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New Treatment Stops Type II Diabetes

samzenpus posted about 3 months ago | from the one-shot-and-your-done dept.

Medicine 253

multicsfan writes Researchers have found that an injection of protein FGF1 stops weight induced diabetes in mice, with no apparent side effects. However, the cure only lasts 2 days at a time. Future research and human trials are needed to better understand and create a working drug. From the story: "The team found that sustained treatment with the protein doesn't merely keep blood sugar under control, but also reverses insulin insensitivity, the underlying physiological cause of diabetes. Equally exciting, the newly developed treatment doesn't result in side effects common to most current diabetes treatments."

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Diabetic and Cancer patient - sign me up (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47480187)

With the side effects of the cancer meds, I don't need the side-effects from the diabetic medications, as well as the pain meds causing issues with blood sugars.

If they need a human test subject, sign me up.

Re:Diabetic and Cancer patient - sign me up (3, Funny)

davester666 (731373) | about 3 months ago | (#47480651)

A bunch of big-pharma executives are plowing their hookers extra hard tonight. A "cure" that you have to keep taking for the rest of your life, for a relatively common disease. If anything, they are slightly worried the tip of their penis will pop off.

Re:Diabetic and Cancer patient - sign me up (0)

Mashiki (184564) | about 3 months ago | (#47481003)

Yay! It's the crazy person who believes in crazy things. Next up, vaccines don't cure anything. They're a method of mind control, and that's why research takes forevar!

There's another treatment that stops most T2 (5, Informative)

AbRASiON (589899) | about 3 months ago | (#47480197)

It's called eating well, exercising and losing a significant amount of weight.
I know, I came very very close to having it. Break the sugar addiction, quadruple your vegetable intake, vastly reduce your sugar / heavy foods intake and do a little, tiny bit of basic light exercise.

In a couple of years, guess what,...?

Re:There's another treatment that stops most T2 (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47480203)

...diabetic retinopathy?

Re:There's another treatment that stops most T2 (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47480233)

That's mostly due to high Insulin/Sugar levels in the blood. If you're managing your sugars, you can escape most if not all the ravages of that problem.

Re:There's another treatment that stops most T2 (4, Interesting)

Artifakt (700173) | about 3 months ago | (#47480437)

Probably not. Both me and my ex are Type 2. I can't afford to get even 20 lbs. over weight (I'm 6'1", For me, I should weigh at least 180 - that's show off the six pack range, but even with measured bodyfat at less than, say, 14%, I still have to use some oral meds if I get only 20 lbs. over what looks to be about ideal). For her, at only 5' 6", she could probably get above 220 before she would need to use insulin or see progress in retinopathy - she has some initial traces, but the progression has been totally stalled for nearly 10 years now. However, she has to stay below 180 lbs. or she has peripheral neuropathy symptoms (that's in the feet, where it usually starts. Under 165, she stops having those symptoms, plus even needing Metformin, and so she's trying to stay there. She has about the usual cushion for Type 2, I have almost none at all. For typical Type 2's, managing the disease well enough to beat neuropathy is also plenty to beat retinopathy. For atypical ones such as myself, who knows, but what AbRASION wrote is generally good advice.
            However, it's generally tougher than what he (?) wrote - more like 30 minutes + of just plain running 3x a week, PLUS some weights and wierd stuff like climbing walls, standing jumps for elevation and such, so the gym sessions usually go to a full hour, and weekend hiking, swimming, cross-training if either of us gains even five pounds, and often if not. We both run in 10 K's not just 5's,,and have managed a half marathon in the last 2 years. She leg presses 550 lbs to my 440, I'm benching 265 to her 110. If that's light exercise to someone, their dad's name was Jor El.
          Quadrupliing your complex carbs? Well double them at least, and cut the simpler starches nearly as much as the sugars. "Vastly reduce your sugar intake" is also accurate, as in NO HFCS, NO sweetened soft drinks, Stevia is a lifesaver, a cookie? - is it my birthday? We had to memorize, and check for changes frequently, which peanut butters or canned soups have how much added sugar - there's added sugar or HFCS in a whole lot of products that people don't usually expect. Who would think that some brands of Smoked Ham lunchmeat have more added sugar than the same brand's Honey Ham version? Working out as we do, we can manage twice a week soft drinks made from fruit juice and soda water, no added sweeteners, and a small dessert at sunday family dinners (a third of the pie slice or cake slice everyone else cuts), but I, at least, have to know which fruits are high in Fructose and which have more of the other sugars mixed in to even do that, and I skip that dessert completely more often than not.
          We've been on this sort of regimen for over 8 years for her and 11 for me. I'm not going to jump at a potential cure, because I'm managing, and I doubt she will want to volunteer for early tests either, but if this leads to a real cure, we can stick to what we do, and in another five years, most of you will be welcoming me and her as your new overlords. I'm expeding effort like what I used to do in my 30's to score 380 on the Army's extended scale APFT, just to stay in pretty good shape for a guy in his 50's. Take away this disease and that effort will again make me a veritable titan, and all Slashdot will tremble at my name. Bwaa-ha-ha-ha! Excuse me, I meant to say I find this prosepective cure moderately interesting.

Re:There's another treatment that stops most T2 (5, Insightful)

HnT (306652) | about 3 months ago | (#47480849)

Note that the article talks about a TREATMENT and not a CURE. Your diet and workout regime is also a TREATMENT and not a CURE. As it stands now Type2 can go into remission which usually means your GP will take you off of your meds and people think they are "cured" when actually they are not cured, their condition is just in remission and like your account vividly displays: it can quickly flare up again.

Re:There's another treatment that stops most T2 (2)

umghhh (965931) | about 3 months ago | (#47480969)

had my Mum losing sight to this shit so I know haw dangerous it is. Keep up good spirits. I hope your sport regimen makes some fun at least.

Re:There's another treatment that stops most T2 (1, Insightful)

Gaygirlie (1657131) | about 3 months ago | (#47480225)

Too bad healthy food tastes and/or feels like shit and excercise is frustrating, wholly unpleasant and time-consuming :/

Re:There's another treatment that stops most T2 (4, Insightful)

AbRASiON (589899) | about 3 months ago | (#47480275)

Bullshit, I've been doing it for 2 years now and healthy food is fine, it tastes like food, not random chemicals and slop.

It's actually not that difficult to cook something healthy and quickly in a short amount of time once you actually put the effort in for a couple of months, a quick and simple food routine is great.

Re:There's another treatment that stops most T2 (4, Interesting)

Gaygirlie (1657131) | about 3 months ago | (#47480301)

Well, I have a problem with how food feels in my mouth and going down, the texture of it matters a lot. The more consistent, predictable, processed feel the food has the more likely I am able to eat it, but alas, healthy food tends to be rough, tangy, contain all sorts of surprises and all that and I just can't stomach it. I just don't know how to make healthy food that tastes *and* feels good.

Re:There's another treatment that stops most T2 (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47480427)

Which is worse, texturally: swallowing a bunch of vegetables now or a bunch of medicine later in life for all of the cancer you got from never eating healthy? If it's texture you have a problem with, get a food processor, steamer basket and cheap blender, or a Vitamix. Seriously, I made alfredo sauce tonight out of steamed cauliflower, sauteed garlic, Bragg's (healthier soy sauce alternative), almond milk, and nutritional yeast--all with a cheap steamer basket and a cheap blender. The calories? Like, tens. Vegan? Check. Feels good in my stomach? Check.

Re:There's another treatment that stops most T2 (2, Insightful)

Gaygirlie (1657131) | about 3 months ago | (#47480451)

Which is worse, texturally: swallowing a bunch of vegetables now or a bunch of medicine later in life for all of the cancer you got from never eating healthy?

The former. Pills are so small that you can just gulp them down with any liquid drink you have handy. I know you were trying to be cheeky, but you kind of failed at it.

Re:There's another treatment that stops most T2 (2)

Bing Tsher E (943915) | about 3 months ago | (#47480485)

I think you missed out on the overall long term feeling you have that induces you to take the pills. Which is a permanent feeling. It also then sucks to feel dependent on said pills to feel at all well.

You're kidding about the pills, right? You don't consider your body just a big sack of chemicals used as the life support system for your brain, do you? Or is this a futile argument for me to even make?

Re:There's another treatment that stops most T2 (2)

Gaygirlie (1657131) | about 3 months ago | (#47480499)

I think you missed out on the overall long term feeling you have that induces you to take the pills. Which is a permanent feeling. It also then sucks to feel dependent on said pills to feel at all well.

But that's totally irrelevant. None of that changes how the food feels. Knowing that having your fingernails torn from your fingers and then having your arm chopped off would hurt like hell doesn't mean that stubbing your toe doesn't hurt anymore, and just as well the possibility of having to take meds in the future does not change how the food feels and how the texture dictates whether I can eat it or not. It is you who is missing what I'm saying.

Re:There's another treatment that stops most T2 (1)

buckfeta2014 (3700011) | about 3 months ago | (#47480479)

Eating vegetables doesn't guarantee that you won't get cancer.

Re:There's another treatment that stops most T2 (2)

Dr_Barnowl (709838) | about 3 months ago | (#47480755)

No, but it does mean that some of you who would have gotten cancer, don't.

As the original poster suggests, it's all about learned response to food.

My daughter likes processed crap as much as any 10 year old, but she loves home cooked food with plenty of veggies. Last Friday she was literally using both hands to cram the broccoli into her face (it was tempura broccoli, deep fried but basically nearly raw with a very thin coating of batter on a large piece of broccoli).

She was brought up with a wide variety of fruits and veggies in her life. Until she started dance lessons, where there is a little pocket money tuck shop, she thought that the only kind of sweeties was dried fruit. She has always received encouragement to try new things, and never been restricted from eating foods because they are "too good for children" or "too grown up".

On one notable oocasion when we were driving home from the supermarket we heard a "scronch, scronch" from the back seat like someone was eating an apple. But we didn't buy any apples. It's my daughter, eating a yellow bell pepper straight from the shopping bag with every sign of enjoyment.

I'd be inclined to agree with the sibling poster I see now as I write this ; you're not just stuck in a childhood, you're stuck in a childhood where your parents did you no favours from a food point of view. But I don't agree that healthy has to mean rough or tangy - even something as simple as lentil soup is very healthy but very consistent in texture.

Re:There's another treatment that stops most T2 (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47480507)

Well, I have a problem with how food feels in my mouth and going down, the texture of it matters a lot. The more consistent, predictable, processed feel the food has the more likely I am able to eat it, but alas, healthy food tends to be rough, tangy, contain all sorts of surprises and all that and I just can't stomach it. I just don't know how to make healthy food that tastes *and* feels good.

Indeed you do. One you should really genuinely seek professional help for. Because you have by your description got a food phobia. Quite common in kids with parents who never made them sit down and finish their dinner, including the nutritious yucky bits, or parents who didn't do much cooking.

Trust me.. your concept of what tastes good or bad is not what it should be. But it can be fixed. Not by forcing yourself to eat normal food, or refusing to eat with others. It's a complicated, and often deeply hidden psychological root that must be dealt with properly. Because there is more than being a fussy eater going on here.
And loading up on vitamin pills is not good either.

Food has texture. Food has variations in size, shape, density. It is supposed to. It's made of different substances. And the more processed it is. the less point there is in eating it.
The stuff you are eating now is tasteless featureless slop. Not opinion.. Fact. That you find real food so distasteful proves it.

Good food tastes bad to you because it actually has flavour. Chicken tastes different to a chunk of potato. But your palette is still stuck in childhood. Go to your doctor and get a referral to someone who can help. This isn't a curious quirk, this is a serious medical and psychological problem.

Re:There's another treatment that stops most T2 (1)

Gaygirlie (1657131) | about 3 months ago | (#47480525)

Because you have by your description got a food phobia.

You're jumping to conclusions. Oversensitivity of mouth and throat is one of the symptoms that some people with Asperger's and it's possible that that's the reason for my issues.

And loading up on vitamin pills is not good either.

Vitamin pills? Why do you assume I'd be using such crap?

The stuff you are eating now is tasteless featureless slop. Not opinion.. Fact.

Yes, because you know what I eat, right? Go on, make a guess. I want to see how close you get.

Re:There's another treatment that stops most T2 (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47480537)

You have some funny preferences in food. Are you a baby?

Re:There's another treatment that stops most T2 (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47480689)

Well, I have a problem with how food feels in my mouth and going down, the texture of it matters a lot. The more consistent, predictable, processed feel the food has the more likely I am able to eat it, but alas, healthy food tends to be rough, tangy, contain all sorts of surprises and all that and I just can't stomach it. I just don't know how to make healthy food that tastes *and* feels good.

Sounds like you need professional psychological help - this sounds close to food phobia.

Re:There's another treatment that stops most T2 (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47480313)

Good for you! [youtube.com]

Re:There's another treatment that stops most T2 (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47480325)

Fresh fruits taste like shit? Boiled chicken, steamed veggies and curry rice taste like shit? Pan-fried seasoned steak and pasta tastes like shit? Multigrain bread, sliced turkey, colby jack cheese, lettuce and tomato tastes like shit? Oats stirred with sliced banana, raisins, greek yogurt and vanilla for breakfast tastes like shit? You might want to take your tongue in to the dealer and have it recalibrated.

After a while you'll find it's the fast food with chemically thickened glop that makes you feel ill, sends you into an afternoon coma, then you wake up not sure whether to lay there or puke for 3 hours (Ugh... never again...) is what really tastes like shit.

Re:There's another treatment that stops most T2 (1)

Gaygirlie (1657131) | about 3 months ago | (#47480351)

Fresh fruits taste like shit?

Yes.

steamed veggies.

Yes.

Multigrain bread

Yes.

colby jack cheese, lettuce and tomato tastes like shit? Oats stirred with sliced banana, raisins, greek yogurt and vanilla for breakfast tastes like shit?

Yes to all of those.

You might want to take your tongue in to the dealer and have it recalibrated.

If only I could! If it was possible I'd go and do it immediately :)

Re:There's another treatment that stops most T2 (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47480423)

If only I could! If it was possible I'd go and do it immediately :)

Actually, it is! Just do what I did and quit eating sugary foods. Eventually your taste buds will recalibrate themselves, and fresh fruit will start tasting good. Even vegetables aren't too bad with a good salad dressing or dip. It's more or less impossible to completely eliminate sugar from your diet because it's in so many things, but if you at least avoid things that taste noticeably sweet, your taste should completely adjust in 3-6 months. But you have to be religious about it. Even eating a sugary dessert as often as once a week can sabotage the effect. As an added bonus, you can still eat some pretty unhealthy foods (foods high in fat), and you will probably lose weight anyway. That's because the insulin resistance that you develop from eating all those sugary things predisposes your body to putting on more weight from the food you eat than it normally would. When it starts to correct itself, with a little exercise the pounds will melt off pretty quickly.

colby jack cheese (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47480585)

That, along with all the other cheeses commercially available in the US tastes like rubber, if it has any taste at all.

Re:colby jack cheese (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47481057)

I always compare it to slices of plastic, which is exactly what it looks and tastes like.

Re:There's another treatment that stops most T2 (2)

Rosco P. Coltrane (209368) | about 3 months ago | (#47480375)

Too bad healthy food tastes and/or feels like shit and excercise is frustrating, wholly unpleasant and time-consuming :/

Yet those of use who exercise and eat healthy seem to lead a happier life. With so much frustration and time wasting, it's a strange thing isn't it?

Maybe you should give it a go some day. You might end up liking your veggies and feeling good exercising...

Re:There's another treatment that stops most T2 (3, Insightful)

Gaygirlie (1657131) | about 3 months ago | (#47480421)

Yet those of use who exercise and eat healthy seem to lead a happier life. With so much frustration and time wasting, it's a strange thing isn't it?

Not really. It's selection bias; those who do it tend to also like doing it, so of course they'll also be happy to continue with it. Those who don't like it tend not to do it. It's like asking people who enjoy chocolate if they're happy when they're eating chocolate.

Re:There's another treatment that stops most T2 (2, Interesting)

Rosco P. Coltrane (209368) | about 3 months ago | (#47480509)

What I meant was, you can train yourself to like healthy foods, to the point of craving them. Me, just eating one small burger from McDonald's makes me sick now.

As for exercising, it make you feel good. It really does. It's a real buzz after an mere half hour of cycling or swimming.

And then, in the grand scheme of things, when your health is good, you generally feel good too.

Staying healthy makes you feel good, but it does so in the medium to long run, and it takes a bit of effort to get going. Chocolate provides immediate, short-term and effortless pleasure. But it's not good for you. Don't you think it's worth investing a little effort for a few months to train yourself to enjoy a healthy lifestyle, so that you can feel good all the time afterward?

Re:There's another treatment that stops most T2 (3, Insightful)

Gaygirlie (1657131) | about 3 months ago | (#47480557)

What I meant was, you can train yourself to like healthy foods, to the point of craving them. Me, just eating one small burger from McDonald's makes me sick now.

That could be, or it could not be. I don't know. I would need to solve the food texture - issue first and I don't know how. Most what people offer me is "stuff it all in the blender and make it all the same, messy goop." -- doesn't sound like much of anything worth eating.

As for exercising, it make you feel good. It really does. It's a real buzz after an mere half hour of cycling or swimming.

Now you're trying to assert your own feelings and tastes as facts. I do not get any sort of "buzz" after excercise, I do not feel good about it, it just makes me cranky. I have tried in the past, I was once in quite good shape. I just couldn't keep it up because it was a major hassle, unpleasant and being cranky and tired was the opposite of what I wanted to feel like. All of you people who actually enjoy excercise always do the same thing where you assert that it's totally impossible not to like excercising and that everyone, EVERYONE, will feel the same as you about it.

Re:There's another treatment that stops most T2 (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47480643)

As for exercising, it make you feel good. It really does. It's a real buzz after an mere half hour of cycling or swimming.

Now you're trying to assert your own feelings and tastes as facts. I do not get any sort of "buzz" after excercise, I do not feel good about it, it just makes me cranky. I have tried in the past, I was once in quite good shape. I just couldn't keep it up because it was a major hassle, unpleasant and being cranky and tired was the opposite of what I wanted to feel like. All of you people who actually enjoy excercise always do the same thing where you assert that it's totally impossible not to like excercising and that everyone, EVERYONE, will feel the same as you about it.

QFT. I have given exercise a fair chance several times in my life, to include a year where I was doing strenuous exercise for ~3 sessions/week for 60+ minutes at a time. I even felt the "rush" of endorphins at the end of some of the sessions.

Seriously, these people act like exercise is better than sex.

Exercise nothing but a monotonous, uncomfortable thing you do in order to, i don't know, "be responsible and mature". You know, the kind of unpleasant shit that builds character while concurrently shackling your mind in boredom. Exercise never got to be enjoyable and it was never something I looked forward to. Even at its best moments (the vaunted "runner's high"), it was far less enjoyable than smoking even a single cigarette. I kept waiting for some kind of epiphany where I would hit an inflection point/get over a hump/whatever and start to enjoy it, but it never happened.

I mean, when you think about it, someone probably has to be at least slightly mentally aberrant to enjoy the drudgery and discomfort of exercise as well as the lack of mental stimulus.

Re: There's another treatment that stops most T2 (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47480977)

that's because enforced exercise in a special purpose exercise room is unnatural. Try cycling or walking to and from your work, and try standing up at work for a significant portion of the day.

Re:There's another treatment that stops most T2 (1)

Maxo-Texas (864189) | about 3 months ago | (#47480703)

Spot on. People ignore selection bias too often.

Or maybe.... I am just more aware of people who ignore selection bias!

Re:There's another treatment that stops most T2 (4, Interesting)

Jesrad (716567) | about 3 months ago | (#47480559)

Oh so wrong. Healthy food is also fabulously tasty. Too bad most people have no idea what food actually is healthy and which ain't so much.

Through my college years of pizza, pasta, candy, couscous, cereal muesli and homemade fruit juices I ended up obese and prediabetic in 2007. I lost the extra weight and reversed the diabetic symptoms (fasting glycemia and Hb1ac back to normal) on zero exercise and a diet of roasted fatty duck filets (with the skin braised crispy), salmon sashimi, lamb/veal casserole, chicken massala and lots of greens bathing in molten butter.

There is a big personal investment required though: you must learn to cook.

Re:There's another treatment that stops most T2 (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47480821)

Too bad healthy food tastes and/or feels like shit

Not true. Food can be healthy, tasty or affordable but you can only pick two.

Re:There's another treatment that stops most T2 (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47480847)

Considering all ghosts ever say is "Boooo" i'm guessing that being dead tastes and/or feels like shit and they have no choice.

Re:There's another treatment that stops most T2 (5, Informative)

ArmoredDragon (3450605) | about 3 months ago | (#47480227)

Sorry but what you say here is a load of crap. Actually no I'm not sorry, it's just a load of crap said by somebody who doesn't know shit about the condition and just wants to find any old reason to attack their eating habits.

Insulin resistance doesn't magically get cured by eating right and exercising. Yes, you can much better manage the symptoms that way, but ultimately they don't go away. At the end of the day you still have to watch your glycemic load, which doesn't necessarily come from sugary foods. In fact several vegetables can cause hyperglycemia in diabetics. Pretty much the only way to avoid that in most cases is to eat so little that you aren't meeting your daily caloric needs, which means you'd need to starve yourself to death in order to avoid taking insulin.

I don't have diabetes, but I've been way overweight (at one point I weighed 290 pounds) and all of the blood tests I took indicated I was nowhere near being diabetic even at THAT time. Yet many other people who have a much lower BMI than I do even right now (I currently weigh 215) and are even younger than I am have type 2 diabetes. The added weight just makes it that much harder for your body to meet its own insulin needs, so losing weight can help manage the symptoms (and in certain cases eliminate them until your later years in life,) but it will never cure it.

Re:There's another treatment that stops most T2 (2)

Gaygirlie (1657131) | about 3 months ago | (#47480241)

I don't have diabetes, but I've been way overweight (at one point I weighed 290 pounds) and all of the blood tests I took indicated I was nowhere near being diabetic even at THAT time. Yet many other people who have a much lower BMI than I do even right now (I currently weigh 215) and are even younger than I am have type 2 diabetes.

I'm at least partially in the same boat. I'm frighteningly obese, but I haven't been even close to having any problems with blood sugar and there's no indication of me developing diabetes in any nearby future. Surprisingly, I also have very low blood cholesterol levels -- many physically fit people with healthy eating habits have several times higher levels. That just goes to show that being overweight doesn't automatically mean diabetic and greasy veins.

Re:There's another treatment that stops most T2 (3, Interesting)

ArmoredDragon (3450605) | about 3 months ago | (#47480367)

Surprisingly, I also have very low blood cholesterol levels -- many physically fit people with healthy eating habits have several times higher levels.

Yeah; your cholesterol levels are controlled by your liver. GGP comes off to me as being a dietary fanatic, the likes of which I've seen all too often, and they're kind of annoying because they play armchair general about what everybody shall and shall not eat, meanwhile their knowledge of biology and chemistry tends to be really bad, just like GGP's appears to be (or at least, a very VERY bad understanding of what diabetes is.) I remember one dietary fanatic telling me how his cholesterol was high, so he decided to become a vegetarian. I don't know whether or not he solved that problem, but if he did the vegetarian diet had very little to do with it, but he's just going on being smug anyways. (In fact the Harvard Study vegetarians frequently cite about read meat being "bad" doesn't actually suggest this, instead it shows a link between people with uncontrolled diets and various diseases...but interestingly it also suggests a link between vegetarian diets and high cholesterol, which they never acknowledge.)

In fact, in recent years we've found that dietary cholesterol has very little impact on blood cholesterol, and may even have no impact at all. What we have found to influence it is saturated fats; less of them will reduce your blood cholesterol. More unsaturated fats will also reduce it (i.e. omega-3.) Exercise also effects it. However dietary changes and exercise have been only found to reduce blood cholesterol by about 30% in the best case scenarios. Beyond that, statin therapy is very effective. People who claim to be "naturalists" (ironically none of them can seem to even agree what the word "natural" means) often tell me how I shouldn't be taking these pills, but I take lovastatin and as a result my cholesterol levels are well within normal range whereas before that and my triglycerides were really high (typically tryglicerides are high when you take in too many calories, which given I am losing weight rather quickly rather quickly, that simply can't be the case; the liver doing something it isn't supposed to be doing however would explain it perfectly.) No side effects either.

GGP types also tend to be those anti-GMO, pro organic extremists, which are even more annoying because at the end of the day there is zero conclusive evidence against GMO, and zero evidence that suggests organic is in any way better than anything else (but it certainly costs more!)

Anywho, being overweight in general isn't a good thing, but if you don't have hypertension and some of the other issues that go along with it, you aren't really in danger of anything bad happening any time soon. The main reason I had to lose weight was due to reduced renal function, which was caused by another unrelated problem related to the immune system (specifically, IGAn, which nobody has ever been able to identify the cause of, and it isn't any more prevalent in overweight people than anybody else.) However reduced weight means reduced body mass, which means reduced need for filtration.

Re:There's another treatment that stops most T2 (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47480405)

One thing I can caution you about, as a med student, is to question where the guidelines for the "correct" cholesterol came from. Hint: it's probably an echo chamber, and not tied to scientific evidence.

Take a look at the trend regarding blood pressure/hypertension definitions over the decades. It was all expert opinion based and kept ratcheting down with each report from the JNC. Then JNC 8 came along and said they were going to release guidelines derived purely from the science, using predefined criteria meta analysis of randomized controlled trials. Guess what? They said the previous hypertension definitions were wrong. That fits, too, because you hear about elderly patients on blood pressure medication who are feeling faint when they stand up... by are still in "hypertension" according to the experts echo chamber definitions. I mean, obviously they aren't, if their blood pressure is causing orthostatic hypotension.

Anyway, what I'm saying is not that statins are bad, but merely to question what your goal cholesterol really should be. Your brain has a lot of cholesterol (myelin is high in cholesterol) and cholesterol modulates your cell wall plasticity. Too low would be bad.

Re:There's another treatment that stops most T2 (2)

MrBingoBoingo (3481277) | about 3 months ago | (#47480523)

"Yeah; your cholesterol levels are controlled by your liver." Very much this. I am chubby pack a day smoker while also being sedentary and drinking ~400 ml plus of hard liquor a day. My cholersterol is great though. Ninetieth percentile on LDL's and low HDL and VHDL cholesterol. It is a situation where people don't get to roll their own dice as much as the shills would have them imagine so.

Re:There's another treatment that stops most T2 (1)

Jesrad (716567) | about 3 months ago | (#47480579)

Careful here, a low cholesterol level is associated with high CHD risk. The ~15% of people with the lowest total cholesterol (165 mg / L IIRC) account for ~40% of the heart attack deaths, that's quite an over-representation.

Re:There's another treatment that stops most T2 (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47480327)

""However, the cure only lasts 2 days at a time. Future research and human trials are needed to better understand and create a working drug.""

""Insulin resistance doesn't magically get cured by eating right and exercising.""

SO you dont find it upsetting that drug companies and "researchers" aren't trying to find a cure, instead the quote from the article ""However, the cure only lasts 2 days at a time. Future research and human trials are needed to better understand and create a working drug."" notice DRUG not CURE in that statement. I seriously doubt they will ever cure anything that isn't an immediate danger to peoples lives. Yes Diabetes is an eminent threat to those that have it, but since drug companies can make billions of dollars off of people with Diabetes they will continue to do just that.

And that's the problem.....

Re:There's another treatment that stops most T2 (3, Interesting)

ArmoredDragon (3450605) | about 3 months ago | (#47480393)

No, that's not the problem. Only a half-wit conspiracy theorist dumbass would think they aren't trying to find a cure. The fact that they got here alone speaks volumes about just how badly they want one. What they've discovered is groundbreaking. They didn't choose for diabetes to exist. They also didn't choose for this treatment to only last two days, rather that's just an unfortunate downside of it. If you think it's so damned easy to find a cure, go publish your own damn paper.

Not everybody is involved in a conspiracy to deprive you of your wallet. The fact that you see it that way is entirely your choice to do so, and is probably the reason you feel like shit every day and think everybody is out to make your life suck. If you really hate civilization that bad, go live in a tree, shit in the woods, get a tropical disease, and see just how much better life is without all of the evil drug companies ruining it for you.

Re:There's another treatment that stops most T2 (1, Insightful)

Dr_Barnowl (709838) | about 3 months ago | (#47480785)

Only a half-wit conspiracy theorist dumbass would think they aren't trying to find a cure.

I think this is one case where conspiracy theory is basically the truth. Big pharma has created one of the most systematic systems of scientific fraud on the planet - running multiple studies and carefully cherry picking only those that happen to produce positive results to promote their new drugs, over the old ones with expired patents being just one of the tricks they use. If you want to see an excellent discussion of it from a statistical epidemiologist, read Bad Pharma [amazon.co.uk] by Ben Goldacre.

In some cases, the new drugs have actually been proven to be worse than nothing at all later on, a fact that the drug companies almost certainly knew when they released them onto the market.

Believing that a company that is ostensibly devoted to improving the lives of people, but actually engages in this crap, just to make a buck, would deliberately withhold a cure for something in order to continue selling a repeat treatment? All too easy.

Re:There's another treatment that stops most T2 (3, Insightful)

mark-t (151149) | about 3 months ago | (#47480521)

If you don't think something that can last a whole 2 freaking days is a big deal because they have to keep doing it, I suggest asking someone who has to poke themselves with a needlle 4 or 5 times a day what they think.

Re:There's another treatment that stops most T2 (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47480611)

There are a bunch of raw vegan folks claiming that diet can cure type II diabetes, especially the 80/10/10 people :
http://www.rawsomehealthy.com/heal-type-2-diabetes/

It's probably true that dietary changes, especially eating like a chimp, can cure some type II diabetes cases, but not all. In fact, I've commonly heard a rumor that artificial sweeteners impact insulin somehow, so they alone might by the straw that breaks the camels back, although the simplistic version of this story is false : http://www.marksdailyapple.com/artificial-sweeteners-insulin/

Re:There's another treatment that stops most T2 (1)

satuon (1822492) | about 3 months ago | (#47481031)

Insulin resistance doesn't magically get cured by eating right and exercising.

That's true, eating right and exercising prevent you from getting it in the first place. But once you've gotten it, they can't undo it, it's too late by then.

Re:There's another treatment that stops most T2 (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47480229)

Fuck you. I bench 285, run 6:25 mile, have 11% body fat, and have been a Type II diabetic since I was 9. Fuck you for shaming people with metabolic disorder.

Re:There's another treatment that stops most T2 (2)

Nefarious Wheel (628136) | about 3 months ago | (#47480273)

I'm pretty fit myself, not particularly overweight, an avid motorcyclist (light exercise for many hours at a time) and I'm good with the foods. I'm in my 60's, too. I have Type II. The symptoms can be managed, but I don't particularly enjoy the method. And shaming people for conditions they can't help is not what kind people do.

If they come up with something better than Metaformin, I'm in.

Re:There's another treatment that stops most T2 (2)

Artifakt (700173) | about 3 months ago | (#47480547)

Thank you. I stopped just saying "Fuck you" to the idiots who want to bash diabetics, because it seems to turn the few who aren't just looking to boost their own egos off to learning, and I want to reach every one that can be reached, but I'm in fundamental agreement. I didn't start having symptoms until my early forties, and am nearly 60 now, but I think I understand (see my post above if you want).
          You see something from someone on the internet who doesn't have the genes for Type 2, and it turns out does less than a quarter of the physical workout you do in their day to day life, (if that), gets away in the short run with eating what you simply, just, can't, has no clue that what he's doing will kill him with a stroke at 48 (because some genetic conditions don't give as many warning shots as others), and is, at 35, already seeing the negative effect on his love life but also has no clue it started with that little bit of weight he thinks he is getting by with, because he obviously isn't as lazy as you, since he doesn't have Type 2 diabetes. And that someone lectures people like you about how lazy you are and if you'd just do like him, you could beat this "disease" (which he puts in quotes, like that). And they won't let you shove him through a wood chipper! It's not fair at all.
          But we (and I mean specific, real, You and Me, not some generalized group) need to get as many of those idiots as possible to wake up, learn this is a real disease, and support finding a real cure. I know they deserve the "Fuck You" ,but we, and plenty of people, who are threatened with dying an average of a decade early, with such conditions as gangrene after limb amputations, or extreme hypertension, deserve that effort to find a cure more. Please save the 'fuck you's' for the idiots who can't learn or have no money.

Re:There's another treatment that stops most T2 (-1)

Spy Handler (822350) | about 3 months ago | (#47481001)

It's great that you bench 285. However you conveniently neglected to mention how much you weigh and how many umpteen thousands of calories you stuff in your face every day.

Re:There's another treatment that stops most T2 (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47481015)

With 11% bodyfat, I'd say he's active enough to spend those calories. Shit, the muscle mass alone helps keep his metabolic rate higher than normal.

Re:There's another treatment that stops most T2 (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47480231)

Actually, it prevents MOST instances of Type II BEFORE you end up with a broken endocrine system. Once you pass a certain threshold, however, you're broken, and diet and exercise can help you not need meds, but you're STILL a Type II Diabetic.

This appears to undo part of the damage done- which is a step in the right direction.

Re:There's another treatment that stops most T2 (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47480369)

And why would I take advice from someone as clearly ignorant as you are?

I'd bother to tell you what you're ignorant in, but it's clear you've chosen to be so.

Re:There's another treatment that stops most T2 (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47480661)

LOL you're a fucking wally.

Re:There's another treatment that stops most T2 (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47480413)

Type II diabetes has a very, very strong genetic component. I've seen plenty of active people of normal body habitus with it.

Re: There's another treatment that stops most T2 (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47480471)

Let's not forget that many foods today contain high processed corn syrup - we have to address this aspect of food production too

Re:There's another treatment that stops most T2 (3, Informative)

Jesrad (716567) | about 3 months ago | (#47480597)

exercising and losing a significant amount of weight.

Nope. [nih.gov]

Re:There's another treatment that stops most T2 (1)

Maxo-Texas (864189) | about 3 months ago | (#47480639)

That's a good approach for many. However, for the 25% of men who suffer from low testosterone- it's not as effective. Just like women can get gestational diabetes, men can get diabetes from other causes (including low T) and all the dieting and vegetabling in the world won't help.

Likewise, if you come from certain racial backgrounds- the diet approach isn't nearly as effective.

However- a healthy diet is good for other things (heart disease for one- subject to the same limitations of course).

Healthy food doesn't have to taste bad. Herbs and other seasoning goes a long way as does using a variety of cooking methods. Roasting can produce delicious vegetables.

Re:There's another treatment that stops most T2 (2)

Jethro (14165) | about 3 months ago | (#47480757)

That's actually not a cure. It's a treatment, and it works, but it's not a cure.

I started doing that about 7 years ago. I was never obese, but I was overweight and I ate a lot (and I mean a LOT) of crap.

So, I stopped eating crap, and started getting a lot more exercise. I didn't lose any weight but I lost a whole lot of fat. My A1C last check was 6.1, and my glucose levels tend to be normal... but.

If I go eat a pizza right now, my blood sugar will still spike. It probably won't go a LOT above 200, but it will get there and stay there for a lot longer than a non-diabetic. Now my way of dealing with that is to never EVER eat anything with as many carbs in it as a pizza would have, and limit my carb intake to early in the day before I do the whole exercise thing.

I'm at the point where I've got it pretty much under control (much to the chagrin of my original doctor which I have since moved on from for obvious reasons) but I would love, love, LOVE a cure. Diabetes forced me to develop the tools and discipline to stay in shape, and I would likely still do that, but I do miss soo much good food.

wall-e (2)

nbritton (823086) | about 3 months ago | (#47480215)

Remember the movie wall-e? All those fat people on the ship, we're going to end up like them if we don't tackle the root problem. A cure for type II diabetes is great and all, but it does nothing to solve the root problem(s).

Re:wall-e (0, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47480255)

And, what do you suppose is the root problem(s).

Lack of exercise? Not even remotely close.
Too many carbs? Close, but no cigar- but you're getting warmer.
Too many of the wrong kind of carbs? Hey, might be onto something.
Entirely too much FREE Fructose in your diet? Hey, there's one of those root causes!

To be sure, there's a bunch more, but no matter how much exercise you have, if you drink a soda, it has the impact of drinking 1-2 beers without the booze on your liver and causes you to be fatter regardless of your activity because Fructose is processed SOLELY by your liver and nothing else. That can of soda will cause your blood sugar to spike, the insulin to jump repeatedly because your pancreas doesn't distinguish between Fructose and Glucose, and it'll just sit there until your liver processes it all. Eventually, the fat and the insulin spikes take their toll and your endocrine system's busted all to hell in a manner they're apparently just NOW figuring out (Hence the article)- you just became a Type II Diabetic.

Once you're broken, though, you want to find a cure/remedy/fix- because being a Type II SUCKS. Esp. if you're allergic to Nutrapoison (which I am...).

Re:wall-e (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47480289)

You've forgotten something...

Genetic mutation / pee-disposition to be type 2 diabetic.

It's a bad gene that makes it so that your body doesn't produce the correct *something* - could be proteins, like this FGF1, or it could be a chemical messenger released by the pancreas, or some other totally unknown chemical compound that causes your body to become insulin resistant.

We just don't know all the facts.

People who get off thinking they know, spewing drivel to trample over those of us with the predisposition, are poor excuses for human beings.

Re:wall-e (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47480319)

Everybody is allergic to the toxic substances known as artificial sweeteners.

Everyone that ingests foods with these face severe health problems down the road.

Nutrasweet - chlorinated sugar - 300 times sweeter than table sugar, increases insulin resistance and damages mitochondria when the chlorine breaks down in the blood stream. Also, many people are allergic to the chlorine levels in it.

Aspartame / Sacharin - both of these sweeteners damage genetic material leading to Altzheimers and Parkinson's disease, as well as several forms of cancer.

Hell, even the preservatives used in sodas lead to problems.

Mt. Dew - one of my favorite drinks as a kid, contains Sodium Benzoate as a preservative.
Guess what? Sodium Benzoate, when mixed with citric acid, causes genetic mutation - it's a known and listed carcinogenic compound.
What's one of the main ingredients to Mt. Dew? Orange Juice... Right there, Pepsi Co. is mixing up a cancer causing agent and bottling it under the name Mt. Dew. They know it causes cancer, yet they do nothing to stop producing it.

Just remove the preservative, shorten the shelf-life, and boom - healthier than the current formula.

Real sugar is made up of glucose, while high-fructose corn syrup has no or very low glucose content.
This sweetener (high fructose corn syrup) is one of the evils that leads to being type II.
  If Pepsi Co. would use real sugar for the non-diet version, or tagatose (left-chondrite sugar) for a diet version, and they would have a soda that wouldn't be so bad, especially after removing the Sodium Benzoate (or Potassium Benzoate).

   

Re:wall-e (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47480339)

Forgot to mention that aspartame breaks down into Formaldehyde once it gets above 7x degrees Fahrenheit, enjoy embalming yourself as you drink your diet pepsi and diet coke.

These drinks also increase your appetite. How many super-heavy weights do you see drinking a large diet-drink with their mega-sized fast food meal? You get the idea.

Re:wall-e (1)

paintswithcolour (929954) | about 3 months ago | (#47480435)

If you're worried about formaldehyde production in your body then you'd better give up eating a lot of food.

I think drinks companies must actually love aspartame. It's basically been arbitrarily chosen to be the focus of wide-spread (and still as of yet largely unproven) hysteria. It the perfect distraction, while they get to pump the drinks with as much sugar as they like.

Re:wall-e (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47480341)

Stop bullshitting. Type 2 diabetes has 1 root cause - sedentary lifestyle resulting in fat, unfit (yes, those are 2 different things) individuals with Type 2 diabetes. * An overweight person has significantly lower chance of type 2 diabetes if they are not sedentary. And no, that does not mean "walking around the block". If you can't run a 10 minute mile, you are unfit.

fatter regardless of your activity

No, that is impossible. If you have enough activity, it is impossible for you to be fat. You can blame things on "other things", like obesogens (mostly plastics), and fructose (guess what - don't eat it!), but the bottom line is obesity is caused by eating too much. If you sit on a couch, and while watching TV you need to eat something, that will make you fat because you eat out of habit. Fix your habits!

* http://www.who.int/diabetes/fa... [who.int]

The number of people with diabetes is increasing due to population growth, aging, urbanization, and increasing prevalence of obesity and physical inactivity.

Re:wall-e (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47480431)

You didn't even read wikipedia:

"The development of type 2 diabetes is caused by a combination of lifestyle and genetic factors. While some of these factors are under personal control, such as diet and obesity, other factors are not, such as increasing age, female gender, and genetics"

Re:wall-e (1)

GigaplexNZ (1233886) | about 3 months ago | (#47480619)

If you can't run a 10 minute mile, you are unfit.

You do realise it's possible to be a fit paraplegic, right?

Old wives tale (1)

Okian Warrior (537106) | about 3 months ago | (#47480317)

Remember the movie wall-e? All those fat people on the ship, we're going to end up like them if we don't tackle the root problem. A cure for type II diabetes is great and all, but it does nothing to solve the root problem(s).

This is an echo-chamber response: someone on the internet heard something, and keeps repeating it. It's rooted in emotional superiority, and comes from someone with no background in scientific research or statistics.

All attempts to pin obesity on the "that sounds about right" reasons have failed, including exercise and food intake - for both amounts and types of food.

In particular, lab animals grown today are fatter than the ones grown decades ago, despite having the same (and well-documented) diets and exercise. (Source. [discovery.com] ) Same with pets.

Current opinion holds that there is something in the environment that causes obesity - some agent that wasn't pervasive a couple of decades ago. Over 700 possible causes have been suggested, including your favorite bugaboo (whatever that is). We're slowly going through the options looking for the cause.

No diet will work, even that great "miracle cure" you heard about on Oprah. Lack of exercise doesn't cause it. Diets and exercise regimes work for *some* people because in changing their behaviour they eliminate the causal factor inadvertently - without knowing what it is. It wasn't the diet and it wasn't the exercise.

Try to keep current with scientific theory, otherwise we'll be repeating these old wives tales forever.

Evolution (1)

Bruce Perens (3872) | about 3 months ago | (#47480445)

For most of the existence of mankind and indeed all of mankind's progenitors, having too much food was a rare problem and being hungry all of the time was a fact of life. We are not necessarily well-evolved to handle it. So, no surprise that we eat to repletion and are still hungry. You don't really have any reason to look at it as an illness caused by anything other than too much food.

Re:Old wives tale (1)

ArmoredDragon (3450605) | about 3 months ago | (#47480457)

Environment definitely plays a role. Genes play directly into that, mainly as an adaptation to that environment. Is already well known that if you have relatives with diabetes (of any type) you are more likely to have it, but also statisticians found that Caucasians are least likely to have it, with Asian being higher than most, and Native American (who happen to be mongoloid, just like Asians) having by far the greatest chance of developing it.

And, as recent research turns out, diabetes isn't new to Native Americans. Furthermore, the high glycemic load foods they now eat make the symptoms stick out more, but this is mainly because their evolution centered around diets that had very low glycemic load to begin with (and are foods that Caucasians would more likely starve to death on because they don't provide sufficient caloric needs as our metabolic system isn't equipped to process them the same as natives do.)

http://www.livescience.com/218... [livescience.com]
http://www.sciencedaily.com/re... [sciencedaily.com]

At any rate, for GP's comments to be true, most diabetics would have to starve themselves to death long before they'd consume few enough sugars to not need insulin. Natives *could* be a different story, but remember that in many cases they literally did starve, and furthermore their metabolic system is more able to deal with that than ours.

Re:Old wives tale (1)

Maxo-Texas (864189) | about 3 months ago | (#47480719)

People show measurable levels of over a hundred chemical compounds (including rocket fuel) which they didn't have 50 years ago.

My bet is on psuedo estrogens given the symptoms.

Re:Old wives tale (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47480947)

Yet some diets do seem to work, especially the ones that eliminate intra-organ fat in the pancreas and liver. They are drastic and dangerous and most people are not able to complete them, but they did reverse type 2 (although if there is already damage done, that can not be reversed). Have a look at the work of Roy Taylor, e.g. http://care.diabetesjournals.org/content/36/4/1047.full .

Re:wall-e (1)

slashmydots (2189826) | about 3 months ago | (#47480355)

Diabetes is mostly annoying and not commonly deadly. Heart disease is the number one killer according to some study somewhere. Murder, drugs, alcohol, HIV, starvation, and dehydration are all also the #1 killer worldwide according to more studies. But still, it's a higher number for heart disease.

Re:wall-e (1)

ArmoredDragon (3450605) | about 3 months ago | (#47480463)

No, that's very wrong. Prior to the 1920's, diabetes was a death sentence. Most diabetics are just so good at managing it that you aren't very aware of what they are going through. Diabetics frequently die from other diseases which were caused by diabetes, heart disease being one of them (also kidney disease, liver disease, and many many others.)

Re:wall-e (4, Interesting)

techno-vampire (666512) | about 3 months ago | (#47480675)

Diabetes is mostly annoying and not commonly deadly.

To quote the infamous Dr. Terwilliger, [wikipedia.org] "I, on the other hand, am inclined to doubt that statement." The most brilliant man I ever knew, Dan Alderson [wikipedia.org] was diabetic and didn't take care of himself. Two years before he was forced to retire for medical reasons, he lost his eyesight to diabetic neuropathy; he was only able to continue because I became his "seeing eye person" and helped him continue to program by dictation. Next, it caused his kidneys to fail so that he had to go on dialysis, forcing him to retire. About a year later, he lost a foot to an ulcer, largely caused by his diabetes. Within a year he was dead. Another friend was concerned about his blood sugar levels and made an appointment to have it checked; before the appointment came, he died of hyperglycemia. I developed Type II twelve years ago and since then have woken up in four different ERs. Diabetes can be, and often is a deadly metabolic disorder. Please learn what you're talking about before you comment on this subject again.

Cure? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47480249)

Is it really a "cure" if it only lasts 2 days?

Re:Cure? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47480287)

It works for 2 daty, perfect for a drug company as the patient is hooked for life
works so great for the patient

Re:Cure? (1)

rusty0101 (565565) | about 3 months ago | (#47480311)

The headline is sensationalist. A "cure" could be to find a way for the body to start producing whatever variation on this hormone they come up with to address the insulin resistance, and the insulin sensitivity on it's own, without additional pharmacology. I'm not expecting that to happen though.

Re:Cure? (3, Insightful)

ArmoredDragon (3450605) | about 3 months ago | (#47480473)

No, but if it removes insulin resistance even temporarily then it can improve the hell out of their lives and dramatically reduce morbidity. Even taking that treatment once a day would be much better than dealing with the constant finger pricks, injections, and constantly having to be careful about what you eat (and I'm not talking about sugary foods, which are obvious and easy to avoid, but rather the glycemic load in other foods that are very much not obvious.)

Re:Cure? (1)

GigaplexNZ (1233886) | about 3 months ago | (#47480627)

That just makes it an improved treatment. It's still not a cure.

FYI--Mayo clinic article on diabetes (2)

thorndt (814642) | about 3 months ago | (#47480347)

Just to level-set everybody.

http://www.mayoclinic.org/dise... [mayoclinic.org]

what a coincidence (1, Funny)

slashmydots (2189826) | about 3 months ago | (#47480349)

After hundreds of years, they come up with a "cure" that the patient takes for their entire life and like half a billion people need. I'm sure it's a complete coincidence that the pharmaceutical company never intended to happen *sneezes and takes another Zyrtec*

Re:what a coincidence (3, Informative)

mark-t (151149) | about 3 months ago | (#47480483)

One injection every 48 hours is one helluvalot better than having to jab yourself with a needle 4 or sometimes even 5 times in a single day.

Re:what a coincidence (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47480867)

One injection every 48 hours is one helluvalot better than having to jab yourself with a needle 4 or sometimes even 5 times in a single day.

Yeah, and it's a convenience you'll definitely be paying extra for. GP poster is right.

Tobacco smoke boosts FGF1 by 50% (2, Interesting)

Nightlight3 (248096) | about 3 months ago | (#47480359)

As always when a new miracle medicine is hailed in the media, I check the effects of the ancient medicinal plant, tobacco on the same biochemical mechanisms, and it didn't disappoint this time either -- as shown in this paper [wiley.com] (pdf), it boosts the same Fibroblast Growth Factor-1 by 50% (nicotine will do as well in this case).

Re:Tobacco smoke boosts FGF1 by 50% (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47480439)

No, it doesn't. It boosts FGF-2, which is implicated in preventing Parkinsons, but does dick-all for diabetics.

Re:Tobacco smoke boosts FGF1 by 50% (1)

Nightlight3 (248096) | about 3 months ago | (#47480475)

You didn't get beyond abstract apparently -- it boosts both growth factors, FGF-1 by 50%, FGF-2 by 100% (see Fig2, p.6 or here Fig2.jpg [flickr.com] ).

you fail It? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47480379)

windoWs, SRUN or [goat.cx]

I'll try it (1)

RubberDogBone (851604) | about 3 months ago | (#47480443)

As a T2 Diabetic for some number of years, I have tried just about every other treatment. Some work. Most don't The cheap ones don't anyway.

Very good news (1)

Alien1024 (1742918) | about 3 months ago | (#47480449)

Very good news. Extremely low calorie diets [theguardian.com] also look promising, worth a try.

Awesome. (1)

PC_THE_GREAT (893738) | about 3 months ago | (#47480517)

Extremely great news. Happy for many of my closed ones, i hope that this could lead to a potential solution to fix type 2 diabetes, i have a lot of familly members having this, despite regulating food intake and doing regular exercise. I just hope pharmaceuticals companies do not manipulate things to create a drug that one should be dependant on forever but instead create a one X number of dose fix it all thing :).

thank god! (1)

meeotch (524339) | about 3 months ago | (#47480747)

Finally, hope for the most vulnerable among us, the children!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?... [youtube.com]

Available food ... (1)

Thanatiel (445743) | about 3 months ago | (#47480779)

It's not only the lazyness or whatever you call it. It's also about what's available and how accessible it is.

I'm an European. I've made a trip to Canada & the U.S.A. a few week ago. (Mostly around Montreal and New York)
Everything was great and marvelous (the people are very nice, everything is huge and there are many cultural differences and things to see ...).

Except for ... the food. Too much on a plate and burnt, too greasy, too sweet, too salty. It mush wreak havoc with the taste buds.
"French" fries, fried with their skin ? Burnt, brown color like if they had been cooked in the same oil more than a couple of times ? Burned (black) meat but not cooked in the middle. Burned bread. Burned pizza.
Coffee that tastes like watered moka.
Pastries were so greasy I suspected them to be flammable and felt sick for a day after couple of them. (from Tim Horton, and to my surprise the food & service there is relatively better than Starbucks, at least in the few places I sampled it).
High-fructose-corn-syrup in many products (which makes you eat more by tricking your brain)

I had a few good meals too but it looked that to can only expect a good healthy dish from about $100 taxes and tip included (which I find quite expensive).

It's not difficult to make tasty AND healthy food. As long as you get fresh products (not OGM, not these mostly-water tomatos, ...).

Lazy: 150g brown rice, water, 200 vegetables, salt, olive oil. Steam-cook in an inox cooker (never any plastic) for 27 minutes (no need to watch) and voilÃf.
Less lazy: a bit of olive oil in a saucepan with a bit of oignons, cook them a bit (middle power), add peas, carrots, a bit of thym and a pinch of salt, cook and watch a few minutes, and eat that with a bit of fresh (home made?) bread. (I'm drooling.)
Bread (hand made) is very easy too.

There's a name for that (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47481065)

The name for something that makes symptoms go away for just a couple of days is "treatment," not "cure."

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