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Microsoft Black Tuesday Patches Bring Blue Screens of Death

timothy posted about 2 months ago | from the but-wait-for-the-patch dept.

Bug 179

snydeq (1272828) writes "Two of Microsoft's kernel-mode driver updates — which often cause problems — are triggering a BSOD error message on some Windows systems, InfoWorld reports. 'Details at this point are sparse, but it looks like three different patches from this week's Black Tuesday crop are causing Blue Screens with a Stop 0x50 error on some systems. If you're hitting a BSOD, you can help diagnose the problem (and perhaps prod Microsoft to find a solution) by adding your voice to the Microsoft Answers Forum thread on the subject.'"

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The suck, it burns .... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47671627)

This is why you should NEVER apply patches that ANY vendor has just released.

Fresh patches are barely beyond alpha tested, if that.

Yes, there's zillions of platforms, but how much of this suck is a result of how Microsoft has architected this crap?

Their years of stealing other people's ideas and then doing a piss poor job of implementing them means they publish so much un-maintainable crap it isn't funny.

Let's face it, Microsoft releases shitty code all of the time. This is nothing new.

Re:The suck, it burns .... (5, Insightful)

bobbied (2522392) | about 2 months ago | (#47671787)

Gee, I don't like Micro$oft as much as the next Linux Zealot, but let's be fair here...

M$ is darned if they do and darned if they don't. When they hold up patching stuff they get pillaged in the press for not getting the gaping security holes in their OS fixed soon enough. When they release stuff too soon and stuff like this happens, they get racked over the coals for not knowing what they are doing, cannot develop/test/integrate their software. M$ has ebbed and flowed on the quality of their patches in the past, they've been slow, they've released some really disruptive software. Being fair, they don't do too bad on either responsiveness or on the introduction of new bugs.

So lighten up on Micro$oft, at least on this front. Now Windows 8 metro and removing the 'start' button? Fire away at that garbage....

Re:The suck, it burns .... (1)

0123456 (636235) | about 2 months ago | (#47671997)

So lighten up on Micro$oft, at least on this front.

Correct me if I'm wrong, but didn't Microsoft just lay off a large number of testers?

Re:The suck, it burns .... (2)

xeoron (639412) | about 2 months ago | (#47672773)

Yes, but that is because the developers are now required to test their own code before it goes to testing, so that things don't break as much during each sprint of coding.

Re:The suck, it burns .... (1)

Richy_T (111409) | about 2 months ago | (#47672889)

What could possibly go wrong? Oh wait...

Re:The suck, it burns .... (5, Interesting)

imgod2u (812837) | about 2 months ago | (#47672053)

I think the criticism isn't so much that they're too responsive to consumers or not -- they obviously listen. The criticism is that there are so many holes to begin with and that their attempts to fix things that are obviously broken -- things that their competitors seem to be able to make work just fine -- often don't work or cause other problems. Knowing the Microsoft engineering culture, their stuff is mostly a patchwork of different groups not talking to each other. In the Windows API, there are something like 17 different representations of strings depending on which engineer/department wrote the code!

When you're disorganized like that in a giant company with a giant piece of software, it's easy to see how bugs can get out of hand.

Re:The suck, it burns .... (1, Insightful)

bobbied (2522392) | about 2 months ago | (#47672361)

Microsoft has competitors in the OS market???? Uh, no, no they don't. At least nobody that approaches even 1/4 of the market share.

But really the OS market is not Microsoft's primary concern, but a means to an end. There clamp on the market is Office in the corporate environment, which drives Windows to the desktop, both professionally and for home computers. They have no real competitors in either the OS or Office worlds. You might claim Red Hat/Linux has made inroads, but only in the server market.

Yea, I know.. All the Apple zealots are foaming at the mouth now... Sorry, didn't mean to take a swipe at the sacred OSx/IOs cow, but it really doesn't have that large of a market share and most of those systems still run windows on the side...

Re:The suck, it burns .... (4, Insightful)

symbolset (646467) | about 2 months ago | (#47672505)

Android Linux moved a billion hardware units last year and this year surpassed the Windows all-time installed base. It is selling above 6x Windows. People using Android have never seen an update mangling this severe, but on Windows it seems a quarterly thing. This whole "Windows rules the world" thing is becoming absurd. Windows rules a small and shrinking backwater - the realm where people are willing to tolerate stuff like this.

Re:The suck, it burns .... (1)

sillybilly (668960) | about 2 months ago | (#47672659)

Last time I installed Google Chrome on my netbook, and used it at the library wireless, every time I went online my packet numbers were huge, and it turned out to be Chrome pulling a daily 50 MB+ update on itself. I quickly stopped any Google related software on my XP netbook. Win XP at least you had the option to download 100-200MB service packs once in a blue Moon, like once a year, and block windows update from constantly fucking with your computer, there is an option for that, but you can't do that with Chrome, they don't give you an option. Which is why I'm not interested in any kind of Google Linux either, if I have to go online with it.

Re:The suck, it burns .... (1)

lgw (121541) | about 2 months ago | (#47673069)

There are updates to Android on phones? I'm not sure my 5-year-old phone has ever received one, and I'm sure its security flaws are legion, just given the history of flaws over the past few years.

Still, it really makes you wonder how this BSOD slipped through - it's not like MS doesn't have vast test automation for stuff like this. It really makes you wonder about the recent massive layoff of QA (and the restructuring behind it). Given the timing, that change starts to seem ill-advised.

Re: The suck, it burns .... (1)

Redbehrend (3654433) | about 2 months ago | (#47673155)

I agree android and linux is moving by leaps and bounds and the best part is almost any company can compile it. Hardware is even running smart altered Linux software these days with built in apps and gui. Windows is on the verge of imploding because they can't seem to do things effectively with all their dang employees lol. Every time they start going in the right direction they screw it up.

Re:The suck, it burns .... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47672123)

Now Windows 8 metro and removing the 'start' button? Fire away at that garbage....

No, instead, fuck the idiots crying about these. Most of the dumb niggers bitching about the lack of Start Menu NEVER knew how to customize it and instead relied on a splattering of shortcuts on the desktop. Not to mention the stupidity of installing a program to have it create yet another yellow folder with it's own name filled with at least 4 other bullshit shortcuts you don't need or want. The Start Screen fixes this, putting everything on one unified screen and filtering out the bullshit. Stupid motherfucking assholes will cry, but that's just what they do. They've been crying since day one.

Re:The suck, it burns .... (0)

sillybilly (668960) | about 2 months ago | (#47672893)

I've seen people with shortcuts on the desktop over 50% of the area. I think it's healthy to cover 25% of your desktop with shortcuts, but once it gets to 80%+, that means you have a severe case of depression, and lack of motivation to clean up your computer desktop. If you're a bachelor, without a woman to clean and pick up after you, then I can only wonder what your pad might look like. But sometimes being depressed has very good excuses. Like I noticed this really smart guy, supporting computers, back in like 2001, and it surprised me that his desktop would be full of shortcuts 95%, and obviously a lot of them garbage. I had no idea that he'd be that depressed, and then I realized what a burden he carried on his back, when, recently switching from commercial Unix to Windows, and touting all the advantages and cost savings that would mean, being a huge Microsoft fan, but suddenly shocked at the core, when all the business applications written in Access 97 stopped functioning just 3 years down the road, when Access 2000 came out without backwards compatibility, and broke everything, so you lived in a dual world where new computers came with Access 2000, and apps written for them, but at the same desk there was a 2nd computer, with Access 97 installed, to run the old apps, and interaction between all the business data split incompatible like that was a depressing huge mess. There was tremendous amount of wealth invested into those old apps, hoping they'd last a business career, not a mere 3 years. That's as good an excuse as any to be depressed. Yeah I know commercial Unix was raping everyone in the butt with per seat licenses, so did Oracle, and Microsoft seemed like such a breath of fresh air, back in the day, in pricing, compared to commercial Unix and commercial SQL database vendors, but then they go and totally ignore the customer and his protecting his wealth, as if the customer did not matter. You can't win, Unix rapes you in the ass with cost, Microsoft, when they give you a low cost, they rape you in the ass with fucking up the things that used to work. Even as late as XP there was still a sense of backwards compatibility at Microsoft, but these days they see backwards compatibility as their biggest threat in making a living, competing against themselves and their old products, people unwilling to upgrade upgrade upgrade every friggin 2 years, that stops the money flow at Microsoft, and that's their prime objective, making money, not making the customer happy, and sometimes these two things do not mean the same thing, but are exact opposites of each other. All I can say they haven't really provided a good reason to upgrade, at least nothing along the lines of win 3.1 to win 95 with over 8.3 file names, or office 7 to office 97 with VBA, etc. If anything, they are castrating the users ability to get done the things they are used to doing, know how to do, and the newer ways of doing them take two clicks instead of a single click, like a print preview does in Office 2010 vs. Office 97, because they lost the good old menu bar, with that stupid ribbon. That ribbon is not what I call an improvement, to the contrary. So why should I upgrade, when it's worse? At least gimme the same thing, with different colors, like a tuned down version of xp that has 150 KB kernel and still gets everything done, looking and acting exactly the same as the 200 MB version of 2002. That's what I'd call an improvement, speed, where I can keep 50 browser tabs open with animate gifs and flash advertising spinning in all of them, and not slow the computer to a crawl. I can use my terrabyte harddisk for other things than code, such as storing high resolution high color images of butterflies, video footages, data, and not code that works on that data. The bigger the code the more complex and less secure I feel using it. I would actually go out and pay money for a version of XP that was super high tuned on speed and ability, super low size on code, never crashed, and let me keep the user interface and the way I'm used to doing things, on an HP Mini 200 Laptop, because even this thing has way too much computing power already, and anything more only increases the possible future occurrence of AI that may or may not eat me alive for breakfast

Re:The suck, it burns .... (2)

sjames (1099) | about 2 months ago | (#47672325)

On the other hand, Apple, Debian and Redhat manage to release timely security patches that don't cause crashing en-masse.

Re:The suck, it burns .... (1, Insightful)

bobbied (2522392) | about 2 months ago | (#47672387)

On the other hand, Apple, Debian and Redhat manage to release timely security patches that don't cause crashing en-masse.

Perhaps, but they have a much smaller market share and support much less diverse hardware configurations, especially Apple.

Re:The suck, it burns .... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47672529)

Perhaps, but they have a much smaller market share and solely in the case of Apple support much less diverse hardware configurations.

Fixed that for you since Debian and Redhat support more CPU archs than Microsoft plus the x86 world that Microsoft supports.

Re:The suck, it burns .... (1)

benjymouse (756774) | about 2 months ago | (#47672729)

On the other hand, Apple, Debian and Redhat manage to release timely security patches that don't cause crashing en-masse.

Perspective, please. This seems to be a *very* limited problem and an (as usual) over-zealous Woody Leonhard trying to stir up a controversy.

Infoworld *is* the fox news of tech.

Re:The suck, it burns .... (1)

phrostie (121428) | about 2 months ago | (#47672769)

maybe they should try letting people pick a level of code that they want to update to.

you could have the really overly tested stuff that doesn't break. we'll call this Stable.

then you could have the stuff that fixes the last problem, but might break something new. we'll call this Testing.

then you could have the bleeding edge stuff that you run just because you want the bragging rights of running some truly unstable shit. we'll call this Siri, Sydney or maybe Sid for short.

i'll bet M$ could even patent it.

Re:The suck, it burns .... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47672787)

Gee, I don't like Micro$oft as much as the next Linux Zealot, but let's be fair here...

...

So lighten up on Micro$oft, at least on this front.

Still using the dollar sign? Why do you think someone will pay attention to anything you have to say? Particularly when you're recommending people "lighten up". How about you grow up?

Re:The suck, it burns .... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47672977)

Micro$oft? M$? Really? It's like I'm reading a comment my pre-teen self made 10 years ago.

Re:The suck, it burns .... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47673039)

No. And HELL NO!
While they keep telling people on why proprietary software is superior to open-source, then they have to take their knocks like everyone else does.

Laugh.. (4, Interesting)

koan (80826) | about 2 months ago | (#47671641)

Someone right now is looking at that error and figuring out how to exploit it.

Re:Laugh.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47671783)

you can help diagnose the problem (and perhaps prod Microsoft to find a solution) by adding your voice to the Microsoft Answers Forum thread on the subject.

How do you post on a forum thread with a non-functioning PC?

Re:Laugh.. (1)

courteaudotbiz (1191083) | about 2 months ago | (#47671979)

In fact, how can you even read this with a non-functioning PC?

Re:Laugh.. (2)

RavenLrD20k (311488) | about 2 months ago | (#47672011)

Boot into your Linux Partition, of course. Wait... you mean to tell me that you're cruising /. and don't dual boot or at least have a LiveCD rolling around? What kind of tech are you into again?

Re:Laugh.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47672097)

Oh, for crying out loud. I don't use Windows; I was ridiculing the idea that Windows users who are experiencing the problem could just post about it!

Re:Laugh.. (1, Troll)

hairyfeet (841228) | about 2 months ago | (#47673057)

If he had a Linux partition he has dealt with so many fucked drivers thanks to Torvalds shittastic driver model (which no other OS on the planet uses, its THAT good) that he'd have no problem diagnosing the Windows driver problem and fixing it so...hey what do you know, Linux IS good for something after all!

Seriously between last known good config and being able to run system restore off the DVD this is really not a problem. BTW anybody know what weird fucked up hardware combo is causing this? Because I got hundreds of Win 7 systems in the field and haven't heard a peep from a single customer about BSODs, I also updated all the systems in the shop, again no BSODs, so it has to be some funky as hell hardware if I don't have any of 'em.

But I just have to laugh because what the average Linux user deals with every distro release (go to their forums sometime right after release, its really funny) is so rare on the Windows side it makes front page news when it happens. IRL its as rare as hens teeth, thanks to a solid driver model with BC and the ability to silently restart drivers if one hangs Windows has never been more stable and solid. I almost wish the FOSSie delusion of Windows still being like Win9X was real, there are times in the shop I feel like the Maytag repairman in the commercials, sitting there waiting for repair calls that never come.

Re: Laugh.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47672009)

That would be me. Now, just pay me a little money (I take Visa, MasterCard, PayPal, and Bitcoin) and I'll share my exploits with you. ;)

THANK GOD for "automatic updates" (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47671667)

Auto Update on by default, one of the updates bricks your server.

Re: THANK GOD for "automatic updates" (2)

bill_mcgonigle (4333) | about 2 months ago | (#47671739)

so funny ... if you were competent enough to review all the patches and keep your server secure enough to be a good Internet citizen, unchecking 'automatic ' would not be a hurdle.

Re: THANK GOD for "automatic updates" (3, Informative)

greenwow (3635575) | about 2 months ago | (#47671991)

Selecting "Download updates but let me choose whether to install them" instead of the default "Install updates automatically (recommended)" doesn't always work. We have about forty Window servers, and around half of them will crash nearly weekly from Microsoft shoving patches down our throats. We've tried everything we can think of and everything Microsoft suggested, but these Microsoft servers still crash for updates. It doesn't always work, and fixing it isn't as simple as you so flippantly suggest.

The mods are Microsoft fanbois (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47672047)

You posted something bad about Windows so they very quickly buried you.

I miss when this site had technical users instead of being run by Microsofties.

Re: THANK GOD for "automatic updates" (2)

cogeek (2425448) | about 2 months ago | (#47672549)

You have 40+ Windows servers and aren't using WSUS? Deploy WSUS, pull the patches down on Tuesday, push them on Monday night. Gives nearly a whole week for the rest of the world to figure out they're not working for you.

I just ran an update and don't have any problems.. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47671707)

Oh wait, I'm on Linux.

Re:I just ran an update and don't have any problem (2, Insightful)

bobbied (2522392) | about 2 months ago | (#47671805)

Oh wait, I'm on Linux.

Which distribution? I have had issues with Linux patches too.. Not as often as with Microsoft patches, but problems none the less.

Re:I just ran an update and don't have any problem (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47672969)

I run Ubuntu on my laptop and there are patches a few times a week for various items and I haven't had any trouble or issues post installation. I can't speak for all Linux flavors, but I can say that for a general purpose web browsing/office productivity laptop, Ubuntu is great.

Re:I just ran an update and don't have any problem (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47671859)

On my private machines, I have been using Linux and *BSD for more than ten years, and I only once had a problem with an update (and that was on a Gentoo box that had not been updated for more than a year - in other words, it was to be expected). About one and a half years ago, I started working as a sysadmin at a Windows shop, and I have been enraged, shocked, scared, and surprised more or less continuously ever since.
On the one hand, you want to keep your systems up to date. On the other hand, installing updates on Windows is like Russian roulette with five out of six chambers loaded. I am constantly torn between my deply ingrained reflex, acquired on Linux/BSD, to install any update as soon as it becomes available, and painful experiences I've had on Windows.
Can't Microsoft just get their act together and do some freaking *TESTING* before shoveling their crap out of the door, instead of having their customers do it for them?

Re:I just ran an update and don't have any problem (2)

bobbied (2522392) | about 2 months ago | (#47672061)

I prefer to play Russian Roulette with a semi-auto with 3 out of 6 rounds loaded. The odds are better.

Re:I just ran an update and don't have any problem (5, Funny)

bobbied (2522392) | about 2 months ago | (#47672135)

Oh, and if you are allowed a 15 round magazine, 3 out of 15 is even better!

Re:I just ran an update and don't have any problem (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47672475)

If it was a M$ gun it would lock up, or empty the entire magazine.

Re:I just ran an update and don't have any problem (2)

bobbied (2522392) | about 2 months ago | (#47672675)

If it was a M$ gun it would lock up, or empty the entire magazine.

No, they'd just hide the trigger and require you to hit three separate buttons requiring at least two hands to fire it, then totally disassemble and reassemble it between shots... ([Ctl][Alt][Del] followed by reboot)

Yea, I know, OLD NT joke.....But it's still funny.

Re:I just ran an update and don't have any problem (1)

Anomalyst (742352) | about 2 months ago | (#47672683)

If it was a M$ gun it would lock up, or empty the entire magazine.

and auto-aim at one of your pedal extremities.

Re:I just ran an update and don't have any problem (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47672113)

Mod up. Anyone who has ever been cast from a professional *nix environment into an MS shop has experienced the same horror (raises hand).

And the difference in tool and OS quality between the two environments produces a totally different mindset. Like designing a jet engine vs. building a castle in the sandbox.

Re:I just ran an update and don't have any problem (1)

sillybilly (668960) | about 2 months ago | (#47673143)

They want to force everyone onto smart phones that store all data on the cloud, and do not function off network. Once they capture all your data, it's easy to blackmail you. So Microsoft might deliberately be castrating themselves, to push the IBM mainframe-cloud in businesses, and smart phone could terminals, for everyday users. The cloud the cloud the cloud, you can't have your own data, like on a USB stick no more. Microsoft might be willing to offer themselves as a sacrifice to accomplish this. Which is why it might be an interesting idea to sell short, but that's a really lame way of making money. Ballmer in 2001 or 3 shouter at a dev conference "I love this company." Which means his mentality is not one of sacrifice for greater good, or greater money, but greater ego. Sometimes corporations, that are treated like people when it comes to taxes, take on a life of their own and want to survive even if there are other sub-collective faction interests, that would make the collective more exploitable, like there is a new set of greater predators that would be much better off with the old top predator gone, even if closely related by kinship to the old one, but the old top predator might want to survive anyway, without transformation. The transformation itself would mean Windows Phone always on the cloud, for everyday people, and Windows Mainframe cloud based servers, for businesses. So forget your old desktops, and your old business investments into apps, they are offered as a sacrifice Microsoft and gang to the Gods, burning on an altar, hoping to be forever gone from the world.

Phew. (5, Insightful)

ledow (319597) | about 2 months ago | (#47671713)

I work in schools, preparing for a huge summer deployment, just re-imaged every PC on-site.

Fortunately, although I pushed the updates out over WSUS, my image was taken BEFORE patch Tuesday. Anything that hasn't been out for a least a month is in beta testing, as far as I'm concerned, and after a month it either "works" (for some definition) or something like this will come to my attention.

Have all the PC's imaged in my rooms, but only have a handful actually deployed at the moment while I test. The very first blue-screen I see, any kernel-mode patch this month will be changed to "Declined" so no further PC's get it.

Yet again, those people who get all stroppy about "you should install updates the SECOND they come out".... real life hits you again. And the downtime from a potential "zero-day" that I'll probably never witeness is nothing compared to potentially rolling out faulty updates to hundreds of PC's that would then have to be re-imaged, and/or having a faulty update inside your images forcing you to reverse changes (in my case, to pre-summer images which is a HUGE step backwards) and re-deploy.

Re:Phew. (4, Insightful)

gstoddart (321705) | about 2 months ago | (#47671745)

Yet again, those people who get all stroppy about "you should install updates the SECOND they come out".... real life hits you again.

I've never understood that mentality ... usually I give patches from any vendor a few weeks or more to have a shakedown period.

Let someone else do the beta testing.

I've seen more problems caused by applying fresh steaming patches than I have seen problems solved by it.

Re:Phew. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47672229)

Like Herd-immunity that only works if most people don't do it. Once most people wait a few weeks, you'll have to wait longer than that to shake out the issues...

Re:Phew. (1)

gstoddart (321705) | about 2 months ago | (#47672439)

Like Herd-immunity that only works if most people don't do it.

Sure, and there will always be those who do it right away.

But I have no intention of being the first lemming off the cliff. I've been in IT way too long to trust a fresh patch for any vendor.

There was a time when release cycles were much longer, nowadays, you're just as likely to end up in the situation of a busted environment.

At the very least you have non-prod systems which you use as guinea pigs. But I've met people who apply new patches to Production machines right away -- and almost invariably end up getting burned by it.

I'll stick with my old school, overly paranoid approach to release engineering/configuration management. What others do with systems they're in charge of is their own problem.

Re:Phew. (1)

steelfood (895457) | about 2 months ago | (#47672435)

That only works if you either 1) have a test system you can test patches on or 2) turn off automatic updates. Either way, you need to be savvier than your average Windows user.

Fortunately, the big corps that give Microsoft the majority of its sales tend to have sufficiently capable tech teams. It's the small businesses that really lose (the personal/home users can mostly hit the reboot button or hold the power button down for 5 seconds or whatever passes for a hard reset these days).

Re:Phew. (1)

antdude (79039) | about 2 months ago | (#47673033)

Even if they are zero/0 days?

Re:Phew. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47673053)

I do it with Fedora every other version ... that beta testing.

And I'm happy to.

Re:Phew. (2)

sandytaru (1158959) | about 2 months ago | (#47671831)

Yup, back when I did the patches for about a thousand computers, I'd always roll them out sloooooowly. First my test system, then my system, then the rest of my office (we know not to panic), then our smallest clients, and then snowballing up to a final massive push to 500 or so systems at our biggest client just before the next round of patches came out. If there was ever a problem anywhere along the line, we could halt before too much damage happened.

Re:Phew. (0)

marcroelofs (797176) | about 2 months ago | (#47672823)

You'd think the guys at M$ had already done that. Isn't that why you pay the yearly extortion fees?

Re:Phew. (1)

nabsltd (1313397) | about 2 months ago | (#47673035)

You'd think the guys at M$ had already done that. Isn't that why you pay the yearly extortion fees?

Nobody pays Microsoft any money for OS updates as long as the OS is in general support.

Re:Phew. (1)

Joe_Dragon (2206452) | about 2 months ago | (#47671863)

you need to update drivers as well. Don't use the ones on the dell website (other then with some laptop that will not take the full ones)

Also drives on windows update can be very hit or miss.

Fault in gdi32.dll (5, Informative)

DigiShaman (671371) | about 2 months ago | (#47671715)

So it looks like certain video drivers are barfing the system (itching the gdi32.dll the wrong way). If you can, roll back to an earlier system restore point, update the video drivers, then re-apply the updates again.

Re:Fault in gdi32.dll (2)

postmortem (906676) | about 2 months ago | (#47671733)

It is not a bug, it is a feature..

It was supposed to always BSOD in this case! MS fixed the bug so it finally BSODs. ;)

Good Idea (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47671721)

If your computer BSODs, then post on a forum about it. Of course, how does one post on a forum if they can't boot up? Might as well add in a www site for network connnectivity problems too.

Re:Good Idea (1)

ccanucs (2529272) | about 2 months ago | (#47671743)

Right - like - call your phone vendor if you experience loss of service... Never figured that one out either... ;-)

Re:Good Idea (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47671941)

Right - like - call your phone vendor if you experience loss of service... Never figured that one out either... ;-)

When I call Comcast, there's a recorded message saying "if you are experiencing an internet outage, check out www.comcast.net to see if there's an outage in your area.

Re:Good Idea (1)

LduN (3754243) | about 2 months ago | (#47672143)

for the wireless internet company I used to work out, we'd send an email alerting people of tower outages in their area...

Re:Good Idea (1)

symbolset (646467) | about 2 months ago | (#47672555)

You can post on a forum from your mobile device over any available network.

Re:Good Idea (1)

hurfy (735314) | about 2 months ago | (#47672733)

Build a new computer. The instructions are right there on the CD that comes with the motherboard.....

Bad Assumptions... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47671723)

If I get the BSOD, I'm not going to have a computer that I can use to "drop by" the Microsoft Forum and report anything.

Re: Bad Assumptions... (2)

bill_mcgonigle (4333) | about 2 months ago | (#47671751)

if you only have one computer you're not the kind of person who will be helpful in diagnosing a kernel driver bug (sorry if that stings).

Re:Bad Assumptions... (1)

Joe_Dragon (2206452) | about 2 months ago | (#47671839)

It's like the power company.

You can now track outages online (this back when cell phone only had very basic web)

Fortunately there is Linux.... (0, Offtopic)

XB-70 (812342) | about 2 months ago | (#47671773)

The update crashed 100% on re-boot stopping at 10% install. Fortunately, I was able to disable UEFI, boot to my Ubuntu Linux partition, go online and figure out what to do... then go back and bang away 'till it booted. I ended up going back to a good install point and adding updates incrementally.

Note to self: Always, always put a Linux partition on EVERY Windoze machine!

Yeah, yeah, I could carry a bootable USB around, but this way, it's always IN the machine.

My problem is this: WHO is going to PAY me for my time? Isn't it time that a consumer watchdog agency said: "Enough is enough, Microsoft. You have cost users countless BILLIONS of hours and money. If this were a car, Ford or GM or Toyota would be BANKRUPTED by the recalls."

Re:Fortunately there is Linux.... (1)

PRMan (959735) | about 2 months ago | (#47671815)

When my Ford car broke down, who is going to pay me for the time it took me to take it to the repair shop and rent a car? Nobody.

Re:Fortunately there is Linux.... (3, Insightful)

sjames (1099) | about 2 months ago | (#47672433)

That's because it broke through normal wear and tear. If someone from Ford came out to your house one night and swapped parts and as a result your formerly running car wouldn't start in the morning, you would certainly be entitled to compensation for your time and trouble as well as a fix fro your car.

Re:Fortunately there is Linux.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47671873)

[ ] The above happened [X] The above did not happen

Re:Fortunately there is Linux.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47671935)

What makes you doubt him?

Re: Fortunately there is Linux.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47672079)

Because he's a Microsoft shill

Re:Fortunately there is Linux.... (1, Insightful)

amicusNYCL (1538833) | about 2 months ago | (#47671921)

My problem is this: WHO is going to PAY me for my time?

Goddamn, how entitled can you be? How about this question: how much time have you saved by using a computer running Windows to do your job? But, what, you expect Microsoft to shell out your hourly rate every time something on your computer doesn't work right? That must mean that you cut Microsoft a portion of every check you make from working on your Windows machine, right? Or wait, you keep all that money don't you? And Microsoft never expects you to cut them part of your check, do they? It's a one-time fee with a giant agreement saying that they are not 100% perfect, isn't that right?

Now, WHO the hell is going to PAY me for having to spend MY TIME to reply to this crap?

Re:Fortunately there is Linux.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47672279)

Coulda just kept your goddamn hands off the keyboard and not bother with it, fucktard.

Re:Fortunately there is Linux.... (3, Insightful)

sjames (1099) | about 2 months ago | (#47672485)

If it doesn't work right because of something MS did and they then leave him to fix it, why not?

I'm pretty sure MS insists on being paid for each and every install of Windows.

Since you were perfectly free to not reply at all, you're an unpaid volunteer.

I have a solution for impacted users (5, Informative)

djdanlib (732853) | about 2 months ago | (#47671791)

This rollback procedure got my Win7 x64 system booting again:

From another system with the same bit width and service pack level, grab the files C:\Windows\System32\gdi32.dll and C:\Windows\System32\Win32k.sys.

Using HBCD or a similar boot disc, boot your defunct system. You can also snag the hard drive and plug it into another working computer.

BACK UP the gdi32.dll and win32k.sys files from System32 to another location just in case. Overwrite those two files in System32 with the ones you grabbed from the other system.

Your system is now bootable, having effectively rolled back the KB2982791 update. This is a quick and dirty procedure and leaves the update itself in an indeterminate state.

Re:I have a solution for impacted users (2)

thoriumbr (1152281) | about 2 months ago | (#47671871)

This is a quick and dirty procedure and leaves the update itself in an indeterminate state.

Quick if you live in an area with lots of cloned Windows around.

Not that quick if you have to call a few friends, ask they Windows' versions, get a match, grab a pendrive, drop by the friend's house, copy the files, use the friend's computer to download and burn a rescue disk, drive home, and proceed to step 2.

Re:I have a solution for impacted users (1)

djdanlib (732853) | about 2 months ago | (#47672281)

Indeed.

You could also boot with the install media and do a System Restore since Windows Update generates a checkpoint when you install updates.

If you don't have that option, my original solution will get you up and running, inconvenient as it may be.

Re:I have a solution for impacted users (1)

tlhIngan (30335) | about 2 months ago | (#47673029)

You could also boot with the install media and do a System Restore since Windows Update generates a checkpoint when you install updates.

Or you can boot the recovery partition on Windows (startup repair), and you can use it to restore from a previous restore point.

You should also be able to find a copy of the older gdi32.dll in the WinSxS directory (that's where all updates are stored - then the files are hard-linked to their final location in the Windows directory. You could, in theory just alter the hard link to point to the earlier version.

Re:I have a solution for impacted users (1)

djdanlib (732853) | about 2 months ago | (#47673085)

Yep. That partition didn't exist on the affected machine because end user reasons, or I definitely would have tried it.

Re:I have a solution for impacted users (1)

Threni (635302) | about 2 months ago | (#47672637)

Easier to boot from a Linux USB install, download and copy the files straight onto the windows drive then reboot.

don't kill the persistent taskbar and add it + sta (0)

Joe_Dragon (2206452) | about 2 months ago | (#47671827)

don't kill the persistent task bar and add it + start menu to windows 9.

Another reason to use Free Software over M$ Junk (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47671951)

This is yet another reason all versions of Vista are failures. Doesn't surprise me as M$ is doing what they always do, using their illegal monopoly to distribbute sub-par, non-free software to its lusers. M$ also uses restricted boot to ensure all systems must use their non-free software. Without their power to reinforce their illegal monopoly people would be fleeing M$ Windoze with its bugs that cause Windoze machines to BSOD and going over to GNU/Linux and use nothing but free software over using non-free software.

--
Friends don't help friends install M$ junk.
Friends do assist M$ addicted friends in committing suicide.

Another reason to use Free Software over M$ Junk (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47672045)

Oh my god... is that Twitter?

You just had to be on the bleeding edge of tech (5, Funny)

daveywest (937112) | about 2 months ago | (#47671999)

So happy I'm running XP right now. No patch for me.

Re:You just had to be on the bleeding edge of tech (3, Funny)

sinij (911942) | about 2 months ago | (#47672055)

No problem, Chinese People's Army will patch it for you.

Re:You just had to be on the bleeding edge of tech (3, Informative)

iggymanz (596061) | about 2 months ago | (#47672399)

nonsense, plenty of current malware prevention and detection wares run on XP, better than Microsoft's.

you are full of needless FUD

Re:You just had to be on the bleeding edge of tech (1)

Megane (129182) | about 2 months ago | (#47672445)

Citizen, have you not yet received your monthly Malicious Software Removal Tool? Clearly you are telling an untruth about using XP and should report to a re-education center immediately!

Who uses windows nowadays? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47672065)

Who uses microsoft corporation's 'windows' product nowadays?
Did this problem really affected someone?
Or is it just some unimportant news for plebs, stuff that doesn't matter?

Re:Who uses windows nowadays? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47672465)

Office 2010 is intuitive and looks very damn nice compared to "1990's is calling" and wants libreoffice back including the buggy and crapping all over itself linux.

Re:Who uses windows nowadays? (1)

0123456 (636235) | about 2 months ago | (#47673145)

Did they finally take that ribbon crap out, then?

7/12/2014 Patches applied and no problem (1)

Streetlight (1102081) | about 2 months ago | (#47672069)

I just checked my update history for my Dell XPS 15 running up to date Windows 7 SP 1 and the three patches listed in the OP post were installed and I have no problems. One was recommended and the other two were listed as important.

Second that (1)

benjymouse (756774) | about 2 months ago | (#47672783)

Updates Win 8.1 x64 all patches. No problems.

Patch Tuesday updates (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47672415)

My win7 desktop is bricked after patch Tuesday updates. Even my win7 install DVD is not working due to Master boot record being damaged. Supposedly the same DVD I used to fix my desktop a few months ago is now not the same version of windows that I installed.

Stop errors 0x50 and 0xc000000f

Sounds like it's... (2)

sootman (158191) | about 2 months ago | (#47672427)

... Throwback Tuesday!

Yo0 fAil it. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47672617)

880 w/512 Megs of fucking confirmed: slings are limited, bought the farm... BSD had become that *BSD 0wned. took precedence obligated to care this is consistent OpenBSD wanker Theo

Lay off testers? This is what happens. (1)

gestalt_n_pepper (991155) | about 2 months ago | (#47672879)

Once again, Microsoft discovers what's obvious anyone else who's been in the business for 25 years or so.

You have to have manual and automated GUI testers. Unit testing is nifty, but that's like testing just the spark plug, or maybe the spark plug and the ignition timing. Not a bad idea, but listen. If you knew about a new car, but knew that nobody had ever actually *driven* the car, much less taken it out on the road on a regular basis, would you buy that car?

For that matter, would you fly in a plane tested that way?

Developers testing their little piece of code isn't ever going to cut it. Neither is unit testing. Thinking it will is just managerial fantasy, or an idea that lets you fire a bunch of testers so the books look better and some manager or bean counter. can get a one time bonus.

Microsoft (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47672915)

Enterprise quality software.

Kernel-mode drivers (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47672961)

I never understood why drivers had to be on the kernel ring anyway. Every single peripheral (GPU, sound card, etc.) driver I've ever encountered has had a history of stability problems. You'd think the largest point of failure on the computer could be moved to userland and restarted when necessary.

Slashdot and Windows? (0)

mi (197448) | about 2 months ago | (#47673045)

If you're hitting a BSOD, you can help diagnose the problem

You should also close your /.-account — and never come back, for all I care...

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