Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

US Army To Transport American Ebola Victim To Atlanta Hospital From Liberia

Unknown Lamer posted about 3 months ago | from the mother-nature-wants-you-to-die dept.

Medicine 409

acidradio (659704) writes American air charter specialist Phoenix Air has been contracted by the U.S. Army to haul an American physician afflicted with Ebola from Liberia to the Emory University Hospital in Atlanta. This will be the first 'purposeful' transport of an Ebola victim to the U.S. The patient will be flown in a special Gulfstream III (formerly owned by the Danish Air Force) outfitted for very specialized medical transports such as this. I dunno. I know there are brilliant doctors and scientists in Atlanta who handle highly-communicable diseases, but is this such a brilliant idea? theodp (442580) writes with related news In response to the Ebola outbreak, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued Interim Guidance about Ebola Virus Infection for Airline Flight Crews, Cleaning Personnel, and Cargo Personnel. "Ebola virus is transmitted by close contact with a person who has symptoms of Ebola," the CDC explains. "Close contact is defined as having cared for or lived with a person with Ebola or having a high likelihood of direct contact with blood or body fluids of an Ebola patient. Examples of close contact include kissing or embracing, sharing eating or drinking utensils, close conversation (3 feet), physical examination, and any other direct physical contact between people. Close contact does not include walking by a person or briefly sitting across a room from a person."

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

PANIC! (4, Funny)

DiamondGeezer (872237) | about 3 months ago | (#47581993)

The Zombie Apocalypse is nearly upon us! Run ! RUNNNNNN!

Re:PANIC! (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47582215)

Better move to Madagascar before its too late.

Yes, let's do this. (1, Insightful)

B33rNinj4 (666756) | about 3 months ago | (#47582003)

Let's bring all the diseases here. What could go wrong?

Re:Yes, let's do this. (0, Flamebait)

DigiShaman (671371) | about 3 months ago | (#47582195)

Don't worry, Texas will be ground zero for this once the virus crosses over a now nonexistent border. Though I'm sure the feds will be all to happy to have border control between the states, just not the one's seperating nations.

Re:Yes, let's do this. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47582381)

it is all a plot to infect Mexico

and if you take that comment seriously... then you deserve to be trolled

Re:Yes, let's do this. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47582399)

Don't worry, Texas will be ground zero for this once the virus crosses over a now nonexistent border. Though I'm sure the feds will be all to happy to have border control between the states, just not the one's seperating nations.

I didn't know Texas shared a border with Georgia.

Re:Yes, let's do this. (1, Funny)

mythosaz (572040) | about 3 months ago | (#47582421)

I believe it's Jawjah.

Thanks for the pointless scaremongering (5, Informative)

sjbe (173966) | about 3 months ago | (#47582207)

Let's bring all the diseases here. What could go wrong?

In all likelihood, nothing. The CDC handles copies of pretty much every known pathogen on the planet. It is the premier pathogen research institution on the planet. They've already seen ebola. The only thing novel about this is that they are bringing in a live patient with the disease to a top tier hospital so they can bring the best tools to bear on researching the disease and hopefully treating this guy.

Re:Thanks for the pointless scaremongering (1)

RabidReindeer (2625839) | about 3 months ago | (#47582349)

Unless I'm mistaken, one of the few remaining samples of smallpox is located in Atlanta.

Re:Thanks for the pointless scaremongering (4, Funny)

dcollins117 (1267462) | about 3 months ago | (#47582521)

Unless I'm mistaken, one of the few remaining samples of smallpox is located in Atlanta.

There's some in the storage closet in Maryland. Might be some in Atlanta, too. Who knows. The reason they call it smallpox is because it's so hard to see. Makes it difficult to keep track of.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/post-nation/wp/2014/07/08/smallpox-discovered-sitting-in-maryland-storage-room/ [washingtonpost.com]

Re:Thanks for the pointless scaremongering (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47582535)

Actually, they misplaced and mis-stored these samples at the CDC and many other Federal Government labs across the USA.
Don't you read the news?

Re:Thanks for the pointless scaremongering (2, Interesting)

minstrelmike (1602771) | about 3 months ago | (#47582427)

Yup, CDC knows how to handle this sort of shit.
It's not like they lose track of pathogens or accidentally expose workers to smallpox, no sirree bob.
They know what they're doing ;-)

NIMBY at its finest (4, Insightful)

sjbe (173966) | about 3 months ago | (#47582609)

Yup, CDC knows how to handle this sort of shit.

Yes they do. Nobody's perfect but I trust the CDC to handle this. I've met people that work there. I'm married to a physician that deals with the CDC from time to time and she trusts them. They are very good at their job.

It's not like they lose track of pathogens or accidentally expose workers to smallpox, no sirree bob.

And that is relevant in what way here? Seriously. Explain to me how some leftover vials of a pathogen from decades ago has any relevance to this case beside pointing out the already obvious fact that there is a tiny but non-zero chance someone might do something stupid. That failure mode has precisely zero bearing on this issue. People are not perfect, news at 11.

Cut out the sissy NIMBY scaremongering. There is really, truly nothing to worry about here. It's not funny and it scares people who don't know any better.

Re: NIMBY at its finest (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47582729)

Also it risks your wife's grant funding.

Thanks for the pointless scaremongering (-1, Offtopic)

Sohail Ahmed (3772355) | about 3 months ago | (#47582461)

In all likelihood, nothing. The CDC handles copies of pretty much every known pathogen on the planet. It is the premier pathogen research institution on the planet. ibollywoodtadka.blogspot.in

Re:Thanks for the pointless scaremongering (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47582507)

The virus don't usually come wrapped in wetware--that's the issue and problem. The way wetware sheds tissue is quite dramatic when transfer of eBola is by "touch".

Re:Thanks for the pointless scaremongering (3, Interesting)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | about 3 months ago | (#47582513)

What I find slightly curious is that they'd bother to transport the patient for a disease that (at present) has no treatment other than supportive therapy to try to keep the symptoms from killing you. The Liberian medical system is not exactly a shining star; but this isn't one of those "Oh, sure, we could cure that; but this hospital doesn't have an endoscopic microsurgery suite and we'd need $250k worth of drugs that you can't even buy here." diseases.

Is there a research interest? Is supportive therapy that much better here and the CDC is the place with isolation expertise? What advantage is being sought?

Yes there is a research interest here (5, Informative)

sjbe (173966) | about 3 months ago | (#47582649)

Is there a research interest? Is supportive therapy that much better here and the CDC is the place with isolation expertise? What advantage is being sought?

Probably yes there is a research interest. Otherwise there would be no reason to choose Atlanta (home of the CDC) of all possible treatment locations. There are plenty of places for treatment but only one place where the experts at the CDC can look at things up close. It's a lot harder to bring the CDC to the patient than the other way around.

Re:Thanks for the pointless scaremongering (1)

wisnoskij (1206448) | about 3 months ago | (#47582559)

Umm.
You realise the different between some freeze dried sample in a jar, in a sealed drawer, in a sealed room, and a living human being infected with it and being transfered all over the place? Right?

More NIMBY (3, Insightful)

sjbe (173966) | about 3 months ago | (#47582711)

You realise the different between some freeze dried sample in a jar, in a sealed drawer, in a sealed room, and a living human being infected with it and being transfered all over the place? Right?

Of course there are differences which is why comparing the two is both stupid and irrelevant. The failure modes have nothing to do with one another. It is well understood how ebola is transmitted and we have very well established containment protocols that we know work well. Ebola is not highly communicative, readily contained and the risks are quite low. The CDC doesn't even consider it among the most dangerous pathogens because it is relatively hard to transmit. They've already had the ebola virus in Atlanta for study. The only thing different here is simply that they have a live patient to handle which is something infections disease doctors deal with every single day.

Re:Thanks for the pointless scaremongering (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47582613)

I read this on NPR earlier and will say the same, it is NOT A GOOD IDEA!! BUT (and I'm not sure who has created it) they may be wanting to try a vaccine and or closely follow how the disease progresses (altho I believe the CDC probably has already done this with animals) within humans, and more importantly if there is any chance the virus could mutate into an air born one, IE the Flu..

Their are in fact 3 US doctors or health workers that have been infected, one has died and I believe there are in fact 2 that are being transported to the Atlanta Hospital. What should be bothersome is the announcement of this did come until the last possible hour. There was never any word about the idea (IDEA) of doing this made public.

  I guess this is the governments "transparency" policies taking affect. Wait till everyone already knows, or until the last possible hour before saying a damn word.

Re:Thanks for the pointless scaremongering (1)

LWATCDR (28044) | about 3 months ago | (#47582759)

Plus it give the US a chance to gain experience with treating Ebola before it gets here.
The Army is involved because of the bio-warfare group they have. Before anyone freaks the US unilaterally stopped developing bio-warfare agents back in the 1970s
The US does research in defence aka treatment and prevention.

Re:Yes, let's do this. (3, Funny)

GNious (953874) | about 3 months ago | (#47582549)

As long as no-one shoots down the plane, while it is over some heavily populated location, like, Atlanta.

Re:Yes, let's do this. (1)

Bigbutt (65939) | about 3 months ago | (#47582601)

[Les Nessman] oooOOooo, there's an idea.

[John]

Why do you think that (-1, Flamebait)

phantomfive (622387) | about 3 months ago | (#47582011)

I dunno. I know there are brilliant doctors and scientists in Atlanta who handle highly-communicable diseases,

I don't know anything about Atlanta's medical scene, but the reality is, that sometimes there are boneheaded doctors who make boneheaded decisions. [slashdot.org]

Re:Why do you think that (5, Informative)

93 Escort Wagon (326346) | about 3 months ago | (#47582077)

The Centers for Disease Control is in Atlanta.

It's nice to see reason and logic flying out the window with most of these early posts, by the way. I think I'll invest in pitchfork futures, pronto!

Re:Why do you think that (1)

LWATCDR (28044) | about 3 months ago | (#47582775)

Amazing how fast humanity flies out the window when fear is involved.

Re:Why do you think that (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47582147)

Thank goodness that happened in a public institution with public accountability.

Humans are mostly incompetent wherever they are (the profit motive does not make a person less incompetent, because it doesn't make them not human). The only reason government appears less competent is that it is usually, shockingly enough, much more public than a private corporation.

Pure FUD (1)

sjbe (173966) | about 3 months ago | (#47582157)

I don't know anything about Atlanta's medical scene

So why are you trying to panic people over unrelated clumsy decisions made decades ago? The fact that some people stupidly left some pathogens lying around a long time ago has pretty much nothing to do with this case.

Re:Pure FUD (1)

dcollins117 (1267462) | about 3 months ago | (#47582663)

The fact that some people stupidly left some pathogens lying around a long time ago has pretty much nothing to do with this case.

Only if you believe there are no stupid people now, which I frankly am having trouble believing.

Re:Pure FUD (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47582747)

There are plenty of stupid people around far more than ebola can kill.

Re:Why do you think that (5, Informative)

Shortguy881 (2883333) | about 3 months ago | (#47582219)

Emory University's Campus touches the CDC, so much so you can look out of some of the windows in Emory and see into the offices at the CDC. They also work together professionally. Essentially this person is being transferred to the CDC.

Vaccine is coming (4, Informative)

Joe Gillian (3683399) | about 3 months ago | (#47582015)

CNN had an article on this shortly before it popped up here. In their article, they said that an Ebola vaccine is well underway, with trials expected to begin in humans soon. It's apparently been proven effective in monkeys already. I was a little concerned before I read that, but if they've got a working vaccine, it's really not a big deal.

Re:Vaccine is coming (2)

xylo36 (1000020) | about 3 months ago | (#47582089)

I listened to an interview with Tom Frieden, head of the CDC, and he indicated a vaccine won't be available for a year in the best case scenario.

Re:Vaccine is coming (5, Insightful)

mythosaz (572040) | about 3 months ago | (#47582453)

On the timeline of vaccine research, "available in a year" sounds entirely like it's a solved problem with a pile of paperwork to be done...

Re:Vaccine is coming (2)

s0litaire (1205168) | about 3 months ago | (#47582097)

But the Ebola virus is a bit like the Flu virus, as it mutates when it becomes infectious to humans

It's probably more like the you have to create a new batch for every outbreak, which only occur every 3 to 4 years in small isolated groups, which means it will be expensive to produce.

Unless they go the whole hog and give everyone in the African continent an Ebola jab every few years

Re:Vaccine is coming (5, Informative)

tiberus (258517) | about 3 months ago | (#47582179)

I heard the same interview with Tom Frieden, Head of the CSC, that xylo36 did. In the interview he stated that Ebola has not really changed since it was first discovered, they have been monitoring the viruses DNA. It's just a nasty little bugger.

Re:Vaccine is coming (1)

s0litaire (1205168) | about 3 months ago | (#47582279)

I heard in another interview on the BBC a day or 2 ago (arghh can't remember exactly when or who it was with)
That the Ebola virus mutates between a harmless and lethal variants every few years (that's why you don't get out brakes of this scale all the time.) and each time it has slightly different incubation time and lethality which makes creating a one-shot vaccine / cure more difficult.

But I hold my hands up and say your guy from the CSC is probably more informed in the subject than my memory of a half listened to interview! lol

Re:Vaccine is coming (2)

Electricity Likes Me (1098643) | about 3 months ago | (#47582725)

Ebola is an RNA virus, very simple, with a very mistake prone polymerase - which is why it tends to mutate to harmless fairly easily. When you have such a short gestation and kill rate, there isn't much room for evolution.

Re:Vaccine is coming (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47582331)

That's because a virus with Ebola's virulence is unlikely to sustain itself over thousands of years as diseases like the measles have. It's just too deadly and that limits its ability to spread. If Ebola does begin mutating, it will probably begin losing some of its deadliness.

Re:Vaccine is coming (1)

minstrelmike (1602771) | about 3 months ago | (#47582449)

It already has mutated to become less deadly. This newest version only kills 60% of the time, down from 90% of the older versions.

Re:Vaccine is coming (2)

umghhh (965931) | about 3 months ago | (#47582599)

This epidemic problem is mostly one of education and capabilities. People in affected regions of Africa do not trust doctors and hospitals (for a good reason I think) and have traditions that help the virus spread like touching dead friends and family members to say good bye or eating the animals that tend to have the virus - these are exactly the wrong things to do. Belief in healers and lack of trust in helpers from the West makes things double problematic. The good thing that the virus is less lethal is problematic too as now instead of being killing almost directly ill people wander around and spread the virus. Lack of sanitation and basic medical supplies but also basic stuff like washing hands, means that virus is spread further and further. This all is tragic because the virus is very fragile and its transmission is easy to deal with by washing hands already. One may think that unless US army does not want to make experiments with it, then the transportation of this poor person back home is actually a good thing for this person and does not change anything for the rest of us. The reason for this are as listed already. If a scenario like from Dustin Hoffman movie, as unlikely as it may be, were to happen that this one transport makes no difference - we would all die as nobody can stop pandemic with a bomb like in the movie etc. If instead people see that we take good care of those that took great risks to help others than there is bigger chance of containing the disease where it is now. In other words - this is actually a good way to decrease chance of having ill people traveling to US or Europe. Me thinks.

Re:Vaccine is coming (2, Insightful)

angel'o'sphere (80593) | about 3 months ago | (#47582347)

It is not a big deal, but for other reasons.

Sidenote: a vaccine does not heal you if you are already ill, it only powers up your immune system to prevent you catching the illness ...

Tom Clancy thought of it first (2)

RetiredMidn (441788) | about 3 months ago | (#47582017)

Wasn't a patient transported on a Gulfstream a sub-plot of a Tom Clancy novel? (Executive Orders, IIRC)

Re:Tom Clancy thought of it first (1)

RetiredMidn (441788) | about 3 months ago | (#47582039)

Correction: Wasn't an Ebola patient transported on a Gulfstream a sub-plot of a Tom Clancy novel?

Re:Tom Clancy thought of it first (2)

iinventstuff (1888700) | about 3 months ago | (#47582087)

If you're saying that the only way to make this better is to have a Jack Ryan become President, well, ... I'm game... ;-)

Re:Tom Clancy thought of it first (1)

TFAFalcon (1839122) | about 3 months ago | (#47582107)

Now that plane just has to disappear and we can all start worrying.

Re: Tom Clancy thought of it first (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47582071)

So was deliberately crashing a commercial airliner into a major government building....

I sure hope it doesn't crash! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47582035)

That would sure put us in a pickle.

Also, I read the Wikipedia page on Ebola this morning. It was a reassuring thing to see no Ebola cases in the U.S. I guess that's about to change.

Captcha: induce

come on we're all thinking it... (1)

s0litaire (1205168) | about 3 months ago | (#47582037)

"What could possible go wrong...?"

Re:come on we're all thinking it... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47582447)

with the competent politicians in power?
Well they might save a few pennies and just flush the fluids down into the sewers... cos everybody knows that nothing lives in the sewers

Prepare for the rise of the Ebola alligators!

All hail the scaly masters

Re:come on we're all thinking it... (1)

sandytaru (1158959) | about 3 months ago | (#47582625)

The CDC accidentally sent a batch of H1N1 bird flu to a research lab in my town. No reported cases of the illness from that "oops" yet, except for the unfortunate chickens that received it.

What a bunch of pansies (3, Informative)

3.5 stripes (578410) | about 3 months ago | (#47582095)

The disease is not particularly communicable. It tends to externalize a lot of bodily fluids, which is why in places with poor sanitary conditions, it spreads pretty quickly. Hospitals which handle patients like these tend not to be considered poor sanitary conditions..

Re:What a bunch of pansies (1)

barlevg (2111272) | about 3 months ago | (#47582173)

That's what I thought I remembered from reading The Hot Zone, but I think this strain might be a bit more virulent--there've evidently been reported cases of contracting the disease at funerals of infected individuals. [nydailynews.com]

Re:What a bunch of pansies (4, Insightful)

Andy Dodd (701) | about 3 months ago | (#47582267)

Note that those are cases in an area where part of the funeral rites include (I believe) washing the body of the deceased by hand.

Re:What a bunch of pansies (2)

SchroedingersCat (583063) | about 3 months ago | (#47582205)

We have Taco Bell. It will spread faster than flu.

Re:What a bunch of pansies (2, Insightful)

DigiShaman (671371) | about 3 months ago | (#47582237)

Up to 22 days without having any symptoms as I recall. So what happens when someone breaks out into a fever and puts their sweaty hands all over hand railings, desks, kiosks, and whatnot? How long does Ebola last once it's on the surface?

There's a reason animals (and humans) are paranoid about shit we don't understand. From a survival standpoint, it's an advantageous attitude to have. And right now, I'm pretty fucking paranoid about being anywhere near people with Ebola!

It's not the flu or a cold. (4, Informative)

sirwired (27582) | about 3 months ago | (#47582545)

If you could catch Ebola by touching the sweat somebody left behind as they passed through a room, it would have spread a lot farther than it has. I'm pretty sure they'll be testing everybody that comes into contact with this guy for the virus, and even if the tests miss it, the symptoms are not subtle, it being a hemorrhagic fever and all...

Not every virus acts like the flu or cold viruses. Ebola isn't particularly virulent, even if it is pretty nasty if you come down with it. Being able to perform tests on a live patient in a state-of-the-art facility (as opposed to a 3rd-world heap whose "hospitals" are about as sanitary as a mid-grade highway rest stop) is invaluable in researching treatments. Just like the movies, the CDC has on-site facilities specifically designed to treat people with scary diseases we don't want in the population at large; this seems like an excellent use for them.

Re:What a bunch of pansies (3, Interesting)

angel'o'sphere (80593) | about 3 months ago | (#47582571)

Then get your paranoia treated and read the relevant wikipedia articles.
Ebola is not the flu nor the black death ... the likelihood to catch it if you don't fuck, kiss, embrace, or otherwise intensive care for a patient is basically ZERO.
Ebola viruses survive on any surface until it either dries out (body fluid containing it evaporates) or by UV radiation.

Do you really believe the USA governments health agency carries an US citizen into the US if it was not perfectly safe? In what paranoia 1984 world do you live?

Re:What a bunch of pansies (2, Insightful)

DigiShaman (671371) | about 3 months ago | (#47582651)

Do you really believe the USA governments health agency carries an US citizen into the US if it was not perfectly safe?

Umm, YES! Damn, you're that incredibly naive to believe that line of bullshit? How many professionals...how many politicians for that matter have promised one thing only later to either admit they fucked up, or blatantly flat-out lied?! Sorry, but oops doesn't count as an excuse if they fuck this up.

Re:What a bunch of pansies (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47582691)

I live in a world where Medical Dollars (yes proper noun), mean more than lives.

It is quite lucrative to suddenly have a bunch of bad diseases which force otherwise healthy people to the hospital.

Or a Government that instantly gets 50% of what someone has when they die.... (lots of sudden death tax money)

Now we need to pay for more burial grounds (helping the economy)
Pay for a bunch of funerals (helping the flower/religious/cemetary trades)
Give up 50% of the assets of those who die to the government....

And even worse, these people who all died had a voting record and remembered all kinds of bad crap this country has done to them. With them dead and all, we can almost change the political landscape by just making sure Ebola hits hard in an R or D area. (Texas vs California).

So yeah I'm seeing a huge money trail if this virus is brought here. That's the paranoia 2014 world I live in.

Uneducated panic (4, Informative)

sjbe (173966) | about 3 months ago | (#47582779)

There's a reason animals (and humans) are paranoid about shit we don't understand. From a survival standpoint, it's an advantageous attitude to have. And right now, I'm pretty fucking paranoid about being anywhere near people with Ebola!

Then you need to educate yourself because ebola is NOT even in the top 20 pathogens you should be worried about. Infectious disease doctors worry about diseases like Vancomycin-intermediate Staphylococcus aureus [wikipedia.org] which is an example of a much more serious threat. You're worrying about a meteor strike when while living in Tornado Alley. Sure there is a tiny risk but it isn't what you should be concerned about. Ebola is scary but there are MUCH scarier and FAR more likely pathogens out there.

Ebola is hard to transmit, easy to contain, evolves slowly and is very unlikely to come anywhere near you in the near future.

What an idiot you are (-1, Troll)

frovingslosh (582462) | about 3 months ago | (#47582285)

Boy, how stupid can you be. We are talking about bring over here someone who knew all of the precautions and should have been taking them himself. If it is so safe to treat this deadly incurable disease then the person would never have caught it in the first place. The very fact that this person has the disease when they knew exactly what they were dealing with and supposedly took all of the proper precautions disproves any claim of safety in bringing Ebola to this country.

Re:What an idiot you are (2, Funny)

3.5 stripes (578410) | about 3 months ago | (#47582483)

Herp and derp, doctors in african countries in makeshift hospitals should have access to all sorts of sanitary facilities, just like in the CDC!

Look, I managed to counter your argument without seeking refuge in ad hominem, you pinheaded microphallic butt sniffer!

Remember the facilities (3, Insightful)

sirwired (27582) | about 3 months ago | (#47582597)

This guy had limited equipment, and was treating patients in a facility that would make a highway rest stop look like a model for cleanliness. I expect he was taking every precaution he could, but that's not necessarily a lot.

The CDC has purpose-built facilities designed precisely for treating patients with deadly diseases a lot more communicable than this. This seems like a good use for them.

Re:What an idiot you are (1)

fightinfilipino (1449273) | about 3 months ago | (#47582633)

The current theory is that Kent Brantly and Nancy Writebol contracted Ebola in a scrub room from another staff member who had been infected but wasn't showing enough outward signs of infection [yahoo.com] . hopefully the persons involved in transport will be more carefully screened before the flight.

NOTHING is 100% safe. all people can do is reduce risk as much as possible. that being said, the risk of this patient now spreading ebola to the U.S. is incredibly low.

also, 3.5 stripes is right. there's seriously no need to call anyone "stupid". wth.

Re:What a bunch of pansies (5, Informative)

Solandri (704621) | about 3 months ago | (#47582553)

The disease is not particularly communicable. It tends to externalize a lot of bodily fluids, which is why in places with poor sanitary conditions, it spreads pretty quickly. Hospitals which handle patients like these tend not to be considered poor sanitary conditions..

The various strains of the flu which become pandemics don't start off as particularly communicable either. They usually develop in other animals (e.g. birds or pigs) and mutate into a form which can infect humans. Even then their outbreak is usually limited to farmers and people who work closely with animals because, like current Ebola strains, they can only be transmitted via direct contact.

They become a pandemic when they mutate into a form which can be transmitted via the air. Not saying this will happen with Ebola. Just saying that just because it's not particularly communicable now doesn't mean it'll stay that way. Ebola is so deadly (50%-90% mortality rate, c.f. 10%-20% for the Spanish Flu) that it inhibits its own spread - killing its victims before they have a chance to mingle with other people and spread the disease. That's also why they haven't transported a patient out of Africa yet - they tend to die before the red tape is cleared. Given the deadly nature of the disease I think it's a good idea to be able to study a case in a modern hospital facility rather than some rural village in Africa. They just need to be super careful handling the case, which it sounds like they are.

There's also something to be said for backing up the doctors who are working on this outbreak with the best possible care we can provide them should they become infected. These folks are casualties on the front lines of an inter-species war. Writing them off and treating them as pariahs if they become infected doesn't exactly bolster their confidence nor encourage other doctors to try to help contain similar outbreaks. Modern epidemiology has become a victim of its own success. People point to fizzled outbreaks like MERS, SARS, the Bird Flu, and criticize our disease control agencies of overreacting because those diseases didn't really spread that far, when the reason those diseases didn't spread that far was likely in large part due to the quick actions of those agencies. We need to be backing these people up. They need to know that should they become casualties, the world is going to provide them with the best possible care to help them recover, not treat them like lepers.

Well smallpox is already kept there... so why not? (1)

blueshift_1 (3692407) | about 3 months ago | (#47582115)

If I recall properlly, the CDC keeps one of the last remaining samples of smallpox in Atlanta... so why not add Ebola? D:

Boneheaded move (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47582123)

The first time I heard this idea, before it was actually going to happen, I thought it was a boneheaded move, and I still agree with myself. Despite healthcare workers' presumably understanding the incubation period, transmission routes, etc., they still are nonetheless still being infected despite their best measures. This suggests sloppiness on the part of healthcare workers, a lack of understanding of the transmission vectors, or perhaps an underestimation of the virulence of this virus, or some combination of these or other factors. Cases of Ebola infection increased about 10% in the last week or so in affected parts of Africa. This may well turn out to be a recipe for disaster.

Ebola Cross with Rabies (4, Funny)

Scottingham (2036128) | about 3 months ago | (#47582131)

Just for fun, the folks at the CDC should combine Ebola with the rabies virus. This zombie apocalypse isn't going to start itself!

Re:Ebola Cross with Rabies (1)

smooth wombat (796938) | about 3 months ago | (#47582311)

Don't you mean cross Ebola with the common cold?

Oh right, that would be a terrible, terrible thing.

Nothing to panic over (4, Informative)

sjbe (173966) | about 3 months ago | (#47582145)

I know there are brilliant doctors and scientists in Atlanta who handle highly-communicable diseases, but is this such a brilliant idea?

Ebola is hardly the only scary pathogen handled by the CDC. In fact I believe the CDC doesn't even consider this among the most dangerous of pathogens because of the relative difficulty in transmission [wikipedia.org] which requires direct contact and it evolves relatively slowly apparently. They know very well how to handle this. The main concern is that they actually follow proper procedures. If they do that then there is little to worry about.

If you really want to study ebola to find a cure this is probably a very good idea provided they exercise appropriate caution. You want the experts at the CDC to be able to study this up close in a live patient. Of course one has to wonder why we had to wait for an american physician to get infected before deciding this was a good idea...

Re:Nothing to panic over (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47582303)

Why did they have to wait for an American?

Because if they tried to take a person of any other nationality out of there and into the USA that would be kidnapping or rendition or some sort of clandestine operation.

I wonder if the Chinese or Russians will send a team in to "investigate" and go home with a passenger on board...

Reminds me of the plot behind "Aliens" where Burke's idea is to get a human to transport the alien inside of Ripley.

Nothing to panic over (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47582459)

I find your faith in these experts disturbing.

They may "know" how to handle this but recent history has demonstrated there's a good chance they won't use that knowledge.

http://www.thewire.com/national/2014/07/cdc-closes-labs-after-anthrax-bird-flu-and-small-pox-scares/374318/

Re:Nothing to panic over (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47582547)

Emory University School of Medicine, Emory University Hospital, and the CDC are all located in the same complex. It's all within walking distance. This is a major research hospital that is co-located with the headquarters of the CDC. It's the best place in the world to handle something like this. These people know what the hell they're doing. It's not a problem.

The patient is a doctor that has first-hand experience with exotic infectious diseases. If he's thinking clearly, he will be able to accurately report symptoms and maybe even collaborate with the researchers and doctors that are studying the case. It'd be nice to save his life, but regardless of that this opportunity to study the virus in a live case is invaluable.

Re:Nothing to panic over (1)

shadowrat (1069614) | about 3 months ago | (#47582705)

You want the experts at the CDC to be able to study this up close in a live patient. Of course one has to wonder why we had to wait for an american physician to get infected before deciding this was a good idea...

Exactly! Walter from Fringe would have been able to find the cure in about 45 minutes in a makeshift kitchen lab. Then he could have engineered a cure with some old yogurt, a teapot and some of his own blood. All that as long as he could just see the patient. You'd never get him to go to Africa though. That's why they have to bring the patient here!

Try, try again? (1, Informative)

iinventstuff (1888700) | about 3 months ago | (#47582155)

If we can't contain the disease (** and keep doctors from contracting it **) in Liberia, who's bright idea is it to try to contain it in Atlanta?

I propose sending containment & treatment equipment (trial vaccines, etc.), and medical personnel to Liberia. Staying put is probably easier on the patient that a transatlantic flight.

Transporting a person with such a deadly disease doesn't seem like the best plan...

Re:Try, try again? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47582289)

Yea, I mean Atlanta probably doesn't have any more advanced facilities than Liberia...

Re:Try, try again? (0)

frovingslosh (582462) | about 3 months ago | (#47582319)

I agree completely. More importantly, this person volunteered to go to Africa and do whatever he did. The millions of people in this country did not volunteer to take similar risks in bringing him back.

Re:Try, try again? (4, Interesting)

Andy Dodd (701) | about 3 months ago | (#47582573)

Um, there are massive differences between Atlanta and Liberia.

Do you believe the following are regular occurrences in Atlanta?
1) Family of someone who died of a known infectious disease choose to hand-wash the corpse anyway, with full knowledge of the cause of death. (Note: Many Africans apparently don't believe the disease exists.)
2) Local residents protest the hospital because they believe that the "story" about the infections disease is a coverup for ritual cannibalism. http://www.reuters.com/article... [reuters.com]
3) Local residents break in to the isolation ward to remove an infected family member from the hospital

Going through Customs... (5, Funny)

tekrat (242117) | about 3 months ago | (#47582217)

Is the TSA agent going to give the Ebola patient a pat-down? After all, he might have a bomb in his underwear.

Re:Going through Customs... (1)

Nemyst (1383049) | about 3 months ago | (#47582785)

Well, he is coming into the country with a biological weapon...

Fucking ridiculous (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47582223)

Maybe if they survive Ebola, they can go hiking on the Iraq/Iran border. These idiots chose to go to Africa and treat highly infectious patients. Why in the hell do we constantly spend tax payer money on people that make stupid decisions and at the same time put others at risk by bringing this disease to the US?

Re:Fucking ridiculous (1)

desdinova 216 (2000908) | about 3 months ago | (#47582375)

according to TFS the patient in question was a doctor, so I'm presuming that he was over there treating patients.

Re:Fucking ridiculous (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47582497)

according to TFS the patient in question was a doctor, so I'm presuming that he was over there treating patients.

No shit. I guess you missed my comment somehow in which I said, "These idiots chose to go to Africa and treat highly infectious patients".

Re:Fucking ridiculous (1)

CaptainDork (3678879) | about 3 months ago | (#47582487)

How much taxpayer money did we spend?

Re:Fucking ridiculous (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47582699)

How much taxpayer money did we spend?

I do not know. Why don't you go look up the costs for the following and get back to us. It should not be too difficult since Barry promised to have a transparent government:

"Aeromedical Biological Containment System"
"specially built isolation unit"

Those two alone do not sound cheap. Of course, that does not account for the fuel, treatment of the patient and other miscellaneous items. Or perhaps you are so naive that you think the NIH, CDC or Obama is going to send this patient a bill for all of this?

I think I speak for most Americans... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47582233)

I think I speak for most Americans when I say "What. The. Fuck.", followed by "What kind of crack are you on? Show me where in the manual it says we should bring these guys out of the hot zone. This is like an anti-quarantine. Our government has truly gone off the rails".

MASH (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47582245)

What happened to common sense? Fly the doctors to the patient, and drop a cargo container off with all the medical equipment.

Put some of the military surplus medivac equipment to use!

To build a weapon? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47582247)

They're transporting a human because a human is the best way to get the live virus that far. It doesn't live very well outside of a body so transporting it via other means is a risk. They don't care if the human lives or dies, what they want is the virus. And lots of it. Alive.

Will they weaponize it or try to build a vaccine? Or just put it in an archive "for safe keeping"?

Read "The Hot Zone" - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Hot_Zone

The Onion is right again... (0)

powerlinekid (442532) | about 3 months ago | (#47582255)

Ebola vaccine [theonion.com]

I'm not sure if this is sad or just expected; I guess both which in thereof itself is sad.

I've seen this one before... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47582287)

it doesn't end well.

He (she?) has a legal right to return to the US (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47582343)

A US citizen has a legal right to return to the US. There are no exceptions to this. This is a central tenet of both US and international law. Far better to return under careful medical quarantine than without those precautions.

World War Z (1)

MooseTick (895855) | about 3 months ago | (#47582359)

I have both read and seen World War Z, and see no problem with this.

FUD much? (3, Insightful)

plcurechax (247883) | about 3 months ago | (#47582541)

I know there are brilliant doctors and scientists in Atlanta who handle highly-communicable diseases, but is this such a brilliant idea?

When did Slashdot become home to stupid FUD* spewing dweebs with little or no common sense? The subtitle is "News for Nerds," which would suggest somebody who submits something might have half a clue about what they are talking about (leaving the plebs to pontificate on logical and scientific fallacy or imagine a Beowulf cluster of hot grits ).

I want my Slashdot with nerds filter enabled.

And yes it is an excellent idea, because it gives the CDC a living "test tube" of the actual active Ebola virus, not a sample of infected blood collected, and shipped on ice. Making it ideal for study, and possibly detection of any variant (i.e. mutation) that had not been notice before. Of course, this will likely cost the American doctor his/her life, but such is the risk of fighting an viral outbreak, and the real-world beyond web forums and politicians rambling.

* FUD: Fear, Uncertainty, and Doubt

Re-read your first paragraph... (1)

trailerparkcassanova (469342) | about 3 months ago | (#47582583)

The aircraft was specially outfitted for this type of scenario. You can't compare this to a scheduled flight on a commercial airliner.

#WhatCouldGoWrong (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47582755)

Had to say it.

the strain..... (1)

josepha48 (13953) | about 3 months ago | (#47582761)

I think with all the sci-fy shows like the strain, zombie this and zombie that, people are terrified that something like this will cause the apocalypse. So I am sure when this hits mainstream news people in Atlanta will flip out and the preachers will have thier field day. As long as those stupid religious end of the world fanatics don't do something stupid, it will be fine. All it takes it one fanatic trying to cause the end of the world and we will have ebola here.

Of COURSE it's a good idea. (2)

sirwired (27582) | about 3 months ago | (#47582789)

Better to study Ebola in a large, properly-equipped research facility where we know exactly who has it (this one guy), and can take appropriate precautions. The precautions needed to keep the infection from spreading in a hospital setting are not particularly elaborate; better than what's available in BFE General Hospital, but nothing fancier than the isolation unit present in just about every major academic medical center in the US.

That's about 1000x better than somebody bringing it over here and spreading it to some other people before somebody recognizes it for what it is, and that being the first chance to run real research on a live patient. This way, we bring over one guy, and the best infectious disease doctors in the world can all be treating him at once in a facility designed for exactly this purpose, with virtually zero chance of this not-particularly-communicable disease going anywhere.

Or, we could have a surprise panic when this shows up in a family somewhere in flyover country, or somebody spreads it to patients in the waiting room of the Metropolis General Hospital ER... yeah, that's LOTS better.

Or not.

Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?