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Professor Steve Ballmer Will Teach At Two Universities This Year

samzenpus posted about 2 months ago | from the teaching!-teaching!-teaching! dept.

Education 179

redletterdave (2493036) writes "When Steve Ballmer announced he was stepping down from Microsoft's board of directors, he cited a fall schedule that would "be hectic between teaching a new class and the start of the NBA season." It turns out Ballmer will teach an MBA class at Stanford's Graduate School of Business in the fall, and a class at USC's Marshall School of Business in the spring. Helen Chang, assistant director of communications at Stanford's Business School, told Business Insider that Ballmer will be working with faculty member Susan Athey for a strategic management course called "TRAMGT588: Leading organizations." As for the spring semester, Ballmer will head to Los Angeles — closer to where his Clippers will be playing — and teach a course at University of Southern California's Marshall School of Business. We reached out to the Marshall School, which declined to offer more details about Ballmer's class.

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The first ever business course (5, Funny)

silentcoder (1241496) | about 2 months ago | (#47719235)

that will include a chapter on how to select the most throwable chair.

Re:The first ever business course (1)

Saithe (982049) | about 2 months ago | (#47719245)

Better not sit in 1st row.

Take away that fucking chair !! (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47719269)

No chair allows in the class !

Re:Take away that fucking chair !! (1)

Cryacin (657549) | about 2 months ago | (#47719737)

Next, on Jerry Springer...

Re:The first ever business course (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47719631)

or any row for that matter.. unless you're sitting behind the big fat ugly chick... then you're probably safe (from airborne chairs anyway)

Re:The first ever business course (2)

gsslay (807818) | about 2 months ago | (#47719253)

You may laugh, but there's a lot of factors that need careful analysis. Weight, dimensions, material, grip, balance, available space, ceiling height, bounce, damage.. The list goes on. You could fill at least three hour lectures on it.

Re:The first ever business course (1)

silentcoder (1241496) | about 2 months ago | (#47719299)

Absolutely, though I remain convinced no other business course has ever bothered to teach this apparently critical business skill before and I have to wonder why !

Re:The first ever business course (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47719263)

But will it include a practical part?

Re:The first ever business course (2)

lord_mike (567148) | about 2 months ago | (#47719405)

There is a required lab course in the afternoon.

Re:The first ever business course (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47719573)

I heard Bobby Knight will be the TA for the recitation/lab.

Re:The first ever business course (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47720117)

Unfortunately they will probably assign the class to a room where the chairs are bolted to the floor, so he can't demonstrate.

Re:The first ever business course (1)

dotancohen (1015143) | about 2 months ago | (#47720371)

Those who can, do. Those who can't, teach.

I'd love to be in his class (5, Insightful)

0xdeaddead (797696) | about 2 months ago | (#47719239)

and know what not to do. If anything Steve is the textbook example on how an MBA brought zero growth to Microsoft, and destroyed not only two biggest cash cows in history, Windows & Office, but doomed the company to failure by de-incentiving through MBA theory of the week games like bands, to constantly backdooring H1B1'ing the workforce.

Gates made Microsoft, but Balmer destroyed it.

Re:I'd love to be in his class (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47719259)

A company is much more than just the CEO.

Re:I'd love to be in his class (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47719275)

Gates made Microsoft, but Balmer destroyed it.

By what metric?

http://www.marketwatch.com/investing/stock/msft/financials
$62 Billion in revenue in 2010 and 87 Billion when he retired.

Compare these to win Ballmer first took over

"REDMOND, Wash., July 18, 2000 — Microsoft Corp. today announced revenue of $22.96 billion for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2000, a 16 percent increase over the $19.75 billion reported last year. Net income totaled $9.42 billion."

So under his 14 year reign, revenue damn near quadrupled. It would appear that the only place he failed is in your mind.

Re:I'd love to be in his class (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47719281)

when* not win.... sorry about that.

Re:I'd love to be in his class (4, Insightful)

rmdingler (1955220) | about 2 months ago | (#47719381)

Much like the coach in his new venture into the NBA,

the CEO is often given too much of the blame when things go poorly,

and too much of the credit when things go well.

Re:I'd love to be in his class (1, Insightful)

lord_mike (567148) | about 2 months ago | (#47719501)

Ballmer defenders like to point out the stock value and revenue numbers, which is valid, however Ballmer's reign ended Microsoft's dominance in mindshare and allowed their monopoly to essentially break up. Their revenue gains were made at a great cost to the company's prestige and future dominance and are likely to be short lived. There is only one product now that is making money and that is Office/Exchange and their cloud version of that. The desktop Windows market is shrinking rapidly, Surface is a financial failure, Windows Phone is a laughingstock, Silverlight a joke, and Xbox One is circling the drain. Where is the future? No one cares what Microsoft wants to do in the marketplace. They are ignored. Ballmer made them a one trick pony--a revenue generating one trick pony, but one that is extremely vulnerable to being completely toppled by a better, more respected competitor.

Re:I'd love to be in his class (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47719537)

Can you cite sources to show that this is the only product making money? Didn't think so.

Re:I'd love to be in his class (1)

cyber-vandal (148830) | about 2 months ago | (#47719607)

You missed out Windows Server, SQL Server, Visual Studio and the Dynamics range of products. All of them are making plenty of money [microsoft.com] .

Re:I'd love to be in his class (1)

lord_mike (567148) | about 2 months ago | (#47720281)

My reference to Exchange/Office was meant to include other "back office" products as well, since once a business is a "Microsoft shop", they tend to use Microsoft products for most of their other needs as well. While this is a highly profitable arrangement for Microsoft, it makes them even more vulnerable to a competitor coming in and offering an cheaper better solution by breaking up the "microsoft shop" mini-monopolies at businesses. Microsoft doesn't tend to fare well with open competition once their barriers to access have been broken. Blackberry was very successful and made a lot of money, too, but were also extremely vulnerable and collapsed with frightening speed. I would be somewhat nervous if I was a Microsoft shareholder... only somewhat nervous since they have a lot of cash to burn before they crash, but their future looks kind of shaky at the moment.

Re:I'd love to be in his class (1)

Grishnakh (216268) | about 2 months ago | (#47720231)

Your analysis is only partly correct; you've missed out on all the other business software they make tons of money on. MS is only highly profitable because of their business software, and the usage of their software in offices: Windows, Office, Sharepoint, Windows Server, SQL Server, etc etc. The place where they're failing abysmally is with consumers: they still sell (desktop) Windows of course, but they probably don't make much money with the home versions, and people aren't buying new PCs that much any more, and instead are buying smartphones and tablets (iOS and Android). MS's consumer offerings are ignored or laughed at: Surface, Windows Phone, etc. haven't done well. Xbox doesn't look like it's doing all that well any more either.

Basically, if MS cut out most of the consumer ventures, they'd be far more profitable. But there's definitely a tie-in there: people like to use software at work that they're familiar with, so if MS abandons the consumer space altogether, it wouldn't be long before companies shift to something else for their desktops, and then the rest of the MS infrastructure would crumble too.

Re:I'd love to be in his class (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47719511)

One could argue that the revenue growth was due solely to their continued stranglehold on corporate IT. They've done a very good job in that narrow segment; they've managed to continue and expand the Outlook/Office/Sharepoint lock-in with nary a hiccup.

But how many other line items turned out to be flat to miserable? Bing, phones, xbox, Windows Vista/8 are but a few examples. Like most things, the truth turns out to be in the middle.

Ballmer will probably be remembered for the failures rather than the successes because the failures were more stunning. Quite the opposite of someone like Jobs whose successes were so much more important than his failures (like Next arguably).

Re:I'd love to be in his class (0)

Antique Geekmeister (740220) | about 2 months ago | (#47719611)

> It would appear that the only place he failed is in your mind.

I'm afraid that Mr. Ballmer was considered a liability by various stock analysts and stock holders by the end of his tenure. The failures of the smartphone, Zune media player, Surface tablet and Windows 8 to make their sales goals or to generate loyal user bases were demonstrable failures of his leadership. I'll challenge you to find _one_ loyal customer of any of those products, one who actually prefers it to an Iphone, Ipod, cheap notebook, or Windows 7.

Compounded by the failure to complete the migrations from Windows XP for thousands of businesses worldwide, he created grand visions for a series of failed projects. So yes, he became a failure in many stockholders' minds, as well.

Re:I'd love to be in his class (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47719973)

And this makes the third unsubstantiated assertion in this thread, and now the third that will be shot down by actual facts.

While I am sure you can find individual malcontents, let's look at the stock performance against a broader tech index.

http://bigcharts.marketwatch.com/advchart/frames/frames.asp?show=&insttype=Stock&symb=msft&time=13&startdate=1%2F4%2F1999&enddate=8%2F21%2F2014&freq=1&compidx=XCI&comptemptext=&comp=none&ma=0&maval=9&uf=0&lf=1&lf2=0&lf3=0&type=2&style=320&size=2&timeFrameToggle=false&compareToToggle=false&indicatorsToggle=false&chartStyleToggle=false&state=12&x=71&y=14

Guess what? The company has kept pace with its peers in the stock. This is actually impressive when you consider the size and age of the company when P/E ratios generally drop and companies generally become less nimble and considering the number of new entrants on an annual basis.

So, you leave the third unfounded statement that coincides with the Slashdot hive mind and I smack it down with actual facts again. It is just too easy.

Re:I'd love to be in his class (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47720247)

What planet do you live on? The reason I ask is because that here on Earth where I live, Microsoft stock was stalled at $30/share for about 10 years until 2013. So what you're suggesting is that the OS/Game/App segment of tech industry was stagnant until 2013. Hard to reconcile that view when you look at Apple, Google, Facebook, etc.. who are the actual "peers" of MS and have been successful in every market that MS has failed in.

Re:I'd love to be in his class (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47720365)

Did you look at the chart? I compared MSFT to the broader tech market.

One other thing that I did not take into account, is that MSFT has a higher then normal dividend payout (compared to tech companies). If you factor this in, MSFT likely outperformed its peer group.

Re:I'd love to be in his class (1)

Grishnakh (216268) | about 2 months ago | (#47720279)

>I'll challenge you to find _one_ loyal customer of any of those products, one who actually prefers it to an Iphone, Ipod, cheap notebook, or Windows 7.

I'm sorry to inform you, but it's not that hard to find a loyal customer for any of these products in online forums like this (though that person may just be a shill, it's impossible to tell). There's always some moron who pipes up and talks about how much he loves Windows 8 Metro or Surface or Windows Phone.

As for the Zune, no one uses those any more because, just like no one uses iPods any more: they've been made obsolete by phones. But there's a fair number of people who said they really liked their Zunes just for playing MP3s (back when they used them), they just didn't like the crappy sharing feature or the MS music store or the way MS screwed up "PlaysForSure".

Re:I'd love to be in his class (2)

the_B0fh (208483) | about 2 months ago | (#47720063)

Isn't it the point that he single handedly pissed away Microsoft's lead in tablets, phones, office, windows and Xbox? Making lots of money is easy when you have an illegal monopoly you can leverage.

Re:I'd love to be in his class (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47720537)

By what metric? http://www.marketwatch.com/inv... [marketwatch.com] $62 Billion in revenue in 2010 and 87 Billion when he retired.

Fuck revenues, show me some earnings!

Net income: 18.76B 23.15B 16.98B 21.86B 22.07B.

So he brought in $25B more in 2014 than in 2010? So what? Almost all the revenue gains are being consumed by management. Bloated headcount, top-heavy management, and everyone right down to the line employees looking out for their own little fiefdoms instead of, you know, the shareholders.

I am so fucking sick of this "grow or die" mentality in tech. It's bullshit. MSFT had an enormous and wonderful cash cow in the form of XP/7/Office. XBox is fun but has cost the company billions over the past decade. 8 has destroyed their former desktop dominance.

The company needs core team to maintain and upgrade the core OS and office components, maintain the UI as-is because it was complete 14 years ago, and fire the UX team that wants to dynamically e-leverage your synergies every six months. Make the OS and office suite a subscription service: $5/month for security updates. Fire everybody who's not part of the core business, along with the bloated management structures they bring along with them. Milk the cash cow.

MSFT trades at $45/sh and reports about $2.50/sh in earnings. Even its current bloated structure would pay investors back in 18 years. Well, you don't have 18 years under this business model, but since I've just fired two-thirds of the company (fuck your Xbone, fuck the UX team, fuck the 8/Mobile failures) and cut its SG&A and Development expenses (about $2/sh and $1/sh respectively), I've just doubled your earnings. Now you have a company that does about $70B revenues and $40B in profits , or $5/sh. Hike the dividend to $4/sh, save $1/sh for a rainy day or further stock buybacks (same thing as a dividend, really), and the time to get your money back is now less than 10 years.

If anyone is still using MSFT products 10 years from now, everything you get after that point is free money. If you're a real company, stop acting like a two-bit startup without an exit plan, and start making some actual money, rather than just squandering your revenues on whatever your management's latest pipe dream is.

Re:I'd love to be in his class (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47719287)

Even Ballmer didn't make every decision in the company and he certainly did not "destroy" Microsoft.

Re:I'd love to be in his class (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47719379)

Since Monkey Boy's golden parachute totaled over "one b-i-l-l-i-o-n dollars" (said with a Dr. Evil accent), I'd be happy to learn how he managed to rob them that blind. See, Bill Gates stole from *other* companies......

Re: I'd love to be in his class (1, Troll)

frikken lazerz (3788987) | about 2 months ago | (#47719443)

Let's just be thankful he's teaching business courses and not IT courses!

Re:I'd love to be in his class (1, Insightful)

michelcolman (1208008) | about 2 months ago | (#47719931)

Sure confirms the old saying: Those who can, do. Those who can't, teach.

Professor Balmer (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47719243)

Hope there are enough seat (bolted to the floor).

Will the chairs be bolted to the floor? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47719251)

I would want to know this before attending.

professor processor (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47719279)

Does he even have a professor degree?

Re:professor processor (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47719313)

There is no such thing as a "professor degree".

Re: professor processor (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47719345)

It's like a teaching degree, but without the ability to teach.

Re:professor processor (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47719369)

Kind of like calling someone else we know a "constitutional scholar".

Re:professor processor (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47719437)

John Roberts?

Re:professor processor (1)

Grishnakh (216268) | about 2 months ago | (#47720305)

Anyone can be a professor; you just have to get some college to give you that job. You don't need any kind of degree. It's just that, usually, colleges require an advanced degree (usually PhD) to be a professor, but they can hire whomever they want, so if they want to waive or lessen that requirement because of "industry experience", they can.

"...will teach an MBA class..." (4, Insightful)

Cornwallis (1188489) | about 2 months ago | (#47719367)

Guaranteeing yet another generation of assholes will be coming down the pike.

Re:"...will teach an MBA class..." (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47719475)

What part of "MBA class" was unclear? There is no other outcome.

Re:"...will teach an MBA class..." (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47720111)

How can there be any other outcome when MBA stands for Most Bullshitting Assholes.

must be a mistake in the summary (1)

slashdice (3722985) | about 2 months ago | (#47719373)

I think he's teaching high school phys-ed.

Re:must be a mistake in the summary (3, Funny)

GameboyRMH (1153867) | about 2 months ago | (#47719479)

I was thinking he looks like he was born to be a gym teacher. He has plenty of energy, a balding head, and he sweats profusely.

Re:must be a mistake in the summary (1)

Grishnakh (216268) | about 2 months ago | (#47720317)

And he's fat. I've seen lots of high school gym coaches who were fat.

Is he a scientist? (2, Interesting)

SpaghettiPattern (609814) | about 2 months ago | (#47719413)

Is he an actual scientist? Did he do any scientific research? Did he merit a the title of university professor? Sure, he did make money, but that doesn't automatically mean he should earn a title that few people get after working very hard, usually without extreme luxury or profit.

Re:Is he a scientist? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47719445)

Empirical science includes the failed attempts.

Isn't that how Gates... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47719459)

Got his honorary diploma?

I'm sure there's dozens or hundreds of other examples, and the same applies.

Hell if you have enough money and donate it correctly some places will give you an ACTUAL diploma and, if required, make some backdated paperwork fall into the archives.

Re:Is he a scientist? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47719483)

Yet some people say that only people with real-world experience should be teaching in schools.

Re:Is he a scientist? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47719539)

Only the title says "professor", nowhere in the actual article (I know! actually reading it?!?!?!) does it give him any title other than "instructor" or equivalent. It even says in the summary he is working with a professor to design the course. That tells me he's just going to be the guy writing on the chalkboard, acting like he's breaking iphones, and throwing chairs.

Last I checked, you don't need to be a scientist to be a professor, much less an instructor. After all, there are PhD's in history, music, and art out there.

Re:Is he a scientist? (4, Informative)

bsDaemon (87307) | about 2 months ago | (#47719587)

Well, apparently he did score a perfect 800 on the maths section of the SAT, graduated Harvard magna cum laude with a degree in applied mathematics economics, and won some maths related awards in university. But yeah, go on hating him to hate him. That's very mature of you. That said, he did drop out of Stanford's MBA program to join Microsoft and having the MBA himself would seem like a necessary part of being able to teach in an MBA program. However, 34 years of experience at one of the largest, most profitable companies ever, including many years as President before becoming CEO would certainly seem to be more than enough field experience during which to have gained wisdom (that is, knowing what not to do just as much as what to do) with regards to organizational leadership.

He made mistakes (best lesson of all)... apk (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47719605)

Per my subject-line above: Don't know about the rest of you, but mistakes of my own have been MY greatest lessons (that stuck with me, the most) from my own personal life and yes, career experience.

* What does one *REALLY* get from them? The ability to teach OTHERS how to avoid them (even if/when they 'look good up front', if you didn't think-out ALL the variables in the equation, or underestimate the weight some terms carry thinking they're negligible, you can be WRONG...)

I got into more IN HIS DEFENSE though (having real world practical hands on business experience, mistakes & all, here that work in HIS favor though as an educator http://news.slashdot.org/comme... [slashdot.org] which I think qualifies him as a valid instructor, PhD notwithstanding, since I learned that "hands-on experience in the trenches" is worth FAR MORE than academia (gives you foundations & some tricks to avoid reinventing wheels, but it pales compared to actually doing the job for decades professionally - from MY personal experience some of which is outlined in that link above... & why I did it HOW I did it).

The man wasn't "all failures", far from it... but his failures (Windows 8 interface mostly - dumb move that defies reasoning like saying "now your Ford/Chevy will have motorcycle brakes and gears vs. what you've used your ENTIRE LIFE in cars instead - 'this is good for you, we know best'" (bullshit & bad move/reasoning + the results proved it to be as I knew years ago with many others it WOULD be -> http://slashdot.org/comments.p... [slashdot.org] for those VERY reasons... why? Heck, I am a user, not just a coder, is why... Mr. Ballmer overlooked that! That demonstrates a "disconnect" with his customers imo... too much "stock price focus", from a business standpoint - not enough knowledge of your target market)).

APK

P.S.=> Lastly, on a "humorous note": I am *SURPRISED* no one said "He'll be a lab monkey there" since everyone calls him "Monkey Boy" (due to that video where he 'went off' a WEE bit, lol - but I can understand him being enthusiastic about his company & 'venting' his enthusiasm how he did... I wouldn't have done it QUITE to that level, but that's just me, not he, & he's done better than I have financially for sure... can't argue with success)... apk

Re:He made mistakes (best lesson of all)... apk (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47719767)

yeah, but how 'bout them host files ? ? ?

OK: MS made another mistake there too... apk (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47719947)

In Windows 8 (a failure OS version for sure) - However, I found a work-around along with others on that note & I rather easily "shot down" metrix007 on it too -> http://slashdot.org/comments.p... [slashdot.org]

Since MS made a BIG MISTAKE in Windows 8's "Windows Defender/MS Security Essentials"... big time.

(Which antivirus are NOT that effective nowadays, even Symantec stated they're only "55% effective" -> http://it.slashdot.org/story/1... [slashdot.org] nowadays vs. MODERN threat landscape players in botnets etc. - et al, & might as well be truthful - it's less, FAR less, since threats are no longer traditional exe attaching solely, but webbased malicious script etc. mostly, instead)...

Heck: Even Aryeh Goretsky (my fellow slav, & of NOD32/ESET fame, won't touch my challenges on hosts -> http://it.slashdot.org/comment... [slashdot.org] when I DIRECTLY confronted him to do so, nicely ...

That tell YOU anything? It did me...

It told me that my points on them giving users of them more speed, security, reliability, & more are inviolate & perfect, as stated... (fact with valid backing above, while I confronted "giants" in the field without a doubt, directly).

APK

P.S.=> Of course, lastly, since YOU brought up hosts files? You're more than welcome to disprove my points on hosts giving users more speed, security, reliability, + more, more efficiently, better than ANY single competitor in browser addons out there (fixing DNS redirect security issues too, bonus) with less moving parts complexity & room for breakdown, natively vs. "bolting on more overheads" & not doing as good a job in PREVENTING infestation before it can begin + even cutting off botnet communication back to C&C servers even *IF* you are already infected (bonus) for any webbound app - NOT just browsers) -> http://tech.slashdot.org/comme... [slashdot.org] ok?

Good luck - you'll NEED it (more like a Miracle if the esteemed likes of Mr. Goretsky won't even debate me on my points...)

... apk

Re:Is he a scientist? (2)

jellomizer (103300) | about 2 months ago | (#47719613)

Did you even go to college?

1. Chances are he will be an Adjunct professor not a full professor. Adjuncts don't need a Doctorate they are normally students who are working on their PHDs but for the most part they are people with enough experience in the topic.

2. What the heck does being a Scientist have to be about teaching classes in Business Administration? Now the MBA program does have a lot of classes that talk about process management which uses a lot of Computer Science methods. However the MBA isn't a Science based study but a research/practical based study. MBA program is a lot about reading case studies and working to find better solutions.

3. Microsoft is one of the major software companies out there. Even under Balmers rule Microsoft performed rather well considering factors such as a major recession, shift away from desktop technologies, move towards cloud/web computing. A lot of disruptive influences could have killed Microsoft the last decade but the company is still a force to be reckoned with. It takes good leadership to keep such a large company going threw such issues.

Re:Is he a scientist? (1)

tverbeek (457094) | about 2 months ago | (#47719623)

Who called him a "scientist"? He's teaching a Business Administration class, not CS.

Who (other than the /. headline) implied he was being granted a professorship? TFA refers to him as "practitioner" who's being paired with an "academic scholar".

MBA programs routinely bring in people who may have no academic credentials but have real-world experience administering a business, because they provide valuable insight into the application of the principles that the academics lecture about. Even an ill-tempered in-over-his-head schmuck like Ballmer has knowledge that would benefit business students (e.g. all the mistakes he made).

So what's your problem with that?

Re:Is he a scientist? (2)

geekoid (135745) | about 2 months ago | (#47720209)

I disagree. His total experience is with one company, during a unique point in history. You can't teach that because nothing else applies.

Re:Is he a scientist? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47719713)

Did he merit a the title of university professor?

TFA does not mention professor anywhere in it. The submitter added it. Adjunct Professor - Industry may be a more appropriate title, YMMV based on the specific university policies surrounding such titles. But tenure-track on a whim? Most likely not, this is academia we are talking about after all....

Is he a scientist? (1)

Lamps (2770487) | about 2 months ago | (#47719721)

Have you met some of the MBAs who teach business courses? For a shock, try asking a few of them some fundamental stats questions that a person who has taken some grad-level stats courses (a prerequisite for many scientific/quantitative fields) should be able to answer. I can tell you about MBA profs who use statistical analysis allegedly on a regular basis without knowing the term "R^2".

Ballmer's probably a step up from quite a few people career academics in the business field.

Re:Is he a scientist? (1)

quantaman (517394) | about 2 months ago | (#47719791)

Is he an actual scientist? Did he do any scientific research? Did he merit a the title of university professor? Sure, he did make money, but that doesn't automatically mean he should earn a title that few people get after working very hard, usually without extreme luxury or profit.

He's not teaching science, he's teaching business, a subject that as the former CEO of Microsoft he should know a lot about.

And so what if he didn't earn the title the same way a PhD did? (though he won't be a full Professor)

It's not about granting him some privilege, it's about giving the students the best business education and I have to think he's in a good position to do that.

Re:Is he a scientist? (2)

Intrepid imaginaut (1970940) | about 2 months ago | (#47719799)

Like him or hate him the man assisted in creating one of the most powerful commercial entities in history, one that negotiated not just with whole countries but with entire continents. I'd personally pay good money to get a peek behind the curtains, that's the kind of experience you don't usually get in academia, or anywhere.

Re:Is he a scientist? (1)

geekoid (135745) | about 2 months ago | (#47720193)

Anyone in the position he was in would have been able to ride that wave. EVERY product he wanted to happen, and shove through regardless of market, failed.

Re:Is he a scientist? (3, Informative)

metlin (258108) | about 2 months ago | (#47719907)

B-schools often hire people who are not in academia per se, but have rich real world experience in solving business problems.

For instance, you will often find senior partners from top consulting firms teaching classes, because they bring to bear not just academic knowledge but also practical experience.

People who do their MBA are not there to just learn the latest and greatest management technique from academia -- they also seek to apply that to the real world.

And this is not just true for MBAs -- it is also true for law schools, medical schools, and many other professional degrees. You'll find former judges and lawyers teaching classes, and you'll find doctors and surgeons with real world experience tempering your academic knowledge with their real world experience.

Public policy is another area where you former civil servants often teaching classes.

"Great minds think alike"... apk (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47720085)

http://news.slashdot.org/comme... [slashdot.org] and more importantly imo, here http://news.slashdot.org/comme... [slashdot.org]

APK

P.S.=> Anyhow/anyways: Kudos to you per my subject-line above... apk

Re:Is he a scientist? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47720233)

I'm not a Ballmer fan, but I think he's perfect for this sort of student. Lets face it: An MBA is not an academic degree in the same way a MS in Chemistry or Literature is. Everyone I know with an MBA got it because his/her job wanted them to get it to be eligible for a promotion. Those that get the degree need a mix of practical skills/knowledge about the business landscape, not theories on Keynsian economics from a textbook. Say what you want about Ballmer but he has worked at/managed one of the largest (and for a period, fastest growing) companies of the past 50 years. That's worth something to these students.

Re:Is he a scientist? (1)

Nemyst (1383049) | about 2 months ago | (#47720503)

MBAs aren't like scientific disciplines. Work experience is far more valuable in that context than any sort of research, since it's much closer to a trade school degree than to a university one. As for whether Ballmer's work experience is going to be good for his students....

Lesson one (2)

argStyopa (232550) | about 2 months ago | (#47719419)

Lesson 1: if the company executives are bigger news than the company and more importantly, its products, then you're doing something seriously wrong.

Re:Lesson one (2)

quantaman (517394) | about 2 months ago | (#47719803)

Lesson 1: if the company executives are bigger news than the company and more importantly, its products, then you're doing something seriously wrong.

Like Steve Jobs?

Re:Lesson one (1)

geekoid (135745) | about 2 months ago | (#47720187)

If the thing Steve Jobs pushed failed, then Yes.

Professor Ballmer? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47719429)

All I can say is:

"Yeeeeeeeeeeeeaaaaaaaaaahhhhhhhhhhhhhh!!!!!!!!" :-D

Step #1 Find a Geek (3, Funny)

Dr. Evil (3501) | about 2 months ago | (#47719433)

Step #2, follow him into success.

Step #4, take over the company when he steps down.

Step #5, fail repeatedly throughout a decade.

Step #6, teach MBA class at Stanford and USC.

Re:Step #1 Find a Geek (1)

ubersoldat2k7 (1557119) | about 2 months ago | (#47719647)

Where's Step #3? WHERE'S IT?!? I can't continue without it?!?

Re:Step #1 Find a Geek (2)

Chris Mattern (191822) | about 2 months ago | (#47719875)

Silly man, everybody knows, "Step #3: Profit!"

Steve Jobs wasn't any different... apk (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47720301)

He attached himself to a FAR greater technical mind in Mr. Steve Wozniak (my fellow pole, & technical 'whiz-kid' from his teens on).

Seems to be a "working formula" for MONETARY (key point) success, only - not actual respectable technical success to go with it, which personally I value FAR more!

(Mr. Ballmer OR Mr. Jobs' route? Again - Not one I respect personally actually, but it works & "proof's in the pudding" & there IS no arguing with success... or the numbers).

APK

P.S.=> Jobs would've probably ended up doing the same - he DID have business saavy, from experience, like Mr. Ballmer (it means a LOT -> http://news.slashdot.org/comme... [slashdot.org] and http://news.slashdot.org/comme... [slashdot.org] ), but I always felt he was (not to speak ill of the dead, just opinion, albeit based on the premise YOU laid out & my reply response above to it) more of a "10,000 ft. bullshitter" who read up first, & could talk turkey since he did, HOWEVER, NOT WHERE IT MATTERS MOST - the devils of the low-level details! I don't respect that & can usually "see thru it" a mile off (so can most of you I suspect) - since it shows DEPENDENCY on leeching off others of FAR greater brilliance... apk

Teach what? (1)

nurb432 (527695) | about 2 months ago | (#47719441)

How to be a prick? ( well, a lucky wealthy prick.. but still a prick )

In defense of Mr. Ballmer... apk (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47719463)

Something I *think* MOST of you will understand if not appreciate: He's got REAL WORLD experience in business... not just "widgets".

It matters...

Put it THIS way, from my own academic & then real world experience coding (taking a break from academia when Fortune 500 companies picked me up, & I did what great athletes often do in "heck with the Heisman trophy - I am going after the millions NOW, & will finish my degree later when I can easily afford to do so, scholarship notwithstanding"):

I took off in my 1st semester of my 2nd year of an Associates Degree in Comp. Sci. (where we started out with hundreds of CS students & only 10 of us were left @ the end in 1994) to work & make MONEY (the end-goal usually/ordinarily of getting a degree, along with knowledge too of course).

Why? Same reasoning as athletes do it as I noted above! My reasoning was "Why work hard AND PAY FOR IT, rather than get PAID TO WORK HARD?"

It worked out pretty ok!

I went back in 2010 to finish off my CS Associates between jobs in fact & it was CAKE compared to when I started out in it back in the 90's (working professionally ever since almost continuously in the field in fact)... it wasn't easy when I was 'green'/a rookie in academia though. I remember telling my Ma (who was a 22++ yr. computer person) "This is TOO HARD" & she said "Worse guys than you have gotten thru it, so can you: Don't give up!" & 2 guys (one deceased, Mr. Ron Procopio God rest his soul - GOOD man & Mr. Leon Rivkin, best CS mind I know personally in fact & a wealthy man now bigtime, saved me).

However/Disclaimer: Do I *agree* with some of Mr. Ballmer's business moves @ MS? The business ones, overall, I can't argue with (since THAT seems to be his 'forte' more than tech, by far) - he always said "The stock's doing great & has never been higher valued" etc. & he seemed to be able to back it up (with 'tricks' though, much like downsizing via the rotten "bottom 10% of coders get the shaft" evaluation system they have @ MS, which sucks, since to work there in the 1st place you *HAVE* to be pretty damned good & I know for a fact you do (they approached ME, not the other way around, in 2003 -> http://developers.slashdot.org... [slashdot.org] & I didn't "make the grade" (then, but I bet I would, now... albeit 11++ yrs. later AFTER more experience professionally)).

However, his blunders with Windows 8 (not under the skin/covers, there's GOOD STUFF there) & the interface? BAD MOVE... seems to prove he doesn't understand his user market's needs and tried a "tail will wag the dog" idea & failed.

Nobody's perfect all the time though.

APK

P.S.=> Real world PRACTICAL hands-on experience "in the trenches", matters (& yes, I have a Bachelors in Business Administration with MIS minor too ontop of the CS, so... I feel that the SAME IDEA applies to business, just as it would in CS)... apk

Those who can't... (4, Insightful)

MachineShedFred (621896) | about 2 months ago | (#47719465)

It's been said many times - Those who can, do. Those who can't, teach.

Re:Those who can't... (2)

gsslay (807818) | about 2 months ago | (#47719635)

And those who don't, comment on those who do.

Maybe... (1)

Dcnjoe60 (682885) | about 2 months ago | (#47719467)

Maybe he should teach about how not to run a company into the ground by going over his tenure at Msoft.

Grant money (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47719471)

I wonder how much the school is getting for allowing him to teach there. A Balmer CIS lab, library, gymnasium?

Chair throwing 101. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47719481)

by professor SB.

Leadership And The Physics of Furnishings (1)

daniel23 (605413) | about 2 months ago | (#47719519)

Discussing the motivational forces driving an active leadership role participants will train to mobilise and focus energies.
(Protective clothing recommended)

Some tentative ideas for Ballmer courses (1)

Lamps (2770487) | about 2 months ago | (#47719589)

Biz 101: How to ingratiate yourself with the right people
Biz 324: Managing technical staff for the non-technical (focus on developers)
Biz 412: Diversifying your product offerings, and what to do when you fail at it

The Ethics Module (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47719591)

Rumor has it that he will be the guest speaker when they go over the ethics module for the courses. #keepyourhandsonyourwallet

here's a copy of the syllabus (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47719601)

The semester is 15 weeks. Please complete the readings for each topic prior to class.

1. Developers! 2. Developers! 3. Developers! 4. Developers! 5. Developers! 6. Developers! 7. breather 8. Developers! 9. Developers! 10. Developers! 11. Developers! 12. Term paper due, developing themes explored in class. 13. Developers! 14. Developers! 15. in class Final Exam (covering material developed through the semester)

There will be three optional evening seminars covering real estate. (1. Location! 2. Location! 3. Location!)

I just read his lesson plan (1)

Junior J. Junior III (192702) | about 2 months ago | (#47719629)

Lesson 1: Make sure your college roommate is Bill Gates.
Lesson 2: Drop out. You don't need this stuff, go make money.
Lesson 3: Developers, Developers, Developers, Developers.
Lesson 4: When a monopoly is handed to you, ride it into the ground.
Lesson 5: When no one likes you, it's proper to own the L. A. Clippers.

Professor of intellectual property laws. (1)

neghvar1 (1705616) | about 2 months ago | (#47719779)

I can just imagine how biased and one-sided this class would be

Dance classes? (1)

sandbagger (654585) | about 2 months ago | (#47719925)

Just wondering.

TEACHING???? (1)

Jahoda (2715225) | about 2 months ago | (#47720021)

How long have I been sleeping? What exactly is there for this man to teach? How to destroy every strategic advantage your company has in 10 years? I mean, I suppose arrogance and ineptitude ARE characteristics of the MBA.

clippy says (1)

Joe_Dragon (2206452) | about 2 months ago | (#47720073)

It looks like the semester is over do you want me to make small changes to the textbooks so you can have a new edition?

Class Titles: (1)

geekoid (135745) | about 2 months ago | (#47720157)

101 - How to keep stocks flat.
102 - Ignoring the market How to spend billion to have a product fail
103 - The most important class - How to get lucky and land at a company just before the stocks rocket due to nothing you've personally done.

Gasp! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47720163)

Think of the children!!!!!

Corrected course title (1)

amanaplanacanalpanam (685672) | about 2 months ago | (#47720167)

"TRAMGT588: Leading organizations - what not to do"

details aobut his USC gig (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47720267)

Balmer has been appointed to the Steve Job's endowed USC's Marshall School of Business Chair of Asshattery

Students students students Students students stude (1)

140Mandak262Jamuna (970587) | about 2 months ago | (#47720351)

Students students students Students students students Students students students Students students students Students students students Students students students Students students students Students students students Students students students Students students students Students students students

Please sing the lyric to the tune of Developers, Developers ...

Master of Fuckwit Studies (1)

CnlPepper (140772) | about 2 months ago | (#47720531)

Why would anyone want to listen to this lunatic?!

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