Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Microsoft Takes Down No-IP.com Domains

Unknown Lamer posted about 3 months ago | from the slash-and-burn dept.

Microsoft 495

An anonymous reader writes For some reason that escapes me, a Judge has granted Microsoft permission to hijack NoIP's DNS. This is necessary according to Microsoft to thwart a "global cybercrime epidemic" being perpetrated by infected machines running Microsoft software. No-IP is a provider of dynamic DNS services (among other things). Many legitimate users were affected by the takedown: "This morning, Microsoft served a federal court order and seized 22 of our most commonly used domains because they claimed that some of the subdomains have been abused by creators of malware. We were very surprised by this. We have a long history of proactively working with other companies when cases of alleged malicious activity have been reported to us. Unfortunately, Microsoft never contacted us or asked us to block any subdomains, even though we have an open line of communication with Microsoft corporate executives. ... We have been in contact with Microsoft today. They claim that their intent is to only filter out the known bad hostnames in each seized domain, while continuing to allow the good hostnames to resolve. However, this is not happening."

cancel ×

495 comments

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

WTF (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47357009)

Does not seem legal.

Re:WTF (5, Insightful)

Rosco P. Coltrane (209368) | about 3 months ago | (#47357073)

Does not seem legal.

It's legal if the law says it is. And when the lawmakers are in bed with Big Business, like they are in the US, anything goes.

Re:WTF (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47357215)

Does not seem legal.

It's legal if the law says it is. And when the lawmakers are in bed with Big Business, like they are in the US, anything goes.

what a bunch of honkies, kykes, dune coons, niggers, etc

Sue them for all they're worth (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47357031)

This is their business the court decided to hand over to Microsoft. Lawsuits should be flying in all directions.

Re:Sue them for all they're worth (3, Informative)

DrJimbo (594231) | about 3 months ago | (#47357083)

Lawsuits should be flying in all directions.

Are you suggesting they sue the court? Good luck with that. ISTM the fundamental problem is that the US courts have become the corporations bitches. Who are you going to sue and where are you going to sue them?

The book Econned [ineteconomics.org] explains how people with a far right economic agenda have been stacking the US courts for years. The result is what you see, basically a feudal systems where corporations are treated like lords and everyone else is a serf.

Re:Sue them for all they're worth (0, Troll)

cboslin (1532787) | about 3 months ago | (#47357355)

...

The book Econned [ineteconomics.org] explains how people with a far right economic agenda have been stacking the US courts for years. The result is what you see, basically a feudal systems where corporations are treated like lords and everyone else is a serf.

Not only are they stacking the US Courts, they are also preventing any other party from filling open judgeships when they have a president in office...thus the only candidates to the Supreme Court will be their right wing, ultra conservative, cronies. Pathetic.

This has been in the planning for well over 40 years...thanks for suggesting the book, will check it out.

If a party can not legislate, they need to be removed from office and their presence in the Senate and House of Representatives reduced so that all Americans can be helped with economic activity, jobs and more. They have forgotten that if they are not part of the solution, they most certainly are part of the problem. In this case, they are the problem.

To insure they get elected, given demographics going against them, they put in BS legislation to limit voting. Hey if you can not sway people to vote for you, you do not deserve to be elected. Its simply un-American to not want everyone to vote. And they are on the record stating that they can't win if everyone votes.

Lastly its lame to use the label that the left wants to re-distribute wealth, when the right re-distribute's to their political backers. Or to say you want government out of your individual lives and bedrooms, when you use the Court to legislate morals which legislatively puts government into individual lives and American bedroom, in so many nanny state ways. Pathetic.

Full disclosure: While I am fisically conservative, I am not a conservative or liberal, in fact 70% of Americans are closer to my way of thinking then either political party.

Re:Sue them for all they're worth (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47357795)

microsoft and republicrats can kiss my hairy white ass.

Re:Sue them for all they're worth (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47357145)

Microsoft has way more money than whichever company that owns No-ip does. They can't sue and win. Microsoft wouldn't even need to bribe the judge, they can just use scorched earth tactics and let the lawyers suck more and more money until No-ip is dry.
Also, apparently No-ip didn't appear when summoned. Apparently, that's kinda of a big no-no. Maybe next time they will buy their domains somewhere with proper laws.

Re:Sue them for all they're worth (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47357395)

Not showing up should not result in a suspension of justice and free reign to dispense outrageous judgements. Then again, it has been a long time since we had anything more than a pretense of justice. I say, let the corporate handouts continue; outsource the court system to ebay for optimal court proceedings. (While said in jest, from a strictly utilitarian point of view, putting all of those lawyers out of work may actually have a net positive effect, even if otherwise preserving the system of injustice.)

Re:Sue them for all they're worth (2)

man_ls (248470) | about 3 months ago | (#47357735)

Since I'm replying to an AC post I don't feel a need to include citations, but there's been at least one case where the domains in question were purchased through registrars and registered to owners both outside the United States but because the domains themselves were .com domains and Verizon is the ultimate authority for .com domains, the U.S. simply ordered Verizon to update the global master registry to reflect the seizure and there was nothing to be done about it.

They'd have to use a non-U.S. TLD as well.

Re:Sue them for all they're worth (-1, Troll)

Bartles (1198017) | about 3 months ago | (#47357291)

You can thank Kelo v New London and our so called liberal Supreme Court justices Stevens, Kennedy, Souter, Ginsburg, and Breyer for this.

In before (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47357037)

Microsoft announces the purchase of DynDNS, or their own dynamic dns service. Purely by coincidence of course.

Good judge (5, Insightful)

Rosco P. Coltrane (209368) | about 3 months ago | (#47357049)

The best money could buy.

only an excerpt (2, Interesting)

Joe Johnson (3720117) | about 3 months ago | (#47357055)

If a judge granted permission, I have feeling that a domain name service provider may have been guilty of alerting their customers to legal intentions. Which gives credence to locking it down before a new sub-domain is created to deliver the same traffic. While I don't side based on a brief, I don't make adverse statements. I can only surmise.

Re:only an excerpt (1)

guruevi (827432) | about 3 months ago | (#47357075)

I would hope that my ISP's alerts me to legal action. If you have ISP's just complying with every legal request as some already do with DMCA, you can forget about ever getting to anything.

Re: only an excerpt (1)

Joe Johnson (3720117) | about 3 months ago | (#47357093)

This isn't just "some [old/regular] ISP."

This is horrible (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47357077)

Can we say appeals please?

Microsoft "intent" (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47357081)

I suspect Microsoft failing to keep things working like the claim to intend is not malice, but simply incompetence.

But was the giving of this power to them just incompetence of our legal system? Thats the real question.

There is just one domain that needs to be shutdown (2, Insightful)

brodock (1568447) | about 3 months ago | (#47357095)

And it's microsoft.com, the creator and perpetrator of Internet Explorer and Windows, the two biggest malwares ever invented. They should be shutdown immediately. Thanks.

Re:There is just one domain that needs to be shutd (2)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47357283)

I really can't see why this wouldn't be possible using the exact same logic that MS uses.

What are the 22 domain names? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47357115)

What are the 22 domain names???

Here's some I know of... apk (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47357797)

no-ip.biz
no-ip.org
no-ip.info
no-ip.com
no-ip.net
no-ip.fr
no-ip.co
no-ip.pl

(With BOATLOADS of subdomains on each of those - so man, that I couldn't even FIT THEM ALL IN here, there's so many... sometimes, I *hate* /.'s posting size limits, as this MAY have been useful to you in this capacity... oh well! I truly wish I could help you more here, but I can't, for those very reasons... info I have is current, but also stretches back decades too!)

APK

P.S.=> HOW do I know that? This (courtesy of "yours truly", hope it helps) -> http://yro.slashdot.org/commen... [slashdot.org] - Enjoy!

... apk

Hotmail? (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47357121)

So after decades of the community putting Microsoft on notice that HotMail is abused by spammers, can I sieze the domain name?

Re: Hotmail? (1)

m94mni (541438) | about 3 months ago | (#47357429)

As long as you try to keep it running from your basement as you sort out the bad accounts, sure.

Re: Hotmail? (1)

whoever57 (658626) | about 3 months ago | (#47357497)

As long as you try to keep it running from your basement as you sort out the bad accounts, sure.

Why? Microsoft doesn't seem to think it necessary to resolve the subdomains that are not included in the list of bad subdomains.

net neutrality (2)

Chad Smith (3448823) | about 3 months ago | (#47357133)

In other news Microsoft has come out in support of preserving a free and open web

My stuff got hit by this. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47357135)

great looks like my stuff was taken down by this. I guess the Judge wouldn't really care if thousands potentially hundreds of thousands of users were impacted.

I am guessing he will tomorrow as the world wakes up to this.

Re:My stuff got hit by this. (1)

thygate (1590197) | about 3 months ago | (#47357267)

I'd better write down the remote IP for my VPN connection before the session closes.

Re: My stuff got hit by this. (-1, Flamebait)

CoolVibe (11466) | about 3 months ago | (#47357801)

Here's a nickel. Go buy a real domain.

Re: My stuff got hit by this. (1)

gigelu (1588959) | about 3 months ago | (#47357831)

It's not about a real domain, it's about dynamic IP.
I have a "real" domain but I am still using no-ip.org to connect to some VPNs on ADSL with dynamic IP addresses.

Bad software justifies bad actions... (4, Insightful)

QuietLagoon (813062) | about 3 months ago | (#47357143)

Microsoft has pushed upon the world (literally, the world) software that has a history of security issues.

.
Now it appears that Microsoft is using their reputation for producing security-challenged software to badger companies for PR purposes. The headlines will all read, ~Microsoft takes down a company that is a security threat~. And Microsoft will look good in the headline.

But what has Microsoft really accomplished? Will Microsoft's reputation for software with abysmal security be changed? Or will a small company be crushed because a huge company is trying to look good?

Let's sure Microsoft over Windows insecurities (0)

whoever57 (658626) | about 3 months ago | (#47357147)

Perhaps Microsoft should be enjoined from distributing a OS that is responsible for most the the malware and spam that everyone's firewalls and filters are defending against.

What's good for the goose is good for the gander.

Take down Windows! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47357149)

It is abused by creators of malware! All security knowledgeable people know that a microkernel provides micro security --> no security at all !!! :(

Therefore: monolithic kernels!!!! they are most secure!!!

try this kernel here [kernel.org] . Its called Linux (Almost). No. Malware. For. Linux.

Re:Take down Windows! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47357279)

Its called Linux (Almost). No. Malware. For. Linux.

Except systemd or anything else written by Lennart Poettering. I suspect he's intentionally developing shitty critical parts of the OS specifically to cause a Linux downfall. When pulseaudio failed to destroy Linux on the desktop, he introduced his next piece of joy to kill Linux everywhere with a broken init replacement that incorporates udev, consolekit, system logging (in binary), acpid, cron, pm-utils, inetd, login and at.

  Systemd basically meets the requirements for malware. It spread without permission; causes system instability; is poorly documented; infects other system software; hooks other processes, and best of fucking all is non-deterministic. Thanks to the joys of systemd, you CAN repeat the same action repeatedly and achieve different outcomes, all due to poorly documented race conditions with a super-wonderful parallel init. And better yet, you can now search for your ethernet devices with intuitive names like enp3s0, enp3s1, enp3s2, enp3s3; because eth0-3 was too fucking hard and fixing the MACs was too difficult.

Legal Precedent? (4, Interesting)

wisnoskij (1206448) | about 3 months ago | (#47357163)

What is the legal precedent for taking ownership of a company's assets (without apparently even informing them beforehand) and randomly giving them to some other company to use? How is that even a legal possibility?

Re:Legal Precedent? (1)

TheGratefulNet (143330) | about 3 months ago | (#47357195)

as the kids, today, say, "its because of - well - reasons. that's why!"

you won't get any more explanation than that.

Re:Legal Precedent? (5, Informative)

Pinhedd (1661735) | about 3 months ago | (#47357257)

property used to engage in criminal activity is subject to seizure and/or forfeiture. Domains have been seized in the past due to criminal activity but this has usually accompanied a criminal complaint by a law enforcement agency.

In this case, despite what the article may imply, Microsoft hasn't seized ownership of the domains. Rather, they used an ex parte temporary restraining order to seize control of the domains so that they may neutralize the source of the maliciousness. The ex-parte aspect is why no-ip wasn't notified. Microsoft managed to convince a judge to grant the order without informing the other party (most likely to prevent no-ip from notifying the malicious users). This will be followed up by a formal hearing, and full control of the domains will be restored to no-ip eventually.

If Microsoft abuses this, judges won't be so inclined to grant such requests in the future.

Re:Legal Precedent? (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47357381)

No, they seized control of the entire business -- the top-level domains, the second-level domains engaging in criminal activity, and all of the second-level domains who were not engaging in criminal activity. The right way to do this is to get a court order to seize the infringing addresses and leave the millions of customers who did nothing wrong alone. This is like the FBI seizing an entire rack or datacenter from AWS because someone served child pornography from a t1.micro instance, and then letting the accusing party respond in any way they want to all of the non-criminal traffic for the next six weeks. The collateral damage is completely unacceptable.

Re:Legal Precedent? (2)

Pinhedd (1661735) | about 3 months ago | (#47357409)

Second level domains are controlled through top level domains. Do you know nothing about DNS?

Re:Legal Precedent? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47357569)

And a court order could compel the company to make any changes to those DNS entries that needed to be made. Stop being a bloody idiot.

Re:Legal Precedent? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47357629)

So, what you're saying is that they have to seize all of the root servers too?

Re:Legal Precedent? (5, Informative)

lister king of smeg (2481612) | about 3 months ago | (#47357411)

property used to engage in criminal activity is subject to seizure and/or forfeiture. Domains have been seized in the past due to criminal activity but this has usually accompanied a criminal complaint by a law enforcement agency.

In this case, despite what the article may imply, Microsoft hasn't seized ownership of the domains. Rather, they used an ex parte temporary restraining order to seize control of the domains so that they may neutralize the source of the maliciousness. The ex-parte aspect is why no-ip wasn't notified. Microsoft managed to convince a judge to grant the order without informing the other party (most likely to prevent no-ip from notifying the malicious users). This will be followed up by a formal hearing, and full control of the domains will be restored to no-ip eventually.

If Microsoft abuses this, judges won't be so inclined to grant such requests in the future.

Most people I know that use no-ip are people setting up their own minecraft servers its not a hotbed of criminal activivty like MS claims. I use it for my ssh server/freeciv/cloud storage/retroshare and it has been inaccessibly today thanks to microsofts fuckery. claiming that they are a tool of criminal activity is like saying that the internet is a tool of criminal acivity because criminals use it, which is to say anything may be taken away and given to another with this same logic.
I wonder seeings as Microsoft has fucked with my servers traffic today thanks to this could I go after in court them for maliciously hijacking my sub domain and traffic and have their DNS entries redirect to me with no warning to microsoft.

Re:Legal Precedent? (4, Informative)

lindseyp (988332) | about 3 months ago | (#47357439)

I'm one of those Minecraft servers. Goddammit I ony found out why this was happening thanks to slashdot.

I know my own IP, but none of my users do.

Re:Legal Precedent? (2)

Pinhedd (1661735) | about 3 months ago | (#47357449)

I'm sure that you're absolutely correct about that. The vast majority of no-ip's customers are using the service legitimately, I'm certain of this. However, no-ip has certain legal responsibilities as a service provider and if they don't meet them their legitimate customers may end up getting caught in the crossfire.

For the record, I'm not taking a side as I have no idea what evidence Microsoft presented to get the ruling. I'm just pointing out the legal basis for what occurred.

Re:Legal Precedent? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47357415)

If Microsoft abuses this, judges won't be so inclined to grant such requests in the future.

Yeah... That's like saying if the NSA/CIA doesn't stop abusing FISA rules, the judges won't be so inclined to rubber stamp their requests.

Now, I wanna seize the domains serving pop ups on my browser.

This is bogus. We shouldn't allow it under any circumstances.

Re:Legal Precedent? (2)

rtb61 (674572) | about 3 months ago | (#47357513)

Still wildly inappropriate for M$ to be doing this. You could argue that the FBI could do this and even contract to M$ to do it under FBI supervision but no way should M$ have been given carte blache vigilante powers.

It should have all been laid out. What access was allowed. What end user data was gathered. What is to be do with end user infected systems. What record will be required to be kept of all activities conducted. What recompense the innocent affected parties. How will evidence be preserved and a proper legal chain from source to court. How about some reasonable professionalism.

It should have gone from M$ to the FBI to the Court, back to the FBI and fully documented and only then under specific guidelines contracted to M$ under FBI supervision and all the data should leave M$ hands as they were only contractors and M$ can apply to the courts and the FBI for the data gathered after it has been vetted by the court and the FBI.

Not that I particularly love the Fucking Bloody Idiots but there is a right and a wrong way for doing things and the FBI should be questioning this and demanding all the data and direct supervision of the evidence obtained.

Re:Legal Precedent? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47357753)

You'd make a credible named plaintiff in a massive class action lawsuit.

Rule of law = dead (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47357303)

Because the rule of law is already dead in the US, and at this point we're just desecrating its corpse.

Re:Legal Precedent? (0)

Bartles (1198017) | about 3 months ago | (#47357309)

You can thank Kelo v New London and our so called liberal Supreme Court justices Stevens, Kennedy, Souter, Ginsburg, and Breyer for this. At least that's the best I can come up with.

Selling My Used 2013 LEXUS LX570 (-1, Offtopic)

Peter Van Horssen (3724297) | about 3 months ago | (#47357205)

The 2013 Model Lexus LX570 Gulf Spec Edition with Extremely low Mileage,With exterior color Starfire Pearl and Interior color Parchment as well this Vehicle is as good as brand new and has Never been Involved in Any Accident or Scratch,the vehicle is graded full option and well maintained. I only want serious buyer to contact me : petervan1963@gmail.com Text Message/ sms +16085617423 Add BBM Chat 24HRS: 2ACBFC69 God Bless

Re: Selling My Used 2013 LEXUS LX570 (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47357307)

What the fuck?

Re: Selling My Used 2013 LEXUS LX570 (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47357423)

Asshole.

Re: Selling My Used 2013 LEXUS LX570 (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47357749)

And yet, this is the least amount of FUD I've read in this entire comments section.

No customer notification (4, Interesting)

Stealth Dave (189726) | about 3 months ago | (#47357207)

While I fully blame Microsoft for creating this mess, I'm somewhat dismayed that as a customer I'm finding out that my service is down from a news outlet rather than from noip themselves! I've been using their sub domain wildcard service for 7-8 years now and have just now found out that it's down. I'm none too happy about being thrown out with the bathwater!

Re:No customer notification (1)

itsme1234 (199680) | about 3 months ago | (#47357535)

Even if you were using one or some of the affected domains still this is the type of service where most customers just won't notice any problem, even if they would be technically counted in the millions from TFA.

Such notification has less operational importance and more PR/image. They might send one eventually, once dust settles.

PLUS ... they might be having issues with the emails as well! They say now for me:

Alert: Email communications to your email address on file recently bounced. Please update your email address on file.

Re:No customer notification (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47357695)

Well...they can't send email thru @no-ip.com anymore.

The reason is power. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47357217)

I think the reason the judge has granted the permission is because he can. Aka power.

Karel Kulhavy, Twibrigh Labs [twibright.com]

Re:The reason is power. (0)

Bartles (1198017) | about 3 months ago | (#47357315)

Kelo v New London.

Re:The reason is power. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47357693)

Nothing to do with eminent domain, this.

Microsoft takes on global cybercrime epidemic (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47357275)

Microsoft takes on global cybercrime epidemic in tenth malware disruption
-- for immediate release--

Playing offense against cybercriminals is what drives me and everyone here at the Microsoft Digital Crimes Unit. Today, Microsoft has upped the ante against global cybercrime, taking legal action to clean up malware and help ensure customers stay safer online. In a civil case filed on June 19, Microsoft named one operating system, for its role in creating, controlling, and assisting in infecting millions of computers with malicious software—harming Microsoft, its customers and the public at large.

We’re taking No-IP to task as the owner of software frequently exploited by cybercriminals to infect innocent victims with various families of malware. In the past, we’ve predominately seen botnets originating in Eastern Europe; however, the authors, owners and distributors of this malware are Kuwaiti and Algerian nationals. The social media-savvy cybercriminals have promoted their wares across the Internet, offering step-by-step instructions to completely control millions of unsuspecting victims’ computers to conduct illicit crimes—demonstrating that cybercrime is indeed a global epidemic.

Windows is an easy target for cybercriminals

An operating system is essentially a method of automatically updating a listing of the current running processes, and is a vital part of the Internet. However, if not properly managed, an operating system service like Windows can hold top-rank among abused computers. Of the 10 global malware disruptions in which we’ve been involved, this action has the potential to be the largest in terms of infection cleanup. Our research revealed that out of all OS vendors, Windows installations are used 93 percent of the time for Bladabindi-Jenxcus infections, which are the most prevalent among the 245 different types of malware currently exploiting Microsoft products. Microsoft has seen more than 7.4 million Bladabindi-Jenxcus detections over the past 12 months, which doesn’t account for detections by other anti-virus providers. Despite numerous reports by the security community on Windows abuse, Microsoft has not taken sufficient steps to correct, remedy, prevent or control the abuse or help keep its domains safe from malicious activity.

Re:Microsoft takes on global cybercrime epidemic (5, Funny)

lister king of smeg (2481612) | about 3 months ago | (#47357421)

i wonder if the same court would let you take update.microsoft.com and redirct it to ftp.debian.org using this reasoning

Affected me (3, Informative)

BenJeremy (181303) | about 3 months ago | (#47357357)

I don't serve anything important... but I usually post images through my local server and upload to imgur "through the web" - it took several retries when I tried to do this a short while ago, and now I know why.

Thanks, Microsoft.... you can't just take over no-ip and then run it through crap servers that can't handle the loads.

Affected me (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47357645)

I don't serve anything important... but I usually post images through my local server and upload to imgur "through the web" - it took several retries when I tried to do this a short while ago, and now I know why.

Thanks, Microsoft.... you can't just take over no-ip and then run it through crap servers that can't handle the loads.

Resembles their takeover of hotmail and later replacing the BSD servers with their own software.

Re:Affected me (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47357667)

Thanks, Microsoft.... you can't just take over no-ip and then run it through crap servers that can't handle the loads.

Did Microsoft increase everyone's TTL values so DNS caching would take over automatically, you know like DNS was designed to do? I guess not. No-IP deliberately uses ridiculously low TTL values because they're sooooo very dynamic, but they compensate by running beefy servers that can handle the extra load that low TTL causes. Microsoft knew what they were seizing, and they should have planned accordingly.

How about a home brew dynamic DNS system? (2)

Nethead (1563) | about 3 months ago | (#47357359)

I've looked a bit but never really found a package to do this, although it's been a few years. I've got a BSD box, a static IP and some domain names. How would I set it up so that other hosts could use this in a dynamic way to set forward DNS records if they were on an ISP's ever changing DHCP addresses?

In other words, how can I roll my own no-ip.com system without being a Vixie level hacker?

Re:How about a home brew dynamic DNS system? (4, Interesting)

Temkin (112574) | about 3 months ago | (#47357427)

I have a $10/mo VPS at a major datacenter with static IPv4 & IPv6 addresses that hosts the primary DNS server for my vanity domain. My house has plain old boring dynamic address DSL with filtered port 25, etc... I have a Raspberry Pi running light network services on the house net. It runs a cron job that runs pubkey ssh into a no-shell account on the VPS. When that happens, a script rips $SSH_CLIENT and does a quick compare to see if it changed. If it has, another cron job on the VPS fixes up a record in my vanity domain with a 60 second TTL.

OpenVPN gets me around the port 25 filter...

Why am I explaining this to a low four digit?

Re:How about a home brew dynamic DNS system? (1)

Nethead (1563) | about 3 months ago | (#47357533)

Because us lower 4 digits don't like to re-invent the wheel:)

Nice setup though, I'll keep those tips in mind if I need to roll my own. I'm looking for a client and server package that can be installed quickly on a client computer/router. A client end that could run on OpenWRT would be really sweet.

Re:How about a home brew dynamic DNS system? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47357625)

Probably just a programmer. Writing code and creating services are two separate abilities.

Re:How about a home brew dynamic DNS system? (1)

ThatsMyNick (2004126) | about 3 months ago | (#47357647)

powerdns [powerdns.com] + powerdyn [github.com]

Re:How about a home brew dynamic DNS system? (1)

ThatsMyNick (2004126) | about 3 months ago | (#47357655)

GnuDIP [sourceforge.net] (and BIND) is okay too.

Re:How about a home brew dynamic DNS system? (1)

Nethead (1563) | about 3 months ago | (#47357727)

Okay, this seems like what I'm looking for, runs with named and has a Windows client. Much thanks!

Re:How about a home brew dynamic DNS system? (1)

stoborrobots (577882) | about 3 months ago | (#47357665)

MyDNS [mydns-ng.com] plus a custom-built sign-up form?

Microsoft should takedown Hotmail.com & Live.c (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47357407)

These is where most Malware comes from and commonly used by Scammers.

Re:Microsoft should takedown Hotmail.com & Liv (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47357711)

The whole f*cking Azure platform too...

So turn around and get a court order to seize MS (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47357425)

Microsoft has been aiding malware for decades through their active negligence.
SO shouldnt this company be able to turn this back onto the shoddytards for an even bigger perpetration of actions damaging to the public ???

Hey Microsoft (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47357435)

How about making your own software less shit instead of strong-arming the judiciary to pander to your whims?

When exactly was this? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47357459)

I found my account banned without warning or explanation recently, I wonder if the two events are related...

Wow (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47357463)

Just wow.

Microsoft will fix it. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47357467)

After all, they have done such a good job of fixing their OS and keeping it safe from malware.

What could possibly go wrong?

so, how does that work? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47357471)

i understand, at least somewhat, how dns works, but i was wondering how microsoft could seize control of no-ip's subdomains? did they physically seize something? did no-ip hand over control? or was control taken without no-ip even knowing and if so, how?

Re:so, how does that work? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47357553)

There's nothing physical to seize. Domain ownership is just an entry in a registrar's database, that's all people really pay for when they buy domains. Looks like the registrar was court-ordered to update their database to delegate control of no-ip.org to microsoftinternetsafety.net, after that Microsoft can do whatever they please with all the subdomains.

so, how does that work? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47357633)

Control was taken without No-IP even knowing.

DNS names like "some-subdomain.no-ip.com" are hierarchical, and different groups are responsible for the different levels in the hierarchy.
* One group is responsible for the root domain ("."), which has NS records that point you at the name servers for ".com"
* Another group is responsible for the ".com" top-level domain, which has NS records that point you at the name servers for "no-ip.com"
* No-IP /was/ responsible for the "no-ip.com" second-level domain, operating their own authoritative name servers which were registered with the ".com" domain servers (above).

Microsoft, with the help of the judge, got the group responsible for ".com" to change the registration for "no-ip.com" to point to Microsoft's name servers instead of No-IP's name servers. And Microsoft's name servers aren't doing a very good job of handling the load.

embraced, extended and extnguished (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47357483)

Google may well be next in their sights, if you can't compete, sue, block their domain.
The only way Bing can be sure....
This has been MS strategy in the past too.

Time For Decentralized DNS (1)

Raystonn (1463901) | about 3 months ago | (#47357485)

Using blockchain technology for decentralized consensus. Let's take the power from the corrupt and place it back with the people.

New definition (1)

Thanshin (1188877) | about 3 months ago | (#47357559)

We should change the definition of Legal to "Backed by much money".

Well, fuck you very much (4, Interesting)

FuzzNugget (2840687) | about 3 months ago | (#47357567)

So *that's* why my DDNS suddenly went dark today, with no apparent explanation.

Port 80 forwarding to the right LAN IP. Server daemons are running. I can access all the services directly by WAN IP (not very useful). Updater client running just fine. No firewall configs in the way. No-IP reports the correct IP. No news posting on No-IP's website about any sort of outage or technical issues.

Well, I was lost -- that was everything. ... and that was all because of this horseshit? Guess what... I'm not even *in* the US, so now the US courts think they have jurisdiction over countries? (OK, that's not new)

Fuck all involved. Hope they get their asses sued to hell. And this judge canned for such a dumbass decision.

Re:Well, fuck you very much (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47357685)

Yeah. Why the fuck is Microsoft, a company, allowed to seize *anything*!?

Overdue (4, Insightful)

networkzombie (921324) | about 3 months ago | (#47357597)

Why is anyone surprised about this? I've been reading articles for over a year about No-IP and the abuse that they seemingly allow. They say they are working hard to stop the malicious software plowing through their service, but obviously they are not working hard enough. No one contacted No-IP to tell them that their service was being used to spread malware?

Bullshit.

April 2013: http://labs.opendns.com/2013/0... [opendns.com]

Sept 2013: No-IP is a preferred choice for other similar attacks for command and control infrastructure: http://threatpost.com/njw0rm-a... [threatpost.com]

Feb 2014: Even Cisco said their domains were being abusive and they posted to complain that Cisco didn't contact them. http://www.noip.com/blog/2014/... [noip.com]

Looks to me like they should have contacted Microsoft and asked them for help. I guess they waited too long.

Re:Overdue (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47357697)

Not overdue.
1) Legitimate customers shouldn't be punished.
2) Companies shouldn't be able to seize *anything*. It should be handled by law enforcement, and if need be, they can *contract* a company to work closely with them, under close supervision.

Our government is so obviously bought and paid for that it's apparent they're not even trying to hide it.

Sorry, that kind of talk isn't allowed (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47357713)

We here are required to always side with "the little guy" when they whine about some alleged injustice, whether valid, completely fictitious, or somewhere in-between.

You have been put on probation for this post.

WTF? (1)

doghouse41 (140537) | about 3 months ago | (#47357617)

So my email and VOIP system has been subject to an attack by Microsoft (as they rely on *paid for* no-ip domains.).

Can we have microsoft.com domains taken down, as they are clearly causing a huge amount of damage to the fabric of the Internet.

What a bunch of w******s

Wait a second... (5, Insightful)

FuzzNugget (2840687) | about 3 months ago | (#47357631)

So, Microsoft's argument was that they needed to hijack thousands of computers, secretly redirect them and put people in financial strain... so that someone else couldn't hijack thousands of computers, secretly redirect them and put people in financial strain?

Great plan, fuckwits!

Re:Wait a second... (1)

AHuxley (892839) | about 3 months ago | (#47357707)

You would think this could be fixed at an OS or application level vs the only fix been reaching out to fix the 'internet'?

They're not kidding (I've seen it 1st hand)... apk (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47357649)

How? Populating my custom hosts (#'s lately have been way higher daily (not only no-ip stuff) - DynDNS' make it easy for crooks vs. most folks - not me due to this):

APK Hosts File Engine 9.0++ 32/64-bit:

http://start64.com/index.php?o... [start64.com]

(Details of benefits in link)

Summary:

---

A.) Hosts do more than:

1.) AdBlock ("souled-out" 2 Google/Crippled by default)
2.) Ghostery (Advertiser owned) - "Fox guards henhouse"
3.) Request Policy -> http://yro.slashdot.org/commen... [slashdot.org]

B.) Hosts add reliability vs. downed/redirected dns (& overcome redirects on sites, /. beta as an example).

C.) Hosts secure vs. malicious domains too -> http://tech.slashdot.org/comme... [slashdot.org] w/ less added "moving parts" complexity/room 4 breakdown,

D.) Hosts files yield more:

1.) Speed (adblock & hardcodes fav sites - faster than remote dns)
2.) Security (vs. malicious domains serving malcontent + block spam/phish & trackers)
3.) Reliability (vs. downed or Kaminsky redirect vulnerable dns, 99% = unpatched vs. it & worst @ isp level + weak vs Fastflux + dynamic dns botnets)
4.) Anonymity (vs. dns request logs + dnsbl's).

---

* Hosts do more w/ less (1 file) @ faster levels (ring 0) vs redundant inefficient addons (slowing slower ring 3 browsers) via filtering 4 the IP stack (coded in C, loads w/ os, & 1st net resolver queried w\ 45++ yrs.of optimization).

* Addons = more complex + slow browsers in message passing (use a few concurrently & see) & are nullified by native browser methods - It's how Clarityray is destroying Adblock.

* Addons slowup slower usermode browsers layering on more - & bloat RAM consumption too + hugely excessive cpu use (4++gb extra in FireFox https://blog.mozilla.org/nneth... [mozilla.org] )

Work w/ a native kernelmode part - hosts files (An integrated part of the ip stack)

APK

P.S.=> "The premise is quite simple: Take something designed by nature & reprogram it to make it work for the body rather than against it..." - Dr. Alice Krippen: "I am legend"

...apk

Re:They're not kidding (I've seen it 1st hand)... (2)

lgw (121541) | about 3 months ago | (#47357739)

Well, fuck. No-IP going down? A million basement virgins lose access to their favorite minecraft server, and nothing of value was lost.

But, dammit MS, you proved APK right about something. That karmic burden is on you guys now. That bell can't be un-rung. You've got to carry that forever now.

Re:They're not kidding (I've seen it 1st hand)... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47357809)

Yep. Totally right.

Because a file with static assignments of host to IP bindings is an exact replacement for a dynamic DNS and is extremely helpful in the common no-ip et al. use case of the target host changing IP every reboot. You just have to phone somebody on the other end, ask them about IP and change it in your HOSTS file, easy as pie!

You *might* want to read this then... apk (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47357835)

I can't post how many 100's of subdomains I have off 'em (too big for /.) -> http://yro.slashdot.org/commen... [slashdot.org]

APK

P.S.=> It used to *NOT* be that way here - in this case, I wish it IS the way it was years ago, since restricting my postsize doesn't let me answer that guy's question with pertinent data as fully as I could, to answer his question & help him... apk

Take them to court over Windows (1, Interesting)

future assassin (639396) | about 3 months ago | (#47357715)

If it wasn't for the all the holes in WIndows then there's would't be as many people trying to distribute malware. MS themselves are the first in line as the root cause.

Self appointed judge (2)

ruir (2709173) | about 3 months ago | (#47357745)

USA and Microsoft the self-appointed police of the world strikes again... Two comments. If it indeed no-ip has virus problems, it would be FBI, CIA or NSA, or whatever national agency and not the fuckwits from Microsoft. Second point, if we are talking about malware distribution points, are we disabling hotmail.com and microsoft.com too?

Here's a hint: (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47357767)

Since apparently neither Microsoft nor this judge are concerned with due process, maybe this judge should be tried, convicted, and executed by a mob of his peers.

When the rule of law fails, the rule of mob can be used as a reminder.

Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>