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Study Finds That Astronauts Are Severely Sleep Deprived

timothy posted about 3 months ago | from the loud-snoring-small-space dept.

Space 106

sciencehabit (1205606) writes "Researchers tracked the sleep patterns of 85 crew members aboard the International Space Station and space shuttle and found that despite an official flight schedule mandating 8.5 hours of sleep per night, they rarely got more than five. In fact, getting a full night's rest was so difficult that three-quarters of shuttle mission crew members used sleep medication, and sometimes entire teams were sedated on the same night. Given that sleep deprivation contributes to up to 80% of aviation accidents, it's important to better understand why sleep is so difficult in space, the authors say."

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how dark can it be on the ISS? (0)

ChipMonk (711367) | about 3 months ago | (#47633707)

If it isn't really dark, with all the indicator lights extinguished, how well can one expect to sleep? Even a single blue power light on a PC is enough to interfere with REM. And, if the windows aren't totally blacked, having a sunrise-sunset every 45 minutes can't help, either.

Re:how dark can it be on the ISS? (2, Informative)

WillgasM (1646719) | about 3 months ago | (#47633729)

They sleep in little padded pods. I'm pretty sure they can go pitch black.

Re:how dark can it be on the ISS? (4, Funny)

Pliny (12671) | about 3 months ago | (#47634037)

With the exception of the cosmic rays shooting through their eyes....

Re:how dark can it be on the ISS? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47634277)

You can't see cosmic rays. Yes, there are more cosmic rays in space, but our circadian rhythm hs nothing to do with that.

Re:how dark can it be on the ISS? (3, Informative)

MachDelta (704883) | about 3 months ago | (#47634401)

Parent is probably referring to Cosmic ray visual phenomena [wikipedia.org]

Re:how dark can it be on the ISS? (1)

dangle (1381879) | about 3 months ago | (#47635303)

This phenomenon also seems to occur in the darkness of caves as well.

Re:how dark can it be on the ISS? (1)

Jane Q. Public (1010737) | about 3 months ago | (#47635707)

Most likely it happens all the time; it's just not noticeable under common conditions. As with so many other sensory phenomena, it gets drowned out by noise from other sources.

Granted, however, it's going to happen more often in orbit.

Re:how dark can it be on the ISS? (1)

mikael (484) | about 2 months ago | (#47638283)

Maybe there are radioactive elements underground as well.

For me, the best the sleeps I had were in a hotel room which had air filtering, blackout curtains and was on the end of the top floor, well away from all the other guests banging and clattering their suitcases through the corridors.

But move to the same kind of room right next to the main hallway, and it was impossible to get a deep sleep, because there was always someone every hour who figured the best way to open a door that opened inwards was to hit it with a large suitcase. The same thing happens if the hotel room has emergency lights that come on whenever the main lights are switched off.

Air flow could be another problem. Even on Earth, sleeping under a lie-in (sloping part of a roof) always gives me a sore head due to the lack of air flow. The CO2 seems to build up. The only way I could stop that, was to sleep directly underneath the skylight window and keep it open. Maybe the shape of the sleeping pods leads to CO2 build up.

Re:how dark can it be on the ISS? (1)

TWX (665546) | about 3 months ago | (#47633935)

Oh, I hate blue LEDs. When they first came out I thought they were so awesome, then I mistakenly bought an alarmclock that had a blue display. Two layers of automotive window tint later and I still couldn't stand it, had to switch back to red. The blue one now lives out in the tool shed so that its radio can be used while doing yard work.

As to the astronauts' problems, I expect that between the hum of equipment, the extremely short orbital period the station has, the feeling of weightlessness from a sensory perspective, and the effects of weightlessness from a biological perspective probably all make it much harder to sleep. Until we get some kind of centripetal acceleration thing going and get a station up into something closer to geostationary orbit it's probably not going to get any better.

And yes, I am aware of how expensive it is to send mass up to geostationary as opposed to low earth orbit. That doesn't change the need to do that to get our space program out of danger of just falling out of the sky.

Re:how dark can it be on the ISS? (5, Insightful)

sillybilly (668960) | about 3 months ago | (#47634649)

I agree that sensory deprivation must be the cause of sleeplessness for the astronauts. I for one have a hard time sleeping without any covers, no matter how hot the weather is, and I may be sweating, but I can't sleep without something pressing down on my skin, and even in the heat, a simple thin bedsheet, which is much colder, is not as good from the comfortable pressure feeling perspective, as a thicker sleeping bag material, except for the heat part, so I do use the thin sheets when I have to, but if in any way bearable, even if very hot, I go for the sleeping bag material. Modern camping sleeping bags from Walmart are nice in that you can wash and dry them very fast, and they take full strength dose of bleach in the washer, and do not degrade, unlike colored traditional linen or even white linen that yellow after prolonged numerous bleachings, plus they are too heavy, and not soft, fluffy enough. Old school goose feather packed fluffy beddings are very thick (and for that they may cause sweating in the summer but work in extreme winter without stove heat in single layer as opposed to Walmart sleeping bags needing to be doubled or tripled up to build the thickness), but harder to wash, bleach and dry.

In the weightlessness of space nothing presses against the body and skin to any degree. I could not sleep well like that. One way to solve it is to take a 55 gallon drum, or something bigger, and spin it, create microgravity like that, but the air friction becomes an issue, plus dizziness from uneven centrifugal forces as small radii, compared to a 300 meter radius spinning cylinder space station. Another way to create skin pressure is to use inflatable things, that look like sleeping bags, inflated to just the right pressure, not too tight, not too loose, just comfortable. I used to have inflatable air beds from walmart, and they were awesome comfortable down here in Earth's gravity, especially when they haven't been inflated for days or weeks, and slightly deflated, but without exception somebody comes into the house and pokes a hole into them when I'm not at home, or when I'm asleep, to where they end up totally deflated and it feels as if you are sleeping on the bare hard floor. So inflatable sleeping bags for now, maybe some kind of small radius slow spinning device that does not cause too much dizziness, and 300 meter radius rotating space stations with sleeping bags in the future, is the solution. That's my 2 cents, or more like 2.1 cents due to inflation.

Re: how dark can it be on the ISS? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47635547)

Nobody gives a shit

Re:how dark can it be on the ISS? (1)

Jane Q. Public (1010737) | about 3 months ago | (#47635735)

I agree that sensory deprivation must be the cause of sleeplessness for the astronauts.

I agree that it may be a contributory factor. I doubt very much it is a singular cause.

... I can't sleep without something pressing down on my skin, and even in the heat, a simple thin bedsheet, which is much colder, is not as good from the comfortable pressure feeling perspective

This cannot be the cause. Again it might contribute but this effect is not just possible but rather easy to simulate in microgravity. Not exactly, you understand, but closely enough that it should not be a problem. Imagine a blanket held against you gently by elastic or springs. Or... by pressure on the blanket from the outside via extremely soft foam. (By "easy" I did not mean cheap.)

Re:how dark can it be on the ISS? (1)

hackertourist (2202674) | about 3 months ago | (#47636371)

There have been experiments in this area: one design for the sleeping bag had an inflatable ring around the bag's perimeter. When inflated, it pulled the sleeping bag taut to provide some pressure on the body.

Re:how dark can it be on the ISS? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47636513)

I hate sleeping bags. It's like having your legs tied together. To sleep well I need to be naked in absolute darkness and quiet, with something soft and preferably furry to wrap my arms and legs around. And I need to be free to masturbate whenever I feel like it. Most of these would be hard to implement on a space station. Astronauts even sleep with nappies because of nocturnal micturition which isn't a big issue down here, but you wouldn't want drops of pee floating around a space station. I've also heard space stations are difficult to air. Maybe they can't sleep because of farts?

Re:how dark can it be on the ISS? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47636487)

You want centripetal acceleration and then you don't like falling out of the sky? Make up your mind.

Melatonin! (1)

Jane Q. Public (1010737) | about 3 months ago | (#47635823)

Exposure to light (and in particular some frequencies at the blue end of the spectrum) fool the body into thinking it is experiencing daylight, and this actually affects the balance of certain hormones, like melatonin which is normally secreted shortly before and during sleep.

Studies have shown that experiencing bright light (and especially, as mentioned, of certain frequencies) straight up to bedtime, not only after bed, is known to interfere with melatonin production and other less significant hormones. In some animals, it can drive their hormones so crazy as to cause tumors and other serious health problems.

Humans are very flexible, and we can adapt to conditions of the tropics and (with protection) the poles, but it takes time to acclimate.

I suspect that if they subjected astronauts to the same kind of lighting conditions and hours for 60 days prior to their stay on ISS, a good part of this problem would go away. Expecting them to acclimate to the lighting conditions on top of everything else, and without a prior adjustment period, is asking a lot of them.

Re:how dark can it be on the ISS? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47636305)

If it isn't really dark, with all the indicator lights extinguished, how well can one expect to sleep? Even a single blue power light on a PC is enough to interfere with REM. And, if the windows aren't totally blacked, having a sunrise-sunset every 45 minutes can't help, either.

Are you serious?
I live up north (above 59) and from May to early August it never gets really dark at night. We do not have window blinds nor curtains and we all sleep just fine.

Re: how dark can it be on the ISS? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47636999)

Sleep mask?

Would YOU be able to sleep in space?? (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47633709)

I'd want to soak up every minute of it. Maybe they should look into the mechanism called: "It's frickin awesome."

Re:Would YOU be able to sleep in space?? (1)

Triklyn (2455072) | about 3 months ago | (#47633981)

wow, someone voted this down to troll? it's pretty innocuous and pretty on topic.

Re:Would YOU be able to sleep in space?? (4, Interesting)

amicusNYCL (1538833) | about 3 months ago | (#47634141)

Seriously, someone contact these authors:

Given that sleep deprivation contributes to up to 80% of aviation accidents, it's important to better understand why sleep is so difficult in space, the authors say.

Causes range from slipping the surly bonds of earth, to floating weightless around a space station, to being able to look out a window and see the place where nearly every recorded event in human history has happened from a vantage that you would never otherwise get. Everything from showering to eating to pooping to masturbating is new again!

I would probably have to spend at least a month on the space station before the idea of closing my eyes for an extended period sounded like a good use of my time.

Re:Would YOU be able to sleep in space?? (5, Insightful)

StikyPad (445176) | about 3 months ago | (#47634265)

Excitement may be a factor, but I suspect fear and stress are the more powerful factors. Most adults don't stay up in anticipation of the excitement of Christmas, but they will lose sleep over upcoming deadlines, during financial difficulty, etc. I suspect it's pretty stressful being in space, between performing mission requirements, being separated from loved ones, and being protected from death by only a few mm of aluminum, not to mention the anticipation of re-entry. Add to that the lack of privacy and alone time, the alien physiological sensation of weightlessness, and restraints and tethers to prevent floating around. I suspect that comfort is in short supply, and that it may well be difficult to truly relax in such an alien environment.

Re:Would YOU be able to sleep in space?? (5, Funny)

sillybilly (668960) | about 3 months ago | (#47634769)

Yeah lack space creates lack of privacy and allows for no masturbation, or quick and easy disposal of the expelled material, so it's not done for months, or for the entire length of the mission, unless maybe for females, that can use covert techniques like pedaling an old sewing machine and holding their thighs tight in just the right way, and then it can get addictive. But for both It's easy to go for months and months without orgasms if you have to, such as a serious business space station situation - though you might get wet dreams if you're near 14-21 as a male, though not when much older, say over 35, spontaneously if you don't masturbate for like 2-3 months, and they are a big mess to wake up to, even though you feel like you never wanted to leave the dream it was so freaking awesome, like why can't I have more dreams like that, til you wake up and realize maybe that would not be a good idea. Lack of space, and congestion, above all, is the biggest stress factor in outer space, because of the very small size of the space modules. It's expensive to get a spacious auditorium that echoes, or mansion up there, at least from Earth, though it may be a lot cheaper from Moon based materials. When I was asked in first grade what I wanna become when I grow up, I said astronaut. But I changed my mind since then, and I'd be happy living like Immanuel Kant, who never left his home town or traveled anywhere, but he still lived a happy life, and entertained guests from all over the world, so it's like he took mental trips with them. That's what media today is, I can watch a jungle video, or a Moon landing video, without people saying "you had to be there to understand." And get bitten by the mosquitoes? I beg to differ. I can watch the face of a person orgasming and I don't have to be that person to know how that person feels. You don't always have to be there, it's sometimes enough to just watch, from a distance. If they tried to make me be an astronaut, I'd be constantly bitchin about lack of space, lack of roominess, and they'd keep telling me to suck it up, space is too expensive in space, there is not enough of it, and at 200 lbs I'd be already more expensive to take into orbit than a 90 lb 5' 0" ft person, who can push the buttons and follow instructions just as well or even better, coming directly from Houston.

Re:Would YOU be able to sleep in space?? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47635233)

Ladies and Gentlemen, this is what the face of insanity looks like.

Re:Would YOU be able to sleep in space?? (1)

musth (901919) | about 3 months ago | (#47635885)

This is my favorite comment from slashdot ever.

Re:Would YOU be able to sleep in space?? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47636571)

Yay stream of consciousness! I don't know what you do with what you choose to call excreted material from masturbation, I always eat it, it's yummy! I wonder how a female astronaut would explain why she needs her old sewing machine in space, those fuckers are heavy. Oh and that old Kant you mention, he didn't get out of the house because his sense of aesthetics commanded Eulerian tours and they just weren't an option where he lived.

Re:Would YOU be able to sleep in space?? (3, Interesting)

reverseengineer (580922) | about 3 months ago | (#47635137)

I read the Apollo 11 Lunar Surface Journal [nasa.gov] during the anniversary back on July 20th, and one of the entries that stood out to me was a section called "Trying to Rest," which detailed a time between the end of the astronauts' moonwalk, but prior to when they needed to make preparations to liftoff from the Moon. A period of about 7 hours was scheduled for the astronauts to sleep, but

[Armstrong - "(The quality of the rest) was poor in my case."]

[Aldrin - "I'd say the same thing."]

In their technical debrief, Armstrong and Aldrin detailed some problems with their sleep environment- too cold, too bright, too noisy, but yeah, that they were also just too excited to sleep. (It does mention that most of the technical problems were worked out by Apollo 15, and the last few crews got decent sleep on the lunar surface. I'm still convinced that if it were me, I would have responded to planned rest periods with "HOUSTON, I CAN SLEEP WHEN I GET BACK FROM THE MOON, OVER.")

Re:Would YOU be able to sleep in space?? (4, Interesting)

thisisauniqueid (825395) | about 3 months ago | (#47634221)

I know Yi So-Yeon, the first Korean astronaut. She said she hated space. She wanted to throw up the whole time, and felt like her head was going to explode. (Both of these symptoms are caused by gravity not pulling things downwards, as well as the vestibular system being screwed up.)

Personally, I have been on a Zero-G "Vomit comet" flight, and it *was* "frickin awesome" until about the 15th parabola, then I started feeling extremely nauseated. I'm lucky we landed before I needed to throw up (some poor shmuck paid $6000 for the flight and had to strap himself into a seat so he could throw up constantly into a bag after the very first parabola). However, I have never felt more motion-sick -- it was *awful* -- and it didn't subside for over five hours after we landed.

Re:Would YOU be able to sleep in space?? (1)

king neckbeard (1801738) | about 3 months ago | (#47634777)

I would think that it's the roller coaster effect that turns your stomach.

Re:Would YOU be able to sleep in space?? (1)

sillybilly (668960) | about 3 months ago | (#47634831)

I never knew motion sickness existed til I took a single yacht-trip of my life, in very rough windy weather, and constantly thew up, the sunflower seeds that were the only thing in my stomach, I haven't eaten anything a whole day before it just sunflower seeds. I went below deck and it was worth, they told me it'd be worse, you have to be on deck and fix your eyes on a steady object in the distance. But I just felt dizzy and sleepy, and fell asleep on the windy deck, without a t-shirt, and I got a lobster red sunburn that swelled up pretty bad, and lasted for like 2 weeks, and it hurt to touch it with a plain white cotton t-shirt, for 2 weeks, it was a pain dressing and undressing. Obviously sailing is not in my veins, I wasn't born a seaman (though I'm born from semen), or it would take some practice and getting used to.

Re:Would YOU be able to sleep in space?? (1)

flyingfsck (986395) | about 3 months ago | (#47636075)

If anyone who wants to go sailing read this - Sit in the back of the yacht, don't go inside, do put on a hat and shirt, do use sunscreen. Always look horizontally, try not to look down and NEVER look up. After a few days, you'll be used to it, unless you don't heed the previous, get seasick and consequently never get used to it. My guess is that space is like being inside the cramped cabin of a yacht, while suspended upside down.

not an uncommon problem (2)

confused one (671304) | about 3 months ago | (#47634869)

Her experience is actually not at all uncommon. Many astronauts report being uncomfortable for extended periods because of the shift in fluids messing with the body. Nausea is not uncommon because the middle ear ends up filled with fluid and there's no "down" for the vestibular system to reference. People in extended missions find they suffer from discomfort of muscles and joints. They experience vision changes and bone loss. The human body is just not adapted to zero G. Some never adapt; but, astronauts being a group of over-achievers by definition, the hide the symptoms and don't report them.

Re:Would YOU be able to sleep in space?? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47634281)

No, it's not like its awesome. It's awkward, that's what it is.

You sleep attached to something, instead of on something. You are basically floating. Then there are the many noises on the space station. Quiet, familiar sounds is what sleep needs. Otherwise brain will wake you right up.

Sensory information (noise, floating not sleeping in your favourite position) is probably the primary reason that getting sleep is difficult.

Re:Would YOU be able to sleep in space?? (1)

king neckbeard (1801738) | about 3 months ago | (#47634813)

Awesome and awkward aren't mutually exclusive, and both could cut into sleep.

Re:Would YOU be able to sleep in space?? (1)

TheNastyInThePasty (2382648) | about 3 months ago | (#47634541)

I don't think I would be able to. Every moment in space feels like you're on a roller coaster drop. Your stomach constantly feels like it's in your throat. Not even the tightest strap can make your internals feel like you're back on solid ground. It would be amazing to experience space but awful to live there without some kind of artificial gravity.

Re:Would YOU be able to sleep in space?? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47635227)

Have you ever been skydiving? I have. So, we've got free fall. You don't feel like you're falling. You feel like you're floating motionless. It's not like a sudden rollercoaster drop at all (which usually is very short, bringing you near to something you can see/"crash" into). It's actually pretty nice, and if not for the wind and the sudden stop at the end, I'd feel fine sleeping there. I speculate that it has more to do with being in totally alien surroundings and tight confinement.

Re: Would YOU be able to sleep in space?? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47635465)

I have been skydiving as well, and I think you missed the mark. For the first couple of seconds you are in a true freefall, relatively unencumbered by air resistance, accelerating. But from then until you pull the cord you are basically no longer accelerating (in fact you are ever so slightly slowing down as the air thickens around you), you have reached your terminal velocity, you are basically sitting on a cushion of air that is pressing up on you the same amount as a mattress would on the ground. Comparing this to the weightlessness of space is a huge mistake.

I would love to experience space. I have a feeling I would have a hell of a time getting sleep though. I wonder how long before we do just build a spinning toroidal or cylindrical station for the astronauts like they always have in sci-fi. Clearly our bodies just aren't designed to be weightless.

Re: Would YOU be able to sleep in space?? (1)

wagnerrp (1305589) | about 2 months ago | (#47637871)

For the first couple of seconds you are in a true freefall, relatively unencumbered by air resistance, accelerating.

You're already experiencing significant drag when you jump out of that aircraft at 100 knots. You're only in something closely resembling freefall when you jump from a balloon, or base jump.

Re:Would YOU be able to sleep in space?? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47634563)

I'd want to soak up every minute of it. Maybe they should look into the mechanism called: "It's frickin awesome."

I'd need every second to appreciate it. Heck, how the moon folks (I AM on the FRICKIN MOON !!!) do it I have no idea.

Re:Would YOU be able to sleep in space?? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47635033)

I experienced the same thing when I visited Tokyo for the first time. I didn't sleep for at least 50 hours after booking a hotel room and wanting to go back outside and explore all the backstreets and neon-lit streetways and places to eat.

Re:Would YOU be able to sleep in space?? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47635527)

My personality is captured in the sphere [youtube.com] flying in the background.

Re:Would YOU be able to sleep in space?? (2)

wisnoskij (1206448) | about 3 months ago | (#47635667)

I have never understood this sentiment.
It is like no one even understands space. It is like everyone is blinded my the laserwork of star trek space battles. It is, by definition, the most boring place in the universe; Bar none.

It is not subjectively boring like a poetry reading, it is objectively boring. And not only boring, but, again, the most boring place in the universe, by definition. The place where, by definition, nothing ever happens and nothing ever is, or at least relatively nothing compared to everything not-space.

Re:Would YOU be able to sleep in space?? (0)

Panoptes (1041206) | about 3 months ago | (#47636019)

"I'd want to soak up every minute of it. Maybe they should look into the mechanism called: "It's frickin awesome" How on earth did such a vacuous comment get modded +5 insightful?

Ignore the media, the facts are in FRONT OF YOU! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47633713)

I submit David Hasselhoff is the AntiChrist

And I have the proof

How can one explain the phenomenal global success of one of this country's least talented individuals? There are only three ways.

        * Mr. Hasselhoff actually is talented, but this goes unnoticed in his own country.

        * Mr. Hasselhoff has sold his soul to Satan in return for global success.

        * David Hasselhoff is the AntiChrist.

            I vote for the latter -- and perhaps, after seeing the facts involved, the rest of the world will agree.

The Facts First, the obvious. Add a little beard and a couple of horns -- David Hasselhoff looks like the Devil, doesn't he? And the letters in his name can be rearranged to spell
fad of devil's hash.

What does this mean? Well, Baywatch is David's fad. David is the devil. The Hash is what makes Knight Rider popular in Amsterdam.

(I was actually hoping to make the letters in his name spell out he is of the devil, which would be possible if his middle name was "Ethesis," which it might be. I'm sure his publicist would hide such a middle name if it were true.)

Second -- and most importantly -- David Hasselhoff and his television series were foretold in the Bible. Biblical scholars worldwide may quibble over interpretations, but they all agree on this. For a few telling examples let's skip to the end of the Bible. If any book of the Bible will tell us who the AntiChrist is, it's the Revelation of Saint John, which basically describes the AntiChrist and the Armageddon He causes. I'll just give you the verse, and the current theological interpretation of that verse.

Who is the Beast?

Rev 13:1 And I stood upon the sand of the sea, and saw a beast rise up out of the sea, having seven heads and ten horns The Beast, of course, is David Hasselhoff. The Heads are His separate television incarnations. Young and the Restless, Revenge of the Cheerleaders, Knight Rider, Terror at London Bridge, Ring of the Musketeers, Baywatch and Baywatch Nights.
The ten horns represent His musical releases: Crazy For You, David, David Hasselhoff, Do You Love Me?, Du, Everybody Sunshine, I Believe, Looking For Freedom, Night Lover and Night Rockers.
Not only does Mitch The Lifeguard literally "rise out of the sea" on Baywatch, but David's musical career has mostly occurred in Europe, a metaphoric rise to fame from across the sea.
Rev 13:3 And I saw one of his heads as it were wounded to death; and his deadly wound was healed: and all the world wondered after the beast. Of course, this is a reference to his third head: Knight of the Phoenix, the first episode of Knight Rider. In this episode, "Michael Long, a policeman, is shot and left for dead. The shot is deflected by a plate in his head, but ruins his face. He is saved and his face reconstructed. He is reluctant, but agrees to use K.I.T.T. to help the Foundation for Law and Government fight criminals who are 'beyond the reach of the law'. " Knight Rider has been shown in 82 countries.
Rev 13:5 And there was given unto him a mouth speaking great things and blasphemies; and power was given unto him to continue forty and two months. The following blasphemies are actual quotes from David Hasselhoff -- I read these while he was 42 years old.

"I'm good-looking, and I make a lot of money."

"There are many dying children out there whose last wish is to meet me."

"I'm six foot four, an all-American guy, and handsome and talented as well!"

"Before long, I'll have my own channel -- I'll be like Barney."

"(Baywatch) is responsible for a lot of world peace." which the Hoff said at the Bollywood Oscars. Don't believe me? Read the original article!

And here's a blasphemy that came from David's recent (Feb 2004) visit to the Berlin Wall museum. I couldn't have made something this great up by myself. He was upset that the museum didn't spend more time devoted to his personal role in the fall of Communism. You can read more about it here, if you don't believe me.

The Second Beast: Television

Rev 13:11-13And I beheld another beast coming up out of the earth; and he had two horns like a lamb, and he spake as a dragon.
And he exerciseth all the power of the first beast before him, and causeth the earth and them which dwell therein to worship the first beast, whose deadly wound was healed.
And he doeth great wonders, so that he maketh fire come down from heaven on the earth in the sight of men,

        The Second Beast, with it's dual antennae, is obviously the Television -- merely a pawn in Hasselhoff's underworldly regime. His stereo speaker (the dragon's voice) spews forth the blasphemy of Baywatch until He has caused all people of the earth to worship and watch Baywatch and Baywatch Nights. How well has he done? Baywatch is now seen by about one billion viewers in 140 countries -- the most watched series ever.

You probably never knew this, but the entire historical purpose of television has been to attract a worldwide audience for the eventual syndication of Baywatch. And how does it accomplish this global distribution? Via satellite - from heaven to the Earth.

Rev 13:15 And he had power to give life unto the image of the beast, that the image of the beast should both speak, and cause that as many as would not worship the image of the beast should be killed. How does television work? By giving life unto Hasselhoff's image. I'm pretty sure the second part hasn't happened yet.

Lifeguards: Denizens of the Underworld

These biblical revelations will show that the lifeguards on Baywatch are foretold as servants of the Devil. (Need I say who that is again?)

Rev 20:11And I saw a great white throne, and him that sat on it, from whose face the earth and the heaven fled away; and there was found no place for them

Rev 20:13And the sea gave up the dead which were in it; and death and hell delivered up the dead which were in them...

        Doesn't this sound like an exact description of what the lifeguards on Baywatch do? They sit on their big white wooden throne, and watch out over the sea -- waiting for a dying person to get cast up.
Rev 9:6 And in those days shall men seek to find death, and shall not find it; and shall desire to die, and death shall flee from them.

        One word: CPR

Rev 10:2 And he had in his hand a little book open: and he set his right foot upon the sea, and his left foot on the earth, Sounds like a lifeguard, eh? Standing on the beach reading a paperback?

Rev 17:3-5 ...and I saw a woman sit upon a scarlet coloured beast, full of names of blasphemy, having seven heads and ten horns. And the woman was arrayed in purple and scarlet colour, and decked with gold and precious stones and pearls, having a golden cup in her hand full of abominations and filthiness of her fornication: And upon her forehead was a name written, MYSTERY, BABYLON THE GREAT, THE MOTHER OF HARLOTS AND ABOMINATIONS OF THE EARTH.

    and if that wasn't enough, try
Ezekiel 23:17 And the Babylonians came to her into the bed of love, and they defiled her with their whoredom, and she was polluted with them, and her mind was alienated from them.

        The fabled "Whore of Babylon." Well, people have been calling Hollywood "Babylon" since long before I was making web pages. And of all the women in Hollywood, whose wedding night video is the most popular? Hmmm.... Did someone say "Barb Wire?"

Rev 18:11 And the merchants of the earth shall weep and mourn over her; for no man buyeth their merchandise any more Do you know any merchants who invested heavily in the acting career of this "whore of Babylon?" I've seen that "VIP" show of hers, and I'd be weeping if I had spent money on the merchandising rights.

Rev. 18:21 ... a mighty angel took up a stone like a great millstone, and cast it into the sea,...

        Speaking of lifeguards chucking rocks at innocent people, listen to this excerpt from a recent lawsuit against his Hasselness: "while Plaintiff was in the audience of the Rosie O'Donnell Show, Defendandt DAVID HASSELHOFF came on stage and threw a stack of cards depicting himself into the audience, striking Plaintiff in the eye. . . [he] should have known that throwing cards into an audience could cause injury to the audience."

Rev 18:14 And the fruits that thy soul lusted after are departed from thee, and all things which were dainty and goodly are departed from thee, and thou shalt find them no more at all. He stands to lose money in this lawsuit -- or maybe even all those dainty and goodly things he bought.

The Number of the Beast

The Bible shows us another way to prove a person is the AntiChrist, namely through numerology. Rev 13:18 says: "Let him that hath understanding count the number of the beast: for it is the number of a man; and his number is Six hundred threescore and six."

That's a bit cryptic, to be sure. One score is twenty, so threescore is 60, the number of the beast is 666.

Now, the way biblical scholars and numerologists usually convert the names of men into their numbers is through a simple numerical code. Let's assign the 26 letters of the alphabet the numbers 1 through 26. It looks like this:

a 1 i 9 q 17 y 25

b 2 j 10 r 18 z 26

c 3 k 11 s 19

d 4 l 12 t 20

e 5 m 13 u 21

f 6 n 14 v 22

g 7 o 15 w 23

h 8 p 16 x 24

Now, we take the letters from Mr. Hasselhoff's name, assign numbers to them, and calculate his number.

D A V I D H A S S E L H O F F

4 1 22 9 4 8 1 19 19 5 12 8 15 6 6

Now, since thirteen is such a fitting number for evil, let's multiply the first 13 numbers together. The total (65,874,124,800) is approximately 6.6 billion. Tack on the remaining 6's from the end of his name, and you've got yourself the mark of the beast.

Another tactic you could use would be to add the letters in "David" (I think you should get 40) and the letters in Hasselhoff (99) and then multiply them together. 40 x 99 = 3960. Now, 3960 is 660 x 6. And of course, 660 plus 6 is -- again -- the mark of the beast.

Not enough proof for you? Well, let's see what else the winning combination of the Bible and numerology have in store for David.....

As he explains it in his interview, David Hasselhoff first decided to act at the age of 7 when he saw a local production of Rumplestiltskin. His acting debut was in Peter Pan. Knight Rider ended its run in 1986, when Hasselhoff was 32. Baywatch debuted in 1989, when Hasselhoff was 35. His first televised role was as Snapper Foster on the Young and the Restless at the age of 19. If we look at the 37th chapter of the 19th book of the Bible (Psalms) -- at verses 32 and 35, we notice an interesting phenomenon. Take a look:

32. The wicked watcheth the righteous, and seeketh to slay him.

35. I have seen the wicked in great power, and spreading himself like a green bay tree.

Viewers of Baywatch may have thought they were watching the good leader Mitch Buchannon -- whose main job as head lifeguard is to watch over the righteous babes at the beach, and save them. According to the Bible, he is really trying to slay them. But can we be sure that the show in question is actually Baywatch? Well, count the number of letters in Rumplestiltskin and Peter Pan. 15 and 8, right? Now look at those bible verses again. Find the 15th word of verse 35 - and the 8th word from the end of verse 32. Put them together.

35. I have seen the wicked in great power, and spreading himself like a green bay tree.
32. The wicked watcheth the righteous, and seeketh to slay him.

Wow (1)

Doug Otto (2821601) | about 3 months ago | (#47633715)

Apparently I sleep like an astronaut.

Re:Wow (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47633979)

Apparently I sleep like an astronaut.

Yeah, no kidding. I didn't think five hours was all that odd these days.

Did they try reading a book? (1)

ciaran_o_riordan (662132) | about 3 months ago | (#47633757)

That helps me sometimes.

Oh, and no coffee late in the evening.

503 and 504 errors (1)

TubeSteak (669689) | about 3 months ago | (#47633773)

Earth to astronauts: Go to sleep
By Emily Underwood
7 August 2014 6:30 pm

It's hard to sleep in outer space. On the International Space Station (ISS), the sun rises every 90 minutes when the station circles Earth. Space suits can be uncomfortable, too: After landing on the moon in 1969, Buzz Aldrin reported getting only âoea couple of hours of mentally fitful drowsingâ due to the noise and the cold.

Now, a new study published online today in The Lancet Neurology shows the extent of sleep deprivation among astronauts. Researchers tracked the sleep patterns of 85 crew members aboard the ISS and space shuttle and found that despite an official flight schedule mandating 8.5 hours of sleep per night, they rarely got more than five. [thelancet.com]

In fact, getting a full night's rest was so difficult that three-quarters of shuttle mission crew members used sleep medication, and sometimes entire teams were sedated on the same night. Although, unlike astronauts from Aldrin's day, crew members now sleep in quiet, dark chambers, lack of gravity itself may contribute to the problem.

Given that sleep deprivation contributes to up to 80% of aviation accidents, it's important to better understand why sleep is so difficult in space, the authors say.

I used this: http://www.viewcached.com/http://news.sciencemag.org/brain-behavior/2014/08/earth-astronauts-go-sleep [viewcached.com]
Yahoo is the only site that had it cached.

Re:503 and 504 errors (0)

AK Marc (707885) | about 3 months ago | (#47633831)

The problem is that they are running in a 90 minute day, but sleep scheduling at 24 hour day. They should have more frequent naps, and less frequent "sleeps". Also, from what I can tell, the sleep areas need to be better heated, and maybe sleep in a water-bed cocoon to give the feeling of pressure from all sides, like on a bed with heavy blankets.

sleep apnea (1)

WillgasM (1646719) | about 3 months ago | (#47633783)

I wonder how sleep apnea works in space. It's hard to sleep on your side when there's no "up".

Re:sleep apnea (1)

Doug Otto (2821601) | about 3 months ago | (#47633795)

Beware of flying drool.

Re:sleep apnea (1)

sillybilly (668960) | about 3 months ago | (#47634861)

How about some space porn? Would people pay to see it? They keep looking for good commercial reasons to justify conquering outer space, or to get jump started, as a private, profitable commercial enterprise, so maybe you can add that to the list of possibilities. Every dollar or incentive counts, though I personally would not pay for porn, even if it's made in the weightlessness of outer space. On a rotating space station they could have one of the floors, or some of the floors nonrotating, with slipping ceilings and floors from the other floors, to where you could shoot stuff halfway across the room and see if you can hit bullseye. Or smack the water-droplet spheres floating in space around you out of the way that came from a very wet pussy. The porn room where everything is flying, and has to be vacuumed down every so often to clean up the air and let you see again, else it looks like it's in a standstill monsoon rain.

Re:sleep apnea (1)

peragrin (659227) | about 3 months ago | (#47635067)

Not as good as you might think.

No gravity means lower blood pressure, which means a softer penis. And then comes the deed itself. Sex requires something for the man to push against while the woman prevents being pushed. However in space there is little to grab on to and your combined motion s will throw you both into things.

That being said I volunteer to try it out with nearly any woman who wants too.

Re:sleep apnea (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47635241)

That being said I volunteer to try it out with nearly any woman who wants too.

That's just desperate. Try sunlight. That's a good first step.

Re:sleep apnea (1)

sillybilly (668960) | about 3 months ago | (#47635461)

What he means is get out from your mother's basement and see the sunlight outside.

Re:sleep apnea (1)

AK Marc (707885) | about 3 months ago | (#47633851)

Since much of sleep apnea is caused by gravity pulling parts into the airways, I'd presume it less of a problem. Also the physicals they do before going may exclude those with such a medical condition.

Re:sleep apnea (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47636131)

In space, nobody can hear you snore.

Want male astronauts to sleep? Get 'em laid. (1, Informative)

leftie (667677) | about 3 months ago | (#47633793)

Everyove knows how fast men fall asleep after they have taken care of themselves.

Re:Want male astronauts to sleep? Get 'em laid. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47633909)

Everyove knows how fast men fall asleep after they have taken care of themselves.

Yes, and the fact that the overwhelming majority of the astronaut population is male, I'm certain not one of them has ever thought of that before...

Ever.

Re:Want male astronauts to sleep? Get 'em laid. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47634111)

Everyove knows how fast men fall asleep after they have taken care of themselves.

That's why men always bring Rosie and her five sisters wherever they go. :)

Re:Want male astronauts to sleep? Get 'em laid. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47634395)

Everyove knows how fast men fall asleep after they have taken care of themselves.

That's why men always bring Rosie and her five sisters wherever they go. :)

If you're going to fap in zero gravity, please do your flightmates the courtesy of using a condom. It goes everywhere.

Re:Want male astronauts to sleep? Get 'em laid. (1)

sillybilly (668960) | about 3 months ago | (#47634873)

Or astronaut hookers that swallow.

Re:Want male astronauts to sleep? Get 'em laid. (1)

Nimey (114278) | about 3 months ago | (#47635763)

Or the old Navy trick: keep one sock under your mattress. Replace it when it can stand up on its own.

Cosmic Ray Visual Phenomena (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47633811)

This is nothing new, and is surely not news; perhaps quantifying it and writing an article for a magazine bleeding subscribers is relevant, but this has been discussed since mankind breached the outer limits of the atmosphere.

Blindingly obvious link for anybody with a Freshman-Year level physics course: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cosmic_ray_visual_phenomena [wikipedia.org]

Probably because of all the... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47633815)

Aliens probing them. I know that I would have a hard time sleeping.

Unless it was a sexy tentacled alien probing me with its slimy sticky gooey dropping hot ovipositor.

Re:Probably because of all the... (1)

PPH (736903) | about 3 months ago | (#47634713)

I'd find it particularly difficult to sleep wearing a facehugger [wikia.com] . Its probably almost as bad as when the cat decides to flop down on my head at night.

Re:Probably because of all the... (1)

vux984 (928602) | about 3 months ago | (#47635357)

I'd find it particularly difficult to sleep wearing a facehugger.

You must be doing it wrong. Per your wikia link:

" the Facehugger cuts off the blood supply to the victim's brain, knocking them out within seconds"

You really should sleep fine. :)

Re:Probably because of all the... (-1, Offtopic)

sillybilly (668960) | about 3 months ago | (#47635125)

Like this one? http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-b7lK... [blogspot.com] One thing my old priest said is beware of sex with animals. People get down and dirty and do all kinds of nasty shit to each other, but when it comes to animals, it's impossible to get consent, for things like torture and sado-masochism that things can degrade into, unlike with participating and willing humans. Even though an animal would probably much prefer being fucked then sent on its way and stay alive, than butchered for meat, we should heed his advice. There is a long tradition of eating meat for economy reasons, as when life is hard, and there is no truly edible food around, but grass and trees, you can have cows and chickens eat the grass and the worms and seeds, and you can eat the cows and chickens. It depends on how good life is whether you have to eat the whole cow, or just the milk, or the whole chicken, or just the eggs, but economics dictate not to waste meat, as long as it's killed kosher, without much suffering. Don't ever get off on skinning cows alive and kicking them around a butcher shop cement floor, as some news come out from some butcheries, for entertainment reasons, where the workers get so desensitized from having to do daily butchering and killing, that that's how they find entertainment. Or even some country farmers cutting a chickens head off and setting the chicken free to run without the head, for the entertainment of the children. That's wrong. Also the things they do to cattle that happen to be born male, and sell them as tasty tender veal, the way they keep them isolated and laying on the floor in tents so their muscles don't harden up from standing on their feet, is probably worse than fucking them. Also putting worms on fishing hooks, that happens everywhere, the worms really hate being impaled alive on a metal hook, and they'd probably much rather just be fucked then be sent on their way, even if there is a chance of getting stuck, than be killed alive like that. At the very least someone should invent a worm anesthetizer, like getting sprayed with ethyl chloride that dentist do to gums before pulling teeth, that would quickly put them out of their misery and make them feel insensitive, before they are put on the hook. That could be part of every human fisherman's tackle box, sold at the tackle shop, same exact thing that dentists use. So it's up in the air, but it's a good principle to draw the line at not fucking with animals, because of lack of consent, and just plain animal dignity. They say a measure of the wealth of a society is often best mirrored not by how much money and gold they can amass, but how well they can afford to treat their prisoners and animals, those most exposed at the lowest classes of society. For one, I love petting cats and making them purr, or playing with dogs, but I never in my life touched an animal the wrong way,(except some grasshoppers and even some worms when fishing, but the grasshoppers were easier imagining they were robots, machines without feelings, which is of course not the case, and whenever I fished with worms I tried to mug the other person I was fishing with to put it on my hook, I was so disgusted, and if they were not willing to do it I just fished without a worm, but other bait, and I never fished with worms when fishing alone.) I would be very reluctant to get involved in having an animal orgasm, even if they really enjoyed it, that's well over the line, even if somebody paid me a whole lot of money, but I'd probably do it for a billion dollars, because that's a lot of money, and you can build a hospital from that and help other people, and making an animal orgasm is nowhere near as bad as some of the animal experiments going down in biotech research labs, where the inner guts of the animals are exposed, and the animals kept alive like that, in pain, tied up, and cancer induced to study anticancer treatments and such. In vitro, that's way over the line, and I would not do it for even a billion dollars. Fuck cancer and biotech research like that. However, if there were an alien species more powerful than me, smarter than me, able to give consent, that's a whole other topic that I haven't thoroughly thought through.. I'll think about it later, see what I can come up with..

Re:Probably because of all the... (0)

sillybilly (668960) | about 3 months ago | (#47635215)

Also, there are natural life cycles, like bugs. Some bees maintain a temperature inside a hive through a winter, but other ones, that have hives numbering in the few tens of individuals, like bumble bees, instead of the few thousands, like domestic honey bees, only have the young freshly hatched queens mate then bury in a hole and hibernate through the winter to start a new hive in the spring, and everyone else dies, including the workers and males. So I would not get involved in helping these other bees survive too, or the male bees that regularly get tossed out of the hive before the winter, I would not go around the world and find them all and provide them with food and shelter and warmth, so they can live out their life and die a natural death instead, for all males bees from all over the world, that's a highly unrealistic thing to even think about, just like I would not get involved with making salmon that had just mated, keep on living out the rest of their lives in some useful way, or black widow spiders not eat their males after mating, or even earthworms, when they detect the weather getting cold, they start laying eggs like crazy, and just dying, that's how they economically deal with cold. So exposing them to cold is like a way of torturing them, or triggering that reaction, but if you make money off of it, it might be something that, well, is up in the air. But not done for pleasure, as if you were doing the same thing as a volunteer. It's still less harm than done in BIO 101 lab across the world, subject Dissection 101, as done with worms and frogs. Also, worker bees with "hygienic" mutations can detect infected pupae while they are sealed up in a honey comb, and extract and eat it for protein, before the infection such as a mite, matures, hatches, and proliferates inside the hive. That's right, they eat their own kind, not wasting protein, and push life forward, even if they themselves don't reproduce or get orgasms at all. As such an activity is beneficial for future life, but fucking an animal, even an intelligent space creature, that can give consent, does not have much to do with pushing life forward, unlike some bondage bdsm sex, that can get off the partner and result in a child too. But we live in the day and age of same sex marriages, that have nothing to do with pushing life forward, other than pure pleasure and entertainment, and with global overpopulation issues, it's almost welcome, and with good life, with great luxury, such things as survival hindering peacock tails and even butterfly colors and features, luxury items, like various useless but cute dog-breeds, can proliferate, and so can pure pleasure things, like same sex things, that have nothing to do with survival, but they come about as an artifact of the things that push survival. So when butterflies can afford to be pretty, when peacocks can afford a colorful tail, when same sex sex is socially accepted, because it's a time of plenty and luxury, even an alien consenting species might be on the table of discussion.. What's right and wrong is a very difficult topic. It's hard to tell the east asians to not eat animals live, like octopi and spiders, or even fish kept alive in the head while the back part is steamed and tenderized, and served like that, with gills moving on the plate at the center of the table, and everyone picks at the back part for a bite, or even party girls in the US swallowing goldfish live, or whatever goes down on mainstream TV in shows like "Fear Factor." or dog fights, or rooster fights (human boxing is totally different), and matador bullfights, all of those things are more wrong than fucking an animal, then setting it free, let it go on its business, in my mind at least.

Re:Probably because of all the... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47635791)

Hi!
You are obviously insane. However, I must ask you something.
Do you write your codex of insanity like that, or you just haven't realized yet that there is a "Text only" option in the drop-down control?
Thank you for your time!

No shit really? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47633821)

I have trouble getting a full night's sleep when I stay in a hotel during a business trip. Maybe they can't just relax and sleep like babies easily because they're, you know, flying through space at 17,100 mph, 200 miles up in the sky where there's no air to breath, in a tiny, cramped, tin can that's just barely keeping them alive in the most inhospitable environment humans have ever survived in. I don't think I'd sleep soundly, either.

Re:No shit really? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47635191)

Wow, I'm not the only one. I travel on business at least once a month. I hate flying so I am already worked up a few days before a flight, the night before I leave, I may sleep 3 hours tops. I get up at 3, I'm on the plane at 6 and in Chicago for example at 8. I work all day, and maybe do dinner and some drinks until about 9 or 10. Get to the hotel room exhausted, tired, and ........I can't sleep. I watch TV flipping channels watching the stupidest crap, I browse the internet, play games on my phone, I look out the window, I watch more TV and so on. Finally about 2-4 am I finally fall asleep and then I have a hard time getting up at 8 and the cycle repeats.

At home.. If I lay on the couch at any time of the day or night any day of the week and turn on the TV, I am sleeping in 10-15 minutes. When I take a bus home from work, I am sleeping in 10 minutes. When I car pool, I am sleeping in 10 minutes. I get to a hotel tired as hell and I can't fkng sleep.

I am a fucking astronaut (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47633841)

...every morning

What could possibly cause them to lose sleep? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47633853)

I mean, they're only in a metal tube in an airless environment hurtling at 27700km/hr around the earth surrounded by objects that could possibly destroy or cripple the only thing keeping them alive. Who'd lose sleep over that?

Sleeping patterns? (4, Interesting)

Carnildo (712617) | about 3 months ago | (#47633895)

I don't think there's ever been a proper study of astronauts' natural sleeping patterns in space. There are always more things people want astronauts to do than there are hours to do them in, so everything (including sleep) is very tightly scheduled. Nobody's ever said "spend the next week doing nothing but keeping your spaceship running, and do it on your own schedule".

We don't know what effect, if any, the freefall environment has on sleep patterns. It may be that astronauts are so sleep-deprived because Mission Control has been scheduling things wrong.

Re:Sleeping patterns? (1)

Triklyn (2455072) | about 3 months ago | (#47634007)

and again, it's friggin awesome. I have trouble falling asleep too if i'm even slightly enthused about something. let alone if i have something on my mind. factor in the buttload of work, the idea that every second counts and the fact that being weightless might be the most awesome thing that a person could be... and well, I AM SUPER SURPRISED.

Re:Sleeping patterns? (1)

Alomex (148003) | about 3 months ago | (#47636787)

Nobody's ever said "spend the next week doing nothing but keeping your spaceship running, and do it on your own schedule".

Actually, that's pretty much what happened to Sergei Krikalev who was scheduled to return to earth in October 1991, but stayed in the Mir Space Station until March 1992 due to the collapse of the Soviet Union.

Excercise (1)

Squidlips (1206004) | about 3 months ago | (#47633989)

Their bodies are not challenged during the day

Re:Excercise (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47634501)

Their bodies are not challenged during the day

Physical exhaustion is but one form of exhaustion. Probably a safe-bet that they get mentally exhausted. Ever driven cross-country(8+ hours at a go)? Not overly physically demanding(unless you're in the Le Mans) but you're wiped out at the end of it.

How many hours of sleep is enough? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47634047)

"mandating 8.5 hours of sleep per night"

Oh sigh. Last time I had over 8 hours of sleep a night regularly was probably in the '70s.

People do not need the same amount of sleep... some people regularly need 8+ hours, others do fine on 5+. It's a question of age, metabolism, habits, workload, etc.

If you mandate that astronauts must sleep 8.5 hours a night, then you should not be surprised that they do not quite make it! State that they should have 6+ on average other their mission and suddenly the statistics will look far less worrisome.

What about the mental health? (1)

king neckbeard (1801738) | about 3 months ago | (#47634065)

Do we have comparisons for their physical state before and after regarding how much sleep deprivation their bodies showed? Perhaps part of the reason that they had trouble sleeping is that it's less tiring to be awake in space or more restful to be asleep in space.

Several factors (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47634207)

The ISS is probably the worst place to try and get some sleep imaginable.

1. The noise
It might not be apparent from recordings taken on the ISS, but the station is noisy as hell. This is because all the air inside must be constantly recirculated to prevent dead air, and the only way to do this is with large fans.

2. Zero-G
Even if you're psychologically capable of tolerating zero-g, your body is expecting a constant downwards acceleration of 9.8m/s^2. For the relatively short stays on the ISS, each astronaut has to adjust to not having that downwards pressure acting on them when they try to go to sleep.

3. Danger
You're floating in a tin can on the edge of space and if anything whatsoever goes wrong, you could be dead before you wake up.

I blame Tang (1)

BenSchuarmer (922752) | about 3 months ago | (#47634257)

that stuff is just too perky

sleep meds (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47634539)

Sleep meds? And the whole team in one night? That can't be good or safe.

Why not some fine pastries made with green butter? Non-addictive and more effective; mentally unwind as well as sleep inducing.

I can't sleep... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47634557)

because my brains a-floatin'.

Free Fall (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47634943)

Two words: Free Fall. Now, I don't know what true weightlessness feels like, but I do know what free fall feels like, which is what an astronaut in orbit is experiencing. Just like it sounds, it's equivalent to falling. The difference from jumping out of a plane is that in orbit you never stop. Now, I don't know about you, but I would need some significantly powerful tranquilizers to fall asleep while falling, even if I know I'm not about to stop suddenly and die. That wake up while falling response was hardwired into our tree dwelling ancestors to reduce the instances of death by broken neck.

So is just about the entire military (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47635147)

Unless you have a desk job or you are not on a deployment, I don't many military people that get more than a job 5-6 hours of sleep in a 24 hour period and the 5 or 6 they do may not have been in a single session.

Post Mission Neurological Effects (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47635469)

Remember the episode, not tv but real time, of the now-former Shuttle crew member, Lisa Nowak, who drove from Huston to Orlando to confront her sexual rival, Colleen Shipman, for the sexual attention and pleasures of another Shuttle crew member, William Oefelein !

Ah, the 'Young And Sleep Deprived'.

Or perhaps, 'The Drugs.'

Ha

Gravity (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47635599)

If the ISS had gravity I'm sure this would be less of an issue. Spin that fucker.

Seriously, I would bet 99.9% of the sleeping issues are related to the foreign weightless environment. Stress, etc, yes that plays a role but the biggest issue is gravity.

Lack of gravity... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47635635)

makes your face swell up with blood, putting pressure on your sinuses. I've heard its compared to having a cold. Wrap that into being in FREAKING SPACE, I couldn't imagine myself sleeping too.

Sleep medication (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47635701)

Great. More drugs...These numbskulls never heard of Ginseng or Blue light blockers ...Yoga....etc

Sleeping for four hours (1)

tquasar (1405457) | about 3 months ago | (#47635827)

I had an unusual work schedule and began sleeping for no more than four hours at a time. The effects where bad.. My sister is a nurse and worked PM's and nights and we talked about the toll it took on us. When she told people that she worked nights their reply was "Oh. so you just sleep during the day". The lack of a normal day/night schedule is really bad. The flight crews train for this but you can't erase your body clock. If you haven't done it you will never know what it's like. Imagine having a sunrise and sunset every 90 minutes.

Re:Sleeping for four hours (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47635873)

People do far worse. Imagine being on a submarine for 90 days with no sun rise or sunset and following a cycle where a day is 18 hours long instead of 24. People adapt. Of course gravity is still there.

Gravity (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47635867)

Von Braun's original designs for space stations pictured them as huge wheels in orbit around the earth. Humans occupied (for the most part) the outer portions and the slow spin created an artificial gravity as also depicted in Kubrick's "2001, a Space Odyssey". Apparently all aspirations to build such a space station were abandoned entirely by the '80s. Given all the stuff we've already sent into space that has been allowed to simply burn up in the atmosphere (by design, usually), humanity could very likely have built the original design and solved many of the problems such as sleep and bone density, etc. To date, nothing has been done in that regard, and apparently nothing is even planned, insofar as I know. Anyone have good reasons why? Is it the cost alone?

sleep (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47635895)

They should look at this: http://www.bbc.com/news/magazi... [bbc.com]

Too much crap in space research/science nowadays.
All the NASA scientists who are proposing one way trips to Mars should go on one way trips out of NASA. That'll improve NASA. One way trips to Mars are a waste of money, time and resources. NASA should just get with the real next step and build a space station with artificial gravity. Not talk about stupid one way trips to Mars.

Trying to go to Mars at this point of our "tech tree" is like trying to jump before being able to stand. Even if we succeed we will fall on our faces. And we won't learn that much for the effort expended.

Falling (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47636569)

You try getting a good night's sleep while constantly falling. I wake up just having a dream where I fall.

Who would have guessed? (1)

HangingChad (677530) | about 3 months ago | (#47636687)

In space no one can hear you snore.

Submarines (1)

blackfeltfedora (2855471) | about 3 months ago | (#47636715)

That sounds a lot like the submarines I served on. It often seemed like I was the only one not popping Tylenol Cold or melatonin to sleep.

Re:Submarines (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47637557)

When taken away from natural 24 hour light cycles, the body reverts to 6 on 6 off periods of wake/sleep cycles. Submariners have been experiencing this effect for years, which is also known to cause sleep deprivation due to the irregularities in melatonin production and limited REM sleep.

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