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Knocking Down the Great Firewall of China

Soulskill posted about 3 months ago | from the crumbling-from-a-million-tiny-cracks dept.

Censorship 167

New submitter Nocturrne writes: The FOSS project Lantern is having great success in unblocking the internet for many users in oppressive regimes, like China and Iran. Much like Tor and BitTorrent, Lantern is using peer-to-peer networking to overcome firewalls, but with the additional security of a trusted network of friends. "If you download Lantern in an uncensored region, you can connect with someone in a censored region, who can then access whatever content they want through you. What makes the system so unique is that it operates on the basis of trust. ... Through a process called consistent routing, the amount of information any single Lantern user can learn about other users is limited to a small subset, making infiltration significantly more difficult." The network of peers is growing, but we need more friends in uncensored countries to join us.

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

LOL (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47684161)

I had great success plowing your dads while your moms tossed my salad.

How about backing off? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47684163)

The day I lost a lot of respect for Open Source is the day they went political.

Why don't they mind their own business and stop trying to push their ideology worldwide? China isn't a democracy - neither are 99.9% of those that claim to be but that's beside the point. They have their own rules and regulations and you should respect them and not interfere.. You have no right to decide what's right or wrong or to push your means to them, the same way as they don't or shouldn't push their ideology to your countries.

Re:How about backing off? (-1, Offtopic)

ArcadeMan (2766669) | about 3 months ago | (#47684187)

Everything should taste like maple syrup.

Signed,
The Canadian Maple Syrup League.

How about backing off? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47684247)

Sounds like you could use some reeducation. You will be subjected to pictures of Stallman in a dress until you see five lights.

Re:How about backing off? (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47684331)

The day I lost a lot of respect for Open Source is the day they went political.

Why don't they mind their own business and stop trying to push their ideology worldwide? China isn't a democracy - neither are 99.9% of those that claim to be but that's beside the point. They have their own rules and regulations and you should respect them and not interfere.. You have no right to decide what's right or wrong or to push your means to them, the same way as they don't or shouldn't push their ideology to your countries.

Yes. The article is all about people forcing their viewpoints on others. Unfortunately you did not grasp which group was doing the forcing and which group was giving people options to prevent it.

Re:How about backing off? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47684991)

Yes. The article is all about people forcing their viewpoints on others. Unfortunately you did not grasp which group was doing the forcing and which group was giving people options to prevent it.

Like forcing "democracy" on China?
I agree with GP.
The West need to mind its own failing business.
Mounting national debt by rogue governments (bankrolled greatly by those vile and vulgar Chinese no less), race riots in American/UK/France cities, rogue government trampling basic human rights and its own constitution like privacy...
Sorry if this is "democracy", I'm not sure I want it.

Re:How about backing off? (2)

drfred79 (2936643) | about 3 months ago | (#47685185)

The Chinese social networking army has really fluent English speakers.

Re:How about backing off? (1)

poity (465672) | about 3 months ago | (#47685193)

Probably western Sinophiles who can't distinguish between government and people. Regular Chinese people have no respect for these Chinaboos.

Re:How about backing off? (1)

Applehu Akbar (2968043) | about 3 months ago | (#47685657)

I wish there were a way to get your overseers to switch you from the political screed team to the manual-writing team.

Re:How about backing off? (1)

sound+vision (884283) | about 3 months ago | (#47685941)

The software in question isn't forcing anyone to do anything, it's giving the option for people to get around a filter.

"Anonymous Coward" is there for a reason. (1)

gfolkert (41005) | about 3 months ago | (#47685263)

I mean really... ACs make wild claims and can't / won't back it up.

Re:How about backing off? (1)

tepples (727027) | about 3 months ago | (#47684369)

So if someone under the jurisdiction of a not-democracy disagrees with the policy of the not-democracy, what recourse ought he to have?

Re:How about backing off? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47685001)

So if someone under the jurisdiction of a not-democracy disagrees with the policy of the not-democracy, what recourse ought he to have?

You're welcome to get the fuck out of America.

Re:How about backing off? (4, Insightful)

stephanruby (542433) | about 3 months ago | (#47684387)

The day I lost a lot of respect for Open Source is the day they went political.

Open Source isn't a person. It's neither political, nor apolitical. Open Source is a tool that makes sharing software much easier. That is all.

They have their own rules and regulations and you should respect them and not interfere..

Why should I? If a friend of mine in China wants me to give him access to github because its government blocked it for some reason (as it has done in the past), then I will certainly give it to him. Not that I was ever asked, everyone I know in China already pays (or has their own company pay) for a private proxy to ssh through.

You have no right to decide what's right or wrong or to push your means to them,

I have the right to say whatever I want, and they have the right to ignore me. Just like you have the right to say whatever you want, and I have the right to ignore you. The same goes for my government, please feel free to try to influence it. Most people running my government are self-serving idiots anyway.

Re: How about backing off? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47684591)

Open source is a "way of thinking", a philosophy! Not a tool, not a corp ...
Opening your code is like sharing wisdom!

Re:How about backing off? (5, Insightful)

znrt (2424692) | about 3 months ago | (#47684575)

The day I lost a lot of respect for Open Source is the day they went political.

"they" who?

Why don't they mind their own business and stop trying to push their ideology worldwide? China isn't a democracy - neither are 99.9% of those that claim to be but that's beside the point. They have their own rules and regulations and you should respect them and not interfere.

what kind of being could possibly put "99.9% of democracies aren't democracies" and "we should respcet rules and regulations" in the same sentence. a mushroom?

Re:How about backing off? (2)

BarbaraHudson (3785311) | about 3 months ago | (#47684761)

The day I lost a lot of respect for Open Source is the day they went political.

Why don't they mind their own business and stop trying to push their ideology worldwide?

So I guess you lost all respect for Einstein and his peers when they warned about the implications of weaponizing nuclear technology ...

They have their own rules and regulations and you should respect them and not interfere.

The world disagrees. "Ve vere chust followink orders" isn't a defense for following "rules and regulations" that deprive people of what most of the people on the planet consider to be universal human rights.

Re:How about backing off? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47685427)

The world disagrees. "Ve vere chust followink orders" isn't a defense for following "rules and regulations" that deprive people of what most of the people on the planet consider to be universal human rights.

Listen beyotch, leave the NSA out of this...if you know what's good for ya...

Adm. Michael S. Rogers
Director, NSA

Re:How about backing off? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47685093)

... well there it is, folks! And you thought apologists for the US were retarded. Here is someone who transcends general retardation and creates his own universe of retardedness.

Re:How about backing off? (1)

drfred79 (2936643) | about 3 months ago | (#47685177)

You make me want to download lantern. Back in the day the United States was actively promoting democracy. France, our biggest ally in the revolution received a colds shoulder from us as we favored the rebellion. Screw China and screw totalitarianism.

Not my job (-1, Troll)

bazmail (764941) | about 3 months ago | (#47684167)

Its not our job to knock it down. Its the job of the chinese citizens.

I know it sounds un-American and like I'm not a team player in the Us Vs Them battle, but fuck it, not my job.

Re:Not my job (1)

The New Guy 2.0 (3497907) | about 3 months ago | (#47684299)

Firewall knock downs require two sides... somebody wanting the content, and somebody willing to send the content in a way that passes the firewall.

Re:Not my job (1)

dbreeze (228599) | about 3 months ago | (#47684335)

And when I see you and yours harshly or unfairly treated you'll appluad me for responding in kind......?
We are to be our brothers keeper, at least to the extent we would expect help from a brother.

Re:Not my job (1)

Zero__Kelvin (151819) | about 3 months ago | (#47684343)

"Its not our job to knock it down. Its the job of the chinese citizens. "

That has to be the most phenomenally stupid comment I've read in a very long time. Who the hell do you think is running this tool on the other side of the censorship wall? I suppose if a woman cried rape you'd say it is not your job to stop rape, it is the responsibility of the women to not get raped, no? I am dumbfounded that you would post such drivel.

Re:Not my job (2)

penix1 (722987) | about 3 months ago | (#47684377)

I read that line quite differently. It IS the job the the Chinese citizens to change a situation they don't agree with and this is one tool to help them do that. To say it is solely up to outsiders to change the system of a country without the support of the citizens is forcing your will on those citizens.

Re:Not my job (1)

Zero__Kelvin (151819) | about 3 months ago | (#47684409)

"To say it is solely up to outsiders to change the system of a country without the support of the citizens is forcing your will on those citizens."

Great. Now who said that? I didn't see anyone saying it. This tool certainly doesn't say it.

"Lantern is a piece of software that allows people in countries without Internet restrictions let someone in a place lacking those same kinds of freedoms see what the Internet looks like through their browsers. "

How can you interpret that to mean the citizens inside the censored zone aren't involved?

Re:Not my job (1)

poity (465672) | about 3 months ago | (#47685111)

That's what they're already doing -- they're using this tool for themselves. It so happens that this tool is developed internationally but that has nothing to do with its use. You would have it only be a Chinese coding effort?

Re:Not my job (0)

BitZtream (692029) | about 3 months ago | (#47684645)

Yes, the 0.33 billion Americans should get all uppity and force China to change because the 1 BILLION chinese citizens can't be bothered/don't care enough to overthrow the 0.0000001 billion people that are forcing this on them.

If they don't care, why should I? Is it REALLY making their lives horrible? No. They really don't give a shit that they can't view some dissidents blog in Taiwan or Tibet.

Do you see them fighting their government? No. Are they really suffering? No. Is it anything more than you forcing your viewpoint and culture on people who could give a shit what you think? No.

If they want change and it bothers them, they can start working on the process. Governments can be overthrown, every single one of them. They depend on the citizens to produce the required components needed for the government to function. When the citizens want to get rid of the government and are willing to make the required sacrifices the government doesn't stand a chance in hell. All the citizens have to do is stop producing.

Re:Not my job (1)

Zero__Kelvin (151819) | about 3 months ago | (#47684669)

Holy shit. You have to be one of the most misinformed idiots on the planet.

Re:Not my job (2)

dk20 (914954) | about 3 months ago | (#47686179)

How many Chinese VISA's do you have stamped on your passport?
Let me guess, you don't even have a passport, let alone been there?
Let me give you a quick hint of life in China. They are more concerned with making some money and improving their life then worrying about "the great firewall".
Is China a perfect place? Far from it.
Do the Chinese have bigger concerns then "the great firewall" going on in, you bet.

You do realize the state controls both the TV and newspapers right? This is something that impacts far more then the few that can afford computers and internet access.

Re:Not my job (1)

Gavagai80 (1275204) | about 3 months ago | (#47684725)

I guess searches for "Tiananmen square protests" are censored in your country too.

Re:Not my job (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47686187)

Care to share what the Tienanmen square protest was about?

Re:Not my job (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47684917)

What about the people in China who do care, but know their aren't enough people behind them? This sort of thing is for them.

Re:Not my job (1)

poity (465672) | about 3 months ago | (#47685113)

No one forces anyone to use free software.

Re:Not my job (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47684675)

Its not our job to knock it down. Its the job of the chinese citizens.

I know it sounds un-American and like I'm not a team player in the Us Vs Them battle, but fuck it, not my job.

Nobody's asking you to do anything.

Why did you even bother posting?

Lantern? (0)

ArcadeMan (2766669) | about 3 months ago | (#47684173)

You can't see a lantern from far away. They could have chosen a better name, such as Lighthouse.

Re:Lantern? (2)

Smallpond (221300) | about 3 months ago | (#47684341)

A lighthouse sits in one place and is easy to hit with a mortar. A lantern is easy to move and shield.

Re:Lantern? (3, Funny)

Larryish (1215510) | about 3 months ago | (#47684367)

And a GREEN lantern can shoot laser beams, like a shark.

Re:Lantern? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47684349)

You can't see a lantern from far away. They could have chosen a better name, such as Lighthouse.

"...Through a process called consistent routing, the amount of information any single Lantern user can learn about other users is limited to a small subset..."

Perhaps you missed this not-so-subtle hint in TFS...

Why so many China stories today? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47684191)

This submission is about China's censorship of the Internet.

The one below it on the main page is about spying and China.

The one below that is about Apple storing data on servers in China.

The one below that is about Lenovo buying IBM's server line.

Yeah, I know China is an important player in the world today, but I don't come to Slashdot to read just about China. Let's have some diversity when it comes to the submissions posted to the main page, okay Slashdot editors?

Re:Why so many China stories today? (1)

The New Guy 2.0 (3497907) | about 3 months ago | (#47684323)

Well, it's the weekend when US business isn't doing anything... I'm not sure who declared it "China Day on Slashdot" but it's not that unusual to have a SlowNewsDay on a Saturday.

Re:Why so many China stories today? (1)

Smallpond (221300) | about 3 months ago | (#47684357)

Afghanistanism - noun, A journalism term used to describe the practice of reporting on distant parts of the world that is not relevant to the subscribers (obsolete).

Re:Why so many China stories today? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47685137)

Why do you hate China?

What about the great monthly caps of Canada? (1)

ArcadeMan (2766669) | about 3 months ago | (#47684197)

When will someone make a proxy-style program so that we can bypass our small monthly caps?

Re:What about the great monthly caps of Canada? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47684223)

When will someone make a proxy-style program so that we can bypass our small monthly caps?

First World Problems..

Re:What about the great monthly caps of Canada? (1)

The New Guy 2.0 (3497907) | about 3 months ago | (#47684337)

Proxying actually increases bandwidth under a cap... what you actually want is somebody else to run a wire to the Internet for you.

Re:What about the great monthly caps of Canada? (1)

tepples (727027) | about 3 months ago | (#47684375)

Step 1: Vote out each city government that puts up entry barriers against competitive ISPs.

Re:What about the great monthly caps of Canada? (1)

Smallpond (221300) | about 3 months ago | (#47684463)

When you have multiple cables running to neighborhoods the number of downed lines and mysterious cable cuts increases dramatically.

Re:What about the great monthly caps of Canada? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47684567)

Just force the fucks to share their lines.

Re:What about the great monthly caps of Canada? (1)

reikae (80981) | about 3 months ago | (#47685723)

Aren't they already trivially bypassable with money?

Not going to work (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47684213)

I do not want to be negative, but networks being based on "trust" and "people you know" work only to a certain size, then it breaks down under the own weight.
So this sounds like a pretty good thing while it's small, but it cannt be a big alternative or solution.

Re:Not going to work (2)

The New Guy 2.0 (3497907) | about 3 months ago | (#47684311)

Yep... WWW stands for World Wide Web meaning public servers... if you have to know the person you're contacting via the Internet, that can be HTTP or whatever protocol you're using, but that's not WWW.

Re:Not going to work (1)

Zero__Kelvin (151819) | about 3 months ago | (#47684347)

Somebody should invent proxies!

Re:Not going to work (1)

m00sh (2538182) | about 3 months ago | (#47684541)

I do not want to be negative, but networks being based on "trust" and "people you know" work only to a certain size, then it breaks down under the own weight. So this sounds like a pretty good thing while it's small, but it cannt be a big alternative or solution.

Networks based on "trust" and "people you know"? Works for facebook and makes billions of it.

Hell, even works for human society.

Invite to NSA: please run our proxy servers (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47684241)

Very clever. While most of the volunteers will be the NSA, this won't provide much extra security, but at least you get plenty of proxy servers with practically unlimited bandwidth for free :-)
The NSA already taps most of the data somewhere along the route, but running the proxy servers could provide a bit of extra meta data, which helps them when sorting the recorded data.

Re:Invite to NSA: please run our proxy servers (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47685153)

Chinese probably trust going through the NSA more than their government. NSA can't lock them up for looking at banned information.

Does China still need a firewall? (1)

The New Guy 2.0 (3497907) | about 3 months ago | (#47684295)

Yesterday, Slashdot ran this story [slashdot.org] about China moving data inside the borders, and therefore presumably inside the firewall... it seems like they could turn the firewall off if they have everything they want there already.

No signup without a Google Account? (1)

Robin Banks (3531127) | about 3 months ago | (#47684297)

Can anyone explain how this should make anything more secure? I do live in a country where there is internet censorship done by an ISP or anything yet, I would like to provide access through my connection but I cannot do that without signing up for an account with Google? Hmm...

Re:No signup without a Google Account? (1)

Zero__Kelvin (151819) | about 3 months ago | (#47684353)

No. Nobody can explain that because that is not the purpose of the tool. It allows people within China to bypass the "Great Firewall" that the Chinese Government has put in place. They can access a lot more content using this tool, not the same content more securely.

Re:No signup without a Google Account? (2)

Fnord666 (889225) | about 3 months ago | (#47684655)

No. Nobody can explain that because that is not the purpose of the tool....They can access a lot more content using this tool, not the same content more securely.

Incorrect. It does improves security by building a web of trust that makes infiltration by an opponent more difficult. It also improves security by compartmentalizing connection and peer information so that if a opponent does infiltrate the system, the amount of information that they can obtain about other participants is drastically reduced compared to other systems..

"In order for a censor to discover the IP addresses of your computer, they'd have to somehow convince you that they're a friend." Fisk explained. "It uses these real-world trust relationships to protect the IP addresses of these proxies because when you run Lantern in the uncensored world, you are a proxy.

Through a process called consistent routing, the amount of information any single Lantern user can learn about other users is limited to a small subset, making infiltration significantly more difficult.

Re:No signup without a Google Account? (1)

Zero__Kelvin (151819) | about 3 months ago | (#47684687)

First of all, I did't notice that the IOP didn't include the whole question in his post. That being said, it is a VPN. I didn't realize his question was: How is having a VPN more secure than not having a VPN. If I had, I would have told him to use the very service he is complaining about.

Re:No signup without a Google Account? (1)

complete loony (663508) | about 3 months ago | (#47684397)

I've talked with the developers before at conferences. They were (and probably still are...) using google contacts and messaging for the initial handshake in establishing connections. That may change in future.

They also weren't doing any kind of onion routing. So if they get big enough to be noticed, passive network monitoring may reveal the very social graph that lantern depends on.

I have a better idea. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47684315)

How about fucking off?

I'm sick of americans pretending to have the moral high ground. IIRC, you have bombed Iraq and Afghanistan to the stone age killing hundreds of thousands just because it was business for one of your lobbies. And you wanted to loot and indebt too. You people also fucked with Ukraine, have made countless attempts on Cuba, made up this ISIS bullshit and ARE STILL SUPPORTING ISRAEL. Your fucking nigger started bombing Irak again this very week.

Yet you pretend to have the right to whine because some censorship in some country.

Fuck you americans. You are the cancer of this planet.

Re:I have a better idea. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47684503)

now if only Lantern were an american project then your post would make sense as well as being stupid

Re:I have a better idea. (2)

poity (465672) | about 3 months ago | (#47685163)

If people still didn't believe there were political/governmental shills on /., the knee-jerk whataboutism posts on every article about a non-US country should very clearly dispel that belief.

Re:I have a better idea. (1)

reikae (80981) | about 3 months ago | (#47685817)

I don't see how the parent post is any proof that the poster is working for any government, party or similar political group. Bashing the US is fun for many trolls, and people don't generally need compensation to do something they have fun doing.

From Limewire to ... (1, Insightful)

CaptainDork (3678879) | about 3 months ago | (#47684339)

... this? Just no.

Peer-to-peer based on trust.

What could possibly go wrong?

Re:From Limewire to ... (1)

The New Guy 2.0 (3497907) | about 3 months ago | (#47684355)

LimeWire's problem was that it never had legal content... there was nobody willing to pay the content providers, just downloaders taking what they could. Without a good "that's my content, pull it down" system, it's not legal and the authorities will pull it down.

Re:From Limewire to ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47684457)

The DMCA is a garbage law and should be repealed. Sites should have safe harbor, but DMCA takedown notices shouldn't exist. Want something taken down? Go to court and have the judge issue a court order to have it taken down. Stop subverting the court system with shitty takedown notices.

Re:From Limewire to ... (1)

CaptainDork (3678879) | about 3 months ago | (#47684465)

Limewire's legal and economic woes were a .01% concern to IT peeps.

It was a "virus by permission."

We who had to deal with its existence pulled a lot of computers out of the ditches and blocked it (and all P-2-P) at the firewalls.

When I saw the word "trust," in TFA, I just about peed down both legs.

Re:From Limewire to ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47685613)

Yep. Just download this mysterious program and run it on your computer to allow people you don't know to access your computer and internet connection.

We've now gone from drive-by infections to purposely handing over access to our computer systems under the guise of helping others. No thanks!

TOR (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47684403)

dedicate the resources to that tool. It works, it's been available and the community is strong.
Why why why? Because you can? TOR Needs all the resources it can get and this is doing nothing to help.

Re:TOR (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47684445)

TOR is unusably slow in China and the traffic is easily identified and throttled by the filters.

Re:TOR (1)

CaptainDork (3678879) | about 3 months ago | (#47684487)

TOR is compromised [idigitaltimes.com] . I wouldn't ride that trail with YOUR horse.

Lantern on Indiegogo (1)

kanweg (771128) | about 3 months ago | (#47684471)

Lantern has a crowd funding project running on Indiegogo:

https://www.indiegogo.com/proj... [indiegogo.com]

Bert

Trust (1)

penguinoid (724646) | about 3 months ago | (#47684481)

What makes the system so unique is that it operates on the basis of trust.

It does sound like a unique privacy system, if it is based on trust.

even using POT (Personal Open Terminal) unsafe (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47684499)

'laws' change every day now like herding us ordinarians around...in the spiritless unlawfulness we now face it is freedom of spirit & the truth that cannot be controlled as usual...

ironically, I'd have to firewall that. (1)

Karmashock (2415832) | about 3 months ago | (#47684537)

Assuming you ran that program, would you feel safe running it on your actual computer on your actual network?

I wouldn't. Its basically a free for all VPN that you throw on your machine. Anyone could use that thing. yeah, people in repressive regimes trying to be free. Also terrorists and pedophiles.

And lets not forget hackers that want to exploit your good will to gain access to your system.

Now lets assume you really want to help so you're going to run this thing. What sort of precautions would you have to take to do it responsibly?

I'm thinking I would have to run it sandboxed or VMed somehow. Or on a spare machine that I don't care about. Possibly on a raspberry pi because why not.

Then I'm thinking it would have to be on a different VLAN. Because I am sure as hell not sharing a private network with that thing.

And even then I'm thinking that isn't enough because what is to stop the hacker that takes control of the raspberry pi on VLAN2 from simply hacking the router, gaining access to VLAN1, and then proceeding to rape my network from the inside out?

You see the problem. I like the idea of this thing. I just can't trust it. Maybe if I put it on a hosted system data center or something and let them deal with it. After all they have no reason to trust anyone that hosts programs on their systems. They should firewall everything from everything else as a matter of course.

Does it make any sense to bridge the first router that creates VLAN2 to a second router so that if someone accesses the gateway they won't actually be accessing the router that controls the VLANs? That is, bridge a second router on VLAN2 to the port and let it act as the gateway for the suspect system?

Would that make this operation safe or is this just needless abstraction that doesn't accomplish anything?

Am I missing something here? (1)

westlake (615356) | about 3 months ago | (#47684581)

If you download Lantern in an uncensored region, you can connect with someone in a censored region, who can then access whatever content they want through you. What makes the system so unique is that it operates on the basis of trust. ...the amount of information any single Lantern user can learn about other users is limited to a small subset, making infiltration significantly more difficult.

Outside of the geek's virtual worlds and ways of thinking ---

The more you know about someone, the more you are willing to trust them. Particularly when the stakes are high.

Re:Am I missing something here? (1)

advocate_one (662832) | about 3 months ago | (#47684605)

can I use this to access content my BRITISH ISP has had to block because of court orders from American media companies?

Who gives you the right? (-1, Troll)

nurb432 (527695) | about 3 months ago | (#47684733)

Who gives you the right to impress your concepts of right and wrong onto the citizens of another sovereign nation and its people?

How would you feel if another country did it to you?

Re:Who gives you the right? (3, Insightful)

redeIm (3779401) | about 3 months ago | (#47684933)

I don't recall anyone forcing anyone to use this. If there are people who don't like the fundamental right to free speech and love censorship, then they're welcome to simply not use this.

How would you feel if another country did it to you?

Did what? There are no invasions here. What's with you idiots? Do you have some problem with giving people the option to get around censorship if they want to or something?

Re:Who gives you the right? (1)

nurb432 (527695) | about 3 months ago | (#47685437)

Do you have some problem with giving people the option to get around censorship if they want to or something?

I have a problem with people like you meddling in the affairs of other countries. Keep your nose out of their business.

Re:Who gives you the right? (2)

redeIm (3779401) | about 3 months ago | (#47685523)

People like me? Once again, who is forcing anyone to use these tools? Who is meddling? People in countries with censorship can *choose* to use these tools. What is your specific complaint with this? Are you pro-censorship? Do you think that laws and society is always right, so anyone who provides tools that people can choose to use to get around censorship are wrong? Just what is your problem?

Re:Who gives you the right? (1)

nurb432 (527695) | about 3 months ago | (#47685947)

Are you pro-censorship?

I am pro sovereignty. China has a right to restrict any speech they like [with their own citizens], and you have no right to interfere.

You, and meddling do-gooders like you, are 'my problem'.

Re:Who gives you the right? (1)

poity (465672) | about 3 months ago | (#47686055)

What do you think about VPN providers in the UK which US citizens sometimes use to bypass copyright restrictions? Are they violating US sovereignty? Are they imposing their morality on Americans?

Re:Who gives you the right? (1)

nurb432 (527695) | about 3 months ago | (#47686095)

Technically, yes.

However, citizens in the us do have the right of free speech, and some would say that 'copyright restrictions' violate that right in the first place, so its not really a fair comparison.

Re:Who gives you the right? (1)

poity (465672) | about 3 months ago | (#47686131)

It seems like you don't know the Chinese constitution also outlines free speech as a right.

Re:Who gives you the right? (2)

redeIm (3779401) | about 3 months ago | (#47686069)

China has a right to restrict any speech they like [with their own citizens], and you have no right to interfere.

Erm... what you still don't seem to understand is that there is no invasion! People in China *choose* to use this software of their own fucking volition. Stop acting like it's being forced, or that there is some sort of invasion on the Chinese.

Such censorship is horrible, and I think providing tools that people can choose to use to get around it is perfectly okay.

Re:Who gives you the right? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47686115)

It seems to me your beef is with those inside the country who are breaking the law by using this tool. everyone else is making a perfectly legitimate tool. Internet providers also give these dissidents a tool and network-access to break the law, and they operate _inside_ china. it is an outrage! It is even worse. Stop meddling with do-gooders - it is none of your business. They are sovereign governors of their own actions.

Re:Who gives you the right? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47686211)

As a Canadian many US sites are blocked due to "licensing" restrictions. Do you think we should get rid of these?

How about when the US arrests citizens for possession of Child Porn, should devices to bypass this be created as well, after all isnt that censorship?

How about when your own FTC "bans" words from being said on the radio or TV, isn't that censorship?

Re:Who gives you the right? (2)

poity (465672) | about 3 months ago | (#47685173)

That's like saying non-US vpn providers are forcing their concept of right and wrong on Americans. The tools are made available, the doors are unlocked. People willingly use the tools, and willingly walk through the doors on their own.

Hmmm... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47684885)

What about unblocking Internet in oppressive regimes like the UK?

Re:Hmmm... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47686125)

It is one thing to liberate chinas internet, but dont expect miracles like that.

what gives us the right? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47685089)

other than the quasi-religious argumebt that "we are right amd thwy are wrong" what gives us yhe right to intwntionally try to subvert yhe authority of another sovereign nation with whom we are not at war? This seems an awful lot like spy-games...

FOSS and "Available for Linux"? -- I call BS (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47685197)

It claims to be "Available for Linux", but it's only available for Debian/Ubuntu (and the d/l link is kinda broken). Why don't they just say that it's for Ubuntu and not "Linux"? That's misleading. That's like saying it's available for Windows but they only provide a WFW3.11 version.

And no easy-to-find links to any source code, no mention of source code in the FAQ, so it's difficult to characterize this as a FOSS project, even though they claim the GPLV3 license. Where is the source if they are releasing the binaries?

Sourec Soce (1)

hduff (570443) | about 3 months ago | (#47685511)

Where's the source code for the FOSS project? The license is GPLV3.

Police, open up! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47685549)

I can just see places like England and Australia, where they block such sites, using my American isp to look at kiddie porn. I would never open myself to a damaged front door, screaming beast with badges tracking up my house, throwing flash bangs in my baby's crib, shooting my Chihuahua claiming they were in danger, possibly killing me, the family bread winner, grinding me under their feet with hours of a brutal Reed interrogation method questioning, throwing me in jail with harden, vicious criminals, requiring me to pay a lawyer to get me out, and afterward have the feds confiscate my bank account so that I couldn't keep my lawyer. Governments are far too dangerous everywhere to set yourself up for such a destructive trip.

Re:Police, open up! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47685803)

I thought the U.S. had court appointed lawyers?

Or what about finding one that'll work Pro Bono?

THIS (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47685593)

but we need more friends in uncensored countries to join us

There are no uncensored countries on this planet.

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