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Maldives Denies Russian Claims That Secret Service Kidnapped a Politician's Son

timothy posted about a month and a half ago | from the 30-year-old-napping-is-totally-different dept.

Crime 100

Rei (128717) writes As was previously reported here, the Russian government has accused the U.S. Secret Service of kidnapping the son of ultranationalist LDPR MP Valery Seleznev in the Maldives. The son, Roman Seleznev, stands accused of running one of the world's largest carding operations, with others charged in the affair having already been convicted; however, Roman had until recently been considered out of reach in Russia. Now the Maldives has struck back against these claims, insisting that they arrested him on an Interpol Red Notice and transferred him to the US, as they are legally required as an Interpol member state to do. "No outsider came here to conduct an operation," president Abdulla Yameen stated. "No officials from another country can come here to arrest anyone. The government has the necessary documentation to prove it." Note: the Slashdot post linked didn't include the accusations of kidnapping, but the Krebs On Security link above mentions these claims.

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Putin had it coming. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47424513)

To get the frothie urine!!!!!

Consipricy nuts, go! (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47424533)

Let me guess. All of you who claimed the US overstepped it's bounds in the previous Slashdot article will now claim that the Maldives is lying to cover for the US. Rather than simply just admit your knee jerk reaction was wrong.

Re:Consipricy nuts, go! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47424585)

While idiots like you will continue to claim that the US doesn't commit war crimes on a daily basis, hasn't been demonstrated to ignore national sovereignty every chance they get, and is somehow still the champions of freedom and democracy.

If the US had gone in and done it, nobody would have been shocked.

Face it, the US has more or less become the enemies of global freedom and privacy, because they act like self entitled douchebags.

Re:Consipricy nuts, go! (5, Insightful)

jedidiah (1196) | about a month and a half ago | (#47424683)

Objection: relevance.

These other things are not the topic of discussion. They are just red herrings to distract from the fact that the US appears to have acted in a civilized manner this time.

Civilized behavior should not be swept under the rug because you have a hate-on for some particular country. Your nonsense undermines the positive reinforcement that encourages good behavior and discourages bad behavior.

Doesn't matter if it's the US or Hezbollah.

Re:Consipricy nuts, go! (1)

Talderas (1212466) | about a month and a half ago | (#47426165)

Let's give the OP some credit. He predicted that they would not admit they were wrong and they would claim the Maldives are covering up. The first response to him matched the former but failed to accurately predict the latter. However i consider that a great success.

Re:Consipricy nuts, go! (-1, Troll)

myfacelaunchd50ships (3726569) | about a month and a half ago | (#47424719)

In Russia it is legal and even heroic to steal from Americans on the internet. Russia has never extradited for internet crime so let them seethe in their anger that one of their elites had a bag put over his head by the Secret Service and will now spend the rest of his life with a negro cellie whose size and penetrating capacity will soon make him forget about girls. I hope it gives them a heart attack.

Re:Consipricy nuts, go! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47424759)

In Russia it is legal and even heroic to steal from Americans on the internet.

that's OK, in America, it's legal and even heroic to steal from everybody as long as you're a corporation.

Re:Consipricy nuts, go! (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47424851)

Not just heroic, but actually answering a calling...

"I'm just a banker doing God’s work." -- Goldman Sachs Chief Executive Lloyd Blankfein

Re:Consipricy nuts, go! (2)

chuckugly (2030942) | about a month and a half ago | (#47425085)

Gives pen testing a whole new dimension.

Re:Consipricy nuts, go! (1)

myfacelaunchd50ships (3726569) | about a month and a half ago | (#47427793)

Roman Seleznev and his father, the ultra-nationalist Duma deputy Valery Selenev are on the phone. The scene is tense. There are tears.

Roman: "Father, I'm scared. The lawyer told me I could be looking at 20 years in prison. My whole life will be gone. You've got to tell Mr. Putin to help us."
Valery: "Don't worry, Rommie. We'll spin this into an international incident."
Roman: "And there's a big ObCMORMEYbCM6O (Russian for nigger) looking at my tender, plump buttucks."
Valery: "For God's sakes, boy! Pull up your pants."
Roman: "They are up. He's looking at the spot where my juicy, plump ass would be if it weren't covered up."
Valery: "Oh."

Re:Consipricy nuts, go! (3, Funny)

mi (197448) | about a month and a half ago | (#47424817)

Face it, the US has more or less become the enemies of global freedom and privacy

Far less so than Russia. Instead of detaining the accused and bringing him in, they would've simply poisoned the man [wikipedia.org] .

Re:Consipricy nuts, go! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47425659)

WMD in Iraq. Mass graves of muslim scum in Kosovo. You niggers are so brainwashed...
This guy was poisoned by the British.

Re:Consipricy nuts, go! (1)

jon3k (691256) | about a month and a half ago | (#47425265)

Quick, change the argument to something else!

Re:Consipricy nuts, go! (1)

WindBourne (631190) | about a month and a half ago | (#47426205)

Really? So, who do you consider the defenders of global freedom and privacy? Russia and China?

i.e. no (1)

publiclurker (952615) | about a month and a half ago | (#47426243)

I can't grow up enough to admit this.

Re:Consipricy nuts, go! (3, Insightful)

Joe Gillian (3683399) | about a month and a half ago | (#47424597)

Actually, the only question I have is why the US didn't just say that Maldives law enforcement was responsible for the arrest in the first place. It could've been spun as good PR for both countries - "Cooperation Between US, Maldives Law Enforcement Leads to Arrest of Card Hacker" or somesuch. That would've quelled any questions about who was responsible for the arrest in the first place as well.

Re:Consipricy nuts, go! (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47424765)

Maybe because it wasn't the place of the US law enforcement organizations to discuss or even know what happened before the prisoner was handed over. I doubt they were completely unaware, but the earlier article mentions him being officially arrested at a court hearing in Guam, and makes no mention of the events leading up to that point.
It is possible that the US law enforcement agencies did not want to say who captured him or how just on the off chance that the Maldives would've preferred to remain as close to anonymous as possible in the light of what will be mentioned in the actual trial.

Re:Consipricy nuts, go! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47425227)

I doubt there is anyone who can comment on an ongoing investigation of this type in an official manor. Probably have to allow the Maldives to release that on their own.

Re:Consipricy nuts, go! (3, Informative)

Zontar_Thing_From_Ve (949321) | about a month and a half ago | (#47425365)

Actually, the only question I have is why the US didn't just say that Maldives law enforcement was responsible for the arrest in the first place. It could've been spun as good PR for both countries - "Cooperation Between US, Maldives Law Enforcement Leads to Arrest of Card Hacker" or somesuch. That would've quelled any questions about who was responsible for the arrest in the first place as well.

How do you know that they didn't? The only thing we saw in Slashdot a few days ago was some article without any sources that seemed to claim that US agents were going buck wild in Maldives and made the arrest themselves. I, and others, pointed out in that thread that the article was likely a very badly written summary and I was sure that the Maldives made any arrest and only after a valid arrest warrant came through. Yes, I told (some of) you so.

Re:Consipricy nuts, go! (1)

warpuck (825909) | about a month ago | (#47437163)

The US is so wound up with convoluted politically correct agendas it can't figure out what is correct after the political part is satisfied.

Re:Consipricy nuts, go! (4, Interesting)

Xest (935314) | about a month and a half ago | (#47426001)

Meanwhile Russia has actually kidnapped a Ukrainian doing nothing illegal beyond defending her country against Russian state sponsored terrorists:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/worl... [bbc.co.uk]

I have zero sympathy for Russia in this case given that they're crying wolf whilst doing exactly what they're crying about to others.

Re:Consipricy nuts, go! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47427547)

From the very article you posted, she's being charged over the deaths of 2 Russian journalists, not separatists.

Re:Consipricy nuts, go! (1)

tomhath (637240) | about a month and a half ago | (#47427797)

She was participating in an attack against a rebel target. The journalists were with the rebels; embedded journalists know and accept the risk of being on the front line.

Re:Consipricy nuts, go! (1)

Xest (935314) | about a month and a half ago | (#47429833)

Right, because those journalists decided to embed themselves with the rebels to act as propagandists for Putins regime.

She's still done nothing wrong, there's no onus on soldiers to be psychic in guessing what stupid thing journalists may or may not have decided to do, the onus is entirely on journalists to stay safe, it's part and package of the job.

Thus there's no merit to the charges because whilst it's illegal under international law to specifically target journalists, it's most definitely not anyone elses fault when they get themselves killed by putting themselves in danger's way without notifying anyone. There is most definitely no merit to her being kidnapped and smuggled out of the Ukraine by Russian forces. That's the sort of extraordinary rendition we've been railing against America for for the last decade. It's never acceptable.

Re:Consipricy nuts, go! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47428527)

Base on every posts about Russia.
No surprise! Xest has being a Russophobe!

Re:Consipricy nuts, go! (1)

Xest (935314) | about a month and a half ago | (#47429625)

Anyone with any sanity is a Russophobe right now given the new levels of retardedness the nation has reached.

Calling someone a Russophobe now is a bit like calling someone a Naziphobe in the late 1930s. I don't really see that as a bad thing, it seems like an extremely positive thing to call someone, so thank you for recognise my ability to spot countries that are fucking nasty. I'm actually quite proud of it, as would be any decent human being.

Re:Consipricy nuts, go! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47428553)

It's likely: "I have no sympathy for X because of Y has (slightly) relation with X doing the wrong thing Z with W in completely different situation"
This kind of illogical mind!

Re:Consipricy nuts, go! (1)

Xest (935314) | about a month and a half ago | (#47429839)

That kind of illogical mind indeed. If you could even use it to string a sentence together it would be slightly less illogical.

Keep trying though, you may be able to string together an actual sentence one day.

Re:Consipricy nuts, go! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month ago | (#47433063)

....against Russian state sponsored terrorists

Oh, come on! They are 'freedom fighters', they have support of large number of population in E. Ukraine. Those are blind will deny this.

At least they are better than 'freedom fighters' from Chechen, until, if they decide to bomb Boston, etc. ;)
Or, they definitely better than human organs mafia, which are the top of the 'democratic' Kosovo government.

PS: 'State sponsored terrorist', what a laugh!

Re:Consipricy nuts, go! (1)

Xest (935314) | about a month ago | (#47448707)

Alright Mr Putin. That's your 3rd AC post now.

Yes they're state sponsored terrorists. By definition terrorism is trying to force political change against the majority with violence.

These guys are a minority trying to force change, therefore, they are by definition terrorists. As they have also acquired Russian arms that only could be acquired with Russian support (T-64s, Iglas etc.) then they are also state sponsored.

Re:Consipricy nuts, go! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month ago | (#47478873)

Name calling is for the weak! :D

Replace Russia with America or Britain. Replace Donetsk with Syria Jihad or Afghanistan Mujahideen, you would have better argument.

If you are intelligent enough, you should knew: Ukraine were part of Soviet, owned alot of Soviet weapons when split up. Ukraine has modern Soviet-style weapon manufactures.

Re:Consipricy nuts, go! (1)

Talderas (1212466) | about a month and a half ago | (#47426181)

The US only said they couldn't confirm or deny who made the arrest, which in this case was flak for the Maldives not to take responsibility if they so choose.

Re:Consipricy nuts, go! (1)

superwiz (655733) | about a month and a half ago | (#47428855)

Cooperating with the US would have been (and still is) a terrible PR move for Maldives. Russian oligarchs are their main customers.

Re:Consipricy nuts, go! (1)

cavreader (1903280) | about a month and a half ago | (#47429103)

The richest and most powerful Russian oligarchs are currently having some difficulties managing and funding their foreign enterprises due to targeted sanctions. I think the Maldives will get along just fine in the future. All they did was honor and fulfill their responsibilities and treaty obligations with Interpol. The guy arrested is the son of a top level and powerful Russian nationalist and a long standing party member. If this guy really wants his son back they could always exchange him for someone the US wants back. It would not be the first time this type of exchange was made.

Re:Consipricy nuts, go! (1)

superwiz (655733) | about a month ago | (#47436109)

Actually, the US sanctions are currently an ongoing joke in Russia. I saw someone post a photograph showing that some local gym was advertising that they were having sanctions against McCain and Harry Reid. The sanctions cover a few (very few) individuals. They are about as much "sanctions" as Obama's administration is "the most transparent in history." The Oligarchs managed to make their money in Russia in which every business, at the time, was ran the way the narco businesses are ran in the US (in complete absence of the law). Having a few accounts frozen is hardly a contingency they haven't anticipated.

Re:Consipricy nuts, go! (1)

cavreader (1903280) | about a month ago | (#47436311)

My original post was in response to someone claiming the Maldives should fear the Russian Oligarchs. The very few individuals targeted are considered Oligarchs and close to Putin and extremely wealthy. Your average Russian citizen is not being effected by the sanctions. Those sanctioned have to be wary of having their foreign assets and bank accounts fall victim to the sanctions.

Re:Consipricy nuts, go! (1)

superwiz (655733) | about a month ago | (#47437033)

That was me. Russian oligarch's are the "it" boys which maldives so attractive to Russians with money. And once again. They became oligarchs before Putin tightened the screws. The fact that they survived and thrived in the environment in which murder and fraud were par for the course of doing business should tell you that they are prepared for almost any contingency. Their wealth is virtually guaranteed to be impossible to connect to them or to trace in its entirety. The only real restrictions on them is that they cannot receive US visas at the moment. But 5-50 people having visa restrictions is hardly rises to the level of what is called "sanctions."

Re:Consipricy nuts, go! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47429053)

One agency can't know none of the others did it.

Re: Consipricy nuts, go! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47424651)

Spelling the title of your post wrong makes you lose all credibility.

Re:Consipricy nuts, go! (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47424669)

Moron. If you check TFA link in the first Slashdot post [slashdot.org] about this story you'll read this:

The son of a Russian lawmaker has been arrested by the U.S. on charges of selling credit card information he stole by hacking into the computers of American retailers.

Roman Seleznev, 30, was arrested overseas by the U.S. Secret Service on July 5 and was ordered detained today during a hearing in federal court in Guam, the Justice Department said in a statement.

And there's this [nytimes.com] :

It was not yet clear how the Secret Service arrested Mr. Seleznev, and the United States attorney’s office in Washington State declined to elaborate.

and this [nytimes.com] :

The United States Justice Department has been conspicuously tight-lipped about the details of Roman Seleznev’s arrest, other than to say he was arrested in Guam on Saturday on charges that he hacked into retailers across the United States from 2009 to 2011.

So if anyone got the wrong idea about how the arrest went down, if the US's fucking fault.

Re:Consipricy nuts, go! (3, Interesting)

Zeorge (1954266) | about a month and a half ago | (#47424791)

How is it the fault of the US Government when news agencies are going at each other neck-and-neck, to have the latest, sensationalist story (to drive up ad revenue)? There may be some underlying Interpol related stipulation or other legal framework that has to be followed first before any details can be released. The Secret Service HQ is in DC, Maldives are in the Pacific, factor in time zones, operatives working, relaying info, people having to sleep, etc. So, the timeline makes sense. Having a PR statement is important but not as important as other legal things that need to be taken care of first.

Re:Consipricy nuts, go! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47424907)

Dumbass, the articles were written after the arrest was made, and the guy was in US custody. At that point there was no reason to be tight-lipped about the details of the arrest. The only conceivable reason to come out now with a revised story is that the US did kidnap the guy (violating a bilateral treaty with Russia) and now has persuaded the Maldives to provide cover for their asses.

Re:Consipricy nuts, go! (1)

nedlohs (1335013) | about a month and a half ago | (#47425469)

You have an amazing ability to ignore simple reasons and declare huge conspiracies as "the only conceivable" explanations for things.

Re:Consipricy nuts, go! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47425681)

What huge conspiracy? The Secret Service declared in a press release that they had arrested the guy, but were tight lipped about the specifics of the arrest. Then the Russians complained that the guy was kidnapped and that the US violated a bilateral treaty that require them to give each other a head's up when arresting a citizen of each's prospective country. Now, the DoJ is saying that actually it was the Maldives that arrested the guy on an Interpol warrant and just turned him over to the Secret Service. Ok, fine. So why didn't the Secret Service say that to begin with? They already the guy in custody before releasing their statement. Were they simply taking credit for the arrest, or, more likely, were they getting the Maldives go along with this story in order to cover their asses that they did, in fact, kidnap the guy. They fact that the US had done this before and is still doing this is not a conspiracy. You're denial of the evidence of past behaviour makes you a boot-licking apologist for the empire.

Re:Consipricy nuts, go! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47425479)

BINGO!

This!

Re:Consipricy nuts, go! (1)

CurryCamel (2265886) | about a month and a half ago | (#47424911)

How is it the fault of the US Government when news agencies are going at each other neck-and-neck, to have the latest, sensationalist story (to drive up ad revenue)?

By having such laws that allow these unscrupulous news agenices to do what they do?
See: everything can always be blamed on the government.

But I'd sure like to know how someone arrived from "arrested in the Maledives" to "arrested by US Secret Service". One heck of an interpolation.

Re:Consipricy nuts, go! (1)

nedlohs (1335013) | about a month and a half ago | (#47425551)

The US government stated "On July 5, 2014 the U.S. Secret Service arrested Roman Valerevich Seleznev." They didn't go into any details like where which seems like exactly what you would expect since that's irrelevant and you don't want to give out operational details in some cases (and thus don't want to give them out in general - so that the cases you have a reason not to don't obviously stand out).

There's no interpolation to "arrested by the US Secret Service", it's just reordering the statement without changing the meaning in the slightest.

Of course if Maledives authorities hand him over the the US Secret Service he enters US Secret Service custody and thus has been arrested but the US Secret Service.

Re:Consipricy nuts, go! (1)

Talderas (1212466) | about a month and a half ago | (#47426189)

The Secret Service HQ is in DC, Maldives are in the Pacific

The Maldives are south west of the southern tip of India.

Re:Consipricy nuts, go! (1)

Lord Lemur (993283) | about a month and a half ago | (#47432363)

America only recognizes 2 oceans. The Left and the Right.

Re:Consipricy nuts, go! (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47424889)

Here's what the DOJ actually said. [dhs.gov] The rest was just the media going wild trying to mix together the statements of the DOJ with the claims of the Russians. The DOJ statement says nothing about him being "arrested overseas", just that he was arrested. This, and always was, a question for the Maldives government to respond to. And now they have.

Re:Consipricy nuts, go! (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47424999)

The first sentence of the press release reads thusly:
On July 5, 2014 the U.S. Secret Service arrested Roman Valerevich Seleznev.

This turns out to be a lie since it is now claimed that the Maldives arrested Seleznev and then turned him over to the Secret Service.

Re:Consipricy nuts, go! (1)

Perl-Pusher (555592) | about a month and a half ago | (#47425099)

So nobody in the current US government, or any other government has never before taken credit for the work of others? A politician couldn't survive without the sin of omission. In fact Paul Harvey made a living telling people "the rest of the story".

Re:Consipricy nuts, go! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47425703)

And the US has never asked, or pressured a country to lie for its benefit? What's more likely given the exposed behaviour of the US gov. over the last 25+ years?

Re:Consipricy nuts, go! (1)

nedlohs (1335013) | about a month and a half ago | (#47425739)

Maybe you should learn what arrested means.

Do you think if he had said the the US Secret Service, "I'd like to leave now, thanks. Am I free to go". They would have said "yes" and let him go?

No they wouldn't have. Because he was under arrest. In other words he had been arrested and the US Secret Service was now depriving him of liberty.

Re:Consipricy nuts, go! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47425797)

No, he was under arrest when the Maldives police grabbed him. He was in custody when turned over to the Secret Service. He wasn't arrested twice.

Re:Consipricy nuts, go! (1)

nedlohs (1335013) | about a month and a half ago | (#47427825)

Clearly your usage and the government's usage of the term is different. And since they get to define it...

Re:Consipricy nuts, go! (1)

tomhath (637240) | about a month and a half ago | (#47427851)

He wasn't arrested twice.

Yes, he was. That's the point; the Maldives arrested him, then released him to the US, which then arrested him again. That's how it's done.

Re:Consipricy nuts, go! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47426105)

And he was arrested by the US Secret Service in Guam, having been delivered there by the government of the Maldives.
Even if he had already been arrested elsewhere, the US legal system requires that he be arrested and accorded the full rights when he comes under US control.

Re:Consipricy nuts, go! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47424783)

So what do you say? American agents invite this guy to visit Guam, and he couldn't resist temptation to visit the island ?
No matter how you paint his lips it is still a pig.

Re:Consipricy nuts, go! (-1)

NotDrWho (3543773) | about a month and a half ago | (#47424973)

And let *me* guess. You think it's just a coincidence that the son of one of the strongest Russian leaders in favor of Ukrainian invasion just happens to become a criminal card thief in the middle of the Ukrainian crisis?

I suppose you believe that Dominique Strauss-Kahn and Julian Assange just *happened* to become rapists a few months after challenging the value of the U.S. dollar and leaking secret U.S. material (respectively), right?

Re:Consipricy nuts, go! (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47425035)

You have the sequence out of order. The US issued warrants for this guy back in 2012.

If you're going to throw around ad hominem attacks coupled with suppositions, you should attack the the Russian leader for hating the Ukraine for its perceived turn towards the power that has warrants out for his son.

Re:Consipricy nuts, go! (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47425191)

Facts really are pesky things.

Depends who you're quoting... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47425507)

John Adams or Ronald Reagan.
http://oupacademic.tumblr.com/... [tumblr.com]

Reagan also had a thing about regulations.

The only real disappointment for the president in his relations with Fahd was when the king tried to give Reagan a gift of four Arabian horses.
He complained in his diary, "I couldn't accept them as a gift - due to our stupid regulations."

Re:Consipricy nuts, go! (1)

X.25 (255792) | about a month and a half ago | (#47430197)

If you're going to throw around ad hominem attacks coupled with suppositions, you should attack the the Russian leader for hating the Ukraine for its perceived turn towards the power that has warrants out for his son.

Goebbels is proud.

Re:Consipricy nuts, go! (1)

Charliemopps (1157495) | about a month and a half ago | (#47425357)

Let me guess. All of you who claimed the US overstepped it's bounds in the previous Slashdot article will now claim that the Maldives is lying to cover for the US. Rather than simply just admit your knee jerk reaction was wrong.

I don't remember anyone spinning any conspiracies and this doesn't counter what everyone was complaining about. The US took the son of a Russian politician into custody during a military crisis without talking to Russia about it first. What would your reaction have been if, while on vacation to England (or any other country for that matter) John McCains kid was arrested and flown to Russia overnight? The uproar would be insane. The double standard we hold for other countries is a bit of a joke.

Re:Consipricy nuts, go! (2)

lister king of smeg (2481612) | about a month and a half ago | (#47426019)

What would your reaction have been if, while on vacation to England (or any other country for that matter) John McCains kid was arrested and flown to Russia overnight?.

Forget his kid can they taken him?

Re:Consipricy nuts, go! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47426137)

What would your reaction have been if, while on vacation to England (or any other country for that matter) John McCains kid was arrested and flown to Russia overnight?.

Forget his kid can they taken him?

A point that Liberals and Conservatives can agree on!

Re:Consipricy nuts, go! (1)

Talderas (1212466) | about a month and a half ago | (#47426217)

The Vietnamese did this once. They gave him back.

Re:Consipricy nuts, go! (1)

lister king of smeg (2481612) | about a month and a half ago | (#47427289)

Forget his kid can they taken him?

^take
(stupid tablet keyboard auto-corrected)

9/11 was an inside job (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47426669)

9/11 was an inside job

Re:9/11 was an inside job (1)

superwiz (655733) | about a month and a half ago | (#47428919)

If by that you mean, that it was you talking out of your ass (the inside of it), then you are probably right.

Re:Consipricy nuts, go! (1)

superwiz (655733) | about a month and a half ago | (#47428845)

Maldives doesn't give two craps about the US. The reason it would lie (if it were to lie) would be to placate Russia. Russian tourism money is one of its main sources of revenue. Not just general tourism, but specifically Russian. Vacationing in Maldives is the considered the main indication that one "has arrived" in modern Russia. It's where the Russian Big Money go when they want to prove that they are BIg Money. If there is even a hint that they served as US lap dogs, this particular little vacation destination will be abandoned. They are gonna have to prove now that a son of an MP was on Interpol watch list. Because he almost certainly was travelling on a diplomatic passport and was most likely outside of the reach of Interpol's jurisdiction.

Good For Them (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47424601)

If true, I'm glad the US Government did this. Too many evildoers and criminals will know they cannot avoid US justice because of technicalities like hiding in other countries. It will also serve as a warning to other dastardly villains around the world and let them know they will not be safe.

Any yes the US can get away with this because we are the richest, mightiest, most powerful nation on Earth. Other puny nations can't get away with it because they have no power like the United States.

Re:Good For Them (2)

FRAKK2 (166082) | about a month and a half ago | (#47424691)

Listen when the US goes around poisoning people with polonium, then post here, otherwise open a can of STFU

Re:Good For Them (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47425241)

And don't forget the poisoning was done on foreign soil.

Nice down-mod on you, by the way. Probably done by some foam-at-the-mouth moderator who goes on and on about "the oligarchy" and how they control dissenting opinions. Of course, they being oblivious to the hypocrisy of their own moderation actions.

Everyone is famous for 15 minutes. (1)

spartacus_prime (861925) | about a month and a half ago | (#47424675)

The Maldives saw their opportunity and jumped.

Umm yeah (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47424681)

I'm going to believe a Maldives police spokesperson that the US had nothing to do with this extradition.

Re:Umm yeah (1)

nedlohs (1335013) | about a month and a half ago | (#47424745)

Since they states the exact opposite of that, you don't have to believe it.

Re:Umm yeah (1)

superwiz (655733) | about a month and a half ago | (#47428891)

Maldives is yielding to pressure both from the US (which probably did kidnap the guy) and from Russia. Russians see Maldives as THE PRIME DESTINATION for anyone with money. The name "Maldives" in very, very common in modern Russia. But the reason they were pressured to take responsibility is that kidnapping a direct relative of a Parliament Member makes this potentially an Act Of War. US doesn't want the possibility of such such interpretation being made. And neither does Russia. Russia is in no position to let go of even a minor act of war right now. The internal Russian media has been blaming the West for Ukraine's asserted independence and has created a war-path climate. Russia would HAVE TO respond to even a minor act of war at this point. And they don't want to be forced into this position over someone nabbed on fraud charges.

Red notice (2)

benjfowler (239527) | about a month and a half ago | (#47424701)

Interpol Red Notices are routinely used by oppressive regimes to harass political opponents abroad. They're not always effective; governments seem to be free to ignore these things if it appears to be politically motivated.

It's not a good look for the Russians to be so cheeky as to protest a common thief getting busted like this. I should hope that if somebody in (say) the UK ripped off a few thousand Russian pensioners over the internet, that the Russians could have him handed over (and thrown in Russian PMITA prison) quickly. Our Russian friends seem to have forgotten the notions of reciprocity.

Re:Red notice (4, Informative)

drinkypoo (153816) | about a month and a half ago | (#47424789)

They're not always effective; governments seem to be free to ignore these things if it appears to be politically motivated.

INTERPOL itself has no teeth. It's left to the nations themselves to decide if they care what it has to say on a case-by-case basis. It permits information sharing (etc) but does not require it. Their goal is "To ensure and promote the widest possible mutual assistance between all criminal police authorities within the limits of the laws existing in the different countries and in the spirit of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights" and not to enforce laws themselves.

Re:Red notice (1)

jon3k (691256) | about a month and a half ago | (#47425277)

I should hope that if somebody in (say) the UK ripped off a few thousand Russian pensioners over the internet, that the Russians could have him handed over (and thrown in Russian PMITA prison) quickly.

I would support this 100%. You go to Russia and commit a crime then Russia has every right to prosecute you for it.

skeptical (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47424761)

"The government has the necessary documentation to prove it."

Sure, *now* they do . . .

What will be the tit for tat response from Russia? (1)

schwit1 (797399) | about a month and a half ago | (#47424773)

If I were the son of a high ranking US government official or businessman I would not travel to Russia or any nation friendly with Putin.

Re:What will be the tit for tat response from Russ (1)

Stormy Dragon (800799) | about a month and a half ago | (#47425131)

Actually, I think "I would not travel to Russia or any nation friendly with Putin" is enough without any other qualifications.

Re:What will be the tit for tat response from Russ (2)

ShanghaiBill (739463) | about a month and a half ago | (#47425305)

... or any nation friendly with Putin.

So they can't go to Syria or Belarus. That doesn't seem like a big limitation.

Carding (0)

Dan East (318230) | about a month and a half ago | (#47424797)

accused of running one of the world's largest carding operations

What's carding? Like hacked SIM cards or something?

Re:Carding (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47425005)

You are too stupid to live. Please return yourself to the reprocessing tank so that we may feed people slightly more capable of using Google.

Re:Carding (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47425051)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carding

To be honest, I'm surprised that's considered illegal.

Re:Carding (1)

Stormy Dragon (800799) | about a month and a half ago | (#47425111)

You're suprised it's illegal to steal someone's credit card information and charge things to it without permission?

Re:Carding (2)

cdrudge (68377) | about a month and a half ago | (#47425057)

Carding [wikipedia.org]

It's basically verifying the validity of stolen or generated card numbers.

Say what you will about the US (4, Interesting)

MikeRT (947531) | about a month and a half ago | (#47424799)

But there are no credible reports of the US allowing criminals to just wantonly defraud Russian and Chinese citizens. While all of our governments spy on each other (and each other's economies), the US at least tends to take a dim view toward its citizens committing criminal acts against foreigners.

Criminal acts (1)

phorm (591458) | about a month and a half ago | (#47425063)

I have a sideline job doing computer servicing/repair. Since the issues between Russia/Ukraine have ramped up, there's also been a noticeable uptick in online/banking fraud coming from Russia.
Thankfully the banks seem to be on the watch for this - the notify customers of unusual transactions, e.g. western union, to Russian accounts - so most of my work is just ensuring that machines are clean after the fact.

I won't say that this is state-sponsored, but likely more to issues alluded to with this guy: mainly that Russia doesn't seem to be very cooperative in dealing with known international criminals - especially with the poor international relations of current - and the criminal element are taking advantage of this.

Re:Say what you will about the US (1)

Rich0 (548339) | about a month and a half ago | (#47426481)

Agree. The US even has the FCPA - it is outright illegal to bribe foreign officials. That law isn't enforced as well as it probably could be, but it is enforced and you do hear about a scandal from time to time. I know that my employer trains on the act and makes compliance a clear policy (though I have no idea how much they follow-through in practice - I wouldn't be privy to enforcement actions).

I'm not sure to what degree this is the case in other countries.

I'm surprised the Russians would complain too much (5, Insightful)

swb (14022) | about a month and a half ago | (#47424809)

Since it would seem to only lead to more focus on the mafia-like nature of the Russian government and the shadowy links between Russian government, intelligence and organized crime.

I'm sure the US-haters and the Russian propagandists will begin their usual moral equivocation, NSA, CIA, banking, etc.

All else aside... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47424821)

"The government has the necessary documentation to prove it."

I have documentation that proves that I'm a member of any number of fictional agencies.

NO, NO, NO (1)

dcw3 (649211) | about a month and a half ago | (#47424849)

We can't waste an opportunity to blame America for overreach...stop, just stop.

Blurring lines between criminality and politics. (5, Insightful)

linearz69 (3473163) | about a month and a half ago | (#47425015)

The Russians have been protecting a suspected criminal fraudster who happens to be the son of a government official. These suspicions aren't thin. Seleznev has even admitted to his crimes. If its state sponsored thuggery, then the state is Russia, not US. Roman Seleznev is just another cyber criminal who was dumb enough to step outside of Mother Russia long enough to get caught.

If this had been Snowden, then I think the argument for political motivation is real. But Snowden, his existence in Russian exile, gives Russia some leverage to make claim of political arrest and state overreach. The US government has put itself in a position where it looks bad even when it is doing something good.

Re:Blurring lines between criminality and politics (1)

fustakrakich (1673220) | about a month and a half ago | (#47425675)

Blurring lines between criminality and politics.?

The two are synonymous. What's this line?

Re:Blurring lines between criminality and politics (1)

linearz69 (3473163) | about a month ago | (#47436705)

Blurring lines between criminality and politics.?

The two are synonymous. What's this line?

Since politics has historically existed in all recorded human cultures, is humanity corrupt and criminal by nature? What is the alternative?

If one were to bring a political "system based on corrupt practice" down, how would it be replaced? And what about those who the inevitably see a new political system as criminal?

Khmer Rouge, Blanc, and Bleu anyone?

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