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Home Depot Begins Retail Store Pilot Program To Sell MakerBot 3-D Printers

samzenpus posted about 5 months ago | from the maker-for-the-people dept.

127

ClockEndGooner writes Looking for a 3-D printer to help you out with a home project or two? If you're in one of the 12 pilot program areas in the U.S., stop into Home Depot to take a look at and purchase a MakerBot 3-D Replicator printer. "...The pilot program will offer the microwave-sized MakerBot Replicator printers, priced at $2,899, for sale, as well as the smaller Replicator Minis, which list for $1,375. 'This will open up the whole world of 3-D printing to people who wouldn't otherwise know about it—like moms and dads, electricians, contractors and DIY-home-improvement folks,' said MakerBot chief executive Bre Pettis. 'It's a good match.'"

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and what would i do with it? (2)

alen (225700) | about 5 months ago | (#47450065)

the website makes it seem like i'm buying a $3000 machine to buy plans to print some orange toys for the kids

Re:and what would i do with it? (4, Funny)

Mr D from 63 (3395377) | about 5 months ago | (#47450113)

3D printer sales will be flat.

Re:and what would i do with it? (1)

ArcadeMan (2766669) | about 5 months ago | (#47451037)

You should fix your Z-axis problems.

Re: and what would i do with it? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47451481)

Ohhhh!!! MBA types will love 3D power point! Just pass this pie chart around the table. Unnggg, so heavy!!!

Re:and what would i do with it? (1)

afidel (530433) | about 5 months ago | (#47450173)

Custom cases for phones/electronics projects (Raspberry Pi comes to mind), prototypes of all sorts of things (custom rings is one I saw in their twitter feed [twitter.com] , heck I read a story about a surgeon in the UK who used 3D printing to make models of bones and organs to practice surgery procedures on saving several thousand pounds and several weeks vs traditional hand made models.

Re:and what would i do with it? (3, Insightful)

Registered Coward v2 (447531) | about 5 months ago | (#47450359)

Custom cases for phones/electronics projects (Raspberry Pi comes to mind), prototypes of all sorts of things (custom rings is one I saw in their twitter feed [twitter.com] , heck I read a story about a surgeon in the UK who used 3D printing to make models of bones and organs to practice surgery procedures on saving several thousand pounds and several weeks vs traditional hand made models.

The question is "How much overlap is there between the MakerBot market and the Home Depot shopper market?" My anecdotal experience says there is not a lot of overlap. The pros are buying in bulk at a discount and for them time is money. Waiting hours to make a widget isn't what they are looking for. The average homeowner wants to fix a problem or do some upgrades and needs help and advice. Tinkering with a MB machine isn't really what they want either. Sure, some MB hobbyist also shop at HD but do enough do this to but what is essentially a bleeding edge toy vs a really useful tool for regular work. Toys are nice but the market is limited.

Re:and what would i do with it? (1)

i.r.id10t (595143) | about 5 months ago | (#47453109)

On the other hand, when I went looking for stuff to run some CAT-5 in my house HD had everything needed, including 2 models of switches (4 and 8 port both 10/100). This was in late 2000.

Re:and what would i do with it? (1)

Registered Coward v2 (447531) | about 5 months ago | (#47453213)

On the other hand, when I went looking for stuff to run some CAT-5 in my house HD had everything needed, including 2 models of switches (4 and 8 port both 10/100). This was in late 2000.

Not surprising. Lots of folks run wire and cable. Doesn't mean they also wold buy a MB.

Re:and what would i do with it? (2)

Noah Haders (3621429) | about 5 months ago | (#47450399)

i think if you're practicing your surgery on hard plasticky 3-d printed organs, your skills aren't going to transfer over very well to real-world applications.

Re:and what would i do with it? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47450601)

Maybe it's a modified printer to print some kind of gel that will be the right consistency.

Re:and what would i do with it? (1)

ArcadeMan (2766669) | about 5 months ago | (#47451049)

If it's a printer that's been modified to print some kind of gel with the right consistency, it's probably to print another kind of organs.

Re:and what would i do with it? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47450409)

To borrow your surgeon for a moment, if you could rent a set of surgical tools from Homedepot what would you do with them?

3D printers are not turnkey solutions to making whatever you can imagine. It doesn't matter what the hardware can do, it's what the users skills, patience and needs are. If you want to make a raspberry Pi case it really does not matter whether you have a 3d printer or not if you have no design expertise, no modeling software and no idea how to keep the model stuck to the bed of the printer.

Re:and what would i do with it? (4, Insightful)

LordLimecat (1103839) | about 5 months ago | (#47450863)

"I heard about a guy in another country who used one" doesnt really bode well for sales.

Re:and what would i do with it? (4, Insightful)

ShanghaiBill (739463) | about 5 months ago | (#47450193)

Home Depot has a tool rental program. It would be really slick if they offered 3D printers for rental, either in-store (it could print your part while you shop), or take home for a weekend project.

This past school year I helped out with an after-school programming class at my son's elementary school. One of the projects was to design a 3D part using Python and FreeCAD. We tried to have the parts printed at TechShop, but they wouldn't let kids under 18 into their facility. So we had them printed by an online service and mailed to us. It would have been really cool to have a 3D printer at the school, so the kids could see their parts being made, and maybe fine-tune the design and print again. One of the boys designed a working toilet for his sister's Barbie dollhouse.

Re:and what would i do with it? (1)

afidel (530433) | about 5 months ago | (#47450317)

The per piece rental would make more sense, HD charges your card at rental time the full cost of the tools replacement as a deposit and I'm not sure how many people would have $2,800 open on their card. Of course then they'll run into copyright issues, so probably best just to sell the units.

Re:and what would i do with it? (1)

cdrudge (68377) | about 5 months ago | (#47450487)

Of course then they'll run into copyright issues, so probably best just to sell the units.

What copyright issues? I don't even think you can copyright a specific shape or model. Patent or trademark possibly, but not copyright.

Re:and what would i do with it? (1)

afidel (530433) | about 5 months ago | (#47450569)

Copyright most certainly applies to design files, just like you can run into issues printing photographs proving ownership of the image you would need to prove ownership of the design file you are submitting before they'll use it to make something for you.

Re:and what would i do with it? (1)

ShanghaiBill (739463) | about 5 months ago | (#47450547)

Of course then they'll run into copyright issues

I have yet to hear of a single lawsuit based on 3D parts. Even if there was, all legal precedence says that it is person ordering the part, and not the service provider, that is responsible. Otherwise Kinkos would have never existed.

so probably best just to sell the units.

Then they will likely lose to other companies that are willing to offer parts-as-a-service. Staples [3dsystems.com] already has 3D-print-on-demand at a few of their stores.

Re:and what would i do with it? (1)

Opportunist (166417) | about 5 months ago | (#47450795)

Oh, just wait 'til printing cheap car parts becomes as widespread as music copying is. If you think the media industry caused a riot when people avoided paying their extortion fees, just wait what strings the car industry is going to pull once people start to avoid their plastic spare parts sold at prices that would make you think they're made of platinum.

Re:and what would i do with it? (1)

internerdj (1319281) | about 5 months ago | (#47450855)

Anything plastic on a car is already competing with free, zip tie, or bondo for repairs.

Re:and what would i do with it? (1)

LordLimecat (1103839) | about 5 months ago | (#47450873)

You realize you can already buy third party parts for cars, right? Something something Magnusson-Moss Act....

Re:and what would i do with it? (1)

Warshadow (132109) | about 5 months ago | (#47452793)

Something something...Magnuson–Moss Act has nothing to do with being able to buy aftermarket parts. It's about warranties.

Re:and what would i do with it? (1)

bws111 (1216812) | about 5 months ago | (#47450915)

What legal precidence are you talking about? That is completely incorrect. Take something that looks like it might be copyrighted to Kinko's and ask them to copy it. They won't.

Re:and what would i do with it? (1)

ShanghaiBill (739463) | about 5 months ago | (#47451399)

Take something that looks like it might be copyrighted to Kinko's and ask them to copy it. They won't.

I have been to Kinko's dozens of times. I have copied pages out of book, manuals, and magazines. I have also brought in many downloaded PDFs, including complete technical manuals. All of this stuff was obviously copyrighted. Never, not even once, did they even hesitate to let me copy it.

Re:and what would i do with it? (1)

Applehu Akbar (2968043) | about 5 months ago | (#47453453)

Although Home Depot started as a pure DIY operation, it already has a lot invested in virtual home design software as a service (visualize what your new kitchen remodel will look like, then contract to have the work done). Offering 3D print as a service is a natural fit for the same part of the store. For customers, it will be a risk-free way of trying out an expensive and temperamental new technology.

Re:and what would i do with it? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47450583)

We tried to have the parts printed at TechShop, but they wouldn't let kids under 18 into their facility.

That's interesting given kids and young adults (12 to 17 years of age) are allowed in the facilities to work on projects when under the direct supervision of a parent or legal guardian in the Bay Area and is stated as such on the website. I've taken my kids to TechShop when it was located in Menlo Park. Though, there are some restrictions on which tools / machines minors are allowed to used.

Re:and what would i do with it? (1)

jythie (914043) | about 5 months ago | (#47450709)

Given how many times I have gone into a Home Depot and been told XYZ part is no longer available, having some in-store fabrication like that would be really nice. When one is working on older homes it is pretty common to encounter parts that fit together but are no longer made and you REALLY just want to replace the broken piece rather then rip out the whole assembly.

Re:and what would i do with it? (1)

bws111 (1216812) | about 5 months ago | (#47450977)

Just out of curiousity, what kind of parts are you talking about, where a 3D printed piece of plastic would be an acceptable replacement? In my work on my own older home, the things that are in the can't find/hard to find category are all either structural (2x4s that are actually 2 inches by 4 inches), functional (doorknobs, etc), or decorative (plaster rosettes, etc). None of those are suitably replaced with a piece of plastic, regardless of whether or not it actually 'fits'.

Re:and what would i do with it? (1)

RabidReindeer (2625839) | about 5 months ago | (#47451153)

Just out of curiousity, what kind of parts are you talking about, where a 3D printed piece of plastic would be an acceptable replacement? In my work on my own older home, the things that are in the can't find/hard to find category are all either structural (2x4s that are actually 2 inches by 4 inches), functional (doorknobs, etc), or decorative (plaster rosettes, etc). None of those are suitably replaced with a piece of plastic, regardless of whether or not it actually 'fits'.

Plastic doorknobs, probably. Plaster rosettes, no, although you could print custom plaster moulds and get far more variety than a store would normally have in stock. Your 2x4s that actually 2x4 are a planing job and I've no doubt that HD would be happy to sell you the appropriate hardware.

One of the things that 3D printing can do for you when you need something more durable than straight plastic (for example, a door latch), is print the "public facing" component of a part that, given a suitable metal underbody would supply strength where it's needed while allowing more choices for the outside component.

Where Home Depot could probably make their own mark is in non-plastic printers for custom metal and artifical stone printing.

Re:and what would i do with it? (1)

sumdumass (711423) | about 5 months ago | (#47451633)

for the 2x4, find an Amish person and they will likely know where you can get one. Also, small lumber mills operators will run them happily for you. Of course, my favorite is to glue a piece of plywood to one side and face. Just rip it down on the table saw, glue, and keep a few spares for whenever you need them. Glue the face first cut at 2 inch and cut the side 3.5 wide with .5 inch plywood. Or got with 1/4 inch and go all the way around but frankly, I think you are wasting glue.

I was thinking maybe something like profile molding would be a good use for the 3d printer but there are enough shops that will custom make a knife and plane some out to order. Perhaps nobs and handles for drawers and stuff. A lot of the older homes had cabinetry built into the walls.

Re:and what would i do with it? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47450239)

Your imagination is the limit! Print out anything you can dream of--as long as it's small, simple, and made of cheap plastic!

Re:and what would i do with it? (3, Funny)

Noah Haders (3621429) | about 5 months ago | (#47450455)

a samsung phone?

Re:and what would i do with it? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47452481)

the RDF is strong with this one!

Re:and what would i do with it? (2)

Opportunist (166417) | about 5 months ago | (#47450821)

Actually plastic is pretty much the ONLY limit the average tinkerer had 'til recently. If it was made of wood, just turn it. If it was made of metal, put power to your lathe. If it was made of plastic, though, you were out of luck 'til now. Small numbers or even single items were pretty much anathema to plastic which is the king of mass production, but producing one piece was nearly as expensive as making a few thousands, since the tool was the expensive part, not the material.

3D printing closes this gap.

Re:and what would i do with it? (1)

ArcadeMan (2766669) | about 5 months ago | (#47451059)

Sounds like something Henry Ford would say to sell 3D printers.

Re:and what would i do with it? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47450341)

the website makes it seem like i'm buying a $3000 machine to buy plans to print some orange toys for the kids

Yes, but you missed the part they want you to focus on. I'm certain they'll offer 0% interest on that $3000 machine. On their credit card.

Nothing but win-win-win-win-win for everyone tracking and profiting from that purchase. And no, they don't give a shit what you think.

Re:and what would i do with it? (1)

Kenja (541830) | about 5 months ago | (#47450545)

I'm going to go with "print a sex toy". Target market is those who want a dildo but are too embarrassed to buy one.

Re:and what would i do with it? (1)

Opportunist (166417) | about 5 months ago | (#47450829)

I'm not an expert on dildos, but judging from the stuff I have printed I can tell you one thing: To want a printed dildo, you'd really have to be some fucked up hardcore masochist!

Re:and what would i do with it? (1)

NatasRevol (731260) | about 5 months ago | (#47450837)

The ladies have learned about silicone rubber for their fun.

They're not buying anything until it can print in soft plastic.

Re:and what would i do with it? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47451437)

If only they created this before you could buy toys on the Internet.

Re:and what would i do with it? (1)

jythie (914043) | about 5 months ago | (#47450681)

What would you do with a tablesaw?

Home Depot is one of the places selling these devices makes a lot of sense, though hobby stores that cater to people who need to fabricate miniatures would probably work better.

A lot of them will be returned (4, Insightful)

Animats (122034) | about 5 months ago | (#47450069)

MakerBot has never before sold through a retail outlet that takes returns. A lot of those machines will come back.

Re:A lot of them will be returned (1)

spire3661 (1038968) | about 5 months ago | (#47450139)

WHAT? I see them RETAIL at MicrosoftStore, Microcenter and other places. They take returns.

Re:A lot of them will be returned (2)

alexander_686 (957440) | about 5 months ago | (#47450201)

It is not retailers that take returns per se.

What the OP is saying is that many novice people will wander by the display, think it is cool, and buy it on an impulse. They will then take it home, struggle with it, figure out it is not as cool as they though, and return it.

Think of all those IBM PC jr and Colecovision collecting dust that people bought in the 80s thinking this would be the thing to solve all of their issue. Now, I know a good subset that put these things to good use or used them as a springboard but many where purchased with only vague ideas on how they would be used.

Re:A lot of them will be returned (1)

CaptainLard (1902452) | about 5 months ago | (#47450953)

What the OP is saying is that many novice people will wander by the display, think it is cool, and buy it on an impulse.

How many people are going to spend $3000 (or even $1300) on something they know almost nothing about after "wandering by"? If its more than zero, Makerbot should partner with local divorce attorneys.

Re:A lot of them will be returned (1)

sumdumass (711423) | about 5 months ago | (#47451701)

You would be surprised. Especially around tax time when a lot of lower income people have fat (EIC) refunds that is probably already spent but they never had that much at one time. Big screen TVs, four wheelers, all kinds of stuff get purchased on impulse this way. And usually, it is the junkier stuff that most people would stay away from if they knew about it.

Re:A lot of them will be returned (1)

Bill_the_Engineer (772575) | about 5 months ago | (#47451971)

How many people are going to spend $3000 (or even $1300) on something they know almost nothing about after "wandering by"?

I guess you never been bored one weekend and shopped at Home Depot. It is never cheap especially if your spouse is with you.

I wonder (1)

CheezburgerBrown . (3417019) | about 5 months ago | (#47450079)

I wonder how many people will purchase one, put a rock in the box and return it for a refund?

Re:I wonder (2)

HornWumpus (783565) | about 5 months ago | (#47450091)

Stores have been onto that trick for 20 years.

Scammers still do it, but to people who think they are buying stolen goods.

There _will_ be a metric buttload of returns.

Re:I wonder (1)

CheezburgerBrown . (3417019) | about 5 months ago | (#47450111)

Does the Home Depot force Makerbot to eat the returns?

Re:I wonder (1)

HornWumpus (783565) | about 5 months ago | (#47450155)

Do you think HD will eat them? Of course, Makerbot will get the returns back. So look for referbs to be available soon.

Re:I wonder (1)

Lumpy (12016) | about 5 months ago | (#47450175)

I am hoping for clearance aisle at 80% off in about 16 months.

Re:I wonder (1)

CheezburgerBrown . (3417019) | about 5 months ago | (#47450191)

I'll take one that is *missing* a few parts for a fraction of the price.

Re:I wonder (1)

LynnwoodRooster (966895) | about 5 months ago | (#47451289)

I'll take one that is *missing* a few parts for a fraction of the price.

You bet! Buy a 'bot, find the parts that are missing, print new ones, and...

Oh wait...

Re:I wonder (1)

Registered Coward v2 (447531) | about 5 months ago | (#47450365)

Does the Home Depot force Makerbot to eat the returns?

Probably. Given their size they can, and do, pretty much dictate terms.

Re:I wonder (1)

Noah Haders (3621429) | about 5 months ago | (#47450477)

HD should just buy a mega makerbot that can print makerbots. and mcdonalds should buy a McMakerbot to print hamburgers.

Re:I wonder (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47450827)

Now it's store employees and delivery people who put the rocks in the boxes. Always open something expensive on site.

Re:I wonder (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47451073)

I wonder how many people will purchase one, put a rock in the box and return it for a refund?

Rock? I'm going to print another MakerBot and return that.

Prepare for the general public to be disappointed (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47450089)

Prepare for the general public to be disappointed

I have a cunning plan... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47450101)

Buy 3D Printer from Home Depot
Print a copy
Return duplicate for refund.

SciFri / Staples (3, Interesting)

bill_mcgonigle (4333) | about 5 months ago | (#47450103)

This was mentioned briefly [sciencefriday.com] on Science Friday last week. Also that some Staples are going to have them for "service bureau" printing.

It's a neat idea and a potential reniassance for service bureaus - I haven't needed to go to one since 44-meg Syquest carts were in vogue.

Eventually we'll all have high-strength 3D printers at home, but that's got to be at least a decade off.

Re:SciFri / Staples (1)

CheezburgerBrown . (3417019) | about 5 months ago | (#47450125)

First, products that are worth servicing would need to be produced.

Re:SciFri / Staples (1)

CastrTroy (595695) | about 5 months ago | (#47450247)

We're not even at the point where most people have photo quality printers at home. And for many of those who do have one, it's currently out of ink, and hasn't been turned on in years. Why do you think the average Joe would own a 3D printer? For the two or three times a year you need something printed up, it's much easier to go to a shop that owns one and have them print out the part. I know people who print out lots of pictures, but almost nobody I know owns a photo printer. It's much easier and cheaper to bring your SD card into Walmart or Costco and have them print them while you're shopping. Even if you're going to print stuff off once a month, which I think would be quite high for most people, it would still be way more convenient to just go to a shop and have it done.

Re:SciFri / Staples (1)

Anne Thwacks (531696) | about 5 months ago | (#47450279)

We're not even at the point where most people have photo quality printers at home and know that its cheaper and easier to go to Staples if they actually want printout.

FTFY

Re:SciFri / Staples (1)

fermion (181285) | about 5 months ago | (#47450667)

I don't see home depot as servicing the target market for these products. On a story I heard this morning, it seems like people think they can go home and print gaskets or a screw. Maybe, if you can find the file online or have a caliper a a disign progam you can, but why would you spend the money? I suppose you could print a custom handle for a door or a faucet, if you wanted a plastic handle, but people pay good money for metal parts. I suppose you could coat it in metal, and it would be as good as the low end products.

I think that 3D printers have a market and will get to the point where they will be Sold in Stores My concern with Home Depot is their ability to market them positively. Sure, $4K is low enough that many people will but it and take it home and try to use it. But if Home Depot is trying to push 3D printers to just anyone, many of them are going to get returned because they can't print washers. And the reviews are going to be bad, and 3D printing technology is going to be pushed back 5 years.

...and oversell them on what they can do with it. (2)

PhantomHarlock (189617) | about 5 months ago | (#47450137)

I don't think the price point vs. quality is worth it for that crowd.

For me I just send things out to shapeways because I need small, fine parts, not fused piles of spaghetti.

Plus, how many people in the general population can do any solid modelling?

I'd rather have it as a service (1)

zAPPzAPP (1207370) | about 5 months ago | (#47450153)

I only need a 3D printer in rare occasions, which does not justify buying one.
So I would like to get easy access to one.

Take a better, faster, more expensive printer.
Put it in a vending machine like case and sell the printing service by time/volume maybe?
Couple it with a 3d scanner, so I can scan in some part I need copied / remade right there. But also make it possible to remotely queue jobs and then pick them up at the store later when they're finished.

I am imagining somthing like a postal package station, only the stuff you can pick up is being made right inside the machine.

Re:I'd rather have it as a service (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47450723)

You might be on to something with that business model.

Re:I'd rather have it as a service (1)

Obfuscant (592200) | about 5 months ago | (#47452131)

But also make it possible to remotely queue jobs and then pick them up at the store later when they're finished.

Minion: Sir, the 3D printer kiosk has been spitting out plastic dildos all day ...

Manager: Just mark them $2.99 and put them in the bin with all the rest.

Why the overpriced Makerbot? (2)

Lumpy (12016) | about 5 months ago | (#47450165)

Why not one of the many much more affordable ones out there? Home Depot is not about buying the most expensive tools, it's about buying tools that will work and enable you.

Re:Why the overpriced Makerbot? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47450335)

Because MakerBot closed everything up, was early to market, and, well, has the funds and board members to pull off the deals. I was at one of their first demos and its amazing how much the company has changed after getting funded. Sadly, not for the good in my opinion. The "open" ideals went right out the window and now consist of bastardized promises and "thank you"s to everyone who contributed early on.

MakerBot is a case study for an open project gone wrong.

What's the target audience? (4, Insightful)

Joe Gillian (3683399) | about 5 months ago | (#47450171)

What I don't get here is what target audience MakerBot hopes is going to buy these at a Home Depot. 3D printers are really only viable for purchase by businesses in most cases, because individual buyers generally don't have enough use for them to justify a four-digit purchase price. Most individuals who want to use a 3D printer are going to use one of the numerous places online where you can send them a design and have them print and ship it at a fraction of the cost of buying a printer, and most businesses are going to use something more reliable (injection molding and the like) rather than buy one of these.

It seems like it would be more profitable to set up a "makerspace" kind of thing at the stores - charge people for materials and to use the printer to print out designs, rather than trying to sell them the printers themselves.

Re:What's the target audience? (2)

CheezburgerBrown . (3417019) | about 5 months ago | (#47450197)

the same audience that purchases a $2500 Generator when the lights go out for more than 5 minutes.

Re:What's the target audience? (1)

Registered Coward v2 (447531) | about 5 months ago | (#47450387)

the same audience that purchases a $2500 Generator when the lights go out for more than 5 minutes.

Except that sale is based on calming a fear; i.e. they will be out of power for a while. What fear or need does a MB fulfill that can be articulated in a way that the person who drops 2.5k$ for a generator will see the value of a MB? Just because someone can drop several K$'s on something doesn't mean they will drop it on any item.

Re:What's the target audience? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47450607)

Never underestimate the stupid.

Re:What's the target audience? (1)

RabidReindeer (2625839) | about 5 months ago | (#47451189)

the same audience that purchases a $2500 Generator when the lights go out for more than 5 minutes.

Except that sale is based on calming a fear; i.e. they will be out of power for a while. What fear or need does a MB fulfill that can be articulated in a way that the person who drops 2.5k$ for a generator will see the value of a MB? Just because someone can drop several K$'s on something doesn't mean they will drop it on any item.

What can I say? What about all of us who dropped thousands on PCs back before they were practically sold in blister packs?

Re:What's the target audience? (1)

Registered Coward v2 (447531) | about 5 months ago | (#47451341)

the same audience that purchases a $2500 Generator when the lights go out for more than 5 minutes.

Except that sale is based on calming a fear; i.e. they will be out of power for a while. What fear or need does a MB fulfill that can be articulated in a way that the person who drops 2.5k$ for a generator will see the value of a MB? Just because someone can drop several K$'s on something doesn't mean they will drop it on any item.

What can I say? What about all of us who dropped thousands on PCs back before they were practically sold in blister packs?

Most of those sales however were through either specialty retailers who had a customer base that self selected rather than being sold along side a bunch of none related items. It wasn't until the PC moved past the early adopter stage did they start appearing in more conventional retail outlets. MBs are still a hobbyist early adopter product targeted at people who are willing to put up with many restrictions and tinker to make it work. That demographic probably has little overlap with Home Depots. More to the point, MBs don't yet answer the "what useful things can it do that make my job quicker or easier" question in a way to appeal to the non-hobbyist.

Re:What's the target audience? (2)

itzly (3699663) | about 5 months ago | (#47450305)

Quite a few people (myself included) bought first generation home computers for 4 digit purchase prices.

Re:What's the target audience? (1)

HornWumpus (783565) | about 5 months ago | (#47450347)

I scrubbed pots to pay for my first computer. It wasn't the $2000 for the computer that bothered me as much as the $600 floppy drive.

It was not an impulse buy.

Re:What's the target audience? (1)

rickb928 (945187) | about 5 months ago | (#47450715)

I raised $1800 for my first Turbo XT clone with a yard sale. Dual 5 1/4 floppies, 20MB HD, 8MHz CPU, 640K RAM, CGA baby!

It got updated to 3.5 HD floppies, 40MB drive, then out the door in 2 years and on to 286s, 386SX, blah blah blah. I paid a lot to be bleeding edge right up to Pentium 90s. After that I slowed down, and still run a Core 2 Duo at home that does Windows 8.1 very, very well.

My 3D Printer experiment will be a home made something, probably a GMax clone or similar beam frame kit. I need not pay all that retail, and I may buy a used Printrbot Simple which I see pretty regular. I can always resell it or scavenge parts.

Re:What's the target audience? (1)

HornWumpus (783565) | about 5 months ago | (#47451223)

If I had sold $1800 worth of my brothers and sisters stuff, there would have been hell to pay.

Scrubbing pots for minimum wage was a good experience, much as it sucked at the time. Got me focused on not scrubbing pots for life.

Re:What's the target audience? (1)

HornWumpus (783565) | about 5 months ago | (#47452749)

I've got a i7 4770k and have an Oculus rift on order. G27 wheel. Throttle/stick/rudder pedals. For Gaming goddamit!

Generally go fast enough that I can go a couple of years between machines now.

Re:What's the target audience? (1)

geekmux (1040042) | about 5 months ago | (#47450379)

Quite a few people (myself included) bought first generation home computers for 4 digit purchase prices.

"Shut up and take my money!"

Damn, have I really been saying that shit for 30+ years now? Guess some things never really go out of style...

Re:What's the target audience? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47450447)

I think you nailed it. I'm looking at a 3D printer that has the ability to make at least 12x12x18 inches in volume (mainly for molds for some masks I'm working on as well as magician props.) MakerBot has it, but for 6.5 grand, it isn't cheap.

Now, if HD or Lowe's could set up both plastic and metal 3D printing, it would make life easier. There are always specialty items such as mounting brackets that one may just need a one-off for. Or for metal fab work, being able to 3D print a metal cage that fits a desktop machine almost exactly so the office file server doesn't walk off when unattended.

Re:What's the target audience? (1)

rickb928 (945187) | about 5 months ago | (#47450671)

GMax. I'm thinking of building a clone.

Re:What's the target audience? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47450745)

One-off at HD and Lowes would be great. Also, you can take pre-existing BOMs online, order the parts in one go from Grainger, then follow the existing guides to assemble it. Make it as big as you want. Estimated cost: $600-1000 depending on size + your time. If you're the sort of person who has time to design and 3D print stuff, you can probably figure out how to assemble it in a night or two.

Re:What's the target audience? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47453003)

Not all 3D printers are four come with a four digit price point, Makerbots are imho overpriced.

Don't buy (1)

bhlowe (1803290) | about 5 months ago | (#47450425)

Home 3D printing has two problems for consumers... 1. Most consumers don't need to print widgets more than once in a while.
2. The software to create and modify 3D objects has a learning curve (requires time and effort to learn.)
Sure its fun to create little plastic toys, chains, balls, and cases.. Interesting, but not particularly money-making. A nice skill to have, perhaps. But owning the printer isn't required to learn the skill or take part in the revolution. Save your cash and send your designs to a 3D print shop. Disclosure: I have a very cool but underutilized Makerbot I rented for the summer.

Re:Don't buy (1)

jythie (914043) | about 5 months ago | (#47450739)

Problem #2 is probably why they partnered up with MakerBot. They have that whole online service/community filled with templates and designs that one can download and print.

/. shouldn't help the racists at Home Depot (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47450503)

They are horrible. The radio station where I work recently finally stopped playing their racist commercials. Also, their sueing of people that refuse to put the word the infront of their horrible name is just ridiculous. Also, notice that they are much more likely to sue minorities over this issue. African Americans make-up only 13% of the population, but they are nearly 60% of the frivilous Home Depot law suites. It's ridiculous. I don't think there is another company that is more Republican that that cesspool.

Re:/. shouldn't help the racists at Home Depot (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47450697)

Can you back that statement up?

I'm not actually doubting you but I googled and found 20 pages of results about a single tweet that went out and someone got fired over. Whats the rest of your statement about? Some links?

the ability (1)

MossStan (2635555) | about 5 months ago | (#47451433)

to create a perfectly sized plastic screw or nail or wall hanger or whatever on demand in home would be super handy for many a handy person.

Of course... (1)

Virtucon (127420) | about 5 months ago | (#47450535)

You'll have to use Home Depot's self service lines to check out. I can't see how this is going to work for HD or MakerBot unless it starts churning out 2x4s.

FedEx/Kinkos - Online 3D Print service (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47450539)

So when can we install the 3D print driver for our Panorama Pics?

12 Pilot Areas? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47450563)

The actual list of locations can be found here: http://www.makerbot.com/blog/2014/07/14/home-depot-diy-meets-miy-make/

yo0 f4il it. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47450943)

Don't need 3D printer - Print me unstocked stuff (1)

Kevoco (64263) | about 5 months ago | (#47450945)

I was excited to see the news of a 3D printer in Home Depot - I was hoping they would be able to print stuff for me, but instead they want to sell me the damned printer :-(

Caviats (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47451031)

What are the caviats that go along with purchassing their 3D printer?

Is there a restriction or software control that prevents them from being used to make weapons?

I have no intention of making any, but I will not be restricted by it either.

Anybody who buys... (1)

Bartles (1198017) | about 5 months ago | (#47451071)

...a MakerBot, is going to research the thing first. Why would they pay for the privilege of getting ripped off at home depot when there are other places it can be ordered for less?

Disaster (1)

Skynyrd (25155) | about 5 months ago | (#47452433)

People who are savvy will buy online, or from a trusted source. Only people who have no clue will but from Home Depot. If you're reading this, would you buy a MakerBot from HD? Of course not.

Most of the people who work there don't know a 2x4 from a hammer; this will just be a fucking disaster.

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