Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Black Death's Genome Cracked

michael posted about 13 years ago | from the i-dont-want-to-go-on-the-cart dept.

Science 252

exceed writes: "This article on Wired, and this article on Yahoo! News states that scientists have decoded the genome of the bubonic plague bacterium. This will now (hopefully soon) lead to vaccinations and treatments for the disease it causes."

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

I feel so much safer (1)

skilbeck (315177) | about 13 years ago | (#2387130)

How much do we have in common with it? Are we the cure?

"You're the disease. I'm the cure" (1)

mangu (126918) | about 13 years ago | (#2387184)

Have you seen the movie "Cobra", with Sylvester Stallone? That's one (or should I say "the") memorable quote from that film.

HEAR MY GNU/HOLY WORDS NOW!!! (-1)

Allah_Spork (524500) | about 13 years ago | (#2387250)

It is Mine will that this plague be unleashed upon the sand-niggers and dune-coons, for they are a mote in Mine eyes.

Indeed, Mohummad, peace be on him!, tells the young in His village that 'The cure to foul plagues is in Mine rod! Let Me ram some healing medicines into you. Turn around'.

The
Prophet
Mohummad
Harbinger
of the
Arab Plague
/ x \
I |
I \==
\______/
||
[]
[]\ Muslims
[]\\ /______\
[] \\ /________\
[] \\ / o o \
[] && [][][][][][][][]| > /
[]8=KORAN=*O [] \ \_/ /
||\\ [] [] [] \----/
|| \\ [] [] []
|| \\[][][][][] [][]

Re:I feel so much safer (5, Informative)

Spootnik (518145) | about 13 years ago | (#2387252)

Actually, while the destruction of the cats in the Middle ages may have contributed to (or even allowed) the huge increase in the rat population leading to the "Black Plague", I do feel a need to point out something regarding *current* problems with bubonic plague. One of the major problems with the plague is that the fleas that carry it do not live *exclusively* on rats. Domestic animals such as dogs and cats, can get them too.

According to my source at the Coconino County Health Department in Flagstaff, Arizona, USA, there have been less than 60 cases state wide, since the first recorded one in 1950, of what we commonly refer to as "bubonic plague". Bubonic plague is actually descriptive of a symptom, not the disease itself which is caused by a bacterium called Yersinia pestis. Yersinia pestis is, as mentioned in the earlier post, carried by fleas.

The fleas of rats, mice, prairie dogs, squirrels, chipmunks and even rabbits can all carry Y. pestis. If your dog or cat is out running around free and catches or picks up a dead animal with infected fleas, your dog or cat can get those fleas. Once your pet has those fleas on him or her, they can be brought into your home and you can get the plague. However, this is apparently a very rare happening.

In 1995 there were 5 cases of Plague (Y. pestis) in Arizona. 2 of these were in Coconino county. One of these was in a woman who apparently was infected while visiting relatives in Maricopa County. The other was a man who had been out shooting prairie dogs and had handled several of the carcasses, getting fleas from them. The person at the Coconino County Health Dept. did say it was much more likely to get the aforementioned fleas from a carcass that a dog or cat brought home than directly from your dog or cat, though that was certainly possible and is believed to have happened in the past.

The point being, that while in the 14th century the "Black Death" (which is only assumed to be the same disease as Y. pestis) may or may not have been triggered by the decimation of the cat populations in Europe, we aren't living in the 1300's anymore. Now days, if you let your cat or dog run free he/she is liable to bring you a present that could cost you your life.

And don't even get me started about Hanta virus....

food chain (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 13 years ago | (#2387287)

cats make good dog food

dogs make good mexican food

mexicans make good chinese food

don't eat chinese food or chinese people and you should be safe.

no, wait, don't eat mexican food or mexican people and you should be safe.

ah shit i lost the thread, just eat chiles and drink beer and you should be safe.

except for that mexican/chinese sunburn.

Im just glad were getting something out of this (0)

BigBigBlake (524480) | about 13 years ago | (#2387136)

'nuff said.

I got this BlackHead (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 13 years ago | (#2387281)

This black bitch I met today gave me head without any resistance.

It's not fair (-1, Troll)

Inthewire (521207) | about 13 years ago | (#2387137)

So no more Black people will die? That helps them...hurry up and save the rest of us!

Re:It's not fair (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 13 years ago | (#2387154)

Actually, most people of european descent are relatively resistant to the disease. Comes from being descended from those who lived through it when 1/3 of Europe died. Of course, as your post indicates, some of us have descended farther than others...

Re:It's not fair (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 13 years ago | (#2387253)

(metamod)The above post is yet another reason why it is worth your while to browse at 0 or lower.(/metamod)

But then again, if you can read this, you already knew that.

Re:It's not fair (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 13 years ago | (#2387166)

Isn't the Black Plague called "laziness"?

hey.. (-1)

GaylordFucker (465080) | about 13 years ago | (#2387138)

there is a crack in my ass...

lick it

Re:hey.. (-1, Offtopic)

Spootnik (518145) | about 13 years ago | (#2387243)

First, I would like to get to know you. Who is your daddy, and what does he do?

you shitblasting, cock-walloping gay boy (-1)

Sexual Asspussy (453406) | about 13 years ago | (#2387256)

why don't you get fucked up the Hershey Highway by a 6'7" nigger instead of bringing this insipid shit to the greater /. community???

you mean (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 13 years ago | (#2387293)

insipid shit isn't the greater /. community?

Second Fist Prost? (-1)

FuckTheTaliban (521057) | about 13 years ago | (#2387139)

The Taliban had this years ago. The Taliban like to eat peanut butter. The Taliban sometimes get shit on their thumb when they wipe their ass.

Soon the Taliban will be ashes.

This will go a long way towards vaccinations... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 13 years ago | (#2387144)

Bubonic Plague is a concern because of bioterrorism, but imagine if they can do the same decoding of the AIDS virus, how much that would help come up with a vaccination for AIDS and slowing down its damage in the human body...

AIDS vaccine (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 13 years ago | (#2387203)

AIDS (Anal Induced Death Sentence) affects only gay people who deserve to die. Please direct medical research to benefit deserving people.

what do you get... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 13 years ago | (#2387148)

when you feed the squirrels at the grand canyon?

yersinia pestis

mmm, my favorite

decameron anyone?

I can see it coming... (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 13 years ago | (#2387150)

Satan will sue these scientists under the DMCA for having cracked the protection of his copyrighted microscopic pupil. Will Congress learn to weigh all sides of an issue before passing random laws?

Technology is a Double Edged Sword... (3, Insightful)

Ron Bennett (14590) | about 13 years ago | (#2387151)

Sounds like a great advance, but sadly I fear such information will also be used by some to develop even more deadly biological weapons.

Re:Technology is a Double Edged Sword... (2, Informative)

Katan (104699) | about 13 years ago | (#2387155)

Well, if the fear is biological weapons, then I don't think its much of a worry about what "new" weapons they'll come up with.


Smallpox for example, would spread like crazy since we don't have a vaccine for it anymore.


A single spec of Anthrax will kill you... I don't think you can get much more deadly.

plutonium vs anthrax toxicity (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 13 years ago | (#2387183)

thanks to modern science, the trace amounts of plutonium released into the atmosphere will guarantee that 1 in 3 people will get cancer in their lifetimes.

so yeah, a speck of anthrax might kill you quickly, but a millionth of a gram of plutonium will make you suffer for years and wish you had taken the speck of anthrax instead.

red pill or blue pill?

the choice has already been made for you.

so smoke, drink, do drugs, because we've already doomed ourselves. might as well enjoy it.

i'm certainly enjoying my strontium 90 laced tobacco right now!

Fuck plutonium (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 13 years ago | (#2387198)

the trace amounts of plutonium released into the atmosphere will guarantee that 1 in 3 people will get cancer in their lifetimes


1 in 3 people will get cancer anyhow, from several different motives. Plutonium in the atmosphere will not change your chances a shit, so fuck your mother's ass.

Re:Fuck plutonium (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | about 13 years ago | (#2387207)

i fucked your mothers ass,

and 9 months later,

she shit you out.

and the doctors said fecalgenesis was impossible.

go figure

too bad she didn't flush

Re:Technology is a Double Edged Sword... (3, Troll)

leucadiadude (68989) | about 13 years ago | (#2387210)

Smallpox won't "spread like crazy" because you need to be within close proximity to an infected person. Once it becomes known that there is a major smallpox outbreak, you can be sure people will severely limit their interpersonal contacts. And there is indeed a smallpox vaccine. See this article. [cdc.gov]

An excerpt:
"The possible use of smallpox virus as a weapon by terrorists has stimulated growing international concern and led to a recent review by the World Health Organization of the global availability of smallpox vaccine. This review found approximately 60 million doses worldwide, with little current vaccine manufacture, although limited vaccine seed remains available (1). Ongoing discussions in the United States suggest that the national stockpile should contain at least 40 million doses to be held in reserve for emergency use, including in case of a terrorist release of smallpox virus (O'Toole, this issue, pp. 540-6).

The current U.S. stockpile contains approximately 15.4 million doses of vaccinia vaccine (Dryvax) made from the New York City Board of Health strain of vaccinia and was produced by Wyeth Laboratories in 13 separate lots. The vaccine is lyophylized in glass vials with rubber stoppers and sealed with a metal band. When rehydrated, each vial contains 100 doses and has a potency of at least 108 plaque-forming units (pfu)/ml. Some vials of the vaccine stockpile have shown elevated moisture levels and thus failed routine quality control testing; however, the vaccine in these vials remains potent, and the failed lots have not been discarded.
"

Re:Technology is a Double Edged Sword... (-1)

FuckTheTaliban (521057) | about 13 years ago | (#2387212)

The US has over 100,000 units of Smallpox vaccine, you dumb cum guzzling spiced scrotum sucker.

Fuck you.

Re:Technology is a Double Edged Sword... (2, Insightful)

smack_attack (171144) | about 13 years ago | (#2387186)

I'm more afraid that the vaccine will cause problems too. Ever had a flu shot? They basically inject you with a weakened strain of the virus in order to make you immune, imagine if they inject people with something that isn't weak enough (I've gotten VERY bad flu "symptoms" from getting a flu shot).

With something of this scope I'd rather take my chances without it. Personally if I found out that I had contracted some infectious disease as a result of bio-terrorism, I would be on the next flight to Pakistan trying to cross into Afghanistan so I could personally infect some of those idiots.

flu shots... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 13 years ago | (#2387224)

are what the government uses to kill dumbfucks.

just like the lottery is a tax for those who are dumbfucks at math.

Re:Technology is a Double Edged Sword... (2)

thrig (36791) | about 13 years ago | (#2387312)

CCHF is well ahead of you [telegraph.co.uk] in that department...

Your comment violated the postercomment compression filter. Comment aborted

Re:Technology is a Double Edged Sword... (1)

TroyFoley (238708) | about 13 years ago | (#2387196)

True. We must use our powers for good, not evil

Re:Technology is a Double Edged Sword... (3, Insightful)

UserChrisCanter4 (464072) | about 13 years ago | (#2387279)

Let's consider something for the time being here: Most of slashdot is people in computing-related fields. We know computing. Most of us don't know much beyond the few college-level bio courses... this isn't our area of expertise.

For a moment, let's just replace the words, 'publishing bubonic plague genome information' with "releasing source code for the 2.4 Kernel". Are we all of a sudden afraid that the script kiddies are going to root our box, or do we realize that the release of such information will allow the many skilled programmers of the Linux world to make fine adjustments to the security features of Linux?

I'm talking out of my ass for this last bit here, but I'd have to figure that it takes a significantly skilled person to engineer a more dangerous strain of a given bacteria. I would also have to figure that the thousands of other people with roughly the same skill level could probably come up with a vaccine in a shorter time period. If I wanted something super-destructive, I'd probably stick with a nuke. They're a lot cheaper, and no one's come up with a personal nuke/radiation proof shield that can be injected into a toddler.

Wasteful (0, Offtopic)

talonyx (125221) | about 13 years ago | (#2387153)

Who the hell cares about the bubonic plague? We dealt with that shit back in the 1200's. There are more important diseases these scientists should have been studying, like AIDS and cancers.

Re:Wasteful (3, Insightful)

OmegaDan (101255) | about 13 years ago | (#2387159)

ummm, I care. They find squirrels carrying the disease all the time in southern california.

no worries if you (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 13 years ago | (#2387237)

stop fucking squirrels

dumbass

Re:Wasteful (2, Insightful)

dadragon (177695) | about 13 years ago | (#2387164)

One word. Bioterrorism. Actuall, two words: Biowarfare.

three words (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | about 13 years ago | (#2387249)

go fuck yourself

four words
you are an idiot

five words
kill or be killed, dumbass

Re:Wasteful (4, Insightful)

Alien54 (180860) | about 13 years ago | (#2387168)

It killed 200 million people in the 14th century and continues to kill about 3,000 people each year according to the World Health Organization. Some experts are newly worried that the bug could be used as a bio-weapon in light of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks.

Which is why you worry. People playing with bio engineering could come up with a new version that could be very nasty.

Re:Wasteful (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 13 years ago | (#2387177)

In which case, an antidote for the stuff that is around now is effective for a modified version in which way?

scary (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 13 years ago | (#2387190)

the black death mixed with goatsex, natalie pornman and hot grits.

it's what's for dinner!

Re:Wasteful (1)

A Tin of Fish Steaks (416200) | about 13 years ago | (#2387221)

People playing with bio engineering could come up with a new version that could be very nasty.

Why worry about people bio-engineering nastier versions when the ones that already exist (of this and other diseases with the potential to be bio-weapons) are already quite nasty enough?

We're understandably hearing a lot of talk about diseases being used as weapons of terror. Fortunately, such attacks would require considerably more expertise than merely knowing how to fly a crop duster. While it is something to take very seriously, I'm still more concerned about hijackers. Why should terrorists trouble themselves with biological weapons when they can wreak such mayhem with box cutters?

Re:Wasteful (2, Insightful)

MyMarty (262639) | about 13 years ago | (#2387171)

Well, aside from the arguments above regarding bioterrorism, warfare and squirrels there is also the argument that medical science should endeavour to raise the quality of life for ALL people (not just middle-class white Americans). Bubonic plague is still deadly, and can still be found in the unhygenic squalor of many a shanty-town in third and second world countries.

Re:Wasteful (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 13 years ago | (#2387235)

...can still be found in the unhygenic squalor of many a shanty-town in third and second world countries.


So, let's get away from third and second world countries shanty-towns. Who wants to go there anyhow?

second and third worlds (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 13 years ago | (#2387266)

so you're saying that northern california,
northwest new mexico, northeast arizona, southwest colorado and southeast utah are equivalent to second and third world countries?

well, i can't argue with you there, buddy.

the 5 corners of squalor.

Re:Wasteful (2, Funny)

A Tin of Fish Steaks (416200) | about 13 years ago | (#2387288)

Bubonic plague is still deadly, and can still be found in the unhygenic squalor of many a shanty-town in third and second world countries.

It can still be found in the unhygenic squalor of Colorado [cnn.com] . In fact, the strain analyzed by the researchers in this study came from the United States in 1992.

I'm afraid I can't attest from first hand knowledge whether or not Colorado Springs qualifies as a shanty-town.

Re:Wasteful (2, Informative)

quannump (310933) | about 13 years ago | (#2387176)

bubonic plague killed 34 in Los Angeles in 1924. That's not recent, but more recent then 1200's

Great! (1)

Kasreyn (233624) | about 13 years ago | (#2387157)

Does this mean I won't lose 1 life point every time they hit me?

Oh wait, this isn't the Diablo forum!

-Kasreyn

Re:Great! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 13 years ago | (#2387245)

Where are those trenches?!

Terrorism is good for gene research (2, Offtopic)

sting3r (519844) | about 13 years ago | (#2387161)

It's nice to see so many [nih.gov] genome-related research projects receive renewed interest and attention after the terrorist attacks.

Although the citizens of the U.S. will probably suffer an unspeakable loss of civil liberties and privacy [cnn.com] , we will probably reap many benefits from the medical research that was spurred.

-sting3r

Re:Terrorism is good for gene research (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 13 years ago | (#2387227)

Its a free mason plot to take over the world and control and monitor everyone

CNN and Civil Liberties (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about 13 years ago | (#2387308)

anything that would make the rabble rousing, news manufacturing, mongoloid morons at CNN Shut The Fuck Up would be a good thing.

man i hate media paranoia. i wish i could make them all pet the squirrels at the grand canyon.

except Valerie Voss, she can show me her tits anytime, even if they are scraping her knees now.

Well, finally! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 13 years ago | (#2387165)

And it only took them about 700 years too!

Re:Well, finally! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 13 years ago | (#2387199)

You're not funny at all.

[goatse.cx]

It wasn't meant to be funny (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 13 years ago | (#2387220)

That was an "insightful" post, ashole!

Re:It wasn't meant to be funny (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 13 years ago | (#2387290)

It was neither.

And log in if you're karma whoring. Dumbass.

stupid question (1)

RelliK (4466) | about 13 years ago | (#2387170)

I thought that there is already a cure for plage? I know it was a big problem back in middle ages, but does anyone still get sick with it?
Sorry for stupid question. Please enlighten me.

Read the article. (1)

leucadiadude (68989) | about 13 years ago | (#2387180)

It actually answers your questions.

Re:stupid question (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 13 years ago | (#2387193)

Yes, but I believe that normal anit-boitics take care of it. Every so often, they find a groun-hog in south western Colorado with the disease.

But, I have a hypothesis to explain it. See, Colorado is undergoing rapid (rabid may be more exact) urban development. I think that developers infect a population of grounf hogs, and report that plauge is running amok, to incite the public to hate ground hogs. See, houses are less likely to have the plauge, so naturally, people want houses next door, instead of a harmless ground-hog family. Win win for the people, lose everything for the groundhogs and the species that depend on their existance (Hawks, Eagles, Ferrets, etc etc.).

Re:stupid question (2)

leucadiadude (68989) | about 13 years ago | (#2387228)

The obvious answer to your hypothesis is where these evil developers managed to get hold of a viable supply Yersinia pestis bacteria. Not something you can obtain at Home Depot or Lowes hardware.

Black Death (3, Funny)

Digitalia (127982) | about 13 years ago | (#2387173)

Rest asssured, lowly peasants. Your fair and benevolent rulers have presented you with the ultimate cure for the vile scourge known as the black death. This, a lowly bar of soap, shall be your floral scented cure! Fear not any longer.

Re:Black Death (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 13 years ago | (#2387191)

You're not funny at all.

This line added to satisfy the postercomment compression filter!

Not Funny At All (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 13 years ago | (#2387313)

Sure it was.

curiosity killed the vet (0, Troll)

layingMantis (411804) | about 13 years ago | (#2387178)

"In their study, published in the Oct. 4 issue of Nature, the researchers mapped a strain of plague that killed a veterinarian in the United States in 1992. He contracted the disease after an infected cat sneezed on him."

If you mess around with some bad pussy you get burned.

Re:curiosity killed the vet (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 13 years ago | (#2387182)

You're not funny at all.

This line added to satisfy the postercomment compression filter.

Re:curiosity killed the vet (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 13 years ago | (#2387194)

Mr. Anonymous Coward: The fine folks of Slashdot have given us the power to post anonymously. So, if you choose to post as an AC, at least use your license to be insensitive, controversial, or outrageously stupid, like the rest of us. Your comment here was boring. Perhaps you could go fuck yourself for a while and then get back to us. (that's how it's done)

Re:curiosity killed the vet (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 13 years ago | (#2387226)

You misspelt controversial [adequacy.org] .

Re:curiosity killed the vet (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 13 years ago | (#2387304)

can i get some of that rock?

controversial (kntr-vûrshl, -s-l)
adj.
Of, producing, or marked by controversy: a controversial movie; a controversial stand on human rights.
Fond of controversy; disputatious.

Re:curiosity killed the vet (0, Troll)

Digitalia (127982) | about 13 years ago | (#2387192)

Your mother.

Bubonic Plague? (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 13 years ago | (#2387181)


Oh come on...why do medical-science-type people have to muck about,
wasting their time with old,
uncommon illnesses like Bubonic Plague.

I'd bet the number of BP cases are probably 50000 worldwide every year. maybe less.

HSV2 -- why dont they decode _that_ genome and get cracking on something to help with that.

I'm getting tired of all these damn blisters! :)

To clarify a couple points (5, Insightful)

alewando (854) | about 13 years ago | (#2387188)

  1. Antibiotics help a lot with treating bubonic plague, but they're only effective if the disease is first properly diagnosed. Because people are no longer used to contracting fatal diseases (which bubonic plague always is if left untreated), and because the symptoms are not all that different from symptoms of diseases people are used to shrugging off, the disease is often not diagnosed in time.
  2. Releasing the genome to the general public will help vaccination discoveries far more than it will help people who would use the plague for biological warfare. Frankly, you don't have to know the genetic sequence that underlies the organism in order to culture it and construct a suitable delivery device. In contrast, the benefits due to a vaccine discovery are obvious and numerous.
  3. A couple people do die of the bubonic plague every year, mostly in Asia and Africa. In addition to the importance of antibiotic treatment and a vaccine discovery, the importance of improving hygiene standards cannot be understated. It's a three-part chain involving rodents, fleas, and humans, so if you eliminate human contact with both, then you've effectively cut humans out of the loop and eliminated human infections.

make that "a couple thousand people do die" (1)

alewando (854) | about 13 years ago | (#2387195)

Worldwide. In the US, it's more like "a couple", since it's mostly confined to people like veterinarians, who have a lot more contact with sick animals than does the rest of the population.

Re:To clarify a couple points (5, Informative)

Metallic Mongoose (147944) | about 13 years ago | (#2387257)

"Because people are no longer used to contracting fatal diseases (which bubonic plague always is if left untreated"
----------------
Actually, it isn't.

The most virulent & deadly version of plague (pneumatic) has a mortality rate of aprox. 90% if left untreated...

...if (untreated) bubonic plague had a 100% mortality rate, european history would look very diffrent.

Re:To clarify a couple points (2)

dragons_flight (515217) | about 13 years ago | (#2387264)

...fatal diseases (which bubonic plague always is if left untreated)...

Just a minor nitpick.

"Without prompt antibiotic treatment, plague is fatal in 50 percent to 90 percent of cases.

Even with appropriate antibiotics and hospital care, about 15 percent of plague patients in the United States die. Pneumonic plague is the most rapidly fatal form of plague, and most victims will die if they do not receive antibiotics within the first 18 hours after symptoms begin."
-Source [intelihealth.com]

It's not totally fatal, though those that survive often have permanent scaring. After all some infected people managed to live through it even back in the European dark ages. Of course it's more than bad enough that I wouldn't ever want to encounter it.

Can you imagine.... (0, Offtopic)

psykocrime (61037) | about 13 years ago | (#2387189)

A Beowulf cluster of these?

LKJJL:JJLJJLKLJKLJ LAMENESS FILTER BLAH BLAH *(*&*&*(

Let me get this straight... (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | about 13 years ago | (#2387205)

The worst terrorist attacks in United States history occurred less than three weeks ago, and you people are discussing how "scientists have decoded the genome of the bubonic plague bacterium."

How do "scientists have decoded the genome of the bubonic plague bacterium" help the 6000+ people that died as a result of being burnt to death, ripped to shreds, smashed, blown to bits, jumping from 80 stories to their death to avoid being burnt alive or being pinned between thousands of tons of steel and concrete for a week?

Unless you are going to discuss something worthwhile to humanity, such as ridding the world of disease, then shut the fuck up and stop discussing this useless shit, please.

My *GOD* people, GET SOME PRIORITIES!

Quite frankly, the 6000+ people who died in this unprecedented tragedy could give a rats ass about the bubonic plague.

You people absolutely disgust me. You are all poor excuses for human beings.
I am almost ashamed to visit this site after seeing the terrorist attacks in the news on this site for a few days and then just brushing it aside and moving along as if it was no big deal.
You people simply play too many computer games and thus have no grip on the reality of this tragedy.
Its obvious that computer-game-playing-linux-geeks have no sense of reality, are very self-centered and have no regard for human life.

You should all be glad that you are alive and well and able to masturbate as frequently as you like while looking at goatse.cx, and not stuck under 100 stories of a collapsed building with your penis sliced off from shrapnel.

MOD PARENT UP!!!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 13 years ago | (#2387265)

im cummmminnngggggg

Your comment violated the postercomment compression filter. Comment aborted
You are not logged in. You can login now using the convenient form below, or Create an Account. Posts without proper registration are posted as Anonymous Cowa

Genomes and Vaccines (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 13 years ago | (#2387206)

Tools of the Trade
Gloves: provide protection to the both the top and bottom. Surface abrasion in the walls of the large intestines are an ordinary occurrence even in normal conditions. For the top, minor paper cuts, scratches and sores on the hands can be protected with the use of gloves. For most situations, the standard disposable examination glove is sufficient. The longer calving gloves should be used if the top has cuts or scratches above the glove line. When choosing between vinyl and latex, the preference is for latex.

Lubricants: one of the most popular still remains regular CRISCO from Procter and Gamble. Water based lubricants rarely provide the lubrication necessary for fisting. Whatever lubricant is being used, seperate containers should be used for each person. This can be done by transferring lubricant from a freshly opened container to individual containers for each of the play participants.

Covers: for beds or floors, underpads or "chucks" are good. These pads have plastic on one side and are absorbant on the other. There are also rubberized play sheets available. Rolls of paper towels should be nearby.

Slings: made from leather, plastic webbing or canvas, a sling is normally supsended from the ceiling or from high on walls with metal chains.

Preparation
One thing to keep in mine is your diet. Before a session, foods like fruits, vegetable and whole grains are best while red meat and fatty foods should be avoided. During this period, avoid eating nuts as well as poppy, sesame and other seeds (19 to 36 hours before). The final 18 hours should see little consumed. What you do eat should digest slowly such as dairy products and eggs. Vitamins should be a part of your diet to ensure proper strength and nutrition is maintained. To aid in flushing your system, a hot drink about 15 mintues prior will help.

It goes without saying that an enema should be done before engaging in activity to rid the system of any remaining residue in your intestines. Allow about two hours between your final enema and the beginning of play.

Shaving: If the hair around your butt is long, you may want to shave it as it may otherwises get pulled when a hand is inserted.

Positions: Many bottoms perfer a sling when available. Another position condusive to fisting activity are doggie style, belly down and butt up. This position also provides the least bending of the rectum and often permits easier depth.

Entry: This is usually a slow process. Start your entry with the fingers straight and the thumb tucked under. The fingers may slowly wiggle to aid in entry, gently massaging the sides of the anus. As the bottom relaxes, the fingers may be broaden. Avoid sudden moves or jerks as this will cause the bottom to tighten up. Always make sure that there is plenty of lubricant in front of you, on your hand and on your wrist. For the bottom, deep breathing is a big help and as he exhales, the top will have an easier time for entry. Once inside, rest a few seconds until the bottom's body has had a chance to adjust. A gentle in-and-out motion without pulling out of the cavity will usually help the bottom build confidence. From this point, be creative and take your cues from the bottom as you subtly change speed, twist and explore deeper. Lengthy repetition of the same movement at the same spot will likely make the bottom sore.

A good book (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 13 years ago | (#2387216)

This reminds me of Connie Willis' "The Boomsday Book". It's not as apocaliptic as it sounds, but it is very scary anyway. If you don't know what the big deal is the black death, read this book.

biowarfare vaccinations? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 13 years ago | (#2387225)

in all the talk flying about concerning biowarfare, I've seen several mentions of vaccinations, and how although useful, they would be hard to administer to large groups in a hurry.

is it possible to get vaccinations now? if so, who the hell do you as for something that weird?

vaccine availability (5, Interesting)

leucadiadude (68989) | about 13 years ago | (#2387258)

Smallpox:
CDC is the only source of vaccinia vaccine and VIG for civilians. CDC will provide vaccinia vaccine to protect laboratory and other health-care personnel whose occupations place them at risk for exposure to vaccinia and other closely related Orthopoxviruses, including vaccinia recombinants. Vaccine should be administered under the supervision of a physician selected by the institution. Vaccine will be shipped to the responsible physician. Requests for vaccine and VIG, including the reason for the request, should be referred to

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Drug Services, National Center for Infectious Diseases
Mailstop D-09
Atlanta, GA 30333
Telephone: (404) 639-3670
Facsimile: (404) 639-3717


Plague:
Plague vaccine is available in the United States from Greer Labs. Plague vaccine USP is manufactured by Greer Laboratories, Inc., P.O. Box 800, Lenoir, NC, 28645-0800, telephone (800)438-0088 or (704)754-5327. The vaccine is shipped refrigerated in 20ml vials and should be stored at 2-8 degrees C (35-46 degrees F). It should not be frozen. The following groups of people should consider vaccination:

Persons working with the plague bacterium in the laboratory or in the field. Persons working in plague-affected areas or with potentially infected animals where they have little control over their environments, particularly in developing countries.


I don't know where you might find tularemia vaccine or some of the other lesser known organisms.

So now we'll have new variants... (1, Funny)

TWX_the_Linux_Zealot (227666) | about 13 years ago | (#2387233)

...Like Blue Death, Green Death, White Death, Fuscia Death...

Infectious Disease Variants! Collect the WHOLE set!

genome posted (0, Troll)

Rinikusu (28164) | about 13 years ago | (#2387238)

Microsoft has posted the genome of the Black Plague here [gnu.org] , confirming the "viral" nature of the GPL. FSF responded by pointing out that the Black Death was actually a bacterium. Isaac Hayes suggested that a reconstructed Black Plague would produce this [geocities.com] .

And also... (1)

hhe_hee (470065) | about 13 years ago | (#2387239)

This can now (maybe soon) also lead to even better biological weapons that can kill much more than the 200 millions that the plauge killed. Now scientists will be able to modify it and cause it to lead to even worser diseases.

Cracked? (0, Offtopic)

Dolly_Llama (267016) | about 13 years ago | (#2387246)

It was cracked? Does that mean the genome was running IIS [slashdot.org] ?

Cats rule (1, Interesting)

DEATH AND HATRED (158846) | about 13 years ago | (#2387247)

During the christian, err I mean dark ages, people killed cats because they thought they were witches. The rodent population ran out of control, causing the black plauge problem. 1/3 of Europe was wiped out. The moral of the story. Cats rule, dogs drool.

Vaccine pricing (0, Insightful)

Trollificus (253741) | about 13 years ago | (#2387248)

"This will now (hopefully soon) lead to vaccinations and treatments for the disease it causes."

Sure, but we both know that the people who will never see this vaccine are the people who need it the most.
No doubt, there will be patents involved. The first thing they will patent is the Genome itself. So, only one major company will be able to make these vaccines. And the result will be prices that only the wealthiest will be able to afford.

Another good idea down the shitter.

All in the timing. (4, Funny)

Chairboy (88841) | about 13 years ago | (#2387255)

Great! This is excellent! This is something that could have been great about 400 YEARS AGO!

Grr!

What they REALLY need to decode is whatever virus it is that prompts record executives to pull together a group of 4-5 teenage boys and turn them into a 'boy band'. Cure THAT virus, and the world will thank you.

Re:All in the timing. (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about 13 years ago | (#2387275)

The world would never notice, after all who would ever stop to think about boy bands if they weren't around to begin with?

One down, two to go? (1)

destiney (149922) | about 13 years ago | (#2387260)


So then the cures for cancer and aids should be just around the corner right?

Re:One down, two to go? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 13 years ago | (#2387303)

Bah, Government mapped out the AIDS genome a long time ago. :-)

Excellent! (4, Informative)

stevarooski (121971) | about 13 years ago | (#2387262)

Bubonic plague is nasty, nasty stuff. . .I've read a lot about the various fun ways it can kill you through history books. For those who have no idea of what it did to Europe, read a good summary of the Black Death here [byu.edu] .

Also, before people go off on biological weapons, etc, consider that there have been several recent breakouts of this disease, particularly in the southwest US(where I'm from). Don't know what I'm talking about? Check out this [cnn.com] as an example. I remember reading in the paper in AZ about outbreaks occasionally and shuddering. A cure would be a godsend--even though there are only about 10-15 cases in the US a year, its a painful way to go.

Is it getting open sourced? (1)

Nindalf (526257) | about 13 years ago | (#2387267)

They'll never get out the exploits like vaccines and cures if they try to develop it in a closed development group. There are many skilled reverse-engineers in biology. Security through obscurity never works.

Open Source Black Death!

Don't you watch the documentaries? (1)

sharkey (16670) | about 13 years ago | (#2387268)

The cure is simple: DON'T SAY THE WORD "SHIT" SO MUCH.

It is a curse word, as overuse of it brings about the curse of the Black Death. Also avoid other curse words such as "fuck" and "mekrob".

now only if they can find and fix bad teeth (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 13 years ago | (#2387271)


and sin too, wait.....that can't be found in science.....only religion ;) [ie God]

Quick! (-1)

The_Messenger (110966) | about 13 years ago | (#2387276)

Patent the genome before those Magnus Opus fucktards get a hold of it!

not so useless (1)

davereed (525994) | about 13 years ago | (#2387284)

i guess all those CPU cycles i contributed are showing some positive results! i didn't get much from SETI...

Question.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 13 years ago | (#2387292)

I wonder what the long-term impact of modern medicine is going to have on the future? I mean, we come up with cures for sickness and disease, thats great... But don't these things exist by nature for a reason? Natural population control perhaps? They obviously serve a purpose, so I guess I'm just speaking philosophically here.. I can't imagine having the ability to cure these diseases, but not putting it to use, wouldn't make much sense. But do you know what I'm trying to say?

Plague and a little childs song - OT (2, Interesting)

deadmantalking (187403) | about 13 years ago | (#2387296)

Just rememebered that as a child i used to sing
"ring-a-ring-a roses,
pocket full of posies,
husha busha,
all fall down"
and never really understood what it was all about. then i found out that it was referring to the black plague epidemic of London when about a third(?) of the population was wiped out and people actually dropped dead on the streets...

A couple questions (3, Interesting)

Z4rd0Z (211373) | about 13 years ago | (#2387310)

Since the article mentions there is already a vaccine for this, why is there talk that this could be used to create a vaccine? Why would we need another?

The scientists were saying they knew that the bacteria modified itself and they even knew that it did it 1500 years ago. How do they know that? Would anyone with some knowledge of this care to speculate?

No, thanks (1)

jaysones (138378) | about 13 years ago | (#2387318)

If it doesn't come in an easy to use powder, then I'm just too busy for it. I'll learn to live with my plague until it fits my hectic lifestyle.
Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?