569)

Not in the default minimum install of Red Hat 6... (or is it?)

Re: vi, Emacs or IDE (2, Informative)

geekboybt (866398) | about 4 months ago | (#47336625)

Is not. But there's only a neutered version of vim too, so either way you're installing something.

Re: vi, Emacs or IDE (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47336629)

What is this 2002?

I vim and Perl (1)

gurps_npc (621217) | about 4 months ago | (#47336251)

The reason I vim and Perl is that I run Perl on a unix system. When I run it on windows, I use Notepad++. So I think it might have more to do with the operating systems than with personal preferences.

Re:I vim and Perl (1)

Z00L00K (682162) | about 4 months ago | (#47336289)

If I want to view/edit random code I go for VIM as long as it's a small scale action. If I'm going to work with larger scale projects in C++ or Java it's Eclipse. For hash-coding in C# it's Visual studio.

I gave up on Emacs 20 years ago because it was never as default on the systems I was on then and it was too much of a hassle to build it on them.

VIM (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47336255)

VIM + Python

Really? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47336257)

This sounds like a dumb question.

Anyway: UltraEdit, Notepad++, PhpStorm pretty much cover everything I need for my perl/PHP needs.

vim c (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47336267)

vim c

Perl & EPIC (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47336269)

For any structured perl application (not the 30 minutes to automate something once) I generally get EPIC (An Eclipse add-on) going. Othewise Notepad++ on Windows, or vi usually suffices on Linux or Solaris....

Old School (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47336279)

C99 in vim

kate editor from kde (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47336281)

for web development PHP, JS, LUA etc

vim and Pthon... (1)

thewebsiteisdown (1397957) | about 4 months ago | (#47336283)

Oops... I meant Visual Studio and C#

Oldster, not hipster (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47336293)

C, vi. My IDE is make. Now get off my lawn!

One editor, multiple languages (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47336295)

Editor: emacs
Languages of choice: C++, ocaml, latex, perl, python

vim & nvi (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47336297)

vim - Python, Ruby
nvi - C, Makefiles

Applesoft BASIC in Applesoft BASIC (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47336299)

yes

C/C++, perl, python, Java (1)

Snotnose (212196) | about 4 months ago | (#47336303)

Mostly vim, although I'll drop to Eclipse if I need a debugger for Java.

BBEdit and Emacs (1)

mah! (121197) | about 4 months ago | (#47336317)

wait, what?
Yes, BBEdit and Emacs, side-to-side, one for its clean interface, multi-file search GUI, etc. and the other one for its macros and programmability.
Now if only Python had a good *native* GUI debugger on Mac OS X that'd be useful.

No love for nano? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47336323)

No love for nano?

Double troll (1)

BlackPignouf (1017012) | about 4 months ago | (#47336325)

Wow. Congrats on your double troll!
PS: Vim-ruby FTW!

Eclipse (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47336327)

PHP, HTML, Javascript = Eclipse
Simple edits = Scite

Re:Eclipse (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47336499)

PHP, HTML, Javascript = Eclipse
Simple edits = Scite

Only shows you don't value your time.

nano = configs, shell bits
scite = everything else

gedit 4 life (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47336335)

gedit on gnome2 on Linux 2.6.32-62-generic #125-Ubuntu SMP Mon Jun 9 16:05:41 UTC 2014 i686 GNU/Linux
idle otherwise

Re:gedit 4 life (1)

LordLimecat (1103839) | about 4 months ago | (#47336575)

Scite is not only generally better, its also cross platform.

Visual Studio most common for .NET (VB, C#) (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47336337)

Research shows most VB.NET and C# programmers use Visual Studio.

NEdit (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47336341)

NEdit for VHDL / Verilog / SystemVerilog, an oldie but a goodie. Not a programming language mind you, but a hardware design language. And Linux due to offloading the legwork of simulations and chip builds from a local machine which is used for reading ... this.

vim and C++ (1, Informative)

dr_leviathan (653441) | about 4 months ago | (#47336343)

I use vim for almost 100% of all editing. My main programming language is C++

OK (5, Funny)

slapout (93640) | about 4 months ago | (#47336347)

"Please post your editor and language of choice in the comments."

O'Reilly and English

Re:OK (1)

Oligonicella (659917) | about 4 months ago | (#47336465)

Sir or Madam, that was sweet.

I'm seriously an outlier. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47336633)

The very last program I wrote was in Inform 6, and I used Kate. Honest to God!

Whatever (2)

Fished (574624) | about 4 months ago | (#47336349)

I was an Emacs dude for a long time and still use it. Then I tried RubyMine, and eventually upgraded to IDEA. The IDE features are sometimes handy. I also use vi very regularly for quick edits of small scripts.

I would no more stick to one editor than I would stick to one programming language. Right tool for the job is the key.

Perl and Vi (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47336359)

But, the "reason" is:
Programming language of any sensibility (Bash is not) that is available on "every" unix system: Perl
Editor of any usefulness that is available on "every" unix system: vi

So through sysadmin experience, I "learned" to use the very basics.

emacs for lisp, vim for other code, vile for text (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47336389)

vim and other vi's don't have a decent lisp mode, as far as I can tell.

emacs has the best lisp mode by far, but for everything else it just makes my wrists ache to have to type control-meta-alt-whatever

I love editing ordinary text in vile because it's got some features that I've written macros around
that just don't seem to be there in other editors. (of course they're there somewhere in vim and emacs,
but they don't fall to hand as easily.

For some languages .... (1)

PPH (736903) | about 4 months ago | (#47336395)

... the emacs psychiatrist comes in handy.

N/A (3, Interesting)

Oligonicella (659917) | about 4 months ago | (#47336403)

I don't use one language, I don't use one machine, I don't use one operating system, I don't use one editor and I don't program into any language with just one of those editors. So, to me, the entire topic reduces to "That doesn't even make sense."

This site is a mess (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47336407)

Obviously they created ./ in Word

emacs, vi in a pinch. (3, Insightful)

Mysticalfruit (533341) | about 4 months ago | (#47336409)

If I have to write a tool, I create a new buffer in emacs and have at it. If I'm standing in front of a machine fixing it, I'll reach for vi, only because it's on every platform.

I work in almost a 100% UNIX environment and what I generally see on people's desktops are: emacs, Eclipse (some flavor) and IntelliJ.

Re:emacs, vi in a pinch. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47336689)

Emacs of course! Languages = C, Perl, HTML. Why even plain text. I even create my blog pages in Emacs then C&P into Wordpress.

C# and VS are obviously linked (2)

neminem (561346) | about 4 months ago | (#47336417)

See title

VS also handles javascript pretty well these days, so I rarely have to leave the VS bubble - which is nice, as VS is actually a pretty darn good IDE.

Very recently I've been fooling about with learning Android development, for which I use IDEA. It's no VS (I miss VS), but it's also no (major ew) Eclipse.

On the rare occasion that I have to edit some other type of code file (or the slightly less rare occasion that I have to edit an xml file), I use notepad++. Unless it's a really simple edit, in which case I use regular notepad.

On the rare occasion that I'm in a linux environment and I have to edit a text-type file, I use pico/nano, because screw emacs *and* VI. :p

Notepad++ / Python (1)

MetalliQaZ (539913) | about 4 months ago | (#47336437)

On *nix I most use Vim. If I'm not using Python, I'm using C.

C/C++/Java/Ruby/Python and I use.... (5, Funny)

RedHackTea (2779623) | about 4 months ago | (#47336445)

Quill pen on papyrus. I have a dedicated typist to re-type all of it when I'm done into whatever editor it chooses. I also have a stenographer for when my hand gets tired. I never get compilation errors.

Re:C/C++/Java/Ruby/Python and I use.... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47336561)

Butcher!

I prefer to pluck a single hair from the ass of the nearest ermine, dip it in kokeiboku ink made from Visayan deer horn and charcoaled relictus cycad, then waft my thoughts across 15-momme silken paper balanced on the ass of a Xianbei virgin.

Compare plugins... (1)

AnontheDestroyer (3500983) | about 4 months ago | (#47336449)

It might be as simple as comparing plugins/scripts. Sublime Text seems to be the new hotness for web development, with lots of JavaScript, HTML and CSS project plugins (e.g. angular, node, emmet). VIM probably has more plugins for projects that use C++.

Start a survey (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47336451)

Personally I use nvi (not vim) and end up using the crappy busybox "vi" far too often, for, well, bourne shell+friends, C, C++, python, email, opinion pieces, and whatever else I end up writing. Including when I did a little ruby (and failing to like it). I'm not using any IDE, haven't since my DOS days (Q.EXE (qedit 3) worked much better than the borland turbo IDEs because it didn't hog all the memory!). Tried to use emacs once and immediately left it, retching. This was before picking up on vi, back when I used pico for a while in my early Unix days.

I really don't mind what others are using so long as they don't bother me with it, so keep your explicit or implicit assumptions of superiority (emacs AND vim folks) to yourself please. Where you don't it can easily have negative effects. Like how any book on lisp more or less tells you to pick up emacs. I'm reading the book for the supposed superior programming language, not for the bundled IDE/OS/crappy editor/keyboard combo cult, thank you. And for what? nvi implements % to find the other side of the brace/paren/bracket, and that ought to be enough. Even so, I'm exhorted to pick their fave editor. So I skip lisps and pick something else. So sorry.

Notepad++ (1)

wisnoskij (1206448) | about 4 months ago | (#47336459)

I will just leave this here.

Real programmers use echo (0)

gameboyhippo (827141) | about 4 months ago | (#47336477)

As a real programmer, I just echo punchcards into a file.

Console vs Visual Programs (1)

mcolgin (818580) | about 4 months ago | (#47336495)

I think it has to do with the target... For PHP and C; I use SemWare TSE aka Q.EXE from the old DOS days. It's a Win32 console mode editor that performs very well. However, anything that needs a "resource editor" aka "RAD Design"; I *have* to use an IDE, just to deal with the visual components of the program.

Emacs and whatever language suits the job. (3, Interesting)

BitterOak (537666) | about 4 months ago | (#47336511)

Emacs is my editor of choice. As for language, I use whatever best suits the task at hand, most frequently: Perl, Ruby, Java, C, and JavaScript. And if I'm customizing emacs, I use lisp.

Vim, Python (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47336519)

Vim, Python

Sublime Text for Web Development (1)

AnontheDestroyer (3500983) | about 4 months ago | (#47336525)

Sublime has a pretty extensive plugin set for JavaScript, CSS and HTML, which includes support for various projects in those languages (e.g. angular, node, LESS, emmet, etc.). The multi-cursor stuff is a nice gimmick.

Perl (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47336529)

I use both Emacs with CPerl-mode and Eclipse with EPIC. I prefer Emacs if I'm writing a non-trivial shell script (a trivial shell script I will use vi/vim).
I use Eclipse on Windows with ActiveState Perl. I try not to edit anything serious directly on my Linux webhost.

Well, perl and vim yes, but not for that reason (1)

Fallen Kell (165468) | about 4 months ago | (#47336535)

I use VI and VIM as my editor because as a system administrator, VI was one of 2 editors that were guaranteed to be in Solaris should the system be in a real bad state and in recovery modes. I use perl because it is installed on everything out of the box (Solaris, Red Hat, SUSE, and IRIX all of which I deal with). Python isn't on all those OS's by default (Solaris in particular), which means it might not be on all the systems I deal with. I'm not about to go and write code that I can't run universally on the systems I deal with.

sublime editor (1)

Mr_Nitro (1174707) | about 4 months ago | (#47336547)

I use a modern fashion editors for most of my scripting (python/js ) / programming activities, which is Sublime editor these days, and Aptana sometimes for more heavy tasks. Old style editors just slows me down....I'm weird i know...:)

main two (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47336565)

Perl: joe

Lighttable (1)

ShopMgr (1639595) | about 4 months ago | (#47336599)

Clojure = LightTable
Java = Eclipse
Emacs = good O/S, lousy editor. I use it for magit, XML and scratch pad. I keep a cheat sheet on my desktop.
Vim = I use it automatically from the command-line to edit files. Also use it as part of a "find" to edit files down in the bowels of file system.

Honorable mentions:
Cursive - Remote debugging with NREPL is to menu intensive.
IntelliJ with Cursive might become my choice for Clojure.

VS (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47336601)

is decent. .Net as it is.

Eclipse is not bad. Java as it is.

I have not tried the new android studio. Java as it is.

I long for the day of native code apps (vc6 days). Managed apps are such pigs, and as with all pigs, lipstick only matters if you are yourself a pig.

ED, ARexx (1)

RJFerret (1279530) | about 4 months ago | (#47336637)

Where does that fit in your Analyze! spreadsheet?

gVim, C++ (1)

RailGunner (554645) | about 4 months ago | (#47336639)

Anything else would be....

.... uncivilized.

Vim for: C, C++, Python (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47336641)

Vim for just about everything I code: C, C++, Python, shell scripts. Here's my story:

As a kid I learned enough vim to not be stymied when needing to edit a file on a remote machine. hjkl, :wq, i, a, dd, yy, 0, $, etc. you know, the basics.

Latest job we are using Qt and C++, everyone on Qt Creator. Qt Creator has a passable Vim mode, so I turned it on and made an effort to learn more Vim so I could be more productive while editing. Kind of hard to describe, but every so often I'd google search "vim ___" when I found myself doing something particularly repetitive and then add my knew knowledge to my toolbox.

All together, Qt Creator is a decent IDE, it's simple enough that you can just start using it without being completely lost, it's cross platform, open, etc. Recently it's gotten a lot more buggy, but I digress...

Ended up on a Python project, but Qt Creator's autocomplete for C++ plus Vim keybindings had spoiled me. Couldn't find an editor that would do python autocompletion with vim keybindings. Ended up configuring Vim with a bunch of packages to get it to do what I want. Took some effort but it was worth it.

Now I use Vim for everything, it is missing some of the shortcuts that I used in Qt Creator (getting these to work or finding alternatives is just a matter of me spending the time to tell Vim what I want it to do, then assign a key). Vim has a bunch of peculiarities probably due to its heritage, such as not being able to map Control-/ to toggle comments or looking weird inside of tmux vs a regular terminal.

But the precision I get in Vim is worth it.. it's not necessarily faster for me, but editing is a lot more precise and deliberate.

Vim would probably be useless for programming (but great for editing conf files) without its diverse plugin system. I use one called Vundle.

I'd like to expand my Vim/C++ skills, for stuff like:

- rename a class member variable everywhere in header and implementation
- sync up modifications between method signature in header and implementation (say you add an argument in the .cpp file, you want the corresponding line in the .h file to be modified to match, and vice versa, etc.)
- add unimplemented methods in .h file to .cpp (I have something that does this, but my gripe with it is that if I put copy constructor and assignment operator under private in the .h with the intention of not implementing them, it will add them to .cpp file anyway)
- rename a method everywhere in project ... that kind of stuff. Any good suggestions?

Ruby? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47336647)

In my experience, the majority of Ruby "programmers" use a crayon and construction paper. If construction paper is not handy, then a nearby wall is usually substituted.

Language: any Editor: TextMate (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47336657)

nm

I still love Joe (1)

DarkOx (621550) | about 4 months ago | (#47336667)

Joe -is a great editor (he/it) all the features I typically need for small and medium sized software projects.

Editor,Language (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47336671)

Notepad... "Like a sailor"

Class Browser (1)

K. S. Kyosuke (729550) | about 4 months ago | (#47336681)

Every Smalltalk programmer programs in the class browser [google.com] , and its good friend, the live debugger [google.com] . So there's a definite link there. Except for the GNU Smalltalk people who are weird and program in Vim or Emacs.

VIM (2)

halfdan the black (638018) | about 4 months ago | (#47336687)

Just a question. Is there anyone out there younger than around 40 who uses VIM because of their own choice? By that I mean, they at first turned on a Unix/Linux box, investigated some editors and chose VIM. Nearly everyone I know who uses VIM uses it because someone else originally made them use it and they stuck with it. I know this sounds like flamebait, but seriously, its an honest question.
It just seems like Emacs is a lot easier to learn because it one keystroke to get to a menu, and just another to get to a help system.

vi/gVim, PL/SQL (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47336695)

Oracle DBA/developer. Love vi for whipping up huge scripts in a heartbeat. vi on my AIX, HP-UX, and Linux servers, gVim on my Windows PCs. SQL*Plus when I'm stuck with it, and Oracle SQL Developer or TOAD when I get any say in the matter, which seems to happen less and less frequently with each passing year.

Vim. (1)

Noryungi (70322) | about 4 months ago | (#47336719)

These days it's mostly vim, Python, shell, Perl.

When I really have to do something ''serious'' in Python, I use the free version of PyCharm, with the vim plugin, of course.

Otherwise, it's nothing but straight vim all day, every day. If not vim, thel elvis. if not elvis, then straight vi or nvi.

Well, C# is a given (1)

Sowelu (713889) | about 4 months ago | (#47336731)

Visual Studio when doing C# stuff. Eclipse when doing Java stuff. On Linux, vim or notepad++ when doing C stuff or any other random shell junk. On Windows, notepad++ (okay, let's be honest, it's usually just noteBut I always wind up missing Visual Studio. It seems to fit my workflows best, and if it worked well with Java I'd replace Eclipse with it in an instant.

Emacs (2)

halfdan the black (638018) | about 4 months ago | (#47336747)

I use Emacs and

1: C++, C, Objective-C
2: LaTeX
3: Python
4: Bash
5: Text files

I used to use (also in Emacs):
1: Java
2: C#
3: Fortran

Emacs works for just about any language out there, I use variety of languages and a variety of different platforms, Emacs is the same on all of them and just works. 2:

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