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Chromebooks Are Outselling iPads In Schools

Unknown Lamer posted about 3 months ago | from the keyboards-still-useful dept.

Education 225

Nate the greatest (2261802) writes Apple thrilled investors earlier this week when they revealed that they had sold 13 million iPads to schools and claimed 85% of the educational tablet market, but that wasn't the whole story. It turns out that Apple has only sold 5 million iPads to schools since February 2013, or an average of less than a million tablets a quarter over 6 quarters. It turns out that instead of buying iPads, schools are buying Chromebooks. Google reported that a million Chromebooks were sold to schools last quarter, well over half of the 1.8 million units sold in the second quarter. With Android tablets getting better, Apple is losing market share in the consumer tablet market, and now it looks Apple is also losing the educational market to Google. Analysts are predicting that 5 million Chromebooks will be sold by the end of the year; how many of those will be sold to schools, do you think?

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Papers (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47525851)

What are you gonna use for typing papers?

Just say'in.

Re:Papers (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47525923)

you can type on an ipad, it's just a big PITA to edit it

i'm almost done with a novel i'm going to indie publish and use google docs on my ipad and galaxy s3 to write on the subway and at work. but i need a real computer to do editing like move paragraphs around

Re:Papers (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47525951)

>

i'm almost done with a novel i'm going to indie publish and use google docs on my ipad and galaxy s3 to write on the subway and at work. but i need a real computer to do editing like move paragraphs around

Goddamn hipster!

That said, kudos for actually getting off your ass and writing!

Re:Papers (1)

MightyMartian (840721) | about 3 months ago | (#47526067)

Double kudos for writing it on touch screen devices. I do some Play-by-email roleplaying and at times I do posts on my Nexus 7, and man oh man it's difficult. I wouldn't even dream of doing long prose writing on a tablet.

Re:Papers (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47526195)

the ipad screens are pretty good and i have no problems writing hundreds of words on it
problem is editing. i'm at almost 50,000 words split into 24 different google docs files. a few days ago i moved thousands of words between documents to change the order of events in my story for better flow.

almost impossible to do on a tablet

Re: Papers (0, Troll)

ShieldW0lf (601553) | about 3 months ago | (#47526293)

You claim to be a writer. If you were legitimate, you wouldn't be posting anonymously, you'd be self promoting. I call bullshit.

Re: Papers (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47526509)

Right, he'd be posting pseudonymously because that's so much better.

Re:Papers (2, Interesting)

hairyfeet (841228) | about 3 months ago | (#47526887)

I think the $99 netbooks that are gonna be coming out this fall should just suck up these low end sales like a sponge. After all the new Atom and Jaguar chips are crazy powerful and at 8 inches it'll be just perfect for kids sticking into backpacks. i already have a dozen customers that have put off getting their kids a tablet to get one of these new netbooks and I have a feeling that without having the lowest cost these ChromeOS sales are gonna dry up, same goes for the low end tablets.

After all why would you buy a Chromebook that ONLY works on the net when you could have a netbook that runs all the apps a Chromebook can run AND run offline as well? Oh and the Linux guys should love 'em as both Intel and AMD have been pretty good about opening up the APUs so it should be a dirt cheap way to have a pocket Linux lappy.

Re:Papers (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47527059)

After all why would you buy a Chromebook that ONLY works on the net when you could have a netbook that runs all the apps a Chromebook can run AND run offline as well?

Operating costs.

Who cares? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47525893)

They're both terminals to the cloud mainframe. People who don't learn history...

Re: Who cares? (4, Informative)

cyber-vandal (148830) | about 3 months ago | (#47526219)

I hate to break it to you but web apps kickstarted the neo-mainframe movement because everyone having their own PC turned into an admin nightmare. Apple and Google have given the same thing to people who don't want to fight with their computer all the time.

Re: Who cares? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47526341)

I don't know that I'd say kickstarted. Maybe gimped would be a better term.

Yes. I was web apps who gimped the neo-mainframe movement because for certain types of simple apps it's nice to have it be accessible through a browser from wherever.

Re: Who cares? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47526701)

Vote for free iPads

Good (4, Interesting)

afidel (530433) | about 3 months ago | (#47525905)

That's probably a good thing since students shouldn't be static consumers of information and tablets are really subpar for most kinds of content creation. Add in the fact that a Chromebook costs half as much as even an ipad mini and overall the schools are probably making the rational choice.

Re:Good (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47526039)

Chromebooks cost less because the user is the product that's being sold. (to advertisers)

Re:Good (2, Informative)

afidel (530433) | about 3 months ago | (#47526071)

Except Google doesn't track apps for education users.

Re:Good (5, Informative)

recoiledsnake (879048) | about 3 months ago | (#47526223)

They used to track apps for education users, lied that they didn't track, got caught in federal court where they didn't have the cajones to tell the same lies to the judge that they were telling the public and only recently now say that they stopped.

Read these articles:

http://www.edweek.org/ew/artic... [edweek.org]

http://blogs.edweek.org/edweek... [edweek.org]

Re:Good (3, Insightful)

geekoid (135745) | about 3 months ago | (#47526309)

Wow, that's much ado about nothing.

Re:Good (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47526403)

Typical fanfag behavior. Keep sucking that Google dick.

Re:Good (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47526849)

cajones? They didn't have big boxes?

Re:Good (3, Interesting)

mystikkman (1487801) | about 3 months ago | (#47526107)

Content creation? You mean only English essays, right? Can the students even install and use a proper compiler or something like AutoCAD? Photoshop?

A heavily DRM'ed up "laptop" that no one can do anything except be forced to Google cloudservices to even login and a browser is a rational choice now? Not to mention Google Apps and email which helpfully uploads everything to the Google Cloud.

It pulls Palladium to shame since you can't install any apps except those provided by the Google overlords.

This proves that all the Slashdot talk about software freedom is thinly disguised Microsoft hate since everyone here seems to be pumping up heavily locked down iDevices and Chromebooks.

Re:Good (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47526159)

If they wanted to, it is trivial to put Linux on most Chromebook models, where they could install a vast array of software. They could dual boot them or run crouton on them and be able to launch Linux from inside of ChromeOS.

In addition to that, 95% of what grade school kids are doing are English essays, history research projects, etc. which mostly consist of web research, typing and maybe a spreadsheet at most. I'm sure for art class, they still have Macs or PCs with Photoshop or some version of CAD, but for general purpose devices, Chromebooks can be great, especially when they are being compared to an iPad

Re:Good (1)

recoiledsnake (879048) | about 3 months ago | (#47526191)

It isn't exactly trivial, you have to essentially unlock it and then click through an annoying prompt on every single boot. Even a PC with Secure Boot has better support for Linux than that.

>but for general purpose devices, Chromebooks can be great, especially when they are being compared to an iPad

How are they better than an iPad with a proper hardware keyboard? And it's a bastardization of the term 'general purpose' when it's locked down to run only Google's native's app and everything has to be done in the browser.

Re:Good (3, Informative)

statemachine (840641) | about 3 months ago | (#47526563)

Not only that, jailbreaking the device and installing anything else besides school-approved software would likely get the child disciplined. This is true of both iPad and Chromebook.

Re:Good (0)

Wdomburg (141264) | about 3 months ago | (#47527053)

Less than half the price. When buying tens or hundreds of thousands of units, the savings add up.

And applications targeting the platform have the expectation of a keyboard and pointing device, unlike iOS apps.

There are limitations, but that does not mean it is unsuitable to all markets. And those limitations become less important as applications increasingly move to the web.

Re:Good (1)

afidel (530433) | about 3 months ago | (#47526207)

You don't have to login to use a Chromebook, you can browse as a guest. As to your comment about compilers, MS offers Visual Studio Online Basic for free.

Re:Good (1)

chris_mahan (256577) | about 3 months ago | (#47526549)

Chromebooks have to be online to work, so remote into a debian/ubuntu vps and do your stuff there. SSH client app on chromebooks works great.

Re:Good (1)

Archangel Michael (180766) | about 3 months ago | (#47526553)

Because Every Student Needs AutoCAD and Photoshop!

Well that and yes, you can do Photoshop and AutoCAD on Chrombooks, via VDI infrastructure like VMWare View Desktops, like we are. It isn't as nice as $1500 specialized workstations and 22" monitors but it works in a pinch (and at home). So, you have VDI for remote work, a Lab full or real Computers for classwork, and not spend a shit ton of money on laptops that are used 85% of the time as IM and Typing stations.

Spending money is easy when it isn't yours.

Re:Good (2)

Threni (635302) | about 3 months ago | (#47526555)

>This proves that all the Slashdot talk about software freedom is thinly disguised
>Microsoft hate since everyone here seems to be pumping up heavily locked down
>iDevices and Chromebooks.

Many people - especially Slashdot readers - don't use Microsoft products unless, perhaps, they'd paid to use it at work (either as end users or developers). They're just not relevant to a discussion about tablets (they don't make any that have any impact on the market) or Chromebooks (which are usable in seconds, are free from the `you've moved your mouse - better restart your pc, oh, and don't forget to install todays set of patches for Windows and Java` crap to which Windows users subject themselves).

Chromebooks beat tablet hand's down because it's possible to do anything on a bloody tablet except surf or watch netflix. Students might want to..you know...type something in?

Re:Good (1)

Graymalkin (13732) | about 3 months ago | (#47527397)

If only tablets had on-screen keyboards or supported Bluetooth keyboards or keyboard docks! Those poor students with tablets! They're unable to do anything but watch Netflix!

This sort of commentary just sounds stupid. Even if you want to make a point that tablets don't have good native input solutions don't go full hyperbole. All you're doing is reducing the impact of the point you're trying to make.

In the real non-hyperbolic world tablets are perfectly capable of being typed upon. I would even suggest tablets (especially higher end ones like iPads, Nexuses, and Galaxy Notes) can be more capable than laptops in some situations when given to students.

It's entirely possible for a kid and with iPad to produce their own podcast or video presentation for a class. They've got an audio recorder, video camera, and still camera in their hands. There's also plenty of apps that let them splice all of that together into something coherent and interesting. They can also use that same device to type up a more traditional report.

The idea of kids putting together multimedia presentations has been around for a long time but the technology to do so has really sucked. It's either been overly complicated or vastly underpowered. There's room for both traditional written reports as well as multimedia projects. Having devices that can handle all of them is a good investment.

Re:Good (4, Interesting)

exomondo (1725132) | about 3 months ago | (#47526661)

Content creation? You mean only English essays, right? Can the students even install and use a proper compiler or something like AutoCAD? Photoshop?

Well you can develop webapps, there's IDEs like Codenvy and there is a version of AutoCAD 360 for Chromebooks.

A heavily DRM'ed up "laptop" that no one can do anything except be forced to Google cloudservices to even login and a browser is a rational choice now?

It isn't particularly "DRMed", there's nothing to stop you dual booting a full Linux distro if you want. But really if you're talking AutoCAD and Photoshop then obviously you're suggesting Windows or OS X are the necessity.

Not to mention Google Apps and email which helpfully uploads everything to the Google Cloud.

Well that makes it accessible from anywhere and prevents data loss from hardware failure so i'd say that's pretty damn helpful in the education environment. Though having the option to upload to DropBox or OneDrive or some other alternative would be useful.

This proves that all the Slashdot talk about software freedom is thinly disguised Microsoft hate since everyone here seems to be pumping up heavily locked down iDevices and Chromebooks.

Or maybe they are finally realizing that not everybody needs/wants a fully open, infinitely configurable, high maintenance product all the time. Sometimes they just want it to do a limited subset and do it well with minimal requirement from the user. That isn't to say you couldn't dual boot and have full desktop Linux on there as well.

The whole free and open thing seems to be stagnating a bit, I mean Android is free and open but where is all the FOSS innovation? Sure there are some helpful utilities for devs and admins but that's about it. There's no reason a FOSS package or distro couldn't have been developed that provided all the innovative features that exist in Google Play Services but it didn't. It's nice for everything to be FOSS but from the consumer perspective it doesn't seem to have much advantage over proprietary.

Re:Good (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47527377)

Javascript Development...upload google(USB) drive...

Re:Good (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47526245)

That's probably a good thing since students shouldn't be static consumers of information and tablets are really subpar for most kinds of content creation. Add in the fact that a Chromebook costs half as much as even an ipad mini and overall the schools are probably making the rational choice.

You probably never used a chrome book. I own one and it's the most useless tech product I ever bought. A tablet is far more productive because there is actually a selection of useful apps. A chrome book is built for the internet and it's bad at that

Re:Good (4, Interesting)

lord_mike (567148) | about 3 months ago | (#47526607)

I like mine a lot. It's basically become my primary laptop. Anything that I need beyond Chrome, I can do in Linux via Crouton.

Re:Good (3, Insightful)

UncannyCleric (3569773) | about 3 months ago | (#47526307)

Chromebooks are also probably a lot less likely to be stolen than iPads, which is possibly even more of a factor in making them a rational choice.

Keyboards (5, Informative)

AmiMoJo (196126) | about 3 months ago | (#47525907)

It's hardly surprising that schools would prefer laptops with keyboards, since students are expected to do a lot of writing. Chromebooks make sense because they are cheap, virus-proof and don't run Windows games.

Keyboards (2)

Sable Drakon (831800) | about 3 months ago | (#47526009)

But it will run games using Java and WebGL.

Re:Keyboards (2)

AmiMoJo (196126) | about 3 months ago | (#47526037)

Chromebooks don't support Java, or Silverlight for that matter, in the browser. There are of course web games, but the school will have their internet connection censored to block those out anyway. The students can't install much on those machines, and in fact I think they can be locked down so that no apps can be installed at all.

Re:Keyboards (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47526103)

Where was all this hopeful, insightful talk yesterday [slashdot.org] when we ranting about Apple iPad rollouts in the Valley?

Why is it that iPads are only seen as useful for Facebook and games, and somehow can't be remotely managed (all lies and FUD, BTW) while the chromebook is a magical unicorn spouting educational possibilities?

Re:Keyboards (3, Insightful)

pspahn (1175617) | about 3 months ago | (#47526225)

I don't think it has anything to do with being "remotely managed" but rather the simple fact that a tablet and a laptop are still two different tools.

I think people are starting to understand that using a tablet isn't just "using a computer with a touch screen." It's an entirely different experience, one that is probably better suited for certain tasks that rely on organic movement. Gaming happens to be one of those tasks but certainly not the only. Music and art are others.

A chromebook is a cheap and crippled laptop, basically, but it beats the heck out of any tablet for typing which pretty much anyone would agree, at least as of now.

So I guess if you're seeing a controversy between people clamoring for one item over the other, a reasonable conclusion to draw would be that one person thinks one type of education is better than another.

Re:Keyboards (2)

TrancePhreak (576593) | about 3 months ago | (#47526075)

Chrome devices have Flash support built-in, but they do not support Java or Silverlight. If you need Java, Silverlight, or other plug-in support, there are virtualization and remoting options you can use for Chrome devices

https://support.google.com/chrome/a/answer/1290513?hl=en

Fuck beta (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47525917)

Fuck the fucking beta

Re:Fuck beta (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47526097)

No one cares about the beta anymore as long as http://slashdot.org/?nobeta=1 works! If they take the nobeta link away then people will care!

Surprise, surprise (2, Insightful)

MikeMo (521697) | about 3 months ago | (#47525939)

I'll be darned. Cheapest product sells more units. I wonder who's making the most money?

Surprise, surprise (1)

Sable Drakon (831800) | about 3 months ago | (#47526001)

Probably Apple. But which one's more useful in the education setting? It certainly isn't the iPad or any other tablet.

Re:Surprise, surprise (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47526119)

It certainly isn't the iPad or any other tablet. [citation needed]

Re:Surprise, surprise (1)

geekoid (135745) | about 3 months ago | (#47526351)

CItation:
The iPad doesn't have a keyboard. QED.

Re:Surprise, surprise (0)

BitZtream (692029) | about 3 months ago | (#47526835)

Neither do text books

Re:Surprise, surprise (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47526027)

I'm just surprised that anyone would pay anything for a chromebook. Sometimes it doesn't matter how little something costs, if it's not something that anyone would want.

Re: Surprise, surprise (1)

ShieldW0lf (601553) | about 3 months ago | (#47526325)

I feel that way about the entire tablet form factor. I had a couple given to me. I threw them out because it wasn't worth my time to find someone to buy them.

Re: Surprise, surprise (1)

See Attached (1269764) | about 3 months ago | (#47526877)

Ive used everything from Blackberries to big smartphones to tablets to netbooks to notebooks to laptops to desktops. Most of us /. ers have. The Phone format is good for texting, quick snapshots. Netbooks/notebooks are pretty portable and desktops are solid and can be made into what is needed.. Tablets are sexy and spiffy, but they don't have a good feel for doing what you could get done on a SMartphone or something with a keyboard. people look silly taking pics or movies with Tablets. My Wifes tablet has a bluetooth kb, so its small and light... but a 13-15" net/lap seems optimal for many things ... add a big monitor to a laptop and you have a big screen.... not too bad.... 17" laptop is too big... Cell phone + 15" netbook/laptop and Desktop covers me. Maybe I am hold ing the tablet wrong? My main frustration! But that is just me... a member of the dead tree generation!....

Re:Surprise, surprise (1)

Fishchip (1203964) | about 3 months ago | (#47526695)

Except school boards, obviously.

iPads are toys (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47525949)

The tablets other companies are making are actual tools that people can use for productivity or enjoyment. iPads are nothing more than expensive toys.

Re: iPads are toys (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47526825)

Interesting point. You should look up the latest numbers on whose tablets are currently used most in corporate environments. I think you'll see that it's an iPad.

Re: iPads are toys (3, Interesting)

viperidaenz (2515578) | about 3 months ago | (#47527285)

Managers where I work usually get iPads.

All they can do in addition to Facebook and other web browsing is browse the intranet (which nobody really does anyway) and check email. They already get emails on their Blackberry's and use them more often.

Pretty much a corporate toy.

I think (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47525959)

7 will be that's what i think

What do I think? (2, Insightful)

31415926535897 (702314) | about 3 months ago | (#47525985)

Analysts are predicting that 5 million Chromebooks will be sold by the end of the year; how many of those will be sold to schools, do you think?

As a parent in a school district, I'm pissed that our school district is buying every student a Chomebook*.

I would be even angrier if they had gone with the iPad.

These programs are a bloody sham--they're a waste of money and will not help the education of our next generation one bit. There is nothing that providing a laptop per child affords that can't be accomplished through classroom media presentation devices (computer & projector) and a good school computer lab. These devices will only be a distraction and huge expense for families and schools as millions of them are broken every year.

*Our district is requiring that families pay for half, so I guess they're only half buying them and being dillholes toward us. I would be in favor of a program that provides these devices to low income families (and the district can pay for the whole thing).

Re:What do I think? (5, Insightful)

AmiMoJo (196126) | about 3 months ago | (#47526099)

When I was at school I wasted vast amounts of time being forced to write stuff out in draft form and then re-write it neatly. Fortunately now we have computers that allow editing. This is progress - I can write a report and edit it without endless copying out by hand.

Kids should have access to computers. Not all families can afford them. By giving all the students the same computers it is easier for the teacher to teach without getting bogged down in technical differences, and allows the school to administer and manage them.

Re:What do I think? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47526337)

Learning to write by hand is a fundamental human skill.

Re:What do I think? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47526627)

So were hunting, fishing, and farming. With time, nothing is sacred.

Re:What do I think? (3, Insightful)

MacTO (1161105) | about 3 months ago | (#47526865)

Writing by hand remains an essential skill, and will continue to be an essential skill for the foreseeable future. It is true that it is no longer the domain of people who author reports or books, corresponding with friends and businesses, and many other areas. Yet it is still used extensively for note taking, completing forms, and in many situations where it is easier to use the pen than the keyboard (diagrams, equations, etc.).

In time, that may change. In time, it will probably change. Yet I am getting quite tired of reading the handwriting of adults that wouldn't pass the muster of a grade 3 teacher.

Re:What do I think? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47526939)

I think I use a pen about once a week. I occasionally take notes in meeting by hand, but I am usually taking them on a laptop.

I have "[handwriting] that wouldn't pass the muster of a grade 3 teacher" - always have had this, even while hand writing essays in my latter school years.

Get over it. Nobody uses ink and quill, few people use the classic handwriting that used to be so important. Shorthand is going extinct.

What is it about using a pen and paper to make words that is so important? If nobody ever wrote and everyone always used an electronic device what will change? (and don't give me the nuclear holocaust example as if writing will be the really big issue)

Re:What do I think? (1)

viperidaenz (2515578) | about 3 months ago | (#47527391)

Are you left handed?

Re:What do I think? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47527063)

So were hunting, fishing, and farming. With time, nothing is sacred.

So we've specialized and only a select few do the fishing, farming, and ranching, but that is stil the source of all the food we consume as people.

Re:What do I think? (1)

See Attached (1269764) | about 3 months ago | (#47526915)

Digital platforms are the way of communication these days.... after 30 years of being a Keyboard jockey, my handwriting has suffered. But... the process of writing is antiquating, unless you are a carpenter or somesuch. Being able to concoct a document, and review / send/ print / post / submit etc... good stuff. I don't buy the tablet craze, rather the Chromebook/netbook that make sense. We have to compete in global market place. .. . to keep current, gotta keep kids in the game.

Re:What do I think? (4, Interesting)

daemonhunter (968210) | about 3 months ago | (#47526173)

The thing these programs [try] to bring isn't so much help with learning as much as EQUAL ACCESS to learning. It attempts to level the playing field between the kids at home with no pc for research and the more well-off kids with greater tech access.

That said, it doesn't provide in home internet access, satellite or 3g coverage, so many times it seems like a wasted effort, but it allows students greater flexibility than previous generations. They aren't tied down to a classroom, or getting shuffled out of the lab so a new class can come in. They can do their work anywhere there's free wifi. Further, it adds a value to your district in less tangible ways: showing kids you trust them with not-inexpensive hardware does interesting things to their psyche.

Re:What do I think? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47526449)

This argument would make more sense if these were being provided to at-risk school districts preferentially. They are not.

Typically they hit the districts where the children already have a computer, just not a standardized laptop they can bring to class.

Re:What do I think? (2, Interesting)

Archangel Michael (180766) | about 3 months ago | (#47526779)

"At-Risk Schools" is bullshit misnomer. These schools get ALL sorts of extra money other schools don't. Let me tell you, money is not the issue, the issue with "At-RisK" is the parents of the kids who are "At-Risk". These people are lower educated because many (most?) do not value education. They are lower Economic, because they are lower educated. And because they are lower economic, they don't see a way (even if you tell them) out of their situation. I am not going to say they are lazy, because many of them do very hard labor work.

The issue is, they would rather spend what little (if any) extra money they have on things that do no provide opportunity for their families. The families who figure it out, are out of poverty in one generation, maybe two. IF you want to fix "At-Risk" schools, you'll have to start with the Parents.

Re:What do I think? (2)

stephanruby (542433) | about 3 months ago | (#47526685)

That said, it doesn't provide in home internet access, satellite or 3g coverage...

Citation needed. I am aware that some Chromebooks come without data, but I actually read the article and I don't see anywhere where they differentiate between Chromebooks with mobile data (and wifi) and Chromebooks without data (but only wifi).

My first Chromebook came with 2 years of free 3G Verizon service at 100MB per month (if you want to buy more than the free level of service, you can prepay for more, but there is no danger of getting charged when you go over that amount, once above that quota and if you're away from a wifi hotspot, the internet just stops, not only that but the indicator for how much data is left is very good, you can always tell how much you have left). Granted, 100 MB per month is a tiny amount of data, but I have it turned off by default, and I only use it for emergency email/lookups.

On my second Chromebook, it came with 3 years of free 4G/LTE data on Verizon. Again, that amount is 100 MB per month, which again is really tiny, but it's great to have in case of emergency.

The best thing with Chromebooks is that they're cheap, they're easy to replace if damaged, and they have a lousy game selection. Personally, I hope that it stays that way. I actually don't like the recent development of placing touch interfaces on some of the Chromebooks. It increases the battery consumption and increases the likelihood that kids will play more with it.

Re:What do I think? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47526201)

Since you pay for half, does your student get to keep the device after the school year?

Re:What do I think? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47526249)

A friend's kid used to be really into collecting nature (bugs, lizards, plants, etc), had a microscope and spent 12 hours a day in the woods collecting. He's a smart kid (gifted program, highest standardized test scores in the school, etc) but hasn't left the house since someone gave him an ipad. He basically sits inside and plays games all day. I'm sure he will do well in life, but wonder what he is missing. I suppose it's the future.

I've given him several science kits as well as rpi and arduino, so he had plenty of access to computers before. Much more than I had at the same age.

Re:What do I think? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47526253)

Who is the district? Oh us...

Re:What do I think? (1)

statemachine (840641) | about 3 months ago | (#47526601)

There is nothing that providing a laptop per child affords that can't be accomplished through classroom media presentation devices (computer & projector) and a good school computer lab.

Homework. Many poorer kids do not have a computer at home, and a smartphone is terrible for writing papers and research. The laptop/tablet is also locked down so distractions are kept to a minimum.

These devices will only be a distraction and huge expense for families and schools as millions of them are broken every year.

Hyperbole. Citation needed. Yesterday's article about iPads in Coachella said district-wide there were less than 10 lost or stolen. How does that scale up to millions?

Re:What do I think? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47526621)

I'm not. My kids use their chromebook a lot... mostly for writing stories, making web pages, and.... get this... video editing! I'm thrilled the school is using them (way better than iPads that lock you in so tight, you can't create anything)

Re: What do I think? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47526801)

Actually, I find my five year old has been doing these same things with the family iPad for over a year now. Can't create anything, my butt.

Re:What do I think? (1)

Archangel Michael (180766) | about 3 months ago | (#47526707)

Actually there is. I refer to you Google Classroom (using Google Apps for Education). http://classroom.google.com/ [google.com]

This provides interactive access to the students up to 24 hours every day. The teacher gives feedback and the student receives it immediately, regardless of whether or not they are in class at the time. With Hangouts a "sick" student can be in class, and participate without having to infect classmates with Virus of the year. And so on.

What is a waste of money, is spending it on is old style industrial education items like "Chalk and blackboards", 35 MM movies/VHS', and Books that are obsoleted every time Pearson and Congress comes up with the latest greatest version of Education (e,g. NCLB, Common Core). Imagine being able to get Creative Commons Licensed material/media/books that are Free and edited on the fly to conform to every Jurisdiction's lame-ass requirements, which ultimately will leave politics out of education (once it shows how silly it a lot of it really is). Tie in Khan Academy, and MIT courseware and ..... and you have EDUCATION that goes through PhD level work available ... for free ... for anyone.

I foresee the time when we dump Industrial Education and start providing kids all the education they can handle at any age and quit trying to pigeon hole them into "age" segregated classes, and start putting them into online sessions with educational peers.

And at $200 ea. Chromebooks offer even the lowest income people a chance to own technology that can help bridge the education gap. $200 buys one, maybe two textbooks these days, something school districts have to do every year or two. Are they as capable as a Laptop? Probably not, but they are usable for 85% of what kids need in school.

To be honest, I don't know whether or not to feel sorry for your kids, or you. Here we live in an age where the world is at your fingertips and you spouting off like it is a pure scam. Kind of hypocritical of you being on /. (using a computer and all) don't you think?

Re:What do I think? (1)

eulernet (1132389) | about 3 months ago | (#47526773)

they're a waste of money and will not help the education of our next generation one bit

I believe that the real goal is to make every student familiar with computers.
Tablets are easier to understand than laptops.
But I do agree that they'll increase ADHD even more.

Re:What do I think? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47526955)

A local district is involved in Apple's 1:1 program and gives out MacBooks. They're paid for via the school taxes and thanks to state aid and what not cost a ridiculously little amount (of course replacing them if lost/broken costs nearly as much as a new machine since only the first one is discounted).

Anyway. The students love them (even though they are heavily restricted), the teachers love them and most of all, the parents love them. A questionnaire went out to the parents asking them how they felt about the program and if they would like to see it continue. 98% replied positively about it and wanted it to continue.

They do have a few iPads and found they aren't nearly as good to use as the laptops (go figure), namely due to the lack of collaborative software. A neighboring district went the Chromebook route and I guess go the wrong ones because they weren't certified for use on some state exams. I heard they were having some other issues with them but haven't really looked into it.

Re:What do I think? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47526987)

While the laptops follow the students through the years at the school, they aren't allowed to take them home for the summer and have to give them up at the end of the year. The laptops are then rotated through the classes and the oldest ones are replaced with new ones if they are too old.

Outselling? (2, Interesting)

recoiledsnake (879048) | about 3 months ago | (#47525991)

Google's basically giving them away for free or extremely subsidized and then tries to make money from them by snooping on the kids' email, while Apple actually tries to make a profit from them.

http://thenextweb.com/google/2... [thenextweb.com]

From http://www.edweek.org/ew/artic... [edweek.org]

The plaintiffs allege that Google has employed such practices since around 2010, when it began using a new technology, known as Content Onebox, that allows the company to intercept and scan emails before they reach their intended recipients, rather than after messages are delivered to users’ inboxes, regardless of whether ads are turned off.
Mr. Fread and Mr. Carrillo say that neither they nor any other users of Google Apps for Education consented to such practices. They are seeking financial damages amounting to $100 per day of each day of violation for every individual who sent or received an email message using Google Apps for Education during a two-year period beginning in May 2011.
While the allegations by the plaintiffs are explosive, it’s the sworn declarations of Google representatives in response to their claims that have truly raised the eyebrows of observers and privacy experts.
Contrary to the company’s earlier public statements, Google representatives acknowledged in a September motion to dismiss the plaintiffs’ request for class certification that the company’s consumer-privacy policy applies to Apps for Education users. Thus, Google argues, it has students’ (and other Apps for Education users’) consent to scan and process their emails.
In November, Kyle C. Wong, a lawyer representing Google, also argued in a formal declaration submitted to the court in opposition to the plaintiffs’ motion for class certification that the company’s data-mining practices are widely known, and that the plaintiffs’ complaints that the scanning and processing of their emails was done secretly are thus invalid. Mr. Wong cited extensive media coverage about Google’s data mining of Gmail consumer users’ messages, as well as the disclosures made by numerous universities to their students about how Google Apps for Education functions.

Re:Outselling? (1, Insightful)

geekoid (135745) | about 3 months ago | (#47526433)

Whoop dee fucking doo.

Re:Outselling? (1)

Thruen (753567) | about 3 months ago | (#47527255)

I don't understand this response. People are up in arms about the NSA collecting our private information, but somehow it's okay for Google to read our kids' email? This makes no sense.

Why is this written this way? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47526011)

What's the purpose of writing "Google reported that a million Chromebooks were sold to schools last quarter, well over half of the 1.8 million units sold in the second quarter."? What's the purpose of writing the well over half? Just marketing fluff?

Re:Why is this written this way? (1)

jcoy42 (412359) | about 3 months ago | (#47526171)

It shows that there's an incline of purchase, not a descent.

Re:Why is this written this way? (1)

Algae_94 (2017070) | about 3 months ago | (#47527093)

The last quarter was the second quarter. This doesn't show any sort of change in sales. It shows that out of 1.8 million units sold in the 2nd quarter, 1 million, or well over half of them, were to schools.

What does it mean? (2)

markwillison (3764611) | about 3 months ago | (#47526033)

Although this information is interesting, unless someone does a survey or purchase poll it is difficult to infer why chrome is doing as well as it is. Since iPads are more expensive on average it would be difficult to control for price selection to determine any other user preference bias.

Yes, And (1)

GenaTrius (3644889) | about 3 months ago | (#47526121)

And pizza is more popular than fajitas in Beijing. So what?

Chromebook = Netbook (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47526123)

All the Chromebook is, is another cheap junk device like the Netbook's were! Have fun with them! Its a shame these schools are selling its students to Google like that!

Two issues with the story... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47526247)

1) The average since Feb 2013 number doesn't show cyclical quarter-to-quarter numbers which would allow us to determine an estimate for a like-quarter comparison between the Chromebooks and the iPad.

2) If the 'market' being analyzed covers both the iPad (a tablet) *and* the Chromebook (a laptop), it also certainly includes other laptops, such as MacBooks, which some school systems are buying for their students.
example: http://pvpost.com/2014/01/28/every-shawnee-mission-high-school-student-to-get-macbook-ipads-for-middle-school-and-elementary-starting-in-fall-24540

While fewer schools buy gear like that for every student, if you're going to complain that a statement is 'misleading' because it doesn't include a competitor (which is, strictly speaking in a different category of gear), it's poor form (and even more misleading) to neglect to expand that category *only* for one side of the equation.

Two issues with the story... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47526315)

3) The average since Feb 2013 is only very slightly less than 1 million / quarter. As of the end of Feb 2013, there have been months: 16 months (Feb 2013 was included in the previous numbers, and July 2014 hasn't finished yet). That's 5 1/3 quarters.

If last quarter is above average, then it's *very* likely that iPads are still selling more/faster than Chromebooks.

4) Comparing the quarterly averages (937,500 iPads vs. 900,000 Chromebooks) based on the numbers given in the article still shows the iPad in the lead, even if you ignore similarly bought Apple's laptops in the comparison. (They are unlikely to change the numbers by a lot, but in such a close 'race', even a small difference can impact who is 'leading'.)

Sounds like the modem debate from 20 years ago (3, Interesting)

statemachine (840641) | about 3 months ago | (#47526441)

USRobotics kept walking around and saying their modems were the #1 selling modem. This is analogous of what Apple is doing today.

However, while USR was the #1 brand, most modems sold overall had the Rockwell chipset, with most brands simply adding a plastic box and different color LEDs.

More recently, Apple claims that the iPhone is the #1 selling phone. However, phones that use Android sell the most, period.

I shouldn't be, but I'm always surprised how religious people get when their favorite electronics company is shown to be extremely misleading. I know a guy that I'd known for years who threatened to "unfriend" simply because I refuted his claim that the iPhone was the #1 phone.

So this iPad/Chromebook issue is just another chapter of misleading sales tactics. But if you look at what Apple actually says officially, they're very specific in the literature. Unfortunately, people will be blind to anything that might change their worldview... and any company would be nuts not to take advantage of that.

Re: Sounds like the modem debate from 20 years ago (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47526769)

Actually, this is nothing like Apple because of what you state. Apple devices don't use commodity innards. An iPad's value isn't in its hardware specs. It's in the way that it works both with hardware and software and ecosystem. In fact, it's working so well that everyone else in the industry is struggling to copy them and still make money doing it.

Re: Sounds like the modem debate from 20 years ago (1)

statemachine (840641) | about 3 months ago | (#47526909)

ACs can be quite funny sometimes.

An iPad's value isn't in its hardware specs. It's in the way that it works both with hardware and software and ecosystem.

Yeah, man... puff puff pass, k?

Re:Sounds like the modem debate from 20 years ago (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47527041)

I know a guy that I'd known for years who threatened to "unfriend" simply because I refuted his claim that the iPhone was the #1 phone.

What single model phone sells more units then iPhone?

Re:Sounds like the modem debate from 20 years ago (1)

statemachine (840641) | about 3 months ago | (#47527079)

You're proving my point.

Re:Sounds like the modem debate from 20 years ago (1)

Algae_94 (2017070) | about 3 months ago | (#47527147)

I shouldn't be, but I'm always surprised how religious people get when their favorite electronics company is shown to be extremely misleading. I know a guy that I'd known for years who threatened to "unfriend" simply because I refuted his claim that the iPhone was the #1 phone.

So this iPad/Chromebook issue is just another chapter of misleading sales tactics. But if you look at what Apple actually says officially, they're very specific in the literature. Unfortunately, people will be blind to anything that might change their worldview... and any company would be nuts not to take advantage of that.

It's strange. It like tribalism in a globally connected world. Product brands and companies are one of the few things that touch most places on Earth so they have been able to build this strange support from people. If people got so passionate about things that really mattered, instead of consumer electronics, just imagine what they could do.

Super. Epic. Meh. (1)

jfz (917930) | about 3 months ago | (#47526467)

When instead critical thinking, reasoning, logic, and philosophy outsell let me know. Tech doesn't matter.

Chromebook failure (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47526475)

The big negative schools fail to realize is the value of a Chromebook. Just try and trade in a Chromebook, nobody will give you much of anything for them. They are worth nothing after only 2 years. Many schools already complain about failure rate, breakage and although the Chromebooks are cheap. Some districts are spending thousands to improve or install Wireless networking to handle all those Chromebooks. iPads are not much different, they have breakage and theft, but at least you will get some residual value when upgrading. Chromebooks are throw away devices. The smart private schools are requiring students purchase a Chromebook. I think if a district wants to use Chromebook. Don't expect them to last through multiple users. It won't happen. Most district openly brag about the low costs of Chromebooks. I agree, its tempting to find out you can buy more for less. But I think districts don't do their homework and risk even a lessor investment in a product that does not hold up or belong in a school environment.

Teachers perspective... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47526747)

As a school administrator, there is only one reason that we go with Chromebooks across the industry: they're cheap. We don't have to worry about any kind of replacement cost, as it's cheaper to just buy a new one than try and fix them at all.

Teachers, at least at the high school level, hate Chromebooks because they are grossly underpowered. They don't interface with any of the science hardware or digital media products that most high schools use (Photoshop, anyone?). Sure, there are workarounds, but teachers don't want to have kludge together workarounds, they want guaranteed, tried and true solutions.

Students look at Chromebooks as a joke. They are toys that they get for free on someone else's dime. They can get a iPad or low cost Windows PC, on their own, load Chrome on it, and have a Chromebook that does so much more. Even in a low-income, high-needs district such as mine, kids are laughing at Chromebooks.

They'll be good for awhile, but Chromebooks need to come a long way before they'll be taken seriously by schools who really want to invest in technology.

orly? (1)

slashmydots (2189826) | about 3 months ago | (#47526843)

You mean giving overprices, locked down, fragile nickel-and-dime machines that you can't type on to children isn't a good idea? I never would have guessed.
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