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New Raspberry Pi Model B+

samzenpus posted about 4 months ago | from the latest-and-greatest dept.

Upgrades 202

mikejuk writes The Raspberry Pi foundation has just announced the Raspberry Pi B+. The basic specs haven't changed much — same BC2835 and 512MB of RAM and the $35 price tag. There are now four USB ports, which means you don't need a hub to work with a mouse, keyboard and WiFi dongle. The GPIO has been expanded to 40 pins, but don't worry: you can plug your old boards and cables into the lefthand part of the connector, and it's backward compatible. As well as some additional general purpose lines, there are two designated for use with I2C EEPROM. When the Pi boots it will look for custom EEPROMs on these lines and optionally use them to load Linux drivers or setup expansion boards. Expansion boards can now include identity chips that when the board is connected configures the Pi to make use of them — no more manual customization. The change to a micro SD socket is nice, unless you happen to have lots of spare full size SD cards around. It is also claimed that the power requirements have dropped by half, to one watt, which brings the model B into the same power consumption area as the model A. Comp video is now available on the audio jack, and the audio quality has been improved. One big step for Raspberry Pi is that it now has four holes for mounting in standard enclosures.

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Much better board layout (5, Informative)

brunes69 (86786) | about 4 months ago | (#47447803)

The model B has a lot more thought into the board layout. Having the power, and HDMI all on the same side of the board and the optional I/O also all on one other side, makes so much more sense and will allow much cleaner looking enclosures. Although.. I still wish they had done even MORE thought and out the I/O on the OPPOSITE side of the board where they have all the GPIO pins.

Re:Much better board layout (2)

LWATCDR (28044) | about 4 months ago | (#47448259)

I would still like to see a line in.

Cue the anti not-invented-in-the-us hatred (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47447813)

Relax.

Re:Cue the anti not-invented-in-the-us hatred (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47448027)

So, is "anti not-invented-in-the-us hatred" hatred of those who espouse a not-invented-in-the-us position (and you wish to defend) or is it more along the lines of trying to stop those who hate people who are advocating for US inventions?

Either way, your advocacy is confusingly meta and double-negative.

Re:Cue the anti not-invented-in-the-us hatred (2)

amiga3D (567632) | about 4 months ago | (#47448703)

Don't read so much into it. Maybe people just have opinions. Relax.

Re:Cue the anti not-invented-in-the-us hatred (0)

ArcadeMan (2766669) | about 4 months ago | (#47448059)

Relax [apple.com]

Slow CPU, crippled network, too little RAM (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47447815)

But they fixed some power problems and reduced the power consumption by using switching regulators, like they had planned before they decided to use linear regulators for the first version. The flimsy micro USB port is still the power connector though and other input voltages than 5V are still not accepted, making battery powered applications unnecessarily difficult. Oh, and none of the existing cases fit because they moved the connectors. Yeah, this is great.

Re:Slow CPU, crippled network, too little RAM (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47448013)

Oh, and none of the existing cases fit because they moved the connectors.

Good. The old layout was awful, and they've fixed it.

Re:Slow CPU, crippled network, too little RAM (1)

ArcadeMan (2766669) | about 4 months ago | (#47448155)

Oh, and none of the existing cases fit because they moved the connectors. Yeah, this is great.

It is great indeed, because the ports are now aligned and the new cases won't look like deformed blobs of plastic.

Re:Slow CPU, crippled network, too little RAM (3, Informative)

CastrTroy (595695) | about 4 months ago | (#47448209)

Cases have always been problem with the Raspberry Pi. They didn't really think about cases when they designed it. It's almost as if they just expected people to have the board sitting unprotected on the desk. I like that they actually have mounting holes now, which should help things out a lot.

Re:Slow CPU, crippled network, too little RAM (1)

RabidReindeer (2625839) | about 4 months ago | (#47448679)

Cases have always been problem with the Raspberry Pi. They didn't really think about cases when they designed it. It's almost as if they just expected people to have the board sitting unprotected on the desk. I like that they actually have mounting holes now, which should help things out a lot.

Technically, the old Model B had "mounting holes". Two of them, located in places that would really only work if you augmented them via some sort of edge or insulated under-support. The Pi box I have goes strictly for edge mounting, and it really doesn't do that well, although most of the fault is in the box design.

The B+ won't fit that old box, though. Not because of the changed port locations. Because the new card is slightly larger than the old one.

Re:Slow CPU, crippled network, too little RAM (3, Informative)

mark-t (151149) | about 4 months ago | (#47448689)

input voltages than 5V are still not accepted, making battery powered applications unnecessarily difficult.

Only if you think that adding a voltage regulator chip to your power supply is difficult. A 5v regulator, the 7805, costs about 50 cents a piece even when you buy them in very small quantities.

Re:Slow CPU, crippled network, too little RAM (1)

Hamsterdan (815291) | about 4 months ago | (#47448723)

"other input voltages than 5V are still not accepted"

Putting yet another regulator would increases the cost & complexity. Want to use it with a 12V supply? It's not like it's really hard to use a 7805.

Re:Slow CPU, crippled network, too little RAM (1)

amiga3D (567632) | about 4 months ago | (#47448727)

It's a hobbyist and education board. The amazing thing really is that it's used in a lot of industrial projects now which I think surprised the Rpi people. The problems pale beside the flexibility and low cost of the board. It's not perfect, I'm sure for another 100-200 dollars it could have been.

So they update it, but... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47447833)

...they do nothing about the two major shortcomings making the board an absolutely pain in the b-hind to use: the weak CPU, and the ridiculous amount of RAM. Good jeooorrrrb.

Re:So they update it, but... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47447939)

For simple programming and various custom embedded projects the specs are still plenty.

So they update it, but... (2)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47447991)

Perhaps you're expecting it to do too much? Unless you have very modest needs, it isn't intended to be a desktop/laptop replacement.

Re:So they update it, but... (3, Informative)

fisted (2295862) | about 4 months ago | (#47448055)

Those aren't the "major" shortcomings, and frankly, those aren't shortcomings at all. The CPU is about as fast as you'd expect at that little power consumption, and there is plenty of RAM. No idea what you're trying to do with yours, running Windows on it?

In case you case, the two major shortcomings are power related (try to hotplug a wifi dongle, say) and the non-dedicated ethernet.

Re:So they update it, but... (1)

fisted (2295862) | about 4 months ago | (#47448057)

s/case,/care,/

Re:So they update it, but... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47448103)

no idea what op is trying to do with his but i'm trying to run raspbian and (among other things) xmbc, and the experience is dreadful. i agree that the cpu and ram is far under what it should be.

Re:So they update it, but... (5, Informative)

monkeyhybrid (1677192) | about 4 months ago | (#47448407)

I've been running Raspbmc [raspbmc.com] (the most popular XBMC distro for Raspberry Pi) for a long time, and it has been excellent. It's small enough to be hidden behind my TV, and with an added remote control, offers one of the best user interfaces you'll find in a 'set top box'. Streams all my 1080p movies and TV shows flawlessly (*), and handles pretty much every codec under the sun. All for ~$40 (including HDMI cable, USB PSU, SD card and MPEG-2 license for hardware acceleration).

If you search for "Raspbmc" on YouTube, you'll see my experience is the norm. If you have any specific issues, post in the Raspbmc forums and someone will most likely sort you out. :)

As for Raspbian, I'm also running this on another Pi. It's certainly not going to replace x86 servers any time soon, but it certainly has its uses. Maybe your expectations are too high for a $35, 700MHz, 512MB machine?

* Apparently, it may struggle with some very high bit rate encodes, but I've yet to see this in practice and is unlikely to be an issue for most people.

Re:So they update it, but... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47448503)

my personal expectations are just what you state - a simple media machine capable of decoding h.264 1080p content at reasonable bitrates. and we both know it does not do this flawlessly, even if the bitrates aren't "very high", so stop lying :)

Re:So they update it, but... (2)

monkeyhybrid (1677192) | about 4 months ago | (#47448699)

All I can say is, I have something in the region of 300 1080p movies, mostly H.264 encoded, all of which play with no trouble at all. Google it, YouTube it, there are countless people doing the very same thing.

If you're not just trolling, report your issue in the Raspbmc forums, ideally with a link to a sample video for others to test with. I'll quite happily test a video or two on my Pi if you supply some links.

Re:So they update it, but... (1)

amiga3D (567632) | about 4 months ago | (#47448795)

It does it about as well as anything under 200 dollars will. I've seen an occasional glitch on mine but it's rare. It'll not compete with a full blown media machine of course but it does extremely well. I have to admit I was amazed at what it can do. The only issue I had with mine was solved with a powered USB hub and it looks like the B+ fixes that problem.

Re:So they update it, but... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47449021)

Get real. There are tons of SoCs out there for under 200 that beat the living daylights out of RPi. Most of them are under 100. If you honestly don't know this you really should hold back on giving your opinion and try reading a bit more first.

Re:So they update it, but... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47449025)

The "relax reboot" issue is still a deal killer for Raspbmc, going on two years now. Some say it's due to audio, others wifi but the bottom line is no one seems to know. i.e. consider yourself lucky if everything worked well.

After endless hours pouring over the logs, I ended up punting it and going with Raspbian+xbmc. Except for configuring wifi by hand it's been exceptional.

Re:So they update it, but... (2)

ChunderDownunder (709234) | about 4 months ago | (#47448455)

Well the specs were modest for ARM SoCs even by 2012 standards. Deliberately so, given the mission to produce a $35 computer.

A rpi 2 with Broadcom's quad core Cortex-a7 SoC would still be no speed demon compared to an iPad Mini but adequate to run, say, Gnome/KDE with all the bells and whistles. (Whether they can achieve the same price envelope...)

A $35 computer will never match a 'desktop replacement', if you're used to a Corei7 workstation but should just about surpass the P4 I'm typing this on in the next iteration.

Re:So they update it, but... (2)

serviscope_minor (664417) | about 4 months ago | (#47448223)

and there is plenty of RAM. No idea what you're trying to do with yours, running Windows on it?

Quite. If one grabs an RPi, sees the specs and tries to run a full blown desktop with heavyweight programs on it, it's going to suck. But that's not the fault of the RPi, that's the fault of the user.

The the real worls they work extremely well for a variety of tasks for which an armed and fully operational Linux computeris required, but where one doesn't really need the power to destroy whole planets.

Things I know they're used for:

OctoPi for running a 3D printer. The addition of $35 turns the printer into a network connected device and you no longer have to faff with SD cards, or leaving your laptop plugged in to monitor it.

Display controllers for various things. Add a Pi and a wifi dongle (cheap!) and you have a nice system which can be scriptes, pull data off the network, etc etc etc.

Door and equipment controllers: add an RFID reader and a USB relay and you now have a niec cheap, convenient little access control system.

Mocro servers for things like IRC bouncers and other tasks for which you have low bandwidth requirements but want on all the time.

And so on. They're not suitable for all tasks (DUH!) and there are are other ways of achieving the same thing (again, duh) but they are cheap, convenient, easy to get hold of, easily hackable, a great support compunity, well documented and Just Work.

It turns out that you don't need 16GiB of RAM and a few hundred GFlops of aggregate compute in order to do quite a wide variety of tasks.

Re:So they update it, but... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47448313)

"The the real worls they work extremely well for a variety of tasks for which an armed and fully operational Linux computeris required"

Are you having a stroke? Should I call a doctor?

Re:So they update it, but... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47448445)

Why do you assume he is trying to have it pull those kind of loads? Why do people like you always make extremities out of things to try make your point more valid? I have tried Raspbian, f.e., and it ain't pretty. Period.

Re:So they update it, but... (2)

amiga3D (567632) | about 4 months ago | (#47448839)

I've tried it and it was beautiful. I have to assume you're trying to do something the hardware isn't capable of. It's fully capable of any sort of light computing tasks. It works well as a media machine. This in spite of the fact it was designed to be neither. It was designed to provide a low cost, low power, small and full featured computer board for educational use. At that purpose it's off the chain. People bitching because it wont transcode blue ray movies on the fly just pisses me off. If you say Raspbian doesn't work you either don't know what you're doing or you're lying.

Re:So they update it, but... (1)

serviscope_minor (664417) | about 4 months ago | (#47448975)

Same. I've used OctoPi quite a bit which runs off Raspian. It works great.

Re:So they update it, but... (1)

kent_eh (543303) | about 4 months ago | (#47448211)

It was never intended to be a powerful desktop replacement. Nor a high powered computing engine.
It is intended to be an inexpensive experimenting and learning platform.

spoiled, wasteful. 2000X as much RAM as Arduino (2)

raymorris (2726007) | about 4 months ago | (#47448305)

Get off my lawn, ya spoiled brat. The Pi has 2000 times as much RAM as the Arduino Uno, a million times as much as a Picaxe.

It really isn't necessary to run Windows 8 for embedded^H^H^H^H^H^H^H^H^H any applications. You can run a full operating system with a GUI, web browser, and onboard server in 8 MB. How much more do you need?

Re:So they update it, but... (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47448537)

You call those shortcomings?!

The CPU is a few thousand times faster than any other microcontroller.
The RAM is 512 MEGABYTES - Most micros used in this same class have 32 to 128 KILOBYTES of RAM.

The PI is a moster powerhouse compared to any other microcontroller in its price class.
In fact the only boards that even compare are full blown embedded PC boards, which arguably is a class or two above what the Pi is targeted at (and cost way more than 2-3x still)

It's hardly the Pis fault you are trying to run a full blown Win8 OS on an embedded microcontroller.
Try that on an adruino and go bitch about how 8kb of ram just isn't enough to blink a led using Win8 :P

Oh. Looks like a rasp (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47447837)

That's why it's called that. Always heard razberry. I'm so fukin smart I scare me.

slashdot beta is garbage (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47447857)

Why is this shitty Slashdot Beta active for this particular comment section? Everything else is normal.

Does it have audio in yet? (1)

johnsie (1158363) | about 4 months ago | (#47447867)

We're wanting to put some of these inside wind turbines so operators have the option to listen for potential problems. Having audio in is important for that. I think maybe some other boards have audio in. I'd be interested in hearing other ideas for broadcasting audio over tcp/ip from a network connected wind turbine..

Re:Does it have audio in yet? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47447901)

We're wanting to put some of these inside wind turbines so operators have the option to listen for potential problems. Having audio in is important for that. I think maybe some other boards have audio in. I'd be interested in hearing other ideas for broadcasting audio over tcp/ip from a network connected wind turbine..

You could use a USB microphone.

Re:Does it have audio in yet? (3, Informative)

AkumaKuruma (879423) | about 4 months ago | (#47448009)

you could add the Wolfson Audio Card to the Pi and get all the audio support you could need from a pi

http://www.adafruit.com/produc... [adafruit.com]

Re:Does it have audio in yet? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47448851)

Only problem there is it effectively doubles the price of the Pi. It would be a lot better to have a good simple baked in solution.
Tho the more financially viable alternative would be finding a decent/acceptable USB audio adapter for somewhere around $3-$5.

Re:Does it have audio in yet? (2)

amiga3D (567632) | about 4 months ago | (#47448875)

That's the thing about the Pi, the add-ons just keep rolling in. The community support is unbelievable.

Re:Does it have audio in yet? (1)

kriston (7886) | about 4 months ago | (#47448731)

Can you not use a garden-variety USB audio adapter like any of these dozes of examples?
http://www.amazon.com/s/?keywo... [amazon.com]

RPi? That overhyped underdimensioned joke alive? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47447869)

Really guys, you update it but you do nothing about the processor or amount of RAM?! Seriously, only like EVERYONE has been complaining about these two bits since the release of the RPi and you do nothing?

Re:RPi? That overhyped underdimensioned joke alive (1)

queazocotal (915608) | about 4 months ago | (#47447885)

To quote wikipedia.

'Eben Christopher Upton is a Technical Director and ASIC architect for Broadcom.'

No mystery there then.

Re:RPi? That overhyped underdimensioned joke alive (1)

fisted (2295862) | about 4 months ago | (#47448063)

see this reply [slashdot.org]

Re:RPi? That overhyped underdimensioned joke alive (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47448227)

What can I say except that you're wrong. Model B is a terrible for running Linux. Even the custom Linux packages made for it are frustrating to work with even when the processor is over clocked.
 
Anything even nominally better than RPi is much more expensive but the RPi has played itself out.

Re:RPi? That overhyped underdimensioned joke alive (1)

itsdapead (734413) | about 4 months ago | (#47448247)

Really guys, you update it but you do nothing about the processor or amount of RAM?!

Seriously, what do you expect for $35? They've done well to add the extra USB without raising the price (and, hopefully, removed the need to buy a powered USB hub which was the real dealbreaker with the old Pi).

The stated aim of the Pi was to always encourage people to muck around with programming and electronics without the risk of bricking an expensive PC. Its quite deliberately built down to a price, so letting the magic smoke out is never a big deal.

Devices like the Hummingboard and the BeagleBone Black (which probably wouldn't have existed without the success of the Pi) look great, but they already cost ~30% more.

Re:RPi? That overhyped underdimensioned joke alive (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47448643)

there are similar platforms for $35-$40 that have twice the ram, twice the clock frequency, twice the processor cores. sure, they don't have the same periphery, and it comes down to what you want to do with it, but raspbian on the pi with 512mb of ram and a single core at sub 1ghz is -painful-.

Re:RPi? That overhyped underdimensioned joke alive (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47448721)

Name one and provide a link. Bet you can't...

Re:RPi? That overhyped underdimensioned joke alive (1)

amiga3D (567632) | about 4 months ago | (#47448891)

I'd be interested in seeing a computer board with usb, gpio and hdmi and audio that runs linux for about the same price. Got a link?

Re:RPi? That overhyped underdimensioned joke alive (1)

monkeyhybrid (1677192) | about 4 months ago | (#47448527)

And whilst you're at it, where's the SSD, SATA, Thunderbolt, optical I/O, gigabit ethernet and built in Wifi?

It is quite obvious that the Pi is designed for a very specific price point; one that gets it into the most hands possible. Every dollar you add to the production cost, makes it much less likely to get into the hands of people who would otherwise not be tinkering with such things. If you need something more capable, look elsewhere, the Pi is not for you.

Micro SD (2)

feargal (99776) | about 4 months ago | (#47447877)

Like the move to micro-SD, always ended up using full-size SD adapters that just protruded needlessly from the side. I had one device damaged thanks to the SD adapter being knocked, damaging the board, and I know this has happened to many others.

Re:Micro SD (2)

sylvandb (308927) | about 4 months ago | (#47448347)

Can get 'short' micro-SD to SD adapters that barely protrude. I use them with the R-Pi, Chromebook, MacBook, and several other devices which do not need a full-length SD.

FYI the micro-SD goes in the side so is not removable while the adapter is plugged in.

You Can make a Rasberry Pirate Radio (2)

FudRucker (866063) | about 4 months ago | (#47447893)

http://makezine.com/projects/m... [makezine.com]

did i read about this here a few weeks ago?

Re:You Can make a Rasberry Pirate Radio (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47447997)

I'd love one with two Ethernet interfaces. Small boards with duel Ethernet seem pretty rare. Anybody know of one?

Re:You Can make a Rasberry Pirate Radio (1)

petermgreen (876956) | about 4 months ago | (#47448217)

How small is small?

Once you go up to mini-itx there are loads of options but I sense that is rather bigger than you want to be.

The utilite standard and pro models (but not the value model) have dual ethernet but they are kinda pricy. Theres various hackable routers but they tend to be rather lacking in CPU power and storage (they make a Pi look postively high end by comparision)

The other option is to use an external USB ethernet adaptor.

Re:You Can make a Rasberry Pirate Radio (1)

CastrTroy (595695) | about 4 months ago | (#47448251)

I'd love one with an Ethernet interface that wasn't tied the USB bus. I'd also like the ability to have some kind of storage that supports DMA, be it SATA or IDE to Compact Flash I tried using the Raspberry Pi as a Torrent download device. Saving the files to the SD Card caused so much overload that the whole thing froze up. Using USB allowed me to run without the thing freezing up, but the download speeds were still pretty slow, and the slowdowns seemed to be from waiting for writing to the disk rather than waiting for the network. The I/O on both the USB and the SD Card causes way too much CPU activity.

Re:You Can make a Rasberry Pirate Radio (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47448359)

Have a look at ALIX devices (www.pcengines.ch)

  I have one at home wih 3 Ethernet interfaces, serving as a NAS (USB connected drives), and it seems to work well.

Re:You Can make a Rasberry Pirate Radio (1)

amiga3D (567632) | about 4 months ago | (#47448925)

Alix3d3 here goes for about $125. Specs lower than the pi for cpu and ram but it does seem like a potent board.

http://www.mini-box.com/Alix-3... [mini-box.com]

Re:You Can make a Rasberry Pirate Radio (1)

kriston (7886) | about 4 months ago | (#47448607)

I'd love one with just one ethernet interface that was NOT on the USB bus. Performance of the already stressed CPU is bogged down with the ethernet being on USB.

Re:You Can make a Rasberry Pirate Radio (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47448785)

I guess they're rare because one Ethernet killed the other one, you know, since they're duel...

Re:You Can make a Rasberry Pirate Radio (0)

cyborg_monkey (150790) | about 4 months ago | (#47448355)

that is the most ridiculous project, even by Make's lame standards.

Imagine... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47447921)

a Beowulf cluster of these.
Wait, somebody already did:
http://coen.boisestate.edu/ece... [boisestate.edu]

Ram and cpu (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47447961)

Solidrun has the Hummingboard which addresses the short comings of the rasp pi. I've not tested yet but I will be soon. Does anyone see any issues with the Hummingboard?

Who produces it? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47448003)

There are versions of Raspberry on Amazon that people say are shoddy, and there are version reviewed as top quality. How can I know, who produces e.g. the B+ version on Farnell?

Real Time Clock? (2)

UnknownSoldier (67820) | about 4 months ago | (#47448007)

Last I checked there was no RTC (Real Time Clock). Don't see any mention of timer chips?

Re:Real Time Clock? (1)

Foreign Entity (2296290) | about 4 months ago | (#47448477)

You can use a software based solution that utilizes the PWM or PCM chip to generate pulses, and will let you drive 8 or more servos at a time: https://github.com/richardghir... [github.com]

Re:Real Time Clock? (1)

Foreign Entity (2296290) | about 4 months ago | (#47448609)

Ugh, sorry. I replied to the wrong comment. :-/

Re:Real Time Clock? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47448903)

If you really need an RTC you can pick up an I2C RTC board for ~$10. It isn't exactly a cheap solution but it works and if you are already buying a few hundred dollars worth of other I2C breakouts you really don't notice the extra ten dollars :P

Re:Real Time Clock? (1)

drinkypoo (153816) | about 4 months ago | (#47449047)

Last I checked there was no RTC (Real Time Clock).

So use NTP. By default debian launches with the -g opt.

If you're looking for hardware to operate a satellite site, spend a little more money. Get something with an RTC.

Four holes? (0, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47448015)

One big step for Raspberry Pi is that it now has four holes for mounting in standard enclosures.

That's one more hole than my girlfriend.

Re:Four holes? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47448261)

Oh, c'mon, mods. Somebody had to say it.

Re:Four holes? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47448465)

Why is it offtopic? I call my girlfriend Cutie Pi.

Re:Four holes? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47448651)

It is off topc, because we are out of cherry pi.

Finally has mounting holes (2)

jvschwarz (92288) | about 4 months ago | (#47448021)

Glad to see it finally has mounting holes! With a board mounted on top of the Pi, it was a pain to find an enclosure that would work for my projects.

DSP (2)

Charliemopps (1157495) | about 4 months ago | (#47448157)

Slashdot questions here: Has anyone on slashdot made an effects processor yet?

I've been toying with the idea of making a RPi based Effects processor. I primarily play guitar but am not going to differentiate between it and any other sound application. I've looked around and found 2 projects, one was "Guitar extended" http://guitarextended.wordpres... [wordpress.com] Which, I'm afraid, is a bit too "We're going to change guitar forever!" for me. I don't want to make yet another crazy sounding thing that no-one wants to listen to, that requires an insane peddle board to control. After I get some decent DSP reverb, gates etc... going, then I'll worry about foot controllers. The fact of the matter is, in most applications I don't need to mess with effects on the fly. I'd even argue that's a bad idea in general.

My main problem with retail effects is the size. Getting a decent processor usually means it's a double rack space unit. But if you open them up they could have easily fit into a half rack space. I'm guessing this is an appeal to the same part of the brain that likes SUVs. I build my own combo amps, so I'd like to throw in a half rack effects module and maybe something else. But all I've found is the Roland Vf1 which isn't that great, isn't in production anymore and sells for $200+ used. Also, hey I built the amp... why not the processor as well?

I've not really dove into it yet, I dont like to start these projects myself. It's way easier to let someone else make all of the mistakes and solve the problems for me :-) Also, it seems the RPi has audio latency issues like just about every non-firewire based computer out there. You can fix it, but it's a nightmare of driver and hardware tweaking. I've got a guide: http://wiki.linuxaudio.org/wik... [linuxaudio.org] But that sounds like the typical thing you have to do. That level of complexity is terrifying when you're trying to do a live situation. If you haven't ever played in front of people... God hates live performances... anything that can go wrong, will. I've had retail, $1000+ processors fail live and leave me to just pull the damn plug in the end and go raw.

I've seen some Arduino projects that use a DSP chip and the arduino swaps out code from the chip to change effects... but that sounds insanely error prone to me. I could pull it off, but I would never really trust it.

So if anyone has any experience in this area, or links to articles they've found on the topic, I'd love to see them.

Re:DSP (1)

frog_strat (852055) | about 4 months ago | (#47448911)

I am considering buying some embedded board for the guitar effect purpose. While I am familiar with Linux audio recording, I am new to these embedded boards. What kind of latencies does this have ? I want to try to build a multiband distortion, kind of like the Source Audio Multiwave, except more voiced like a TS9, and friendlier to single coils. I hate the nasty sound of too much blocking distortion, typically caused by allowing too much low frequency into the initial distortion stage. I used to configure my Vetta to simulate dual band, and it was awesome.

yes, there was a bbc model b+ (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47448349)

continuing the naming theme I guesss - http://chrisacorns.computinghistory.org.uk/Computers/BBCB+64.html

PWM? (1)

ShanghaiBill (739463) | about 4 months ago | (#47448375)

Does anyone know if the additional I/O lines include any hardware PWM pins? TFA doesn't say. The old RPi-B has only one PWM pin, which is insufficient for keeping two robot wheels in sync, running an X and Y axis on a CNC machine, etc. Even one more PWM would be great. A total of four would be better.

Re:PWM? (2)

Foreign Entity (2296290) | about 4 months ago | (#47448573)

You can use a software based solution that utilizes the PWM or PCM chip to generate pulses, and will let you drive 8 or more servos at a time: https://github.com/richardghir [github.com] ... [github.com]

Re:PWM? (1)

ShanghaiBill (739463) | about 4 months ago | (#47448811)

You can use a software based solution that utilizes the PWM or PCM chip to generate pulses, and will let you drive 8 or more servos at a time: https://github.com/richardghir [github.com] ... [github.com]

Software PWM is not going to give the same smooth movement, and will result in both audible hum and vibration. It is fine for dimming an LED, but not for precision motor control.

Re:PWM? (2)

Foreign Entity (2296290) | about 4 months ago | (#47448909)

It's not pure software PWM, as it is using the seperate clock signal from the PCM chip for the timing of the pulses. It's worked fine for me so far, but I'm not doing anything precise either.

Re:PWM? (4, Informative)

ebenupton (2424660) | about 4 months ago | (#47448739)

Yes - we bring out both PWM outputs to the GPIO connector now.

USB Bandwidth & Power Problem (1)

thygate (1590197) | about 4 months ago | (#47448433)

Did they fix the USB problems ?

Re:USB Bandwidth & Power Problem (3, Informative)

Dave Whiteside (2055370) | about 4 months ago | (#47448577)

yes as long as your input power adapter is decent
the B+ can provide upto 1200 mA
see
http://www.raspberrypi.org/for... [raspberrypi.org]

Make a VGA version! (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47448473)

A VGA version would be awesome...many of my ideas for the RPi can't happen because of the HDMI requirement, and buying a $35 VGA adapter just doubles the cost of it.

Re:Make a VGA version! (2)

SB2020 (1814172) | about 4 months ago | (#47448741)

Get one of these - works just fine (although was only £8 when I bought one), hdmi>dvi cables also work.
http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/pro... [amazon.co.uk]

improvements (1)

CosaNostra Pizza Inc (1299163) | about 4 months ago | (#47448531)

It sounds like they added more GPIO to make it more competitive with the BeagleBone Black but it still has an outdated CPU with fading support.

More power to the USB ports? (1)

Aardpig (622459) | about 4 months ago | (#47448565)

The addition of 2 extra USB ports is useless, unless they have changed the polyfuse set up to allow more power to be delivered to the ports. As things currently stand with the original model B, attaching anything more than a low-power keyboard to the Pi requires a powered hub -- the Pi itself can't deliver the required juice. It would be great if this restriction were lifted.

Re:More power to the USB ports? (2)

SB2020 (1814172) | about 4 months ago | (#47448797)

It is - you can go up to 1200ma if you have the PSU to support it http://www.raspberrypi.org/for... [raspberrypi.org]

Re:More power to the USB ports? (1)

Dave Whiteside (2055370) | about 4 months ago | (#47448827)

yes as long as your power supply is good it can supply lots of power to all teh ports see
http://www.raspberrypi.org/for... [raspberrypi.org]

Re:More power to the USB ports? (1)

monkeyhybrid (1677192) | about 4 months ago | (#47448835)

With a good 2A+ PSU, it seems the B+ can now supply up to a total of 1.2A over USB (compared to ~600mA with the older model B).

Re:More power to the USB ports? (1)

amiga3D (567632) | about 4 months ago | (#47449009)

I believe they said they fixed the USB power problems.

Great for GPIO and USB (1)

kriston (7886) | about 4 months ago | (#47448569)

Great for GPIO, power supply, and USB. My only real concern is that the ethernet port is on USB. If you're like me and prefer the stability of ethernet, be advised that using ethernet will not only be slower but it will tax the CPU since USB relies on CPU power to operate. Not that this would be much different from using USB WiFi adapters, but it's something to keep in mind about the Pi.

Dur (0)

wonkey_monkey (2592601) | about 4 months ago | (#47448693)

There are now four USB ports which means you don't need a hub to work with a mouse, keyboard and WiFi dongle.

Oh, good, thanks for that. I was having trouble imagining what "four" was, but now I know it's at least "three."

Model C (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47448743)

I'm not really sure why they called it B+, they should have went with C.
This board is hugely different from Model B and even more so than A. Model A only has a slight difference from Model B.

Very confusing indeed.

Re:Model C (2)

wisewellies (2749169) | about 4 months ago | (#47448929)

Isn't it following the old BBC Micro model names - model A, model B, model B+ etc.? The next one should be the 'Master'...

Hardware Evolution Blues (1)

adosch (1397357) | about 4 months ago | (#47448853)

Although I appreciate the changes in the B+ model and board layout changes, it does kind of suck that the natural improvement evolution of the Raspberry Pi is wiping out the 'coolness' I have with the three (what seems to feel like) aging Raspberry Pi original model B's (256MB version) I own from back in ~2011 into early 2012.

I'm still trying to appreciate them for what they are, so I'll still get the mileage out of them. $35 isn't a high price tag, but to upgrade 'X' of them all to chase small features is going to create very unstable 12oz beer bottle coasters over time with little used market re-coup costs.

Ill-named? (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47448863)

FYI: in Hungary, B+ is the abbreviation of "f*ck you". So you've made our day.

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