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FCC Approves Subsidy Plan to Upgrade School and Library Networks

timothy posted about 3 months ago | from the ask-for-a-mile-in-hopes-of-an-inch dept.

Government 70

The Washington Post reports that, "In a 3-2 vote along party lines Friday, the FCC greenlit a plan to spend $2 billion over the next two years on subsidies for internal networks. The move also begins a process to phase out some subsidies under the federal program, known as E-Rate, for services and equipment that are on the decline, such as pagers and dial-up Internet service." That sounds like a lot of money, and it is, but as usual in politics it's the result of a messy process: The original plan called for spending $5 billion on WiFi over five years, in line with a push by the Obama administration to bring next-gen broadband and WiFi to 99 percent of students over the same period. Those funds would have partly come from savings as a result of transitioning away from supporting legacy technologies. The proposal would also have eliminated an existing requirement that E-Rate funds be spent first on broadband services before being applied to WiFi. In past years, the cost of broadband service meant that money was rarely left over for upgrading WiFi connections. But the FCC's proposal was ultimately scaled back late Thursday amid Republican objections that the E-Rate program can't afford the changes. The final proposal's two-year, $2 billion commitment accounts for the money the FCC has already set aside for WiFi upgrades, but it does not commit the FCC to funding WiFi upgrades at that same rate for the following three years.

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Why - why $1 billion a year? (2)

LynnwoodRooster (966895) | about 3 months ago | (#47438839)

Seriously - why? There are less than 100,000 K-12 schools in the US [edreform.com] , we're talking about $10,000 PER SCHOOL in the US, each year. I just upgraded my office (12 Ubiquiti access points, covering 45,000 square feet - probably about the average size of a school campus) to 150 Mbps down/65 Mbps up FiOS for $250 per month. Should cost less than $1000 for the hardware, and less than $3000 per year for the service. Where does the other $6,000 go - for the first year? And what about all the following years?

Re:Why - why $1 billion a year? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47439001)

Should cost less than $1000 for the hardware, and less than $3000 per year for the service

I work for a public library in south Florida, our 50Mbps MetroE from AT&T is WAY* more than $3,000/yr

Re:Why - why $1 billion a year? (1)

zr (19885) | about 3 months ago | (#47439011)

this is a subsidy for _internal_ networks

Re:Why - why $1 billion a year? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47439247)

And MetroE access would generally be used as WAN access for interconnecting private networks, not to the Internet...

Re:Why - why $1 billion a year? (1)

zr (19885) | about 3 months ago | (#47439283)

right, but this bill is only funding wifi improvements.

Re:Why - why $1 billion a year? (2)

davester666 (731373) | about 3 months ago | (#47440949)

That is because:

1. AT&T knows you are a library, and not home user, so you have a nice fat budget, and they would like as big a chunk of it as they can get.
2. [for the GP] Everybody knows you need an expensive Cisco router, no matter how small your school is.

Re:Why - why $1 billion a year? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47451759)

Re: AT&T How would they know? I just got ATT fiber for business and they are practically giving it away in our rural area. We had one company try to offer us their fiber that they ran to all the schools and they decided that they could offer their fiber to other business if they are on the same block or if the fiber runs down the same road. Our didnt but run their fiber to our Hospital it would cost 40 grand. I had att run fiber and they ran it on the poles and it cost nothing. AT&T installed everything for free cisco router included. I change the entire analog digital phone lines to fiber and it cut our costs in half. We got rid of the old T-1 line that on its own was 800 a month. We have 4 dsl's at 40 a month and the phones were over 3500 a month.
The fiber cut our phone and internet to 1800 a month. What?!
I was also talking to each ATT guy that came thu to install different parts and he said other business are getting the 100up 100down fiber also and when they upgrade its costing them under 100 bucks monthly for the fiber. I think thats insanely generous for rural texas.

Re:Why - why $1 billion a year? (1)

pnutjam (523990) | about 3 months ago | (#47447779)

This just in...
ISP costs vary by location.

Re:Why - why $1 billion a year? (1)

mgcarley (735176) | about 2 months ago | (#47459633)

Then stop buying from AT&T and start buying from someone else - if you're in or near a large city, paying over $10/mbit/month is absurd.

Of course, if you're in a rural are that may be a different story as there may be no competition, in which case, yeah.

Something else that some providers are willing to do is provide a single Internet connection/gateway at a single location and then connect satellite sites to it via some form of LAN (exactly what is offered may vary by provider) - so you might have 1 library connected with say 500mb of Internet access on a gigabit port (preferably in the cheapest market for that) and 9 satellite campuses connected to the primary campus via private lines with some load balancing and voila* - you might save yourself 30 or 40% over getting 10 separate 50mb connections**

*My description is a bit simplified, but you should get the jist. We were going to be doing something like this to connect a few offices of the same company - some of which were in different states - together and route everything through a single Internet gateway. The performance hit of a few extra milliseconds involved in routing were not significant enough to outweigh the cost savings.

**Educated guess - your mileage may vary.

As an added bonus, the networks connecting each campus might even be considered internal and thus eligible for a subsidy (maybe).

Re:Why - why $1 billion a year? (2)

Noah Haders (3621429) | about 3 months ago | (#47439285)

The most expensive part is employing tech staff to connect and troubleshoot everything.

Re:Why - why $1 billion a year? (1)

zr (19885) | about 3 months ago | (#47439371)

wifi setup requires hardly any maintenance. 1-2 headcount per school district at most. chances are they already have admins on staff. a little training is all that might be needed.

or contract a private shop to maintain wifi infrastructure.

any way you look at this $$ it can't possibly be justified except that it will be spent lining politicians pockets.

Re:Why - why $1 billion a year? (3, Insightful)

Noah Haders (3621429) | about 3 months ago | (#47439479)

wifi setup requires hardly any maintenance. 1-2 headcount per school district at most. chances are they already have admins on staff. a little training is all that might be needed.

OK, that's cool. so $10k for wifi equipment and $150k for two unionized benefits jobs to maintain it, annually. that equipment is a rip off!

Re:Why - why $1 billion a year? (2)

SuricouRaven (1897204) | about 3 months ago | (#47439961)

Each school building needs multiple access points. On a network of such high node density (ie, thirty laptops in one room) you can't just stick bog-standard APs up - you need a managed wireless solution capable of dynamically adjusting freqency allocation according to demand and load-balancing access points. That means high-end APs, an expensive controller, possible upgrades to the wired network to handle it. You'll also need one high-skill administrator per district, and one low-skill technician per school to handle all the regular maintanance and repair, including user tech support and making sure the filters are quickly reconfigured every time a student finds a new term that gets something inappropriate on image search.

Re:Why - why $1 billion a year? (1)

zr (19885) | about 3 months ago | (#47442143)

so a school with 30 laptops per class doesnt have the funding to buy a $400 router per class? so we have to throw $10k/year at them just to avoid engaging common sense?

we're already outspending nearly every western nation, how's that working out?

all i'm saying is lets _think_ before we spend.

its telling that this idea gets flagged as flame bait and troll..

Re:Why - why $1 billion a year? (1)

Lumpy (12016) | about 3 months ago | (#47442425)

nobody employed at a K-12 school has the ability or IQ to properly run and terminate cat6/fiber/etc let alone install a clean network rack.

Ever single school my company is called in to fix was an utter nightmare that had to have most of the infrastructure gutted. Idiots just running non plenum wire in the ceiling ducts, etc...

If you want it half assed, let the school do it. If you want ti right, hire a real company of professionals to come in and install it right so it has a chance to survive the school's staff.

Re:Why - why $1 billion a year? (1)

Joe_Dragon (2206452) | about 3 months ago | (#47439365)

not all of us are in Fios land others need to pay the costs of running firer to there site.

Re:Why - why $1 billion a year? (3, Interesting)

Curunir_wolf (588405) | about 3 months ago | (#47439633)

Seriously - why? ... Where does the other $6,000 go - for the first year?

It goes to the equipment the NSA needs to collect all the data, connect it with the students and their parents and their home computers, and record and store all the communication that happens. Duh.

Re:Why - why $1 billion a year? (1)

sgt scrub (869860) | about 3 months ago | (#47440265)

Google does that for them for free. No, I am not a Google hater. Google collects data. The shitheads tell them to give it up or enjoy being fucked over.

Re:Why - why $1 billion a year? (3, Insightful)

sgt scrub (869860) | about 3 months ago | (#47440245)

Content filtering is mandatory in K12 schools and can be fairly expensive. Hardware in schools take a beating and need more frequent replacements. If you think network equipment is bulletproof do some work for a school. You can grill food on some of their routers. If it were my decision, there would be 10G network to all public schools and companies would be allowed to bid to be providers using bandwidth branching from those hops. It would push down costs, create an open business model, increase bandwidth to all areas of cities, and move schools closer to were they need to be technologically.

Re:Why - why $1 billion a year? (1)

Archfeld (6757) | about 3 months ago | (#47441099)

WOW I wish more people thought like you. I volunteer and manage a network and wireless setup for a high-school in my area, the bandwidth is provided free of charge by AT&T, I know it surprised me as well. Kids can and DO break things in ways I never even conceived of before taking on this responsibility. I work as an admin for a very LARGE business and do this professionally and I've never seen the cluster-fsck that 2 dozen high school kids can make of a network in 10 minutes without even really trying.
Hardware and software companies need to get these kids to be beta testers.

Re:Why - why $1 billion a year? (1)

mpe (36238) | about 3 months ago | (#47441753)

I work as an admin for a very LARGE business and do this professionally and I've never seen the cluster-fsck that 2 dozen high school kids can make of a network in 10 minutes without even really trying. Hardware and software companies need to get these kids to be beta testers.

It would be a mistake to assume that the most destructive users in a school environment are the students though.

Re:Why - why $1 billion a year? (1)

Archfeld (6757) | about 3 months ago | (#47443841)

Do you have experience that points to other sources ? I've done this for several years now and I've yet to have to work a teachers or admins workstation for anything but a part failure, while I spend more time cleaning up student workstations and shared library stations with the software filter and the tampering students...

NOTE : quite often I learn NEW and interesting things fixing stuff after the kids are done, things I never would have considered or thought of trying :)

Re:Why - why $1 billion a year? (1)

pnutjam (523990) | about 3 months ago | (#47447787)

Don't let your reality get in the way of his (union?) rant against educators.

Re:Why - why $1 billion a year? (1)

mpe (36238) | about 3 months ago | (#47441855)

Seriously - why? There are less than 100,000 K-12 schools in the US, we're talking about $10,000 PER SCHOOL in the US, each year.

Probably considerably less than that once you account for all the costs associated with awarding contracts. Including "bidding" and multi layer sub contracting. Even if the whole thing is free from any kind of bribary.

I just upgraded my office (12 Ubiquiti access points, covering 45,000 square feet - probably about the average size of a school campus)

Area is rather less meaningful than number/density of clients. Also schools typically have what is effectivly a whole site shift change every hour or so. Schools tend to "punch above their weight" in comparison to businesses when it comes to things like network bandwidth requirements.
Even though Unify is cost effective both in terms of the prices of access points and not requiring a separate management system if it's not on some "approved list" a school may not be able to buy it with this money anyway. Also in a school environment you'd most likely be looking at at least one access point per room for decent coverage.

Re:Why - why $1 billion a year? (1)

Lumpy (12016) | about 3 months ago | (#47442407)

You volunteering to install all of it for free?

kickbacks? sheesh.. (1, Flamebait)

zr (19885) | about 3 months ago | (#47438909)

i wonder how many politicians and union hacks will get funded by this money?

Re:kickbacks? sheesh.. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47439037)

Unions are the reason your happy ass has any kind of protection at work. Strong unions mean a strong America and there is a direct relationship between our dwindling middle class and the leaching of union power.

Re:kickbacks? sheesh.. (0, Troll)

zr (19885) | about 3 months ago | (#47439109)

i'm not in a union and have no interest in joining, my job is fine. i was never unemployed for more than 2 months (following my arrival here, i couldn't speak english then).

more over i emigrated a country that was TOTALLY unionized. the only thing protected was mediocre performance and pay.

so with all due respect, tell your happy union stories to someone who doesnt know what a union is.

unions are the reason i can't find a decent school for my son and there is a lottery to get into a union-free charter school.

Re:kickbacks? sheesh.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47439299)

Public schools are garbage, but so are a grand majority of private schools and charter schools. No, standardized tests which just test for rote memorization (And even worse: Multiple choice tests.) and little else don't mean anything.

Re:kickbacks? sheesh.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47439199)

yes and no ... Unions that actually do their job protect jobs are good BUT there are too many unions that are just as corrupt as the government and the Corporations that they fight against.

Re: kickbacks? sheesh.. (1)

rickb928 (945187) | about 3 months ago | (#47439461)

Here's a concept for yah...

Unions are actually corporations. They have a purpose.

That suffer the same problems as any corporations.

Deal with it.

Re: kickbacks? sheesh.. (1)

zr (19885) | about 3 months ago | (#47439625)

except they're monopolies and people like you rationalize against emergence of competition like charter schools.

otherwise let unions compete for work and workers, perfectly fine by me.

now YOU deal with it.

Re: kickbacks? sheesh.. (1)

rickb928 (945187) | about 3 months ago | (#47440005)

What? You've confused me with some other person you've confused with a real person.

Re: kickbacks? sheesh.. (1)

zr (19885) | about 3 months ago | (#47440707)

notion that unions can't survive in fair competition confuses you? well.. i'm not surprised :)

Re: kickbacks? sheesh.. (1)

rickb928 (945187) | about 3 months ago | (#47441003)

No, notion that somehow I disagree that they're monopolies, and that somehow i rationalize against emergence of competition like charter schools. I not only do NOT, but I'm very much interested in alternatives to our failED public school system nationwide.

My comment about unions being corporations was informed by the reality that many unions are effectively subcontractors to trucking, contstruction, technology companies. Teachers unions fit this mold, though they and school systems would probably argue that.

Somehow you seem to think I'm not a lifelong conservative, steeped in capitalism, clinging to the hope that our Nation can somehow leverage our Constitution and sa be out nation from this president. Please reconsider your opinion of me.

Re: kickbacks? sheesh.. (1)

zr (19885) | about 3 months ago | (#47441993)

i have no opinion of you, as i don't know you. i only have opinion of what you've said. if i misunderstood that in some way i apologize.

you invited me to "deal with it" where as i've zero problem with unions competing on the open market same as any other corporation. which was my point.

Re: kickbacks? sheesh.. (1)

rickb928 (945187) | about 3 months ago | (#47442553)

Actually my initial response was to an AC, not you.

Re: kickbacks? sheesh.. (1)

zr (19885) | about 3 months ago | (#47443179)

if i misunderstood your statement, please accept my apologies.

Re:kickbacks? sheesh.. (2)

Curunir_wolf (588405) | about 3 months ago | (#47439653)

yes and no ... Unions that actually do their job protect jobs are good BUT there are too many unions that are just as corrupt as the government and the Corporations that they fight against.

What are you talking about? Unions are GREAT! Without a union, workers are subject to exploitation by corporations. With a union, you get to be exploited by corporations AND unions! It's a double-tap!

Re: kickbacks? sheesh.. (2)

Redbehrend (3654433) | about 3 months ago | (#47439781)

Every union I have been part of has screwed us, has gotten paid more than us and lied about funds. I still get letters about legal actions and that was LONG ago.. The only union I have ever enjoyed is teamsters but that's because everyone is afraid of them lol.

Re:kickbacks? sheesh.. (1)

Curunir_wolf (588405) | about 3 months ago | (#47439639)

Unions are the reason your happy ass has any kind of protection at work. Strong unions mean a strong America and there is a direct relationship between our dwindling middle class and the leaching of union power.

Jimmy Hoffa? Is that you?

$10,000 isnt much to set up a school. (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47438923)

Your funding costs are a bit off there first poster.

The schools I have been in have the following costs to set up a functioning network that can be managed down to a student level.

Cisco 4400 Wlan controller with 50 ap license $7200 (amazon) (no longer produced but functional for a school)
Cisco 1252 aironet ap $300 ea x 50 = $15,000 (amazon)
Cisco POE switch to power all the AP's SG200-50p poe smart switch $800 (amazon)
Cabling installed by contractor 12,000 feet (based on my own install at the last school I was at for 15 AP's taking 3,000 feet) $unknown

$10,000 per school is nothing when just the hardware for a large campus would cost over $23,000 plus cat5e/6 plus labor.

For those of you wondering why so many AP's are needed, most schools have MANY firewalls made of brick that are double thick and radio waves just dont like to penetrate that. On top of that, schools contain upwards of THOUSANDS of bodies sucking in the RF along with hard corners and multiple thousands of devices.
I have seen students with their laptop, phone, and kindle all out and connected at the same time.

$10,000 isnt much to set up a school. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47439225)

Here is the problem.

The schools/government should not be using these high end devices they are totally unnecessary.
The cabling and devices should be installed and maintained by the schools existing engineering and IT departments.

If the school system doesn't have people capable of handling this they have bigger problems.

Re:$10,000 isnt much to set up a school. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47439403)

Engineering and IT departments?

I was the only tech for the last 4 districts I have worked in. If they were to hire a 2nd person, it would be $50,000 minimum in wages and insurance and such. 10,000 isnt much when it is 5 times as much just to turn a 1 person tech dept. into a 2 person tech dept.

Also, Using a lan controller allows for actual control of the network. Just placing a bunch of linksys ap's everywhere is cheap but then you get to have even more tech support to run around changing passwords and ssid's as needed.

Re:$10,000 isnt much to set up a school. (1)

Curunir_wolf (588405) | about 3 months ago | (#47439663)

The schools/government should not be using these high end devices they are totally unnecessary.

Dude... NSA tracking. Plus administrator spying. We need to keep track of these kids, so we can arrest them for child pornography when they take pictures of themselves.

Re:$10,000 isnt much to set up a school. (1)

SuricouRaven (1897204) | about 3 months ago | (#47439973)

Please get one standard consumer AP. Now put thirty laptops around it, and set people doing some web browsing on them. Observe what happens: It'll work, barely, in a radio-clean environment.

Re:$10,000 isnt much to set up a school. (1)

Lawrence_Bird (67278) | about 3 months ago | (#47439251)

Why not use the already installed electrical wiring? Not that every room needs internet connection anyway. Or does the taxpayer really need to make sure little Johnny and Susie can check their social media while in class?

Re:$10,000 isnt much to set up a school. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47439447)

Electrical wiring for AP's isnt going to work as most schools could have a thousand feet from a wiring closet to a room where an AP is needed. That distance doesnt translate well if at all for networking over power lines. Plus the expense of the adapters to go to and from cat5e would just increase the cost.

The small school I am in would have a bit over 200 feet from the server room, to the main panels coming into the school, then back out to the farthest corner would be another 300 feet. 500 feet trying to push 100mbps service on 12 gauge wires isnt going to work too well.

Rural Washington needs internet access. (2)

BrookHarty (9119) | about 3 months ago | (#47438965)

So many schools, librarys and entire towns have no Internet access here in Rural Washington. The rich suburbs down the road near the lakes do, but not the inner city (very small city) does. My mothers town everyone is on dialup. They did start beaming in microwave to the town library and enable wifi. So People drive in and sit in the cars to get online, crazy. Funny thing, she use to get a flickering of 4G Verizon, but verizon shared the tower with the microwave isp, so company made a decision to cut Verizon's data to feed more bandwidth to the library. Now everyone is stuck on dialup. This is about 50 miles north of Spokane, WA.

This is crazy as everyone has underground power and telephone lines, but no internet. The power company put everything underground to save money from falling trees every year, and that had to be expensive as hell.

Re:Rural Washington needs internet access. (1)

Frosty Piss (770223) | about 3 months ago | (#47439629)

So many schools, librarys and entire towns have no Internet access here in Rural Washington.

I think what you may mean is many rural Washington towns have no cable or DSL. If you have a phone line, dial-up is still (yes) available, and both Hughes and Dish offer down and up link to the Intertubes. Expensive, yes, but if there is a cell tower nearby... there is Internet.

Re:Rural Washington needs internet access. (1)

sgt scrub (869860) | about 3 months ago | (#47440283)

+5 w00sh!

Re:Rural Washington needs internet access. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47440617)

Are you sure that your area doesn't have access to this: http://www.wa-k20.net

Most schools, libraries, and public institutions in Washington state use the Washington K-20 educational network. Districts and towns can opt out of the program if they want. If your area is not using it for the library or the schools you should start asking them why.

Re:Rural Washington needs internet access. (1)

mpe (36238) | about 3 months ago | (#47441767)

Are you sure that your area doesn't have access to this: http://www.wa-k20.net/ [wa-k20.net]
Most schools, libraries, and public institutions in Washington state use the Washington K-20 educational network. Districts and towns can opt out of the program if they want. If your area is not using it for the library or the schools you should start asking them why.


A quick look at the website showed quite a bit of "corporate speak". Maybe a poll of school network admins would paint a different picture.

Yes, we know. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47439101)

You told us yesterday.

Almost like This Plan (1)

bill_mcgonigle (4333) | about 3 months ago | (#47439127)

Almost like this plan [slashdot.org] except now with more bacony goodness!

Dupe.

Fuckin Federal government (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47439245)

Why does the Federal government have to butt it's fat ass into EVERY FUCKIN' THING IN THE COUNTRY. What the hell.

If there was CLEARLY something that was a local issue, it's school WiFi.

And we wonder why the Feds have run up an EIGHTEEN GAZILLLION FUCKIN DOLLAR debt.

Fuckin assholes. Makes me want to build a compound and heavily arm myself and shit.

Re:Fuckin Federal government (1)

Lumpy (12016) | about 3 months ago | (#47442451)

Because people are too fucking stupid to do it on their own. Maybe if we require IQ above what degree they paid for this problem would not manifest as much.

how do taxpayers vote against this? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47439319)

It seems like a waste of money that i do not want my tax dollars going towards.

Amazing how little money this is... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47439405)

The Republicans have destroyed our schools again. This is only $10,000 per school. That is nothing. Nothing. Their kind is so stupid that they want to make sure children are not allowed to be educated. This stealing of money from schools to give to oil companies proves the intent of their kind. Not that we need proof when they admit to wanting to shutdown every school and put teachers to death.

Re:Amazing how little money this is... (1, Insightful)

greenwow (3635575) | about 3 months ago | (#47439429)

My neighbor pissed on my wife’s car because she is a teacher. You are correct about the way Republicans feel about teachers. They hate learning. They only love violence. That and fucking over people.

Re:Amazing how little money this is... (1)

SuricouRaven (1897204) | about 3 months ago | (#47439987)

Republicans tent to regard education as a system for making democrats. They attribute this to a massive conspiracy among teachers and unions to indoctrinate children.

Re: Amazing how little money this is... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47441153)

I worked in a fairly moderate, southern public school for a while. There were plenty of hardcore Democrats and equally many hardcore Republicans and moderates in between, and they all got along swimmingly. The kids were trained to pledge allegiance to the flag, encouraged to become soldiers, herded into sports, and allowed to pray around the flagpole (the Christian prayer club was one of the biggest organizations on campus). You've never seen a more Rockwellian picture than what actually went on there. There were Young Democrats' and Young Republicans' clubs, and it was very much a microcosm of the community surrounding the school. In the end, that's exactly what schools are, because they're made of people who live in the community. Not much chance of Seekrit Commie Indoctrination, and really very little in the way of secrecy period, since parents were solicited for volunteer support at every possible opportunity. The administration had an adage: the school teaches reading and writing and math, but only parents teach values. I can't for the life of me see why anyone would suspect otherwise of a school.

Re:Amazing how little money this is... (1)

zr (19885) | about 3 months ago | (#47440729)

$10k per school per year to improve wifi is nothing??

i get your point that the other guy is worse but come on, this isn't "nothing".

yuo FaIl It?! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47439505)

in any way related ultimately, we but with Netcraft Goodbye...she had MECHANICS. SO I'M OF AMERICA irc Ass until I hit my work that you very sick and its collect any spilled and I probably here, please do claim that BSD is a Irc.secsup.org or the numbers. The are almost Shall we? OK! conflicts tha7 teeth into when ME! It's official this exploitation, crisco or lube. same year, BSD is not prone to words, don't get Lite is straining = 1400 NetBSD That the project Kreskin previously thought do, or indeed what will recall that it

Last to learn (1, Informative)

jamesl (106902) | about 3 months ago | (#47439515)

What does McDonalds have that our schools don't have?

1. Affordable food that students will eat.
2. Free WiFi.

Re:Last to learn (1)

Lumpy (12016) | about 3 months ago | (#47442465)

I was going to add 3- A Clown, But then I remembered the Principal from my daughters public school...

How is this the FCC's business? (1)

schwit1 (797399) | about 3 months ago | (#47439581)

Federal agencies should regulate.
Congress should subsidize.

Re:How is this the FCC's business? (1)

Desolation Row (550944) | about 3 months ago | (#47439885)

So, you are not from the USA. While the US Congress directly accepts bribes, it usually doesn't directly disperse the associated thank you dollars back to the corporations.

In this case, thank-yous were paid by stuffing the FCC with lawyers working for Comcast and Verizon (currently on 'accrued salary, bonus and commission deferred until 2017' status).

It is these experts in Telecommunications Law (that could not explain the difference between RJ11 and an Internet Tube) who will determine that all schools and libraries should use Comcast, Verizon, or both, for installation and service.

Next Gen Wifi? (1)

jmac_the_man (1612215) | about 3 months ago | (#47441051)

I'm confused why the FCC and the administration are looking for wifi specifically in schools. If students are going to be rough on whatever technology equipment you have, you should be getting them PCs, which are easier to repair than tablets. PCs are also suitable for some kinds of work that tablets simply aren't, notably the computer science classes that are all the rage right now. If you're getting PCs for classrooms, it makes more sense to wire them into the network directly. It's cheaper, it enables more types of learning, and you don't have to worry about kids dicking around on their personally owned iPhones instead of learning.

Given these factors, why are we trying to upgrade to next generation wifi specifically? I'd imagine that some schools would want to upgrade their CAT 5 based networks. Why are we not enabling that?

Why do schools need internet? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47441207)

Seriously, why do schools need internet? Teachers plan out everything for future classes. Web pages and videos can be downloaded ahead of time. An IT guy, or two, can help a teacher download stuff.

I can see the use of computers and LAN for education software to educate kids, as a form of teacher automation.

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