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Injecting Liquid Metal Into Blood Vessels Could Help Kill Tumors

Unknown Lamer posted about a month and a half ago | from the accidentally-colossus dept.

Biotech 111

KentuckyFC (1144503) writes One of the most interesting emerging treatments for certain types of cancer aims to starve the tumor to death. The strategy involves destroying or blocking the blood vessels that supply a tumor with oxygen and nutrients. Without its lifeblood, the unwanted growth shrivels up and dies. This can be done by physically blocking the vessels with blood clots, gels, balloons, glue, nanoparticles and so on. However, these techniques have never been entirely successful because the blockages can be washed away by the blood flow and the materials do not always fill blood vessels entirely, allowing blood to flow round them. Now Chinese researchers say they've solved the problem by filling blood vessels with an indium-gallium alloy that is liquid at body temperature. They've tested the idea in the lab on mice and rabbits. Their experiments show that the alloy is relatively benign but really does fill the vessels, blocks the blood flow entirely and starves the surrounding tissue of oxygen and nutrients. The team has also identified some problems such as the possibility of blobs of metal being washed into the heart and lungs. Nevertheless, they say their approach is a promising injectable tumor treatment.

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Coley's Toxins? (0, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47651875)

What about Coley's Toxins?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coley%27s_Toxins

Re:Coley's Toxins? (2)

msauve (701917) | about a month and a half ago | (#47652265)

You're trying too hard.

"Injecting Liquid Metal Into Blood Vessels Could Help Kill Tumors"

A large enough dose of cyanide is guaranteed to kill all tumors someone may have. The health of the patient is, of course, not guaranteed.

Re:Coley's Toxins? (2)

germansausage (682057) | about a month and a half ago | (#47652479)

Liquid Metal --- Cyanide.
 
One of these things is not like the other.

Re:Coley's Toxins? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47653525)

If you could deliver cyanide selectively to the tumor, you could kill the tumor only. If you deliver liquid metal only to the blood vessels of the tumor, you could also kill just the tumor.

In either case, you would have to know where all the tumors are first, and if you miss and deliver these agents all over the patient, the patient will dye, and if you miss a small metastasis, you won't cure the cancer (although you may slow it).

Re:Coley's Toxins? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47655885)

In either case, you would have to know where all the tumors are first, and if you miss and deliver these agents all over the patient, the patient will dye, and if you miss a small metastasis, you won't cure the cancer (although you may slow it).

What color?

Re:Coley's Toxins? (1)

torsmo (1301691) | about a month and a half ago | (#47655973)

Cyan.

Re:Coley's Toxins? (1)

sillybilly (668960) | about a month and a half ago | (#47655887)

Prayer kills tumors, as it is God that creates and heals tumors. Reducing the ego to be in balance with the world and living in harmony with nature, kills tumors. The tumor is intelligent, and the only reason why it's killing you is because it decided you are no good. If it thinks you are good, it will sustain you, instead of harming you. Cyanide, or liquid metal or what not, are just protocol, they can kill or heal, and it's up in the air either way. By the way, these are asians, I wonder how many monkeys they injected with liquid metal to come up with this idea? And whoever has a sick enough mind to think up injecting people with liquid metal? It's like in the 50's they used to prescribe electro-shock therapy and lobotomy to patients with behaviorall disorders. In fact one of the Kennedy family girls got a lobotomy in like 1940 or so, to correct her unruly behavioral and she lived to be 80 something, of course, brain fucked and retarded. Some lobotomies - and this includes remote x-ray aneurysm creating gamma knife surgeries done on your head while you're sleeping by your neighbours - do nothing as the brain reorganizes, some fuck you up bad, and she was one of the unlucky fucked up bad ones. But that's the punishment the Kennedy family gets on both the male and female line, for their ancestor triggering the great depression, or even if not triggering it, helping it and pushing his own self interest while fucking up the collective. They are trying to somehow put blame on me for the collapse of the housing market. That's bullshit, the houses were already laid to waste by the time I arrived, and I had nothing to do with that decline, but they did force me to participate by seeking my own self interest to make my own ends meet. Or they tried to get me to commute to Detroit, and somehow they could blame me for how that city is bankrupt too. Dude, I renounce all reponsibility to why Detroit is fucked up. I only been to Detroit, or through it, three times in my life.
By the way if people don't stop mowing lawns - or they don't stop mowing every friggin spot, but leaving say the back half of the lot - au naturel - the world economy is going to collapse, to where they are forced to stop mowing lawns. If you're growing food, you're excused to use pesticides, herbicides, and exploit every square inch of a land. But if you're simply mowing a lawn to be "neat and tidy" all the while laying waste to genetic variablity, driving a lot of plant and animal species locally extinct, you are committing a great crime against Life. That's what the tumors in you think. Usually the biggest value of a chemo is not the actual killing of tumoring contraptions in you, but losing your hair, accepting your mortality in the world, and the spiritual transformation. If you are unable to do that, the tumor will kill you.

The side effect (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47651881)

Well, The side effect might be you're going to die a horribly painful dead, but hey at least you're free from that god awful cancer...

Re:The side effect (2)

ArmoredDragon (3450605) | about a month and a half ago | (#47652751)

I doubt the death would be painful, if it happened. At least, I can't see it being any more painful than chemo already is.

With chemo there's always the debate over which is worse: the disease, or the cure? Most of the time chemo doesn't work, in which case I could see this being used instead.

Re:The side effect (4, Informative)

pla (258480) | about a month and a half ago | (#47653669)

Most of the time chemo doesn't work, in which case I could see this being used instead.

That myth hasn't held true for 30+ years.

When used against appropriate cancers and caught early enough (which doesn't mean "before you have any reason to suspect you have a problem" anymore), chemo has a very high success rate, on the order of 90% and up. Bladder and testicular cancer, most skin cancers - considered almost perfectly curable. Most leukemias, either curable or sustainable.

The question you pose applies more out of desperation than practicality. Very few people, when told they have an untreatable cancer, will decide to just sit down and die. No, they ask the doctor to try anything, however nasty, on the off chance it will work.

We don't complain about antibiotics as a complete failure, despite the fact that they don't treat viruses. The same applies to cancer treatments: use the right drug at the right time.

Re:The side effect (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47655945)

Most of the time chemo doesn't work, in which case I could see this being used instead.

That myth hasn't held true for 30+ years.

When used against appropriate cancers and caught early enough (which doesn't mean "before you have any reason to suspect you have a problem" anymore), chemo has a very high success rate, on the order of 90% and up. Bladder and testicular cancer, most skin cancers - considered almost perfectly curable. Most leukemias, either curable or sustainable.

Hasn't held true for 30+ years? Success rate of 90% and up? Where are you pulling these numbers from? Citation please.

Re:The side effect (0, Troll)

qpqp (1969898) | about a month and a half ago | (#47652763)

You seem to live with the misconception that oncologists try to heal the patient (well, maybe some do). Their job is to get rid of cancer. Sadly.

Re:The side effect (1)

Megol (3135005) | about a month and a half ago | (#47652923)

Idiotic drivel.
My mother have had 3 types of cancer (that is: of separate types not related to each other) and been cured of them all using different kinds of treatments.

My father have a friend that had bone cancer in the cheek which was successfully removed surgically with chemo therapy afterwards to avoid spreading.

A relative was diagnosed with throat cancer (she was a life-long smoker) and the first treatment planned was an operation to remove the main tumors, after opening her up it was discovered that the cancer had spread more than expected and later examinations showed the tumors had spread throughout most internal organs. Then the care shifted to make her death as comfortable as possible.

I could list more examples but the fact is that oncologists are medical doctors just as any in the field and yes they are treated by the same methods as anybody else if they get cancer. This strange paranoid fixation on oncologists is strangely often linked to antisemitism for some reason, like all oncologists would be Jews...

Re:The side effect (1)

qpqp (1969898) | about a month and a half ago | (#47656113)

Yeah, chemo and radiotherapy is so much *FUN* (especially with grade 3 and 4 types) !!
What I meant was: when do we get our nano-bots that swim in the lymphatic and vascular systems and destroys any cancer that spreads already?

The side effect (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47652905)

Yea well, the cancer cells die when the body dies.

Actually... (5, Funny)

Stephen Gilbert (554986) | about a month and a half ago | (#47651889)

Those tumors could be terminated.

Thanks, I'll be here all week. Try the baklava!

Re:Actually... (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47651903)

It's not a toomah!

Re:Actually... (0)

turkeydance (1266624) | about a month and a half ago | (#47651919)

i'll be back. try the 40-watt-range.

Why do I have the feeling... (1, Insightful)

DoofusOfDeath (636671) | about a month and a half ago | (#47651891)

this won't do well in primate/human safety trials.

Re:Why do I have the feeling... (1)

93 Escort Wagon (326346) | about a month and a half ago | (#47652073)

this won't do well in primate/human safety trials.

This is in China, though, where they still have a bit of a "Wild West" attitude regarding human safety.

Re:Why do I have the feeling... (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47652987)

But does testing it on Chinese accurately indicate results on real people?

Re:Why do I have the feeling... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47653373)

In communist China we kil[censored]

This commenter has been sent to a re-education camp, move along nothing to see here.

Re:Why do I have the feeling... (1)

Bearhouse (1034238) | about a month and a half ago | (#47653887)

Well, most workable "solutions" tend to have started with a crazy but creative idea, that gradually gets refined and other good ideas added to it until you get something that's acceptable.

So, for example, you could imagine making the fluid magnetic, so you could then maybe guide it into position and then hold it there. But this brings another issue - you can hardly hold the patient in a strong magnetic field forever.

So, then you could imagine adding some kind of slow-setting glue into the liquid that sets hard after it's had time to be guided into the target and clogged it up.

So only for starting stages then? (1)

thieh (3654731) | about a month and a half ago | (#47651895)

I don't suppose anything will work at later stages where the cells are everywhere... especially not that.

Re:So only for starting stages then? (1)

Megol (3135005) | about a month and a half ago | (#47652933)

Chemo is used for that. Hopefully we'll soon have drugs with better targeting of the tumor cells but hey, chemo have cured many people.

So.... (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47651921)

Possible wolverine on the horizon?

Re:So.... (1)

LordLimecat (1103839) | about a month and a half ago | (#47652825)

Wolverine would have been much less impressive if his claws were made of gallium.

Re:So.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47652917)

What do you mean, gallium is super amazing!

Imagine a superhero whose bones turn to liquid if he gets too hot! He could like.. pass through drains and things like that. That would be very impressive. More impressive, I believe, than a dude with some knives sticking from his knuckles.

When asked for his thoughts... (1, Funny)

TWX (665546) | about a month and a half ago | (#47651923)

...Robert Patrick simply smiled impishly as he replied, "no comment."

Re:When asked for his thoughts... (1)

ChunderDownunder (709234) | about a month and a half ago | (#47652489)

Offtopic??? Mods need to learn some history.

He was the liquid metal bad guy in T2: Judgement Day.

Re:When asked for his thoughts... (1)

gmhowell (26755) | about a month and a half ago | (#47653685)

Offtopic??? Mods need to learn some history.

He was the liquid metal bad guy in T2: Judgement Day.

Oh, you must be talking about Alcide's father in True Blood #getoffmylawn

(I rather liked him as the degenerate gambler in The Sopranos)

Wolverine or T2000? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47651979)

If something goes wrong will these trial patients end up like Wolverine or "the Terminator2000"?

Re:Wolverine or T2000? (0)

mythosaz (572040) | about a month and a half ago | (#47651993)

If something goes awesome will these trial patients end up like Wolverine or "the Terminator2000"?

More like that...

some "problems" (3, Insightful)

asmkm22 (1902712) | about a month and a half ago | (#47651983)

Having blobs of liquid metal flowing to the heart seems like a show stopper to me. I'm intrigued by the old-school-mad-scientist aspect of this idea, but the potential risks seem a bit serious.

Re:some "problems" (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47651989)

from the same people that brought you plastic based milk and lead painted baby toys.

Re:some "problems" (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47652001)

why not they got plenty of people to go around if one up and dies

Re:some "problems" (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47652331)

China isn't the only country with lead problems, even the U.S.A. [wikipedia.org] had it.

Re:some "problems" (1)

Hamsterdan (815291) | about a month and a half ago | (#47652415)

Perhaps, but you don't feed lead to babies.

This is China we're talking about. They were willing to kill their own babies and pets in order to make a little more profit, do you really think they will care about sick people?

Re:some "problems" (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47653177)

This is China we're talking about. They were willing to kill their own babies and pets in order to make a little more profit, do you really think they will care about sick people?

It is true that some of the worst cases of profiteering has been seen in China. What talks in their favor is that they actually enforce capital punishment on the people responsible. Can't say that I can name any other place where people who screw people over for profit actually is punished.

Re:some "problems" (2)

sjames (1099) | about a month and a half ago | (#47652689)

True, but it's use was banned decades ago. We are still cleaning up the mess today and will be for a while.

However China, in spite of having the benefit of learning from our mistakes and knowing very well our standards for import, is using lead paint for children's toys TODAY.

It's one thing to discover that something you've used for years is much more harmful than you thought. It's another to go ahead and use it with full knowledge of the level of harm.

Re:some "problems" (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47656371)

However China, in spite of having the benefit of learning from our mistakes and knowing very well our standards for import, is using lead paint for children's toys TODAY.

You better reign in your G7 buddy Canada for selling asbestos to India.
A little profiteering never hurt nobody...eh?

Re:some "problems" (2)

FuzzNugget (2840687) | about a month and a half ago | (#47652519)

As opposed to the risks of literally inducing chemical and radiation poisoning?

Re:some "problems" (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47654805)

If you looked earlier, they used this alloy before (or something very similar?), to image small heart arteries and check them for blockages as diagnosis for heart attacks.

http://slashdot.org/story/13/1... [slashdot.org]

Four out of five test subjects commented: (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47652017)

"Have you seen this boy?"

Benign or malignant? (1)

dwywit (1109409) | about a month and a half ago | (#47652019)

I'm guessing that they're talking about benign tumours - how would this work with a malignant tumour or metastatic cancer?

If you get the chance, watch "Autopsy - Life & Death". It's a bit gory, but well worth it for the explanation in one episode about the difference between benign and metastatic tumours.

Re:Benign or malignant? (1)

Megol (3135005) | about a month and a half ago | (#47652937)

...or one could just look it up on wikipedia.

"Relatively Benign" (2, Insightful)

penguinoid (724646) | about a month and a half ago | (#47652023)

Lots of things are relatively benign compared to cancer -- but I'm not sure this is one of them.

Not gonna happen (2)

penguinoid (724646) | about a month and a half ago | (#47652045)

Qian and co first tested the cytotoxicity of gallium and indium by allowing cells to grow in its presence and measuring the number that survive after 48 hours. If more than 75 per cent, a substance is deemed safe by China’s national standards.

After 48 hours just over 75 percent of cells in both samples were still alive

The experiments also reveal a number of potential problems, however. X-rays of the rabbit they injected clearly show that blobs of liquid metal found their way to the animal’s heart and lungs.

What’s more, their experiments also show blood vessel growth around the blocked arteries, revealing how quickly the body adapts to blockages.

At least it's easy to conduct research in China. Maybe they'll find something.

What I want to know is, why didn't they try wax or oil first?

Re:Not gonna happen (1)

Jack9 (11421) | about a month and a half ago | (#47652325)

What's the effect of a strong magnet force on that mix? I'm not very familiar with magnetic properties of most metals, but maybe that could contain the metal or shape it that another process can be applied to fix it in place?

Re:Not gonna happen (2)

Michael Woodhams (112247) | about a month and a half ago | (#47652733)

Most metals are not ferromagnetic, and so are not held in place by magnets. I'm pretty sure neither indium nor gallium are ferromagnetic.

As they are good conductors, metals do develop eddy currents in a changing magnetic field, which heats them. (Try dropping a magnet through a narrow aluminium tube. The energy loss due to eddy currents will slow its fall considerably.) If you had this liquid metal inside you, having an MRI scan might be a really bad idea - I wouldn't rule out the possibility that the bits of you in contact with the metal could get cooked. This would be a considerable drawback in a cancer treatment. It would be no different than having metal inside you for other reasons - e.g. titanium pins used in surgery. Does anyone know how those react to MRI?

Re:Not gonna happen (1)

dgatwood (11270) | about a month and a half ago | (#47653133)

Most metals are not ferromagnetic, and so are not held in place by magnets. I'm pretty sure neither indium nor gallium are ferromagnetic.

Most metals aren't, but the iron in your platelets is. Perhaps through carefully tuned EM fields, a natural clot could be formed in a novel way....

I wouldn't rule out the possibility that the bits of you in contact with the metal could get cooked.

I was reading an article a few years ago about doing precisely that—some kind of metal tending to bioaccumulate in tumors, and taking advantage of that in combination with semi-targeted EM fields to literally burn out the tumor.

Re: Not gonna happen (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47653709)

Titanium, nitinol are almost irrelevant to mri. It is non ferromagnetic ( and has low permeability) , has high electrical resistance. As a result you get little magnetic force, little eddy current heating and little distortion of the magnetic field. As a result, there are no significant safety concerns and the images are only mildly distorted in the vicinity of the metal.

Most surgical stainless steel (austentitic) is similar. There is higher magnetic susceptibility so image distortion is significant but as long as the steel is more than 1-2 diameter away from the area of interest, there aren't major problems as long as the steel is well attached to something hard (or away from anything delicate) in case of torque being applied by the magnetic field.

Martensitic stainless (surgical tool steel) is ferromagnetic. A snapped off drill bit lodged within bone, while not mechanically or thermally dangerous, will suck the image for several inches into a black hole (looks quite like artists impressions of an astronomic black hole).

Mild steel shrapnel/shot /BBs are a bit more of a problem due to magnetic force and also low resistance. The image distortion is also huge.

I would expect gallium/indium to be quite similar to titanium, visible on mri, but not a problem.

Re:Not gonna happen (1)

gmhowell (26755) | about a month and a half ago | (#47653693)

Seeing as how we don't know how magnets work, I'm not sure we should add them to the mix.

Re:"Relatively Benign" (0, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47652101)

No kidding. I know that the properties of materials are different when they're alloyed, but I have a hell of a hard time seeing how alloying two heavy metals is going to do anything other than produce a toxic heavy metal.

Re:"Relatively Benign" (1)

rossdee (243626) | about a month and a half ago | (#47652347)

The most widely known liquid metal (Hg) has been used in fillings for centuries

Re:"Relatively Benign" (2)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | about a month and a half ago | (#47653241)

Indium/gallium mixtures are the expensive, classy, mostly-nontoxic-ish low temperature alloy. The cheap seats skip the indium and add zesty cadmium instead. A great deal cheaper; but not for internal use.

Big lump of dead cells (1)

Michael Woodhams (112247) | about a month and a half ago | (#47652025)

Aside from the risks of what happens to the liquid metal after it's done its job, you also end up with a big lump of dead cells inside the body, which can't be good. On the other hand, presumably successful radiation therapy has the same result, and the result doesn't have to be 'good', it just has to be 'better than having a tumor'. Would someone with actual medical knowledge care to comment?

Re:Big lump of dead cells (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47652233)

The body is quite capable of dealing with "big lumps of dead cells": over the course of the next few months, the ex-tumor will be broken down by the immune system.

We already have something functionally similar (5, Informative)

Tippler (3027557) | about a month and a half ago | (#47652031)

I'm a radiology resident who is at least moderately familiar with embolic agents.

We already have a liquid embolic agent that solidifies slowly called Onyx. It is only approved for arteriovenous malformations in the central nervous system, but it is used off label for other indications, including tumor embolization: http://www.ajnr.org/content/34... [ajnr.org] [American Journal of Neuroradiology]. The English on the actual liquid metal article is pretty rough and I soon grew tired of trying to decipher it, but from what I did manage to read I cannot see this doing anything better than Onyx already does.

With regards to embolization to the heart and pulmonary arteries, this happens occasionally with any embolic agent. The cardiovascular system, like the internet, is a series of tubes and the pulmonary capillaries are a fine network of blood vessels that routinely catch tiny blood clots without you even noticing it. It's big emboli that you need to worry about.

Re:We already have something functionally similar (1)

fluffy99 (870997) | about a month and a half ago | (#47652083)

+1 for informative if I had it. Indium and Gallium are somewhat toxic, and ironically suspected as carcinogenic.
http://amdg.ece.gatech.edu/msd... [gatech.edu]

I wonder if the intent was for the metal to get absorbed and held in the tumor rather and slowly poison it more than restrict the blood flow.

Re:We already have something functionally similar (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47652129)

It's an alloy; just because the constituents are bad for you doesn't mean that their combination is. Neither sodium or chloride are exactly good for you, but we all need NaCl. I have done research on using Galinstan (a Gallium/Indium/Tin) liquid metal alloy for electronics cooling and one of the positive things about it is that it is deemed fairly safe, health-wise. Its main application is as a replacement for mercury in oral thermometers. If you happen to be made of copper or aluminum, it isn't very healthy for you though.

Re:We already have something functionally similar (1)

penguinoid (724646) | about a month and a half ago | (#47652329)

It's an alloy; just because the constituents are bad for you doesn't mean that their combination is. Neither sodium or chloride are exactly good for you, but we all need NaCl.

Sodium chloride is a salt, not an alloy. The sodium and chlorine ions exist separately in your body. You can (and do) consume sodium safely without the chlorine as various other salts, for example sodium bicarbonate (baking soda).

Pure sodium is unsafe for you because it converts to a powerful base, not because it is poisonous, and there is no alloy that would fix that (at best you could make it insoluble). But add any non-toxic acid to it and you're good.

Re:We already have something functionally similar (3, Insightful)

rmdingler (1955220) | about a month and a half ago | (#47652131)

The article claims the metal does a better job of blocking 100% of the blood flow supplying sustenance to the tumor than other available options, and is less likely to wash away.

The researchers further posit that since the injected substance is metal, it is an ideal conductor for use as a method of delivery for electrical current to heat up and destroy the unwanted tissue.

Are these plausibly benefits not afforded by existing techniques? I know we get a cancer cure story every fortnight or so, but I, for one, welcome the continued research even if it rarely pans out.

Re: We already have something functionally similar (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47652363)

"The cardiovascular system, like the internet, is a series of tubes ..." I don't need an Internet analogy. I need a _car_ analogy. Dammit.

Re: We already have something functionally similar (1)

Talderas (1212466) | about a month and a half ago | (#47654325)

The cardiovasular system, like your car, is a series of tubes.

Re:We already have something functionally similar (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47652649)

And small emboli, when they are collected by veins into larger and larger blood vessels, which they do not block, and then get pushed to smaller and smaller blood vessels, which they do block.

It's called a "stroke". Do look it up.

Re:We already have something functionally similar (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47654829)

That's why you need an arc reactor on your chest to keep the metal from reaching your heart.

Mercury (0)

dohzer (867770) | about a month and a half ago | (#47652037)

So having mercury in my blood could be good for me?

Re:Mercury (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47652367)

Probably better than having Mercury up your ass, and then getting AIDS

Re:Mercury (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47652521)

Freddie Mercury?

Wolverine :) (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47652149)

one step close to having metal bonded to bone, or having iron man style heart problems ;p

Why poison yourself (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47652179)

When all you need is Rick Simpson Oil

Slashdot is spamming! (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47652193)

I mailed beta-feedback@slashdot.org a while ago using a single-use mail address. Now I get recruitment spam.
Beta is bad, spam is worse.

Isn't it illegal to send commercial mail without opt-in? What can I do about this?

What could possibly go wrong????? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47652207)

What? What?

Magnets (0)

Jim Sadler (3430529) | about a month and a half ago | (#47652235)

Perhaps a magnetic field could secure the position of a liquid metal alloy thus insuring that it doesn't drift to an unfortunate location.

Re:Magnets (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47652263)

Except that its not that type of metal, and the level of magentic field you'd need to manipulate it would also move the water in your cells.

When you see a claim... (1)

Beeftopia (1846720) | about a month and a half ago | (#47652309)

Re:When you see a claim... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47652445)

Not sure how that is relevant here. The substance described is not a common drug or vitamin. The mechanism of action is at least plausible. More research is clearly needed, and it may end up being the case that this treatment is not practical or has too many downsides, but this isn't some supplement company trying to hawk a cocktail of vitamins with dubious claims.

medium.com warning (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47652323)

Warning: source is another fucking annoying medium.com article

And... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47652357)

Turn you into Wolverine. Or so I've been told.

Electromagnetic containment (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47652409)

Maybe Induction coils can be used to position the metal, and keep it from migrating to other organs.

Chinese researchers have said a LOT of stuff. (1)

Chas (5144) | about a month and a half ago | (#47652537)

I'm going to wait until someone who isn't essentially gambling with their patients' lives without informed consent can review these findings.

Re:Chinese researchers have said a LOT of stuff. (1)

russotto (537200) | about a month and a half ago | (#47652587)

I'm going to wait until someone who isn't essentially gambling with their patients' lives without informed consent can review these findings.

Why? Do unethical experiments (by western standards) somehow not work? If we listened to ALL the handwringers we couldn't even experiment on mice, or do nuclear tests on our own planet, and then were would we be?

Ketonic diet (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47652795)

It was discovered already in the 1930's by Otto Heinrich Warburg, who was awarded the Nobel Prize in medicine for his discoveries, that unlike normal healthy cells, cancer cells require glucose to survive. Switching to a ketonic diet and lowering your carbohydrate intake and glucose in your blood will starve cancer cells, and is probably a safer thing to try before you decide to inject toxic chemicals or liquid metals into your blood stream.

Re:Ketonic diet (2)

wierd_w (1375923) | about a month and a half ago | (#47652941)

Unless the cancer is in your liver or renal system.

Then switching to a ketonic diet will poison you in a matter of days.

Always consult a health professional before doing ANYTHING radical with your body. :D

Re:Ketonic diet (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47655371)

Not even remotely true, I was on a keto diet for years. My health had improved beyond belief (strongest indicator is attracting women at a very high rate). My downfall was a return to carb foods from high fat.

But hey, if you want to hold people back with your comments, doesn't affect me.

Sodium? (1)

hughbar (579555) | about a month and a half ago | (#47653101)

As I'm getting older, I want to say that I do not give my consent to have sodium metal injected. It might be a bit dangerous.

Good news Mrs Jenkins (1)

DrXym (126579) | about a month and a half ago | (#47653235)

We cured your husband's cancer but we accidentally vegetablised him by blocking a few veins in his brain with liquid metal.

Re:Good news Mrs Jenkins (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47653391)

Now he is a metal head!

baking soda / bicarbonate (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47653353)

baking soda / bicarbonate cures cancer

Since 30 years I always read the same BS in the MSM: that we have some new cure and it will take several years to come on the market, in the meantime chemo/radiation therapy is pushed, which destroys the immune system and doesn't actually cure cancer.

Cancer can't survive in an alkaline environment, here's the study:

http://www.echtekrant.be/gezon... [echtekrant.be]

Just a tea spoon of bicarbonate in a glass of water every day is enough to make the body alkaline so tumors can't survive.

Liquid Metal (1)

maroberts (15852) | about a month and a half ago | (#47653655)

Terminator 2 called and claimed the patent rights on killing...

More Ideas (1)

StikyPad (445176) | about a month and a half ago | (#47653727)

Dear God, why didn't we think of this sooner? It seems like great inventions are always like that -- so obvious that they're hiding in plain sight. It's like the paperclip, or One Click Payments! Obviously this got the old mental juices flowing, so here are some other things that I'm pretty sure can kill tumors:

  • The fainting game
  • Sufficient quantities of water
  • Ebola
  • Sharks
  • Ski accidents
  • Electricity
  • Heart attacks
  • Famine
  • Other tumors

"Relatively benign" ... ? (1)

fygment (444210) | about a month and a half ago | (#47653843)

Will the side effects simply lead to death in another way?
Will the quality of the time bought, if any, be worth it?

Helloooooo..... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47653853)

Weapon X!!!!

Thank you, I'll be here all week. Give my regards to Logan.

Success! Sort of... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47654507)

Killing the host would in fact kill the cancer.

WTF? I've worked with the stuff (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47654551)

I've worked with that stuff before and I'm thinking: what the hell gave them that idea?

Tested by (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47654903)

This was judged to be completely ethical and safe by scientist.

Dr. Maurau
Dr. Jeckel
Dr. Frankenstein.

Reminds me of a movie... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47656067)

And after your treatment you must be outfitted with an electro-magnet in your chest to keep the shrapn... er, metal blobs from moving into your heart.

T2 (1)

Iniamyen (2440798) | about a month and a half ago | (#47656419)

"So this other guy: he's a cancer treatment like you, right?"
"Not like me. Indium-Gallium, advanced prototype."
"You mean more advanced than you are?"
"Yes. A mimetic poly-alloy."
"What the hell does that mean?"
"Liquid metal."
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