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Xiaomi Arrives As Top Smartphone Seller In China

timothy posted about 3 months ago | from the presto-change-oh dept.

Cellphones 82

New submitter redseo writes Xiaomi, known as the Apple of China, and recently enjoying its new-found fame and glory in the Indian market, has achieved yet another milestone. It has overtaken Samsung, to become China's best selling smartphone manufacturer, in Q2 2014. Xiaomi sold total of 15 million smartphones in China in Q2, which is a three-fold increase from a year ago. That's pretty good for a company founded only four years ago, with no stores of its own. (And though Xiaomi's phones are not widely sold in the U.S., they're offered by third-party sellers on Amazon and elsewhere; CNet has mostly good things to say about the company's Mi 3.)

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Good for them (1)

yeshuawatso (1774190) | about 3 months ago | (#47616575)

Maybe they'll get some retail room for US carriers too. Doesn't matter what country you pick you're going to be spied on, might as well get the devices on the cheap while your privacy is being invaded.

Re:Good for them (3, Interesting)

CanHasDIY (1672858) | about 3 months ago | (#47616621)

Doesn't matter what country you pick you're going to be spied on,

This is likely true, although there is likely merit to being spied on by a foreign government.

Namely, as a US citizen, I don't have to worry about the Chinese government taking my freedom away because I did/said something they don't like.

Re:Good for them (0)

stevez67 (2374822) | about 3 months ago | (#47616635)

That's a quite naive point of view.

Re:Good for them (1, Funny)

CanHasDIY (1672858) | about 3 months ago | (#47616659)

That's a quite useless comment. So I guess we're even.

Re:Good for them (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47616877)

Fancy that... a vague comment from a Slashdotter who tries to look insightful. How refreshing!

Re:Good for them (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47616943)

That's a quite naive point of view.

Re:Good for them (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47622431)

Well look at that.. another lame joke on Slashdot. What a surprise!

Re:Good for them (4, Interesting)

ShanghaiBill (739463) | about 3 months ago | (#47617029)

That's a quite naive point of view.

Really? When was the last time an American was arrested on American soil by the Chinese police?

Even if you spend time in both countries (as I do), you have a far greater chance of being arrested by American police. On a per capita basis, American citizens are four times as likely to be incarcerated as Chinese citizens.

Re:Good for them (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47617193)

How are the per captia statistics for being executed? Oh? Yeah, that's what I thought.

Re:Good for them (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47617249)

We all know the chinese are more efficient, that's why they control our production lines!

Re:Good for them (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47619337)

How are the per captia statistics for being executed?

China leads in the number of executions per capita, ahead of Iran, Saudi Arabia, Iraq and the USA, however they do execute less children than the US.

Nineteen of the 50 American states currently have laws allowing the execution of 16- and 17-year-old offenders. According to Amnesty International, five countries; China, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Iran, Pakistan, and the U.S.A are known to have executed juvenile offenders since the year 2000. There are also currently juvenile offenders on death row in the Philippines and Sudan. Of the 18 executions of juveniles known to have taken place since 2000, nine were in the U.S., five were in Iran, and two were in China. Pakistan and the Congo executed one juvenile offender each.

https://spreadsheets.google.co... [google.com]

Re:Good for them (0)

vakuona (788200) | about 3 months ago | (#47626475)

Umm, I don't think the US executes children. I do however think they can execute adults for crimes committed as children.

There is a difference.

Re:Good for them (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47643265)

There is a difference.

Not much of one

Re:Good for them (1)

PolygamousRanchKid (1290638) | about 3 months ago | (#47617261)

On a per capita basis, American citizens are four times as likely to be incarcerated as Chinese citizens.

Chinese workers are more productive in manufacturing things, but American criminals are four times more productive in committing crimes! We're #1! USA! USA!

Now, if we can just find a way to monetize this advantage, and turn crime into a highly successful export article, we're all set!

Or maybe Chinese criminals are smarter and better at not getting caught? And our criminals are dumber and not very adept at avoiding justice?

As you are in the States now, Shanghai Bill ... (1)

Taco Cowboy (5327) | about 3 months ago | (#47619723)

That's a quite naive point of view

Really? When was the last time an American was arrested on American soil by the Chinese police?

Even if you spend time in both countries (as I do), you have a far greater chance of being arrested by American police. On a per capita basis, American citizens are four times as likely to be incarcerated as Chinese citizens

When you were still in Shanghai, you needn't worry of being arrested by the American authority but now you have moved back to the States, please, Shanghaibill, do not say what you said so loudly

I do fear for your safety

PS. I'd continue to stay outside of the USA if I were you

Re:Good for them (1, Offtopic)

AK Marc (707885) | about 3 months ago | (#47617903)

China is not imperialistic. It never has been. When's the last time China sent an army to the other side of the globe?

England did, quite often. The USA does today, quite often. The USSR did often as well. But China has never been imperialistic. They don't care what happens in the USA, except so far as it affects them.

Re:Good for them (1)

Anonymous Bullard (62082) | about 3 months ago | (#47623813)

China is not imperialistic. It never has been.

Chuckle. And any Tibetan, Uighur, Mongol or Manchu claiming otherwise will have subjected their remaining family to paying for the cost of execution.

Oh and forget about the Manchus making any claims. Their people are for all practical purposes completely extinct after only sixty odd years under Chinese rule.

Of course that's only the contemporary expression of China's imperialism; the current "outer regions" still writhing in their death throes before the inevitable sinicization. The Han-chinese chauvinism and violent Lebensraum policies makes China's imperialism quite grim for these former neighbours turned victims.

Before them there were the previous "outer regions" which were swallowed up and turned into the dozens of singing and dancing "minorities" still technically recognized as non-Han and considered lesser by those already fully Hanified.

The massive change in China's imperialism happened when towards late 1800s first the "republicans" and then Mao's dictatorship adopted a version of Western nationalism based on One Empire, One People, One Leader and One Language. Then western inventions allowed population growth and soon western technology became crucial in hunt for expanded Lebensraum. It's always been those evil western masterminds behind the cultural genocide in "modern" China!

When's the last time China sent an army to the other side of the globe?

Beautiful logic that's been in incessant use by the likes of Mao and Stalin and their successors. "Let's just redefine the whole concept of imperialism and claim ourselves to be the victims! With enough indoctrination, re-education, strict controls on education and media and proper rewriting of history that will keep the masses doing our bidding for generations!"

Just look at the average chinese or russians who are kept "informed" exclusively by the state media. Their great peace-loving empires and dear leaders are pure, righteous and of course never corrupt and nepotistic while their smaller scheming neighbours are resisting their inherent imperial right to various land and sea territories and natural resources nearby. And the yeardstick of their nearby just keeps wandering further and further out after each consolidation of territory. That's how imperialism works.

Re:Good for them (2)

AK Marc (707885) | about 3 months ago | (#47624153)

The US's push west in the 1800s wasn't imperialistic. It was expansionistic. That's what China did (or is doing). That you are too dumb to see a difference doesn't mean there isn't one. And China isn't going outside the bounds of areas that were previously China (yes, some debate exists on those points)

Re:Good for them (1)

Anonymous Bullard (62082) | about 3 months ago | (#47635131)

The US's push west in the 1800s wasn't imperialistic. It was expansionistic. That's what China did (or is doing).

Definition of imperialism in English:
imperialism

  noun
[mass noun]
1A policy of extending a country's power and influence through colonization, use of military force, or other means

1.1chiefly historical Rule by an emperor

Both China and Russia have been both expansionistic and imperialistic from their very inception. China had some less expansionistic dynastic spells but the emperors always claimed the greatest borders their armies had even briefly controlled (and beyond).

 

And China isn't going outside the bounds of areas that were previously China (yes, some debate exists on those points)

That's China's imperial dogma indeed. Any past imperial military excursion or simple claim by the emperor (possibly plotted on some vague imperial map) or now the Communist Party annexes that land or territory eternally into the Chinese empire. That's one imperial behaviour that instead of rejecting the presently ruling murderous Communist Party has really relished.

Territories in Central Asia, Tibet, South Asia, whole sea all the way down to the coast of Brunei and Malaysia and other coastline countries... simply because some Chinese despot centuries ago made an imperial claim. They don't give a fuck what the neighbouring or occupied peoples think, or even if they survive as a people.

That's not just imperialism, but rather malevolent and even genocidal form of it. And not just before the modern era but right now in the 21st century. And territorial expansionism isn't the only form of China's reinvigorated imperialism (aka domination over others).

 

That you are too dumb to see a difference doesn't mean there isn't one.

Now that you "won" the argument with the regular "but USA did it!" attempt at redirection while ignoring the actual content it was time to discredit the other party with an ad hominem?

Re:Good for them (1)

AK Marc (707885) | about 3 months ago | (#47635931)

That's China's imperial dogma indeed. Any past imperial military excursion or simple claim by the emperor (possibly plotted on some vague imperial map) or now the Communist Party annexes that land or territory eternally into the Chinese empire.

At least there are ethnic chinese in those areas, and demonstrable historical claims, unlike the USSR in East Germany, or the USA in California.

France, England, Portugal, Spain and others claimed parts of Africa. That's "imperialism". Having minor border disputes with India, and handling Tibet as an internal matter when nearly all, if not all recognize it as part of China doesn't count as imperialism.

Or are their dealings with Taiwan "imperialism"? Taiwan claims to be Chinese. And the Chinese claim Taiwan. Nobody else has ever claimed it (well, aside from Japan that claimed everything at one point or another).

Re:Good for them (1)

Anonymous Bullard (62082) | about 3 months ago | (#47636791)

Having minor border disputes with India, and handling Tibet as an internal matter when nearly all, if not all recognize it as part of China doesn't count as imperialism.

Are you funny or what. The native inhabitants of those several northern Indian states that China's communist regime is claiming to own might have an issue with your characterizing the threats and landgrabs something other than "minor". Maybe they'd see the wisdom and benevolence of the CCP differently if any of them or their ancestors had had anything to do with China before... But nope, China only showed in drab uniforms behind the newly sealed borders up after invading Tibet in 1950-51 and now they (or rather their ancestral land) just belongs to the PRC apparently? Right.

Same thing with Tibetans and Uighurs. Before Mao grabbed power and embarked on massive population transfers do you have any idea how many Chinese were actually living in the Tibetan plateau or beyond the few inhabitable settlements in "Gansu"? A few hundred or thousand at most versus the millions now (somewhat) settled under the various Go West campaigns with a PLA-issue AK-47 knockoff?

Before Mao's genocidal Lebensraum policies there were only the typical handful of adventurous merchants and, at times, small garrisons that the people of the land found only a minor annoyance. Being persecuted and murdered for their religion, language and ethnicity and hounded off their lands only came after Mao repurposed the paper claims of the past Chinese emperors he so hated.

Taiwan started receiving some Chinese migration from 1700s onwards before General Chiang kicked things up a gear or few in late 1940's (after USA first kicked the Japanese out) and as expected immediately began oppressing the native islanders. Since 1945 Taiwan's situation could be considered similar to UK's half-assimilated "home nations". The Scots have a little referendum coming up...

In modern era only the brainwashed supporters of Mao, Stalin and Hitler have proudly justified their genocidal expansionism as "no big deal" while pointing fingers at past European colonialism. Congratulations.

So you might be a proud Han Chinese giving the impression of living in North America which you appear to detest (in which case offspring of a corrupt Party cadre springs to mind, they tend to migrate early and often). In any case the ability to put oneself in the other person's shoes is considered a high virtue in virtually every culture including confucianism which is again espoused in the PRC after the "minor" issue of the murder and total mayhem of "cultural revolution".

The Chinese or Russians don't seem to like living under foreign occupation even briefly or partially, but they sure like to dish out the genocidal "Final Solution" to their own peace-loving (former) neighbours! "But it's not the same, just look at the evil western kingdoms in the 1700s! See!" It's almost like compassion for those outside the tribe has been bred out over the centuries and replaced by distrust and hate.

Re:Good for them (1)

Type44Q (1233630) | about 3 months ago | (#47617949)

It's an entirely reality-based point of view. Now, if/when the time comes that we're a colonial territory of China, and they're looking to suppress dissent and/or build dossiers on everyone, that'll be another story... but until such time as that, your comment makes you an idiot.

Re:Good for them (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47616845)

So you're confident that the US government, which you suggest is spying on you and taking away your freedoms, will defend you against China's attempts to spy on you and take away your freedoms?

Why? Because the US government called dibs? Seems like there's no appreciable difference between the two in your mind.

Re:Good for them (1)

mbkennel (97636) | about 3 months ago | (#47617081)

"So you're confident that the US government, which you suggest is spying on you and taking away your freedoms, will defend you against China's attempts to spy on you and take away your freedoms?

Why? Because the US government called dibs?"

No, because the US government has political and economic interests to counter the opposing political and economic interests of the Chinese government, and in the end the first cares about your prosperity (well, maybe your boss') more than the second.

Re:Good for them (1)

mrchaotica (681592) | about 3 months ago | (#47617095)

Not at all. We're confident the Chinese government doesn't have jurisdiction to take away our freedoms. What do I care about China spying on me (other than as a matter of principle) if they can't do anything to me with the information they find out?

Re:Good for them (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47617927)

We're confident the Chinese government doesn't have jurisdiction to take away our freedoms.

Really? When extradition is just a bribe^H^H kickback^H^H^H campaign contribution away?

Their police don't have to do shit on American soil - they just have to have some diplomats ask nicely and get the pols to agree that it "makes good sense" to sign a treaty that effectively gives away your rights to China as well.

Re:Good for them (1)

mrchaotica (681592) | about 3 months ago | (#47618105)

You think the American government would agree to extradite an American in America to China? LOL. Not a chance. That's something the US Government would only expect other countries to do for its requests, and never do for them in return.

Re:Good for them (1)

Ralph Wiggam (22354) | about 3 months ago | (#47617125)

Who has the US government incarcerated for nothing besides "saying something they don't like"?

Re:Good for them (3, Informative)

CanHasDIY (1672858) | about 3 months ago | (#47617331)

Chelsea Manning, Leonard Peltier, The Cuban 5, likely at least a handful of Gitmo inmates, and of course all those Occupiers who didn't actually commit crimes.

Oh, and every pothead in jail, ever (although in fairness, they're incarcerated for doing something harmless the government doesn't like, as opposed to saying stuff).

Aaron Swartz would be there too, if not for... extenuating circumstances.

Surely you don't believe that there's no such thing as a political prisoner in the for-profit prison industry, do you? If so, that tells me that you don't know enough about the topic to be commenting from a position of knowledge, but rather one of ignorance.

Re:Good for them (0)

Ralph Wiggam (22354) | about 3 months ago | (#47617385)

I knew you were going to mention Manning.

Because apparently "doing things I agree with" is a valid legal defense in your warped little brain.

Re:Good for them (1)

CanHasDIY (1672858) | about 3 months ago | (#47617545)

Interesting, as I knew you were going to cherry pick that particular one of the many valid examples I gave.

However, you're welcome to your opinion, as I am welcome to the opinion that you should take your playground bullying and go fuck yourself.

Re:Good for them (1)

Ralph Wiggam (22354) | about 3 months ago | (#47617715)

OK. Aaron Swartz. You think he was prosecuted for his opinions and not for breaking and entering? Because he's on video breaking and entering.

Re:Good for them (1)

CanHasDIY (1672858) | about 3 months ago | (#47617869)

Yea, the feds were going to crucify him for a petty B&E, not for disseminating information they didn't want disseminated.

Because that makes sense.

Re:Good for them (1)

Ralph Wiggam (22354) | about 3 months ago | (#47617891)

A 6 month sentence is very standard for B&E. It's not their fault that he rejected the offer.

Re:Good for them (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47621877)

I'm not up on the happenings to this... but if 6 months is mandatory... why would you need to accept an offer?

A quick look at NC's punishment gives 120 days misdemeanor which seems semi-low for the "6 month mandatory". For the felony flavor up to 25 years (habitual) which seems much too high for the 6 month mandatory. So I can't tell which he was trying to "accept an offer" about.

So what was the max/min for this crime?

Re:Good for them (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47619777)

Well, you just have to be careful if you enter China (and probably Macau and Hong Kong as well) and have previously done stuff "detrimental" to them.

Re:Good for them (3, Informative)

arglebargle_xiv (2212710) | about 3 months ago | (#47620549)

Doesn't matter what country you pick you're going to be spied on

With the Xiaomi this is especially the case, it sends a pile of private information [f-secure.com] on you back to Beijing, China [theepochtimes.com] . So it's not just the generic spooks, it's also the manufacturer who's spying on you.

Re:Good for them (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47645503)

Well TheEpochTime is a newspaper of Falun Gong sect, so 99% of the articles are against anything that come from Mainland China (sometimes true but really often false or biased). The other percent is about dogs bump by cars or other usefull things like that.

As far I know, every compnies, including Google at first launch does about the same. and via spell checker, on phone or web interface (most Wordpress installations for example), or with voice recognition, get lot of your informations. Google cars are know to gather wifi informations and exchanges, and so is forbidden in Germany for example. Apple get a pile of private information too as revelated several times.

But after the system builder for operator agnostic phones, you have to add the operator layer, if you was stupid enough to pay several times your phone with expansive subscription, you will also probably backup without your consentment your adress book on their servers.

Yeah yeah (1, Interesting)

s.petry (762400) | about 3 months ago | (#47616587)

For decades the best selling car in China was made by a Chines company, but strangely looked exactly like a Buick which was being manufactured in China by GM.

Telling me that the best selling product is a home grown product in a controlled economy is useless, sorry.

Then the hype is spread to India, which has massive amounts of poverty. If the Chinese made phone is cheap, guess what phone Indian consumers will purchase (considering many people can't afford a phone at all, let alone a cell phone)? No big shock, the Chinese made phone.. *sigh*

Re:Yeah yeah (2)

Sonny Yatsen (603655) | about 3 months ago | (#47616639)

Wait, which "best selling car" in China are you talking about? Because Buick has consistently been one of the best (if not the best) selling car manufacturers in China since before WWII.

Re:Yeah yeah (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47616717)

Chery is the largest Chinese auto exporter, & GM has accused them of ripping off their designs.

Re:Yeah yeah (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47620311)

GM accused them in 2001. Since that time Chery has struck joint ventures with the likes of Fiat and Jaguar. Also, Chery does not make the best selling car, not even close. The top 10 list for the last several years has cars from three companies: GM, Ford, and VW. The Chinese love foreign brands, they hold them in high esteem.

Re:Yeah yeah (2)

Jesus_666 (702802) | about 3 months ago | (#47616905)

Well, I can believe in Xiaomi winning on quality. Their phones are quite powerful, yet reasonably priced. I have a coworker who swears by the brand and from what I've seen I definitely like his Mi2 better than my Galaxy S3. Are they the alpha and omega of phone development? Definitely not. But they certainly are a welcome addition to the high-end smartphone market.

Well, they're better than Samsung, which admittedly isn't terribly difficult.

Re:Yeah yeah (2)

s.petry (762400) | about 3 months ago | (#47617127)

Compared to what? Banned products, or products that the Chines government limits to ensure that Chinese companies are profitable? China is not a free market, so any claim that something is a number one seller is obviously skewed.

Re:Yeah yeah (3, Interesting)

Sonny Yatsen (603655) | about 3 months ago | (#47617179)

China might not be a technically a "free market," but if there's any bit of electronics you want to buy there, it's available for sale even if it is officially banned.

Video game consoles in China have been officially banned since 2001. Guess what I see when I go to the mall in China? Xbox 360s, Playstation 3s, Wiis. I've been told that even next gen consoles like the PS4 has made it to storefronts in China before the official launch date (through gray market means via Hong Kong).

At a macro level, China is not a "free market" but rather a managed economy. At the micro level, though, everything is for sale.

Re:Yeah yeah (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47617445)

America isn't a free market either.

Re:Yeah yeah (3, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47619261)

Compared to what? Banned products, or products that the Chines government limits to ensure that Chinese companies are profitable?

I have the Redmi Note, bought via Singapore, and it's easily the best phone I have used (my job means I get a lot of phones so at hand I have iPhones, Samsung Galaxy, Nokia 625, a couple of Blackberries, and a few assorted other Androids).

The thing is, on specs alone it's a decent phone - the 1.7GHz octacore CPU isn't the absolute fastest in the world, but it's more than capable of running anything currently available on Android very smoothly and without hesitation. 2GB RAM means multitasking is no problem, and the screen is bright and clear. MIUI 5 is clear, nice to look at and has many thoughtful shortcuts and UI helpers that make it very engaging to use. It's clearly built as a workhorse rather than a prestige product, with a lot of plastic and some flex, but the design is nice enough and the build quality reasonable. It all works quite seamlessly, with very few shortfalls and irritations, so the Redmi Note is nicer to use than phones like the iPhones, Nokias and Galaxies.

More than that though, is that it cost less than AU$180 outright, so compared to any other sub-$200 phone, it's astonishing. It deserves to be a best seller in any market, not just China, and I suspect companies like Samsung, HTC, LG, Microsoft and Apple will be looking at it with real fear in their hearts.

Re:Yeah yeah (1)

Duhavid (677874) | about 3 months ago | (#47617309)

Removing incorrect moderation

Sucks to be Samsung (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47616655)

Someone else is better at ripping stuff off from Apple, and cheaper. Ouch.

Sucks to be Samsung (1)

tuppe666 (904118) | about 3 months ago | (#47617185)

Someone else is better at ripping stuff off from Apple, and cheaper. Ouch.

Except the only thing ripped from Apple is the dog and pony show...they ripped off Samsungs business model. The reality is though Samsung have more to worry about from Lenovo, which seems the most likely to break from the pack of hopefuls.

the apple of china.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47616671)

You cannot change battery or add micro SD memory card. yep sounds like the crap that apple sells.. ;)

-db

Re:the apple of china.. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47619269)

Huh? I can change the battery in my Redmi Note, and already have a 32GB SD card in it, as well as dual SIMs. Which model are you thinking of?

Trumpchi (0)

tekrat (242117) | about 3 months ago | (#47616685)

And pretty soon we'll all be driving Trumpchis -- tell us something we don't know. China will the dominant economy before the decade is out, and will be the economic powerhouse of 2020 to 2030, after which they will implode.

Of course, most Americans won't be around at all to see that happen, as the USA will become a dangerous 3rd world shithole by 2030.

Re:Trumpchi (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47617701)

This won't happen without big shakeups in China.

Their current form of government is too inefficient. Too much graft. Too much corruption. It will collapse under it's own weight because you can't govern a real world superpower when your govt officials leverage their power to pretty much exclusively enrich their family's business empires. China is run by an elite, closed society of
ruthless capitalists.

Most have said that a revolution is inevitable without 10% annual growth and they've been missing that mark for the past few years. Unemployment is already starting to skyrocket. You can only build so many ghost towns with fake money and loans backed by accounting tricks concealed by corrupt members of the PRC.

Re:Trumpchi (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47619673)

Their current form of government is too inefficient. Too much graft. Too much corruption.

Are you talking about China or the US? because the same statement could be levelled at each.

Their current form of government is too inefficient. Too much graft. Too much corruption. It will collapse under it's own weight because you can't govern a real world superpower when your govt officials leverage their power to pretty much exclusively enrich their family's business empires. The US is run by an elite, closed society of
ruthless capitalists.

See what I did there?

Unemployment is already starting to skyrocket. You can only build so many ghost towns with fake money and loans backed by accounting tricks concealed by corrupt members of the US banking elite.

Unemployment is sky-rocketing everywhere in the world. This is the inevitable consequence of rising automation and technological sophistication meeting rising autocracy, plutocracy and the loss of democracy worldwide.

At the height of the IAG crisis, there were 3 Million unoccupied luxury condos in the US. That is more than the entire US homeless population at the time.

The problem worldwide, and not just in the US and China, is that the prices are being set by oligarch's, and when they are not met, resources are simply being vacated rather than sold for residual pricing. To make it clear, it is not the oligarch's owning all that property, but rather they own the securities on the mortgages and business loans to cover all that property and nobody in power is prepared to concede that anything has been mispriced. This results in higher taxes in the form of interest payments for everyone except those permitted to borrow from reserve banks.

When more taxes are paid to banks than governments, it's not hard to see why democracy is eroded.

Of course, this means DOOOOM (1)

danaris (525051) | about 3 months ago | (#47616783)

I can't wait to hear from all the pundits why this means Apple—and only Apple—is doomed.

After all, it's not as if they're taking significantly more marketshare and profitshare from Samsung than from Apple or anything...oh, no; every single event that can be broadly construed to be in the cellphone or consumer technology space, no matter how loosely related to Apple, can only ever mean that Apple is in trouble, and all its competitors are poised to take over in everything.

:-P

Dan Aris

Re:Of course, this means DOOOOM (1)

Sonny Yatsen (603655) | about 3 months ago | (#47616855)

I think you're the first to suggest that this article means that Apple is doomed.

Re:Of course, this means DOOOOM (1)

Bing Tsher E (943915) | about 3 months ago | (#47617129)

They're the first person to even mention Apple, which is refreshing.

Re:Of course, this means DOOOOM (1)

Plumpaquatsch (2701653) | about 3 months ago | (#47637633)

They're the first person to even mention Apple, which is refreshing.

Apart from the summary and TFA, you mean.

Re:Of course, this means DOOOOM (1)

93 Escort Wagon (326346) | about 3 months ago | (#47617141)

WHAT? Apple is doomed?! Oh no!

Hey, everyone - I just heard Apple is doomed!

Death of a thousand cuts. (1)

emil (695) | about 3 months ago | (#47617187)

MIUI costs less to develop than iOS. Why? MIUI is open and accepts 3rd party contributions, while iOS does not (in the places that count).

How long can a business lose market share with a more expensive product? We should ask Microsoft.

Re:Death of a thousand cuts. (1)

Plumpaquatsch (2701653) | about 3 months ago | (#47637643)

MIUI costs less to develop than iOS. Why? MIUI is open and accepts 3rd party contributions, while iOS does not (in the places that count).

Gracefully accepting code from the NSA - priceless.

Re:Of course, this means DOOOOM (1)

mjwx (966435) | about 3 months ago | (#47619423)

I think you're the first to suggest that this article means that Apple is doomed.

Pretty much.

Apple has faded so far into mediocrity, they now have to generate their own hate.

But seriously, I dont see how anyone is DOOOOMED(TM) by this because its just another competitor. Huawei and Xiaomi have been making phones for some time, the top models on par with the offerings from Samsung and HTC, this doesn't mean anyone is doomed as Android is already very competitive and fast moving.

I just committed the cardinal /. sin, I read the article, Xaiomi has 14% of the market, Samsung has 12% along with Lenovo and Yulong and Huawei has 11% with the remaining 39% being made up by "other" so Samsung is hardly suffering from a catastrophic loss.

Apple simply has shrinking market share. (1)

tuppe666 (904118) | about 3 months ago | (#47617231)

I can't wait to hear from all the pundits why this means Apple—and only Apple—is doomed.

Actually the only real information is Apple AND Samsung are both having their market share eaten up by Android,

Re:Apple simply has shrinking market share. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47617673)

They'll make it up in volume!

Re:Of course, this means DOOOOM (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47617273)

Actually it is Samsung who is doomed.

Apple has the lions share at the top end, Apple is taking most of the profits from cellphone sales.
Now we have Xiaomi taking out the bottom end of the market where Apple never positioned any products but Samsung did.

Samsung are now the meat in the sandwich getting squeezed from both sides. This can already be seen in their falls in profit over the last few quarters , and even their semiconductor division is posting guidance of lower profits after Apple diversified their supply chain taking large volumes away from Samsung.

Worse yet for Samsung is that they still reliant on Google for Android, with Google now taking more control over the end product. Tiezen is not ready and is a risk where by Google may eject them from the Android market.

3D tv has flopped, 4K TV is not even remotely ready, "curved" displays are a Noddy toy and the profit margins in flat screen TVs is just not there, they are a mass produced low profit commodity. So people are NOT replacing their older flat screens for new ones because there is no compelling reason to do so.

Samsung are also in patent disputes with more than just Apple, Dyson being another example.
Tablet sales are slowing, there is no huge technological leap to make people upgrade after 2-3 years.

All up, things are looking bad for Samsung.

Is that a thing? (2)

tuppe666 (904118) | about 3 months ago | (#47617625)

Apple has the lions share at the top end...Google may eject them from the Android market..Tablet sales are slowing

There is no top end or bottom end...there is just a market for smartphones it is why we are discussing a Chinese branded(not just made in China like the iphone). The proof is we are in an article discussing a phone company as the new Apple...at a fraction of the price ...with more premium features.

Google cannot eject Samsung from the Android market. In fact quite the opposite Google for mow is reliant on Samsung. In fact tomorrow Samsung could produce an Android phone without Google like Amazon and Microsoft...

iPad sales only are slowing. As we continue to say there is no high end low end of the the market...just the market, and Apple have simply priced themselves out of it. Tablets continue to sell very well. If we include the new phablet market..then even faster than ever.

Re:Is that a thing? (1)

Zebedeu (739988) | about 3 months ago | (#47622815)

Google cannot eject Samsung from the Android market. In fact quite the opposite Google for mow is reliant on Samsung. In fact tomorrow Samsung could produce an Android phone without Google like Amazon and Microsoft...

No, they couldn't.
Samsung has had their own Android store for a while, and despite their success selling hardware, nobody wants to use their software, and developers don't want to publish in their store.

If Samsung dropped the Google Play Store, they'd suddenly see their software library become very limited and their (soon to be ex-) customers very unhappy.
Especially now that their sales are starting to go down. The other Android players are catching up.

Similarly, Google can't drop Samsung since they represent such a huge portion of the Android market. These two companies are interdependent, whether they like it or not.
Kind of like how Apple for a long time had to use Google maps, and even today still has Google as the default search engine (or at least I think they do).

Re:Of course, this means DOOOOM (1)

timeOday (582209) | about 3 months ago | (#47617693)

This kind of post works so much better if you wait until somebody actually says the thing you are so sure everybody will say.

Anyways, Xiaomi, Samsung, and Apple are all Chinese-made phones so who really cares? It would be far more shocking if the manufacture of components and final assembly for tens of millions of phones shifted from one nation to another within a year. Designing a styling a phone doesn't require any infrastructure. Heck, the baton has already passed from Motorolla (Chicago? or Phoenix?) to Ericcson (Sweden) to Blackberry (Canada) to Samsung (Korea) and Apple.

Wait for typical Apple revenge - lawsuits (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47616885)

Competition in the USA is the most hated word for local duo/monopolies.

Is it NSA free? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47616945)

or they already hacked it and put spying software?

SEO scum of the earth (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47617221)

Oh lookie, seems Slashdot greenlighted an article from an SEO guy! He's not even ashamed to put "seo" in his user name! Be sure to check out his other submission, "Get Best Android News In India"!

cute company name does it all (1)

poached (1123673) | about 3 months ago | (#47617225)

In case you didn't know, xiaomi means "little grain of rice" in mandarin. Everyone loves rice!
Apple = cute fruit that cannot possibly offend anyone

Brilliant!

Re:cute company name does it all (2)

Ken_g6 (775014) | about 3 months ago | (#47617405)

Even better, the name is pronounced like the English "show me". (Click the listen button on Google Translate. [google.com] ) Which should be easy to spin into a very visual English ad campaign.

Re:cute company name does it all (1)

ShanghaiBill (739463) | about 3 months ago | (#47618171)

In case you didn't know, xiaomi means "little grain of rice" in mandarin./p>

Actually, it means "millet". "Xiao' means little, and "mi" means rice or grain. But you don't just slap the meanings together. The meaning changes when syllables are combined into words.

In America, people use millet mainly as parakeet food. But in China, it is a very common part of the diet. They make a delicious millet porridge, and millet is often added to soup or stew.

Nice Work Visit http://pkawam.blogspot.com (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47617227)

aaa

Nice Work Visit http://pkawam.blogspot.com (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47617247)

Nice Work Visit http://pkawam.blogspot.com

Correction (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47619451)

they do have stores in China. I believe it's around 18, and they look like apple stores

China: Chinese artists learn by copying old master (1)

Bryan bkk (3515247) | about 3 months ago | (#47619951)

Chinese history is built upon artists who can copy the master's work. Xiaomi, and many others fit this roll perfectly, and we should expect nothing less. The there will always be a Chinese copy of a product or art form that has achieved greatness. The real question is if a Chinese company has the potential to break out of this roll, and become the great product that others copy.

And with Apple now banned from Chinese Gov. use .. (1)

fygment (444210) | about 3 months ago | (#47621661)

... it becomes apparent what has been going on:

a) foreign industry allowed in to Chinese markets;
b) Chinese intelligence (government and industrial ... there's a difference?) goes to work stealing IP and passing it on to chosen Chinese industry;
c) foreign industry gets hit with exclusions (eg. MS and Apple banned for government use) and legal harassment (MS target of anti-trust investigation); and
d) Chinese industry rises to dominate the market (Xiaomi - Apple of China).

Nothing wrong with all that, a society/country looking out for itself. In fact, it might be considered admirable that they so closely protect their autonomy, refusing to let themselves be dominated by foreign corporate interests.

If you think that NSA spying is great... (2)

Squidlips (1206004) | about 3 months ago | (#47621749)

then this phone would really be truly wonderful

The CCP is very desperate these days (1)

moneybabylon (2226376) | about 3 months ago | (#47661787)

The chinese communist party is on its last straw of survival, facing severe and increasing stress from all fronts:

1. external opposite forces from all other countries in the world.

2. internal mutiny from all chinese living places e.g. mainland china, hong kong, taiwan, xinjiang, macau etc.

3. its own economy can no further develop to higher level than mass manufacturing, due to complete absence of law and common morals.

4. china's mass manufacturing itself is going away due to increasing cost and hostile business environment.

4. its many suppressed problems from the past all surfacing at the same time e.g.
- severe pollution everywhere in air and water and food etc
- skyrocketing bad debts of all kinds everywhere
- rapidly aging and gender-imbalanceed demographics
- world's no.1 wealth inequality
- complete absence of soft power
- mass exodus in all levels of society, of all able chinese with talents and money
- complete absence of common morals in all chinese from brainwashing by the CCP etc etc.

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