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Apple and IBM Announce Partnership To Bring iOS + Cloud Services To Enterprises

Soulskill posted about two weeks ago | from the international-onebutton-machines dept.

IBM 126

jmcbain writes: According to an article on Recode, Apple and IBM have announced a major partnership to bring mobile services to enterprise customers. "The deal calls for IBM and Apple to develop more than 100 industry-specific applications that will run on the iPhone and iPad. Apple will add a new class of service to its AppleCare program and support aimed at enterprise customers. IBM will also begin to sell iPhones and iPads to its corporate customers and will devote more than 100,000 people, including consultants and software developers, to the effort. Enterprise applications will in many cases run on IBM's cloud infrastructure or on private clouds that it has built for its customers. Data for those applications will co-exist with personal data like photos and personal email that will run on Apple's iCloud and other cloud services."

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126 comments

Notes (1)

Anonymous Coward | about two weeks ago | (#47463353)

Notes

Re:Notes (1)

TrashyMG (2738973) | about two weeks ago | (#47463361)

Sorry Apple...

Re:Notes (1)

Hamsterdan (815291) | about two weeks ago | (#47466387)

Aargh!... Please just let it die...

The end is nigh (1, Informative)

Lije Baley (88936) | about two weeks ago | (#47463373)

Sounds like the effing apocalypse to me.

Re:The end is nigh (1)

Anonymous Coward | about two weeks ago | (#47463411)

Who would do this? Why would you run any part of your business on a machine rooted by a probable competitor?

Re: The end is nigh (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about two weeks ago | (#47463519)

Apple certainly isn't running their own cloud servers. They've done everything to get rid of that. IBM is an OK partner... If IBM is interested this week.

If IBM is willing to convert their "Big Iron" platform front ends to Apple's mobile devices we got something really useful that steps on nobody's toes in either company. It's really just a matter of skipping the crappy web interfaces and building out IBM supported ones in native hardware language on both sides.

Personally, IBM is a short sighted, sucky partner. My company "bet the business" on their support offerings, and I've got my career on the IBM i platform... IBM just plain sucks now compared to ten years ago, it's a gutted shell. But they can "sort of roll out" some really cool stuff. IBM just doesn't stick around to make it shine like they used to.

Re: The end is nigh (0)

Anonymous Coward | about two weeks ago | (#47464177)

Apple isn't running their own cloud servers? Who exactly is running Apple's iCloud data centers in North Carolina and Oregon, then?

Re: The end is nigh (1)

the_B0fh (208483) | about two weeks ago | (#47464881)

Try watching where your iOS devices connect to when you send an iMessage. Or use Photostream.

Re: The end is nigh (1)

Anonymous Coward | about two weeks ago | (#47465993)

Is there an app for that ?

Re: The end is nigh (1)

Anonymous Coward | about two weeks ago | (#47465191)

I was on the receiving end of one of IBM's first acquisitions into the "cloud" space back around '09 when they realized, "hey, there is this thing called the cloud and we need in on it!" I have no issue with that if you are a Novartis or a BofA in that the primary business lies in other areas, but here is/was a technology company that espoused to be a master of all things technology and consulting and selling these services to others.

Case in point, the best attempts internally, and only at a company like IBM, where _TWO_ different AWS-equiv hosting providers were created (and not intentionally), both running around the business preaching that was _the_ solution and that we needed to move to their respective platform and sell to outside customers (Smartcloud, Smartcloud+, they both had nothing in common). One had weekly 4 hour maintenance windows in the middle of Saturday afternoons, a no-go-for us (and most actual SaaS businesses), the other was on an antiquated instance of Xen that did not support such basic things as live migrations of systems which in our case was necessary given the dynamic nature.

We continued to use our own solution using off-the-shelf VMWare (basically creating a third hosting provider), other parts of the business starting wanting and moving to our own platform, internally many folks are getting excited we have something good, the existing two AWS-equiv providers are starting to flatline, and so in continued IBM mastery decides .... lets go buy Softlayer for a few billion... adding even more confusion. IBM "distinguished" engineers (job sucks so much worse than you may think) are running around suddenly espousing, "see, this softlayer thing is great, you need to go _here_ instead! Come on!!!!" ...

IBM knows this "cloud" thing is a major buzzword, they need to be involved heavily as a technology company, but there is no actual strategy other than continuing to throw darts and sums of money until something sticks. They abandon and forget quickly when it doesn't seem to stick ...

  Smart move in the market balance between the two orgs, but I wouldn't trust IBM to actually have any legit apps that I'd give a shit about in the first place ... compare Lotus Notes (which is a whole other thread on its poor/lack of support of mail on your mobile device even to this day, hello 2001) to any Apple app and let me know what you think ....

Hell hath frozen over. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about two weeks ago | (#47463375)

Who woulda thunk it. THe PC Junior meets the Apple ][

Enterprises (1)

rossdee (243626) | about two weeks ago | (#47463385)

Has StarFleet confirmed this?

(and the US Navy retired CVAN 65)

Microsoft and OS/2 . . . ? (1)

PolygamousRanchKid (1290638) | about two weeks ago | (#47463393)

That didn't work out too well.

Hmmm . . . but then again . . . didn't Apple and IBM try to collaborate on something called Taligent and Kaleida . . . ?

Well, those two never managed to see the light of day. I believe Taligent is often used as an example of a "Death March" project. It ran for over seven years, but at any point in time during the project, it was only planned as a two year project.

OS/2 worked out well for Microsoft ... (1)

perpenso (1613749) | about two weeks ago | (#47463601)

Microsoft and OS/2. That didn't work out too well.

It worked out great for Microsoft. Microsoft NT began life as OS/2 NT, the portable cross-platform version of OS/2. As IBM and Microsoft went their separate ways OS/2 NT was renamed Windows NT.

Re:OS/2 worked out well for Microsoft ... (1)

viperidaenz (2515578) | about two weeks ago | (#47463717)

Great?
It's turned in to Windows 8.1
How is that great?

Re:OS/2 worked out well for Microsoft ... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about two weeks ago | (#47463931)

I bet you were a cute baby, too. 20 years later...

Re:OS/2 worked out well for Microsoft ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about two weeks ago | (#47464029)

Not quite. MS started NT when Cutler came on board but kept working on OS/2 separately and didn't have any plans to support it long term at that point. He started NT from scratch with his own small group that looked down on those that were working on OS/2.

Re:OS/2 worked out well for Microsoft ... (2)

perpenso (1613749) | about two weeks ago | (#47464685)

Not quite. MS started NT when Cutler came on board but kept working on OS/2 separately and didn't have any plans to support it long term at that point. He started NT from scratch with his own small group that looked down on those that were working on OS/2.

NT was originally a next generation OS/2 not a next generation Windows. IBM and Microsoft worked together on 16-bit OS/2 1.x. They decided to work separately in parallel on the 32-bit x86 specific OS/2 2.x (IBM) and on the cross platform portable OS/2 3.x, aka NT OS/2 (Microsoft). NT OS/2 was eventually rebranded as Windows NT. NT was a re-write, but it started as a re-write for OS/2.

PowerPC worked out for Apple ... (1)

perpenso (1613749) | about two weeks ago | (#47463623)

Hmmm . . . but then again . . . didn't Apple and IBM try to collaborate on something called Taligent and Kaleida . . . ?

Apple, IBM and Motorola partnered for the PowerPC CPU. It worked out. PowerPC ultimately lost to Intel but that wasn't so much a PowerPC failure as it was that Intel worked friggin miracles with the x86 architecture. No one ever imagined they could get x86 to the performance levels that they did. I suppose technically they did not. Intel actually went to RISC but its hidden in the core of the CPU and only the legacy x86 api is exposed. x86 instructions are translated to risc core micro operations and these microps are what actually executes.

Most people looked at the RISC v CISC debate as one or the other, Intel thought they'd do both in one chip. CISC may be more expensive to work with but Intel certainly can afford to go the more expensive path.

Re:PowerPC worked out for Apple ... (1)

viperidaenz (2515578) | about two weeks ago | (#47463765)

Intel actually went to RISC but its hidden in the core of the CPU and only the legacy x86 api is exposed. x86 instructions are translated to risc core micro operations and these microps are what actually executes.

Intel have been using microcode since the P5 in 1993.
Apple's first use of PowerPC was in 1994

Re:PowerPC worked out for Apple ... (1)

K. S. Kyosuke (729550) | about two weeks ago | (#47464287)

Intel had been using microcode [wikipedia.org] since long before that.

Re:PowerPC worked out for Apple ... (3, Informative)

perpenso (1613749) | about two weeks ago | (#47464575)

Intel actually went to RISC but its hidden in the core of the CPU and only the legacy x86 api is exposed. x86 instructions are translated to risc core micro operations and these microps are what actually executes.

Intel have been using microcode since the P5 in 1993. Apple's first use of PowerPC was in 1994

Apple, IBM and Motorola began working together on the PowerPC in 1991 when PC's were using the 486.
The RISC core and micro ops that I referred to were introduced in the Pentium Pro (P6) in 1995, not the Pentium (P5).

Re:PowerPC worked out for Apple ... (1)

dpilot (134227) | about two weeks ago | (#47465625)

I suspect you're confusing micro-ops with microcode.

Current architectures (not all, but not just Intel) decompose the user-visible instruction set into a stream of micro-ops, (more primitive instructions) and send that stream to a dispatch unit. The dispatch unit resolves dependency issues and as requirements are met, sends the micro-ops to one of a series of execution units. As micro-ops complete, their results are sent to the retirement unit. Note that between dispatch and retirement, the architectural registers have effectively disappeared, and are reassigned at retirement.

Microcode is a completely different thing - usually the opcode is translated into a subroutine entry point, and a (typically) classic Harvard-style computing engine interprets the user-visible instruction set. But it's all in lock-step, not the controlled chaos of micro-ops.

Re:PowerPC worked out for Apple ... (0)

Tough Love (215404) | about two weeks ago | (#47463965)

Apple, IBM and Motorola partnered for the PowerPC CPU. It worked out.

Oh so really true, and that is why consumers are inundated with power PC chips today... Hmm, err, Apple was really loyal to IBM, yes they were. Yes yes! One for all and all for one. Just saving up that loyalty for later. Sure, that's it.

Re:PowerPC worked out for Apple ... (2)

iluvcapra (782887) | about two weeks ago | (#47464163)

Oh so really true, and that is why consumers are inundated with power PC chips today...

Are we counting Xbox 360s and Playstations?

Re:PowerPC worked out for Apple ... (1)

Tough Love (215404) | about two weeks ago | (#47464471)

Funny, I could swear that both Sony and Microsoft punted powerPC for AMD silicon.

Re:PowerPC worked out for Apple ... (1)

perpenso (1613749) | about two weeks ago | (#47464651)

Oh so really true, and that is why consumers are inundated with power PC chips today...

Are we counting Xbox 360s and Playstations?

Funny, I could swear that both Sony and Microsoft punted powerPC for AMD silicon.

That doesn't change the fact that there are in fact 83 million Xbox 360s and 80 million Playstation 3s in the hands of consumers.

Re:PowerPC worked out for Apple ... (1)

Tough Love (215404) | about two weeks ago | (#47464821)

Millions of aging buggy whips do not have a great deal of importance to the modern auto market.

Re:PowerPC worked out for Apple ... (1)

iluvcapra (782887) | about two weeks ago | (#47464187)

Or Wii's for that matter? A lotta STBs and consoles run PowerPC.

Re:PowerPC worked out for Apple ... (1)

Tough Love (215404) | about two weeks ago | (#47464477)

Obsolete consoles running powerPCs, a fine straw to grasp at.

Re:PowerPC worked out for Apple ... (1)

perpenso (1613749) | about two weeks ago | (#47464601)

Apple, IBM and Motorola partnered for the PowerPC CPU. It worked out. PowerPC ultimately lost to Intel but that wasn't so much a PowerPC failure as it was that Intel worked friggin miracles with the x86 architecture. No one ever imagined they could get x86 to the performance levels that they did.

Oh so really true, and that is why consumers are inundated with power PC chips today...

Didn't you read the next line that I wrote? I inserted it above for reference.

Re:PowerPC worked out for Apple ... (1)

MachineShedFred (621896) | about two weeks ago | (#47465499)

Apple was loyal to IBM. It was IBM that didn't give a crap about making low power designs, which is why we never saw a PowerBook G5. IBM forced Apple to move to Intel, or to stop selling laptops.

And PowerPC has seen it's fair share of design wins, including use in a lot of networking gear; to say nothing of IBM's successful P-series of UNIX servers.

You're forgetting... (1)

mariox19 (632969) | about two weeks ago | (#47465931)

They also collaborated, along with Motorola, on the PowerPC. Admittedly, that's a dubious thing to note.

Well Fuck Me Running. (1)

zenlessyank (748553) | about two weeks ago | (#47463399)

I think I feel a little vomit coming up in the back of my throat.

Sweet (1)

afidel (530433) | about two weeks ago | (#47463409)

The i* device revolution has been extremely annoying for enterprise IT since Apple has had almost zero understanding or interest in supporting us. Things like requiring plugging in an iphone to a PC to turn off the find my iphone feature with iOS 7 as an example (No I can't contact all 300 field users and ask them to mail me their iphone for a few days).

Re:Sweet (1)

geekoid (135745) | about two weeks ago | (#47463599)

OR having the same log in on their work device as their home device.

Did you know just having several iPads can use up all your 'shared' slots?

Re:Sweet (2)

perpenso (1613749) | about two weeks ago | (#47463639)

The i* device revolution has been extremely annoying for enterprise IT since Apple has had almost zero understanding or interest in supporting us. Things like requiring plugging in an iphone to a PC to turn off the find my iphone feature with iOS 7 as an example (No I can't contact all 300 field users and ask them to mail me their iphone for a few days).

This was fixed a year or so ago with iOS 7, maybe earlier? iOS devices can be remotely configured and updated. Coincidentally I just watched a WWDC video that mentioned this, I'm pretty sure it was from last year's WWDC not the recent one.

Re:Sweet (3, Interesting)

afidel (530433) | about two weeks ago | (#47463713)

No it wasn't, as soon as you install iOS 7 and enable find my iphone the device is locked to that users icloud account, there's a way to disable it but it requires attaching the phone to a physical machine. You can disable the feature through MDM now, but it has zero effect if the user has already set it up (horse meet barn door). We've lost a half dozen devices due to folks being let go and refusing to unlock our property, Apple's gotten better about unlocking the devices in the last couple months, but if they're not on our main account so we can easily show proof of ownership we're SOL.

Re:Sweet (1)

mpe (36238) | about two weeks ago | (#47464279)

No it wasn't, as soon as you install iOS 7 and enable find my iphone the device is locked to that users icloud account, there's a way to disable it but it requires attaching the phone to a physical machine. You can disable the feature through MDM now, but it has zero effect if the user has already set it up (horse meet barn door). We've lost a half dozen devices due to folks being let go and refusing to unlock our property, Apple's gotten better about unlocking the devices in the last couple months, but if they're not on our main account so we can easily show proof of ownership we're SOL.

Since Apple can unlock the device it should be possible for an admin to also be able to do so. But the issue here is Apple's failure to understand that "user" and "admin" are distinct tasks, even in small businesses. Even, apparently, the concept of a "corporation" being the owner of such a device.

Re:Sweet (1)

rainer_d (115765) | about two weeks ago | (#47464869)

So you gave the devices in an incomplete setup-state to your users and later complain that they locked you out?

In any case, you just keep a share of the last salary until they return all your property. Problem solved (unless you pay them peanuts and the iDevice is worth more than a month's salary).

Re:Sweet (1)

afidel (530433) | about two weeks ago | (#47466591)

Withhold last paychecks isn't legal in the majority of states.

As to the "incomplete" setup, prior to iOS 7 it was a feature that the users could use to find a misplaced device, then suddenly through an OTA update it became a way to brick a phone.

Re:Sweet (1)

Wovel (964431) | about two weeks ago | (#47465407)

Your talking about people that were let go? Why on earth do you care if they have to be mailed in if no one is using them (at least for a time)? I agree the management tool should be able to do it, but you made it sound like you had some reason for active users to be sending in their devices. You clearly do not.

Re:Sweet (0)

Anonymous Coward | about two weeks ago | (#47466381)

(horse meet barn door)

Tell me about it. You're giving your employees unconfigured devices, hoping that they then decide to configure them the way you want, and then blaming the vendor when they inevitably don't.

Re:Sweet (1)

mpe (36238) | about two weeks ago | (#47464253)

This was fixed a year or so ago with iOS 7, maybe earlier? iOS devices can be remotely configured and updated. Coincidentally I just watched a WWDC video that mentioned this, I'm pretty sure it was from last year's WWDC not the recent one.

You can configure some things this way, but not others.

Re:Sweet (1)

Uberbah (647458) | about two weeks ago | (#47463971)

Things like requiring plugging in an iphone to a PC to turn off the find my iphone feature with iOS 7 as an example

Not so.

Settings > Privacy > Location Services > Find My iPhone

Only the Apple account password is needed, not a computer.

Re:Sweet (1)

mpe (36238) | about two weeks ago | (#47464291)

The i* device revolution has been extremely annoying for enterprise IT since Apple has had almost zero understanding or interest in supporting us.

It isn't just Apple. Many Android and Windows tablets have smiliar issues.

Things like requiring plugging in an iphone to a PC to turn off the find my iphone feature with iOS 7 as an example (No I can't contact all 300 field users and ask them to mail me their iphone for a few days).

This featrue has at least some possible use in the enterprise. The whole "app store" idea makes very little sense here. There's also the inability to easily use your servers, including in place of Apples. It's unclear if this is something the article really addresses.

Re:Sweet (1)

jbolden (176878) | about two weeks ago | (#47465399)

You can redirect services to your own servers, that's part of the enterprise SDK. Most people access that functionality through their MDM/EMM.

Re:Sweet (1)

Wovel (964431) | about two weeks ago | (#47465413)

That is likely because Apple addressed it more than 5 years ago. The enterprise App store does precisely that and you have been able to restrict Apple App store installation for about the same amount of time....

Re:Sweet (1)

the_B0fh (208483) | about two weeks ago | (#47464919)

Since when do you have to plug your iphone in to turn off find my iphone? Not in iOS 6, 7 or 8.

Re:Sweet (1)

Wovel (964431) | about two weeks ago | (#47465395)

What are you talking about? That is not a requirement of iOS7 or any other version. You can now and always have been able to turn of find my iPhone from the device. Apple has some problems for enterprise support, but yours is not one of them...

My Condolences to Captain Dunzel (0)

Anonymous Coward | about two weeks ago | (#47463423)

The new M-1 app worked flawlessly.

Does this mean Lotus Notes for IOS ? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about two weeks ago | (#47463431)

Why does apple hate their users?

Interesting disaster to watch! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about two weeks ago | (#47463435)

Wonder how many years and how much money will be expended before this mess self-destructs. Guess they're planning to use the $0.10 an hour Indian support people. Another fine joke.

Re:Interesting disaster to watch! (1)

Anonymous Coward | about two weeks ago | (#47463509)

Apple is providing tech support (Apple Care), IBM on site support.

This will be a huge success for IBM and Ginni (0)

Anonymous Coward | about two weeks ago | (#47463525)

Just like it was a huge success for HP and Carly Fiorina .

This has got to worry Microsoft (1)

Anonymous Coward | about two weeks ago | (#47463539)

Ok, this hits way too close to home. I suspect Satya is up in his ivory tower right now, curled up in a ball and sobbing like a little girl. And I feel for him; it's going to be a gargantuan task to fend off Apple from taking chunks of Microsoft's red meat.

Where is CmdrDoucho to tell us this is lame? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about two weeks ago | (#47463573)

It probably hurts to post this doesn't it?

Apple has lost their innovators (0)

geekoid (135745) | about two weeks ago | (#47463605)

and the ability to bring good ideas to market, so not they just partner and buy things.

Only on Slashdot... (1)

MachineShedFred (621896) | about two weeks ago | (#47465539)

Only on Slashdot would someone say that IBM wanting to get into the mobile game without starting from scratch = Apple not innovating.

Somebody needs to make a new 1984 commercial.. (3, Insightful)

TheNarrator (200498) | about two weeks ago | (#47463607)

30 years after the original 1984 commercial the rebels have been co-opted and are now partnering with big brother. That would make a great commercial: "2014". You could have the olympian women up on the screen and everything's colorful and everyone has prettier outfits but they're all still obedient slaves.

Re:Somebody needs to make a new 1984 commercial.. (1)

Osgeld (1900440) | about two weeks ago | (#47463935)

um power pc?

"PowerPC (an acronym for Performance Optimization With Enhanced RISC – Performance Computing, sometimes abbreviated as PPC) is a RISC instruction set architecture created by the 1991 Apple–IBM–Motorola alliance, known as AIM."

Re:Somebody needs to make a new 1984 commercial.. (1)

Tough Love (215404) | about two weeks ago | (#47464003)

I'm not totally sure about your analogy. Maybe Aliens is more like it? You know, the part where the alien gets its egg inside and bursts out of his chest.

Omigod get it off my face, wait, where did it go?

good, I dont have to find a giant winerack (1)

Osgeld (1900440) | about two weeks ago | (#47463609)

to hold all those mac pro's

PowerPC (1)

Smurf (7981) | about two weeks ago | (#47463645)

A lot of people here seem to forget that the PowerPC processor architecture that powered the Macs for over a decade was developed jointly by Apple and IBM (and Motorola).

My point: Apple and IBM working together is certainly not unheard of.

Re:PowerPC (1)

Anonymous Coward | about two weeks ago | (#47463703)

Yeah, they worked together in the past, when the IBM name still meant something.

The 2014 IBM is a totally different animal. They laid off all their good people and replaced them with talentless Indians. Their reputation is in the shitter and they are shedding clients left and right because aforementioned Indians are not capable of performing the work promised to those clients.

I just hope IBM doesn't drag Apple down with them, when they finally enter their death spiral.

Re:PowerPC (2)

viperidaenz (2515578) | about two weeks ago | (#47463785)

I suppose there is a difference between the old International Business Machines and the new India Business Machines.

The death spiral would be extremely entertain to watch.

Re:PowerPC (0)

Anonymous Coward | about two weeks ago | (#47463847)

but, but, bro...IBM uses LINUX! That means Slashdot must support them just like they support the atrocious abomination known as Android because under all the layers of proprietary bullshit there is a Linux kernel! (really Slashdot users support Android because it's easier to steal 99 cents apps on Android than on iOS but they'll say it's about Linux)

Re:PowerPC (1)

Tough Love (215404) | about two weeks ago | (#47464021)

We fully support IBM partnering with Apple to destroy it. The bottom line: Apple has no fallback, once the hipsters don't want ishiny any more, that's it. IBM will just keep selling bullshit consulting and support contracts to corps big and small.

Re:PowerPC (0)

Anonymous Coward | about two weeks ago | (#47464125)

Yeah, the hipsters won't want "ishiney" right around the same time people stop wanting BMWs and Rolex watches and Gucci sweaters. Stay mad, nerd.

Re:PowerPC (1)

david.emery (127135) | about two weeks ago | (#47464243)

There are a Heluva lot of "hipsters" in the world running iDevices, and the great majority of them are very happy doing so.

Your attitude may vary.

Re:PowerPC (1)

Tough Love (215404) | about two weeks ago | (#47464433)

Trouble is, hipsters are all in advanced stages of getting saggy now. The ithing is the phone your mom has, now how cool is that?

Re:PowerPC (0)

Anonymous Coward | about two weeks ago | (#47465613)

I love how people claim that the choice to buy an iPhone is some kind of "status symbol" and then in the same breath claim that it's uncool because their parents have one.

It's one or the other fucktard, you don't get to use both arguments. Besides, since when is having competition and choice in the market a bad thing? Everyone should be happy that there are two viable, healthy alternatives that force each other to make better products - we've already seen what happens when we have an OS monopoly.

Re:PowerPC (1)

david.emery (127135) | about two weeks ago | (#47465823)

There seems to be a significant number of people here who believe if a device isn't either very complex, or doesn't require or at least allow you to tear it apart and rebuild it, it is somehow "unworthy." For a lot of the rest of us, these are tools we use to do useful things, and the utility of the tool is in part based on how easy it is to use.

If that makes us "hipsters," I guess I'll have to grow a ponytail.

Where is the "Do not Want" tag? (1)

Anomalyst (742352) | about two weeks ago | (#47463661)

Apple products in the Enterprise, what a frightening concept.

Re:Where is the "Do not Want" tag? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about two weeks ago | (#47463805)

If "Enterprise" means everything is .NET, I'm sure it's frightening. Guess what? Enterprise works without Microsoft if you want.

Re:Where is the "Do not Want" tag? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about two weeks ago | (#47465629)

This might come as a shock, but there have been Apple products in the enterprise for a long time now. Where do you think the vast majority of marketing and video content are created?

Et tu, Lenovo? (1)

Aryeh Goretsky (129230) | about two weeks ago | (#47463689)

Hello,

The question going through my mind, is what does this mean for Lenovo? Lenovo acquired IBM's Personal Computing Division in 2004, and announced at the beginning of 2014 that they had reached an agreement to acquire IBM's x86 server business.

The fact that IBM chose not to partner with Lenovo for developing all these apps and services for Lenovo's Windows and Android tablets and smartphones is downright bizarre.

Regards,

Aryeh Goretsky

Re:Et tu, Lenovo? (1)

PapayaSF (721268) | about two weeks ago | (#47464013)

The question going through my mind, is what does this mean for Lenovo? Lenovo acquired IBM's Personal Computing Division in 2004, and announced at the beginning of 2014 that they had reached an agreement to acquire IBM's x86 server business. The fact that IBM chose not to partner with Lenovo for developing all these apps and services for Lenovo's Windows and Android tablets and smartphones is downright bizarre.

On the contrary. Selling things to someone is different from marrying them. And who would IBM rather have a relationship with? An unstable trio (a Chinese maker of undistinguished hardware plus two rival OSes), or the one most profitable and popular maker of phones and tablets and the OS that runs on them? How many of IBM's customers and even employees prefer Lenovo Windows and Android tablets and smartphones to iPhones and iPads?

Re:Et tu, Lenovo? (1)

Tough Love (215404) | about two weeks ago | (#47464031)

Lenovo gets entrenched as the largest PC supplier then leverages it into largest server supplier. 1, 2, easy.

Re:Et tu, Lenovo? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about two weeks ago | (#47465669)

That's because Lenovo hasn't figured out how to make a tablet that large business wants to buy. Trust me, we've looked at them because we're a Lenovo shop. They all suck in some way - either miss on performance, or are way too expensive. The best Android device we've seen for enterprise actually came from Motorola Solutions (the ET1), but it's practically unmanageable with modern MDM (read: anything but Motorola MSP) and it's stale two year old hardware.

Apple is the closest to having a real enterprise solution without going full-blown Windows right now, they just need multi-user support. If IBM shims that in, or allows multi-user space in applications, then iOS might be where nobody else is right now.

Mac OS X on Power? (1)

itomato (91092) | about two weeks ago | (#47463775)

Apple branded Power boxen coming back to a DC near you?

Not going to excite the enterprise (1)

Timmy D Programmer (704067) | about two weeks ago | (#47463779)

Apple's failed previous go at the enterprise plus IBMs track record of abysmal support for their products makes for a less than attractive enterprise solution.

Re:Not going to excite the enterprise (2)

Tough Love (215404) | about two weeks ago | (#47464045)

The ad campaign should revolve around elephants wearing hornrimmed glasses and dancing tango while pressing one button mice with their trunks.

Re:Not going to excite the enterprise (0)

Anonymous Coward | about two weeks ago | (#47465699)

I was wondering how long it would take for someone to roll out the single-button mouse trope. 2002 called and wants it's meme back.

Not going to excite the enterprise (1)

AHuxley (892839) | about two weeks ago | (#47464761)

Think of it more as Google Federal.
'Microsoft, Google spar over federal contract" (04/11/11)
https://thehill.com/policy/tec... [thehill.com]
ie getting beyond FISMA and into enterprise - reps with military, intelligence, gov contractor like skills to move iPhone and iPad into US agencies.

iOS Management Tools for non-macs (3, Interesting)

antifoidulus (807088) | about two weeks ago | (#47463855)

I wonder if this means that Apple will finally port it's iOS management tools to run on something other than OS X server. Ever since Apple killed the XServe(and really even before that) this has been a major hinderance to wider scale enterprise adoption of iOS devices. The tools are actually quite good, but if you are forced to try to cram a bunch of mac minis somewhere or trying to get some mac pros in the server room, it's just a pain. Add to that lack of practical way to deploy OS X server instances on the cloud and you have enterprise customers just not interested in trying to screw around with iPhones. Hopefully this partnership will fix that.

what about letting OS X server be on any VM runnin (3, Interesting)

Joe_Dragon (2206452) | about two weeks ago | (#47463877)

what about letting OS X server be on any VM running on any base hardware as well.

Re:what about letting OS X server be on any VM run (0)

Anonymous Coward | about two weeks ago | (#47465269)

what about letting OS X server be on any VM running on any base hardware as well.

Yeah, and maybe google will make a Windows Phone device. Some thing are just not going to happen....

Re:what about letting OS X server be on any VM run (1)

jbolden (176878) | about two weeks ago | (#47465419)

And why would they want to do that? The purpose of Apple software is to sell Apple hardware. If there is a demand for VMs they are going to want those VMs to run on a reincarnated XServer.

Re:iOS Management Tools for non-macs (1)

93 Escort Wagon (326346) | about two weeks ago | (#47464067)

I'd settle for OS X Server tools that work across subnets. Time Machine backup server and print server, for instance.

These tools actually work quite well... as long as all your clients are all confined to a single subnet.

Re:iOS Management Tools for non-macs (0)

Anonymous Coward | about two weeks ago | (#47465327)

You need to configure appletalk routing. Kind of difficult for appletalk to work when the packets are effectively filtered.

Re:iOS Management Tools for non-macs (1)

MachineShedFred (621896) | about two weeks ago | (#47465789)

Oh boy, no.

AppleTalk has been dead for a decade. Everything on OS X is IP.

Re:iOS Management Tools for non-macs (1)

MachineShedFred (621896) | about two weeks ago | (#47465779)

Have you tried actually routing mDNS [cisco.com] ? Those tools work just fine across subnets, as they are direct IP - it's just an AFP share for Time Machine and a standard CUPS print server. What it sounds like isn't working is Bonjour service discovery (mDNS), which uses multicast.

Re:iOS Management Tools for non-macs (3, Informative)

MachineShedFred (621896) | about two weeks ago | (#47465739)

It's a good thing that there is plenty of MDM solutions that fully support everything you want to do without having to ever touch a Mac then, isn't it? The only thing that requires a Mac is the iPhone Config Utility, and a Mac Mini fixes that nicely. And, now with touchless device enrollment [apple.com] , you probably don't even need that anymore.

OS X Server is not required for management of iOS devices, and in fact only makes sense if you are a Mac shop and using Profile Manager to manage your OS X boxes. Otherwise, look at the many other solutions available that can also manage Android and WinMo in order to not lock yourself to a platform any more than necessary.

how about bringing back the Xserve (1)

Uberbah (647458) | about two weeks ago | (#47464143)

Minis and the iTrash aren't a substitute for a rack mounted server with redundant power supplies. Apple, it would be couch money for you to continue this product as well as a 17" laptop line, even if they aren't big sellers.

Re:how about bringing back the Xserve (1)

rainer_d (115765) | about two weeks ago | (#47464893)

It would rather make sense to license OS X for certain IBM-servers, which incidentally already carry the "X"-tag.
Apple had not much use for their own servers back when they discontinued them. That certainly hasn't changed.

Re:how about bringing back the Xserve (1)

MachineShedFred (621896) | about two weeks ago | (#47465811)

I'd be happier with a deal with VMware, since VMware already has XServe3 and MacPro3 through 5 (and soon, 6) in their HCL.

Just let me run OS X Server on the blades I already have, FFS. We'll even buy a "VMware Edition" that costs more. Give me the choice.

Can Steve Job's Corpse Dance? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about two weeks ago | (#47464293)

Is Apple dead yet? IBM, lacking innovation for decades, is the perfect match for Apple as it becomes the empty shell it must be. That can help make room for Chinese innovation as America declines, this is just part of the funeral march.

Macbook (1)

brunes69 (86786) | about two weeks ago | (#47465225)

If this means I have to switch to an iPhone for my work phone, I am against this.

If this means I can ditch this giant Lenovo brick for a Powerbook during my next upgrade cycle, then I am all for this

Not sure which of the two would win, they are battling in my head...

Two micromicromicro managing control freaks. (1)

gelfling (6534) | about two weeks ago | (#47465263)

The sparks will fly but first they will need to have a regular status meeting to determine the color of said sparks.

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