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Kernel Developer Dmitry Monakhov Arrested For Protesting Ukraine Invasion

timothy posted about 1 month ago | from the man's-inhumanity-to-man dept.

Censorship 205

sfcrazy (1542989) writes, based on a report from Ted T'so, that Kernel developer Dmitry Monakhov was detained for 15 days for disobeying a police officer. The debacle came about when Monakhov decided to protest the recent invasion into Ukraine by Russian armed forces. Monakhov is using Twitter to keep people informed about his experience with the Russian judicial system; a human translator can probably do a better job than Google in this case.

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

The (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 1 month ago | (#47805939)

Fappening

15 Days? That's all? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 1 month ago | (#47805955)

Hell, in udots, disobeying a police officer's a hangin offence.
(If you make i to a judge)

News for nerds ... (-1, Flamebait)

BitZtream (692029) | about 1 month ago | (#47805959)

Can we get stories about when kernel developers go to the bathroom as well?

This is hardly anything that matters or belongs on slashdot. Hans Reiser slaying his wife ... okay, sure, that meant the end of reiserfs effectively. One kernel dev serving time for a basic civil disobedience charge? Who cares? Its about as important as Bennett Hasleton rants about things he utterly fails to understand.

Re:News for nerds ... (3, Insightful)

war4peace (1628283) | about 1 month ago | (#47805991)

Hey, no, this story has the following buzzwords:
Kernel
Ukraine
Russian
Invasion

Guaranteed to bring page views. And you, you... inconsiderate clod, you think it's not a relevant story? Bah! Many buzzwords disagree with you!

Re:News for nerds ... (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 1 month ago | (#47806021)

Feel free to stop reading Slashdot. I've looked through your posting history and you don't offer anything constructive, informative or insightful in your comments, so we won't miss you at all.

Re:News for nerds ... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 1 month ago | (#47807417)

What do you mean "we" you A.C. fucktard?

Relates to safety and knowledge. News for Nerds (5, Insightful)

Etherwalk (681268) | about 1 month ago | (#47806579)

The more people who know about the developer, the safer he is, at least while he is being harassed by relatively minor officials. We should be happy to accept a post or two about a nerd who is under threat by a government seeking to hide the truth about a military invasion.

Science is done best when it is done with the free exchange of truthful information and ideas. A nation which hides the truth is operating in a way fundamentally contrary both to the ideals of the open source community and to the spirit of intellectual exploration.

Nerds who don't care about that aren't nerds at all. There are a lot of diatribes about the authenticity of geekdom or nerdery. Most are just people trying to identify with one group or another and somehow believing the label affects their status in a way that people around them care about. But at the core of all Slashdot-related identities lie knowledge, intellectual expression, and the taking of joy in the exchange of information.

Re:Relates to safety and knowledge. News for Nerds (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 1 month ago | (#47806995)

But at the core of all Slashdot-related identities lie knowledge, intellectual expression, and the taking of joy in the exchange of information.

I knew that bastard TJ was a nerd. Kidding aside, there's the old expression that knowledge is power. The NSA, et al monitoring, then, is the sort of unbridled power that would make the founding fathers scoff in disgust. There's a reason why Putin's connections to the FSB is so frequently pointed out and this whole situation with Russia is good reason to scoff, minimally. But, then I guess Putin is just another example of power going to one's head and corrupting. This is precisely why action should be taken in the US now before we actually do have the sort of de facto dictatorship that Russia is experiencing. And, as you say, it's predicated on knowing about these things.

Re:News for nerds ... (3, Insightful)

mi (197448) | about 1 month ago | (#47807239)

This is a far bigger story — as far as humanity is concerned — than some thug being shot by a wannabe-cop fearing for his life [slashdot.org] . At least, it has an open-source developer in it. And he is doing a noble thing too — a rare thing among Russians lately, I must add.

Re:News for nerds ... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 1 month ago | (#47806001)

> Can we get stories about when kernel developers go to the bathroom as well?

Go take a dump yourself instead of hanging around on /.

It's a better use of our time -- and yours probably too.

New for Despots ... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 1 month ago | (#47806035)

Can we get stories about when kernel developers go to the bathroom as well?

This is hardly anything that matters or belongs on slashdot. Hans Reiser slaying his wife ... okay, sure, that meant the end of reiserfs effectively. One kernel dev serving time for a basic civil disobedience charge? Who cares? Its about as important as Bennett Hasleton rants about things he utterly fails to understand.

When the Nazis came for the kernel developers,
I remained silent;
I was not a kernel developer.

When they locked up the dissidents,
I remained silent;
I was not a dissident.

When they came for the musicians,
I did not speak out;
I was not a musician.

When they came for the humans,
I remained silent;
I wasn't a human.

I'm Vladimir Putin.

Poor Vladimirs... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 1 month ago | (#47806271)

As if it was not enough for them having to deal with being called dicks on account of Vlad the Impaler, now they have to deal with people who like brag about puttin their Vladimir in.
Won't someone please think of the Vladimirs?

No, it's worse than that.... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 1 month ago | (#47807385)

Nobody has realized yet he's a descendant of that Latrine chick from Robin Hood: Men in Tights.

Vladimir POO-TIN. He can spruce up the spelling all he wants, but it's still a crap name.

Dick down in a waste receptacle: Vladimir Putin

News for nerds ... (0)

Jacek Poplawski (223457) | about 1 month ago | (#47806055)

I completely disagree.
Why bull**** about "global warming" is important "news for nerds" and information about kernel developer / russian invasion on Ukraine is not important?
I think Slashdot was much more intesting 10 years ago than it is now, but your comment shows that this direction is not accidental.

Re:News for nerds ... (1, Flamebait)

i kan reed (749298) | about 1 month ago | (#47806097)

Hey, guys, do you think if I include a a well demonstrated scientific fact in quotation marks, suddenly everyone will start believing in a global conspiracy with literally no point like I do?

Science is news for nerds.
The impact of major world events on technology is news for nerds.
Petulant whining about what subjects you personally don't care about is comments for assholes.

Re:News for nerds ... (-1, Flamebait)

rubycodez (864176) | about 1 month ago | (#47806567)

There are many theories and models of climate change, not one. Reputable mainstream scientists question parts of them and refine and change the models (e.g. warming in antarctic via volcanoes or AGW). You probably have a very superficial knowledge of science yourself, not even up to the level of entry level college courses.

Re:News for nerds ... (0)

i kan reed (749298) | about 1 month ago | (#47806603)

Oh shut-the-fuck up asshole. You know full well the fact that human factors are undeniably warming the atmosphere is completely distinct from the minutia of the models.

You just want to "correct" me.

Re:News for nerds ... (-1, Offtopic)

rubycodez (864176) | about 1 month ago | (#47806773)

Not by very much at all, what with 1998 being the warmest year and all. And note Arctic ice percentage climbing again in last two years. Hmm, the mainstream models are not panning out. You are the asshole, aping dumbed-down pop summaries without understanding.

Re:News for nerds ... (1, Offtopic)

i kan reed (749298) | about 1 month ago | (#47807397)

And we drop the pretense nuanced of understanding the models for boring denier talking point that reflects a piss-poor understanding of both the measurement methods and the most basic attributes of climatology(like inter-annual variation).

Yeah, okay, so you didn't want to "Correct" me out of some more detailed understanding, but instead we're #2 or 3 ranked item in pseudoscientist tactics. You were trying the "It's complicated so any scientific attempt at understanding is foolhardy compared to my outright absurd forgone conclusion" line.

Do you like being like the creationists? Like the Homeopaths? Engaged in the same inanity? Does that make you feel good about yourself?

Re:News for nerds ... (1)

rubycodez (864176) | about 1 month ago | (#47808373)

You are being silly, just talking of preference of one of infinite number of methods of averaging. That's fine but don't claim that one particular one has to be intrinsic to "climatology" (perhaps one major university in the world has field of study recently created named that, normally degree that would be in a couple other realms for a serious scientist, instead "climatologist" mostly a tag for agenda driven pseudo scientists at the IPCC).

You sure are a source of amusement for those of us who have studied geophysics (not "climatology")

Re:News for nerds ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 1 month ago | (#47807885)

Not by very much at all, what with 1998 being the warmest year and all.

Aside from 2005, 2006 and 2010, of course. And unlike 1998, those years didn't even have the benefit if a strong El Niño . Yes, 1998 is certainly warmer than any previous year on record, but that fact doesn't exactly support your position.

And note Arctic ice percentage climbing again in last two years.

From a all-time record low. Hasn't really made much of a recovery from before that dip, unfortunately.

Hmm, the mainstream models are not panning out.

I'm not aware of any mainstream models in which Arctic ice decreases strictly monotonically each year. Could you please provide some citations?

Re:News for nerds ... (1, Troll)

rubycodez (864176) | about 1 month ago | (#47808329)

Sorry, you're using multi-year averaged graphs (and probably the IPCC which go higher than NASA's).

Yes, Arctic ice making year on year recovery for now, but sure that can change. I just like reality rather than hoopla.

Ice minimum not decreasing, is increasing, your last sentence contains fallacy.

Re:News for nerds ... (1)

OzPeter (195038) | about 1 month ago | (#47806129)

information about kernel developer / russian invasion on Ukraine is not important?

Because it's a personal interested story about some guy protesting something that his government did and getting arrested for it .. oh and BTW he's a kernel developer.

TFA has fuck all to do with the state of Russian/Ukraine protests - so it doesn't even count as politics
It is barely tangentially a technology story - oh noes if a kernel developer goes to jail, what will happened to my precious ^w Linux

Re:News for nerds ... (1)

Jacek Poplawski (223457) | about 1 month ago | (#47806321)

information about kernel developer / russian invasion on Ukraine is not important?

Because it's a personal interested story about some guy protesting something that his government did and getting arrested for it .. oh and BTW he's a kernel developer.

TFA has fuck all to do with the state of Russian/Ukraine protests - so it doesn't even count as politics
It is barely tangentially a technology story - oh noes if a kernel developer goes to jail, what will happened to my precious ^w Linux

So I assume you wrote similar comments to all news about 9/11 or any american politics, which is not related to technology at all? Or do you mean that Ukraine is not important while USA is?

Re:News for nerds ... (1)

OzPeter (195038) | about 1 month ago | (#47806425)

So I assume you wrote similar comments to all news about 9/11 or any american politics, which is not related to technology at all?

Nowhere in TFA is there a discussion of politics or the state of protests, and the only relation to technology is that the guy *happens* to be a kernel developer - which is not even germane to TFA

If after 9/11 /. had run a story about how some random kernel developer got dirt in his computer after the towers came down (and that was the only topic of the story) I would have reacted just the same.

If however, TFA included summary and discussion of the state of pro-Ukraine protests *within* Russia and/or use of technology to mobilize said protests, and what the Kremlin was doing to subvert said protests/technology, then yes, that would have made it worthwhile to see.

Or do you mean that Ukraine is not important while USA is?

That's a pretty lame attempt at trolling.

Re:News for nerds ... (2)

Charliemopps (1157495) | about 1 month ago | (#47806499)

Can we get stories about when kernel developers go to the bathroom as well?

This is hardly anything that matters or belongs on slashdot. Hans Reiser slaying his wife ... okay, sure, that meant the end of reiserfs effectively. One kernel dev serving time for a basic civil disobedience charge? Who cares? Its about as important as Bennett Hasleton rants about things he utterly fails to understand.

Yea, a war between 2 of the largest countries in Europe isn't "news that matters" at all. The imprisonment of Kernel developers for their political beliefs, nah... who cares right?

Response on why we should care (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 1 month ago | (#47806533)

1. Technology does not exist in a vacuum. Slashdot readers sometimes pretend this is the Online Journal of Bits and Bytes, but it ain't so. What happens in the outside world directly affects what practically every company, university, and engineer works on from day to day; not to mention our quality of life apart from work.

Yesterday we had a story of a major iCloud hack. This would've been somewhat interesting if the victims had been, let's say some sorority sisters attending college in the southern part of the USA. The fact that the victims were Jennifer Lawrence, Kirsten Dunst and Kate Upton made it a story of front page importance, not just on Slashdot but on general newspapers and news sites worldwide; and a much more difficult problem for Tim Cook and Apple.

The NFL thought that the issue of domestic violence was completely unrelated or orthogonal to its mission of organizing professional football games. They just found out otherwise, big time. When a major social or political issue shows up on your doorstep, it's generally a bad idea to stick your head in the sand or some other dark place.

2. This *is* a technology story, and not just because Monakhov works on the Linux kernel. Monakhov has chosen social media as the vehicle for his dissent. While the internal infrastructure of Twitter may not be super interesting, the disruptive effects of social media on nearly all major industries, and on governments, is profoundly interesting, worthy of ongoing discussion here on Slashdot.

3. The effectiveness of civil disobedience depends on support from lots of people outside the region in which the incidents are taking place. Monakhov has identified himself as a kernel developer and is specifically asking for support from the FOSS community. Others may be appealing to their respective external communities as well. If they're ignored, the Russian authorities will feel no risk in shutting them down, or worse.

Russia is back to totalitarism (4, Insightful)

sinij (911942) | about 1 month ago | (#47806007)

Russia is back to totalitarianism, the only thing that still missing for a full return to Soviet era are bread lines and mandatory people's rallies. With sanctions brought by Putin's military aggression theses are not too far away.

Re:Russia is back to totalitarism (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 1 month ago | (#47806037)

Russia is back to totalitarianism, the only thing that still missing for a full return to Soviet era are bread lines and mandatory people's rallies. With sanctions brought by Putin's military aggression theses are not too far away.

We need to get an opinion of top notch oss security folk. ALEXANDER PESLYAK I SUMMON YOU

Re:Russia is back to totalitarism (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 1 month ago | (#47806119)

Actually, the biggest impact of sanctions has been European farmers.

They tried to bypass sanction by selling to Austria, who would then sell on to Russia. The Russians spotting the scam denied entry (Austria is not known for producing oranges).

The farmers were compensated by the EU. But rather than give the food to some needy Greeks, the food was destroyed.

Re:Russia is back to totalitarism (2)

OzPeter (195038) | about 1 month ago | (#47806175)

But rather than give the food to some needy Greeks, the food was destroyed.

Destruction of food happens fairly regularly, no matter how wasteful/stupid you think it might be.

Re:Russia is back to totalitarism (1)

superwiz (655733) | about 1 month ago | (#47806413)

It's not as stupid as you might think. The cost of transporting it to the place where it's needed could far outweigh (in pure energy costs) the costs of growing it locally.

Re:Russia is back to totalitarism (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 1 month ago | (#47806633)

Not really, usually the costs of transport are meaningless next to the cost of processing food.
Growing things locally usually means food gets processed in smaller facilities, which are usually less efficient.

Re: Russia is back to totalitarism (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 1 month ago | (#47807081)

Depends on both the distance and on the cost of production. The costs of production are constantly falling. (Better crops, more efficient technology used in farming, etc). The transportation costs stay pretty much the same.

Re:Russia is back to totalitarism (1)

tlhIngan (30335) | about 1 month ago | (#47807285)

It's not as stupid as you might think. The cost of transporting it to the place where it's needed could far outweigh (in pure energy costs) the costs of growing it locally.

In general it's true. We grow more than enough food to eradicate starvation through the entire world.

The problem has never been growing "enough". We do that quite easily. The problem has always been distribution - getting the food to where it's needed is costly, and that more than a few governments do things that make it far harder than it needs to be.

Re:Russia is back to totalitarism (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 1 month ago | (#47807297)

Polish farmers just came to EU and gave apples away in front of EU institutions, to show their disappointment.
Part of this food also went to some charity institutions.

Re:Russia is back to totalitarism (3, Insightful)

pesho (843750) | about 1 month ago | (#47807755)

Actually, the biggest impact of sanctions has been European farmers.

They tried to bypass sanction by selling to Austria, who would then sell on to Russia. The Russians spotting the scam denied entry (Austria is not known for producing oranges).

The farmers were compensated by the EU. But rather than give the food to some needy Greeks, the food was destroyed.

Quick geography lesson. Austria is in Europe (smack in the middle of it) and is part of the European Union. So your statement that somebody tried to go around the Russian food import ban by going through Austria is highly suspect. The way it is actually done is to go through Belarus. Russia is now importing beef from Belarus, which coincidentally is importing cattle from EU (technically the beef is produced in Belarus, as this is the place the cattle gets chopped up). Somewhat more absurd is the sudden appearance in Russian stores of shrimps originating from Belarus [joyreactor.cc] (Belarus is a land locked country). So yeah, if there is a ban there will always be somebody to make money by going around them. The thing is that the Russians will be the ones paying the bill.

Re:Russia is back to totalitarism (1)

rubycodez (864176) | about 1 month ago | (#47806587)

Why do you think there would be bread lines, totalitarianism on a strong economic base (in this case three criminal gang cartels which we could call the Three Branches of Russian Government) works very well for production and distribution

Re:Russia is back to totalitarism (3, Insightful)

sinij (911942) | about 1 month ago | (#47807243)

Bread lines will return because combination of sanctions and Putin's effort to Keep Up With the US Military Jonses will put Russia back into impossible economical position of high military spending out of shrinking budget.

Re:Russia is back to totalitarism (1)

rubycodez (864176) | about 1 month ago | (#47808389)

Russia can grow its own bread, and the regional "breadbasket" is the Ukraine. No problem there for Putin in the matters of bread.

Huh? (1)

s.petry (762400) | about 1 month ago | (#47807833)

I'm not trying to claim that Russia is 'good', but did you notice "Monakhov is using twitter to keep people informed about his experience with the Russian judicial system."? I don't know any people in the US that are allowed to keep their cell phones and tweet when arrested. I have seen people told to turn off their phones or be arrested, I have seen cops threaten to kill journalists (see the cop in Fergusson that was suspended for doing so), and I know that protestors that are arrested have their devices confiscated. The only reason we ever see wrong doing in our jails/prisons is due to leaked video from surveillance cameras, not because someone tweeted something.

So is the US a more totalitarian system than Russia? Before you "but the Ukraine" remember that US agencies spent over 5 billion dollars to help the revolt in the Ukraine so bears at least some responsibility for what's happening. Is the Ukraine going be be that much better off under EU control? Has not turned out so well for many in the EU (Greece/Spain/France, and the anti-EU party is huge in the UK today) so you will have to really sell me on that one. That, and this should be the choice of the Ukrainians as a whole.

These are complex issues so the answers are complex. Something to consider is that since I have been alive the US has been involved in more wars and killed more people than any other country on the planet. Many of the known conflicts were started on complete fabrications (Vietnam, 2nd Iraq). Would ISIL be as big of a problem today if the US was not funding and arming rebels in Syria, had not armed and funded rebels in Libya (and even provided air cover and bombed targets? Would we have so many problems if we were not continually killing innocent people when trying to assassinate alleged terrorist leaders? Would we have so many problems in the middle east if we had not armed, funded, and trained the Mujaheddin in Afghanistan in the late 80s?

The point here is that the US is not just an altruistic police force, simply helping those in need. We should be questioning these issues at a much deeper level than just repeating talking points.

Which Invasion? (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 1 month ago | (#47806091)

A cultural invasion perhaps.

Lots of huff and puff from Ukraine about a Russian invasion, but no evidence. Did you hear about the Russian convoy the Ukrainians 'eliminated'. Big recruiting potential lost only because the forgot to take a photo? hmmm

The 10 Russian paratroopers that accidentally strayed in to Ukraine? Oh those ones who were swapped for 63 Ukrainian soldiers who strayed into Russia.

[i]Cui bono?[/i]
Nato has a big conference this week. Recent events should allow sensible governments to increase defense spending during a time of austerity.

The Ukraine forces are getting the asses handed to them on a plate by a well organised farming cooperative.

Re:Which Invasion? (2, Interesting)

DocSavage64109 (799754) | about 1 month ago | (#47806187)

Interesting point of view. There seems to be a pretty major propaganda war going on over Russia and Ukraine, and I wonder which parts are truth...

Re:Which Invasion? (3, Insightful)

sinij (911942) | about 1 month ago | (#47806311)

I don't think it is difficult to conclude that Russian state media's point of view on Russian involvement in Ukraine will closely mirror Russian government's official position. Motivations are less clear for Western media, but at least hard facts, like satellite images, or actual footage from reporters could be largely trusted.

Re:Which Invasion? (4, Insightful)

kav2k (1545689) | about 1 month ago | (#47806535)

You should treat both sides as untrustworthy. Fabricated evidence, or just total lack thereof, is used by both sides.

It's an amazing trait of modern wars. We often say that cyberwarfare is the threat of the future, but right now information wars, shaping public opinion that's malleable and not always critical enough of the fact presented, is maybe a bigger thing than actual firefights on the ground. Modern technology makes information easy to manipulate, easy to inject into public view, and far, far easier to spread.

Unless a war goes on in your homeland right next to you, you can't really tell if you're being told the truth.

Re:Which Invasion? (3)

sinij (911942) | about 1 month ago | (#47806655)

Fabrication of evidence by NATO would be much bigger news than entire war in Ukraine. As such, we are can be certain that facts that are presented by Western media are accurate. What we can't be sure about is what facts are omitted or under-reported. Like civilian casualties and humanitarian crisis in Donetsk. Was it avoidable, could it be meaningfully mitigated by ether side?

Re:Which Invasion? (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 1 month ago | (#47807031)

My second purpose today is to provide you with additional information, to share with you what the United States knows about Iraq's weapons of mass destruction as well as Iraq's involvement in terrorism, which is also the subject of resolution 1441 and other earlier resolutions.

Colin Powell, 4 Feb 2003. (Senior fucking guy in NATO)

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2003/feb/05/iraq.usa

Re:Which Invasion? (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 1 month ago | (#47807205)

It became also a huge story once the whole thing was debunked. I look at media coverage as follows:

1. There has been numerous clear fabrications by the Russian media and the state. For example actors have been posing as different people (you can find these on youtube). In addition, pictures have been from different places than claimed. These have been used as evidence for their version of the story.

2. The only sort of pictures that I've seen fabricated by Western media was the one video on the MH17 falling down, which turned out to be some clip from Syria. The main difference was that the clip was never shown to prove anything, only to generate "clicks" by having people visit the site for some exclusive footage. The motive was money, not to mislead.

As an example of verifiability the presence of a BUK in rebel territory was easy to verify from a video released by the Ukrainians. It didn't take long before people used Google Maps to pinpoint the precise location and anyone can verify by going to Google Maps that this is the correct location. The location was firmly within rebel held territory. Similarly, most other interesting pictures have been located on Google Maps, so anyone can verify the location.

Re:Which Invasion? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 1 month ago | (#47807147)

Fabrication of evidence by NATO would be much bigger news than entire war in Ukraine. As such, we are can be certain that facts that are presented by Western media are accurate. What we can't be sure about is what facts are omitted or under-reported. Like civilian casualties and humanitarian crisis in Donetsk. Was it avoidable, could it be meaningfully mitigated by ether side?

Not if you were on the "other side".

To "Westerners" the idea that the facts could be omitted/under/mis-reported is a terrible thing that should be avoided and rooted out. But to most of the world, the idea that the facts could be omitted/under/mis-reported is considered to be a given.

But to (most) non-"Westerners", the media is just a propaganda tool controlled by the government to convince the public to do whatever they want. Freedom of speech? Freedom of the press? HA! Thats just American propaganda. All this talk about civilian casualties and humanitarian crisis? Nothing more than a "Western" excuse to stop Mother Russia from protecting innocent would-be Russians in the Ukraine from their evil Ukranian warlords.

Re:Which Invasion? (4, Insightful)

Dan East (318230) | about 1 month ago | (#47806959)

Yes, but the tanks and artillery the "separatists" keep popping up with are coming from somewhere. At this late stage in the game, they certainly aren't Ukrainian remnants that the separatists have captured in those Ukrainian territories - those were used and destroyed many months ago.

So one of two things are happening. Either Putin and friends are blatantly lying and calling for peace talks and negotiations while they are pouring heavy military equipment into Ukraine, or Putin has no control over his military and anybody can just hop in one of his tanks and leave Russia in it. Either way, he looks like a fool with such obvious blatant lies, or due to his weakness as a military leader. I think we know which of those two is more likely.

Oh, and everyone seems to have quickly forgotten all the civilians that died on a passenger jet because of Russia's antiaircraft missiles. It blows my mind in this day and age that a country that is supposedly a big part of the world community can get by with shooting down a plane and the rest of the world does absolutely nothing about it.

Re:Which Invasion? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 1 month ago | (#47807037)

Did you saw any T90 around there?

Re:Which Invasion? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 1 month ago | (#47807235)

Do you think they're so stupid to send in the newest equipment they have, which anyone can spot from a mile away being 100% Russian as in owned by the Russian military. The point is that the separatist seem to have access to lots of ammo and material and there simply wasn't enough of it in the depos located on the rebel controlled area.

Re:Which Invasion? (2)

Rhywden (1940872) | about 1 month ago | (#47807143)

But, hey, a tank needs holidays, too!

Re:Which Invasion? (1)

dunkelfalke (91624) | about 1 month ago | (#47807425)

There are even youtube videos showing separatists getting museum tanks running. And seriously, I don't think several hundred tanks were destroyed in that conflict. I'd be surprised if so much as ten were.

Re:Which Invasion? (1)

CODiNE (27417) | about 1 month ago | (#47807469)

Isn't it a show of power to be able to blatantly lie and yet nobody calls you on it?

If global leaders know exactly what you're doing and can't simply say it in public, does that not show fear?

Re:Which Invasion? (3, Interesting)

IamTheRealMike (537420) | about 1 month ago | (#47807681)

Yes, but the tanks and artillery the "separatists" keep popping up with are coming from somewhere. At this late stage in the game, they certainly aren't Ukrainian remnants that the separatists have captured in those Ukrainian territories - those were used and destroyed many months ago.

Really? I was reading in the Guardian (which has proven itself to be woefully biased in the past few months) that the separatists were surrounding and capturing Ukranian army units just last week. What's more, in the past days we've been reading about waves of deserters from the Ukrainian army. Nobody is claiming the separatists are armed only with stuff they got months ago. They're claiming, and so is Kiev, that they've been able to obtain large quantities of arms from the fleeing, conscript-based Ukrainian army.

Meanwhile Poroshenko is trying to claim that there's an Russian army rolling around in his country ...... yet so far nobody has been able to actually find it. An entire army! Over 1000 soldiers and 100 tanks! Such a unit requires support vehicles, a tent town, supply lines .... so where is it? Maybe it's sort of like invasion by aid convoy.

Re:Which Invasion? (2)

ehiris (214677) | about 1 month ago | (#47807259)

I don't know that I'd compare KGB-style fabrication of news with a western-style free press.
Ever since MH17, we are all part of this war. It doesn't have to be within some imaginary lines.
Ukraine's only fault is giving up its nuclear weapons and throwing off the balance.

Re:Which Invasion? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 1 month ago | (#47807587)

but for time immemorial and unto eternity, information war

FTFY.

Remember the Maine.

Carthage must be destroyed.

Re:Which Invasion? (5, Insightful)

sinij (911942) | about 1 month ago | (#47806203)

>>>no evidence.

You are entitled to your own opinion, but not your own facts. Satellite images of Russian armored columns entering Ukraine, captured active duty Russian troops, secret burials of killed Russian soldiers, rebel chain of command composed entirely out of Russian citizens with ties to KGB are all disagree with you. You can account for maybe one of these by claiming accidental what-have-you, but combined they establish clear pattern.

Re:Which Invasion? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 1 month ago | (#47806255)

>>>no evidence.

You are entitled to your own opinion, but not your own facts. Satellite images of Russian armored columns entering Ukraine, captured active duty Russian troops, secret burials of killed Russian soldiers, rebel chain of command composed entirely out of Russian citizens with ties to KGB are all disagree with you. You can account for maybe one of these by claiming accidental what-have-you, but combined they establish clear pattern.

[citation needed]

Re:Which Invasion? (1)

superwiz (655733) | about 1 month ago | (#47806407)

If you think that MSNBC, FOX News and CNN agree on something and it's still not true, well, you better have a helluva citation yourself.

Re:Which Invasion? (1)

93 Escort Wagon (326346) | about 1 month ago | (#47806557)

This is a situation where it's instructive to look at who's posting - and note the astroturfing comments you're responding to are being posted anonymously.

Re:Which Invasion? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 1 month ago | (#47806619)

Weapons of mass destruction in Iraq anyone [mediamatters.org] ?

Re:Which Invasion? (2)

DocSavage64109 (799754) | about 1 month ago | (#47808101)

If you think that MSNBC, FOX News and CNN agree on something and it's still not true, well, you better have a helluva citation yourself.

I'm pretty sure someone powerful enough to be putting on a global misinformation campaign has no problem feeding those three news outlets whatever press releases or "news" they want. Not saying that this is happening, but the WMD misinformation wasn't all that long ago.

Re:Which Invasion? (1)

halivar (535827) | about 1 month ago | (#47806585)

*cough* *cough* [UID needed]

Re:Which Invasion? (3, Informative)

IamTheRealMike (537420) | about 1 month ago | (#47807879)

You mean these satellite images [cnn.com] ? The ones that have the following quotes attached to them?

At a press conference on Thursday, August 28, Dutch Brig. Gen. Nico Tak, a senior NATO commander, revealed satellite images of what NATO says are Russian combat forces engaged in military operations in or near Ukrainian territory. NATO said this image shows Russian self-propelled artillery units set up in firing positions near Krasnodon, in eastern Ukraine.

This is an extremely misleading way to phrase things. Krasnodon is not just "in eastern Ukraine". It's right on the border. So being near it can also mean in Russia. The above comments from NATO mean nothing, assuming CNN is reporting them accurately. What about the others .... hmm let's see.

Image 2 is from inside Russia and they say so. Image 3 is also in Russia. Image 5 is captioned twice, once with "Russian self propelled artillery unit inside Ukraine" and again, but this time it's again "near Krasnodon", which is practically in Russia. If there's an obviously demarcated border in this area it's hard to see based on the Google satellite images. The last image doesn't even claim to be of anything in particular, the caption is merely summarising story in general.

Both Russian and Ukranian troops appear to regularly cross the border without realising it - there have been repeated reports of Ukrainian forces entering Russia and then being redirected back across the border, with no obvious blowback. Given these things, and the fact that western media is in full-blown propaganda mode and not even hiding it, I'm going to want way stronger evidence than this.

But honestly, even if Russia did invade, this would merely make it on par with the USA and UK, both countries that practically revel in invading other countries and wading into other countries civil wars. So a part of me couldn't get too excited even if it did happen. It's definitely NOT worth a serious, major conflict between Russia and the west.

Re:Which Invasion? (3, Insightful)

horza (87255) | about 1 month ago | (#47806259)

The invasion of Europe by Russia is pretty big news, and will have an impact on everything from the economy to space exploration. NATO has direct evidence of the invasion, and Russia is hardly trying to hide it any more apart from the loopy puppet Sergei Lavrov (the new Muhammed Saeed al-Sahaf). Ukraine has already introduced conscription, so that's already a pool of potentially talented young programmers off to get slaughtered by Russian tanks. The Russian murder of those Dutch people in the airliner also has affected air traffic.

As Europe gets sucked unwillingly into war with Russia, this is going to get quite brutal as the Putin doesn't care how many people die on either side even his own. He's got a fair amount of cyber-warfare talent to call on too. Maybe this will be the wake-up call to start putting in place proper encryption EVERYWHERE. War with Russia is a little more important than the NSA passing on tips on drug dealers.

Phillip.

Re:Which Invasion? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 1 month ago | (#47806487)

Thanks Philip.

Any citations?

Re:Which Invasion? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 1 month ago | (#47806685)

Yup, the thousands of satellite images coming from countries that aren't Ukrainian is origin. Google will show you thousands with 2 seconds of searching, astroturfer.

Re:Which Invasion? (1)

DocSavage64109 (799754) | about 1 month ago | (#47808153)

A good cyberwarfare department could easily post lots of fake satellite imagery to google from multiple sources. Kind of like how people game Yelp.

Re:Which Invasion? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 1 month ago | (#47808189)

You are retarded like many looking for WMD in Iraq or mass graves in Kosovo.

Which kernel? (1)

grub (11606) | about 1 month ago | (#47806125)

One would hope the headline would say. Linux? OpenBSD? FreeBSD? OSX?

Re:Which kernel? (1)

fisted (2295862) | about 1 month ago | (#47806211)

It's Linux. It's always Linux, because hey, Linux is a kernel. The kernel. /THE/ Kernel.

...written on my NetBSD machine.

Re:Which kernel? (1)

Shatrat (855151) | about 1 month ago | (#47806355)

That's like linux for old CS professors right?

Re:Which kernel? (1)

fisted (2295862) | about 1 month ago | (#47808225)

No that'd be minix. NetBSD is just for people who like a sane system without any Poettering-crapware, and oh well, see sig.

Re:Which kernel? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 1 month ago | (#47808277)

"It's Linux."

Move along, nothing to see here...

First Poster is correct, this is not news (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 1 month ago | (#47806139)

I wonder when I'll find a technology news site that understands what is technology and what is news relating to technology. Perhaps next time I'll read a story about how a kernel dev was wiping his ass, got abit onto his fingertip, went to take a look and a sniff then got some onto the tip of his nose.

ooohhh oohhh money want banana

How about sticking to stories that potentially affect the future of our species because of how radically it has subtly altered the world around us.

Re:First Poster is correct, this is not news (2)

superwiz (655733) | about 1 month ago | (#47806383)

Arrest of a Linux kernel development is not news? You are dreaming.

Re:First Poster is correct, this is not news (1)

superwiz (655733) | about 1 month ago | (#47806395)

*developer*

Re:First Poster is correct, this is not news (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 1 month ago | (#47806541)

According to Mr Torvalds most of the kernel team exhibits signs of arrested development.

Re:First Poster is correct, this is not news (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 1 month ago | (#47806553)

If he was arrested for kernel development yes. He was not, this story is nothing but monkey butt fluff

Re:First Poster is correct, this is not news (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 1 month ago | (#47806833)

This may yet happen later on - 15 years for espionage and uploads to us servers

Veteran Intelligence Professionals for Sanity (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 1 month ago | (#47806155)

SUBJECT: Ukraine and NATO

MEMORANDUM FOR: Angela Merkel, Chancellor of Germany
FROM: Veteran Intelligence Professionals for Sanity (VIPS)

We the undersigned are longtime veterans of U.S. intelligence. We take the unusual step of writing this open letter to you to ensure that you have an opportunity to be briefed on our views prior to the NATO summit on September 4-5.

You need to know, for example, that accusations of a major Russian "invasion" of Ukraine appear not to be supported by reliable intelligence. Rather, the "intelligence" seems to be of the same dubious, politically "fixed" kind used 12 years ago to "justify" the U.S.-led attack on Iraq. We saw no credible evidence of weapons of mass destruction in Iraq then; we see no credible evidence of a Russian invasion now. Twelve years ago, former Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder, mindful of the flimsiness of the evidence on Iraqi WMD, refused to join in the attack on Iraq. In our view, you should be appropriately suspicions of charges made by the US State Department and NATO officials alleging a Russian invasion of Ukraine.

President Barack Obama tried yesterday to cool the rhetoric of his own senior diplomats and the corporate media, when he publicly described recent activity in the Ukraine, as "a continuation of what’s been taking place for months now it’s not really a shift."

Obama, however, has only tenuous control over the policymakers in his administration – who, sadly, lack much sense of history, know little of war, and substitute anti-Russian invective for a policy. One year ago, hawkish State Department officials and their friends in the media very nearly got Mr. Obama to launch a major attack on Syria based, once again, on "intelligence" that was dubious, at best.

Largely because of the growing prominence of, and apparent reliance on, intelligence we believe to be spurious, we think the possibility of hostilities escalating beyond the borders of Ukraine has increased significantly over the past several days. More important, we believe that this likelihood can be avoided, depending on the degree of judicious skepticism you and other European leaders bring to the NATO summit next week.

Experience With Untruth

Hopefully, your advisers have reminded you of NATO Secretary General Anders Fogh Rasmussen’s checkered record for credibility. It appears to us that Rasmussen’s speeches continue to be drafted by Washington. This was abundantly clear on the day before the U.S.-led invasion of Iraq when, as Danish Prime Minister, he told his Parliament: "Iraq has weapons of mass destruction. This is not something we just believe. We know."

Photos can be worth a thousand words; they can also deceive. We have considerable experience collecting, analyzing, and reporting on all kinds of satellite and other imagery, as well as other kinds of intelligence. Suffice it to say that the images released by NATO on August 28 provide a very flimsy basis on which to charge Russia with invading Ukraine. Sadly, they bear a strong resemblance to the images shown by Colin Powell at the UN on February 5, 2003 that, likewise, proved nothing.

That same day, we warned President Bush that our former colleague analysts were "increasingly distressed at the politicization of intelligence" and told him flatly, "Powell’s presentation does not come close" to justifying war. We urged Mr. Bush to "widen the discussion beyond the circle of those advisers clearly bent on a war for which we see no compelling reason and from which we believe the unintended consequences are likely to be catastrophic."

Consider Iraq today. Worse than catastrophic. Although President Vladimir Putin has until now showed considerable reserve on the conflict in the Ukraine, it behooves us to remember that Russia, too, can "shock and awe." In our view, if there is the slightest chance of that kind of thing eventually happening to Europe because of Ukraine, sober-minded leaders need to think this through very carefully.

If the photos that NATO and the US have released represent the best available "proof" of an invasion from Russia, our suspicions increase that a major effort is under way to fortify arguments for the NATO summit to approve actions that Russia is sure to regard as provocative. Caveat emptor is an expression with which you are no doubt familiar. Suffice it to add that one should be very cautious regarding what Mr. Rasmussen, or even Secretary of State John Kerry, are peddling.

We trust that your advisers have kept you informed regarding the crisis in Ukraine from the beginning of 2014, and how the possibility that Ukraine would become a member of NATO is anathema to the Kremlin. According to a February 1, 2008 cable (published by WikiLeaks) from the US embassy in Moscow to Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice, US Ambassador William Burns was called in by Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov, who explained Russia’s strong opposition to NATO membership for Ukraine.

Lavrov warned pointedly of "fears that the issue could potentially split the country in two, leading to violence or even, some claim, civil war, which would force Russia to decide whether to intervene." Burns gave his cable the unusual title, "NYET MEANS NYET: RUSSIA’S NATO ENLARGEMENT REDLINES," and sent it off to Washington with IMMEDIATE precedence. Two months later, at their summit in Bucharest NATO leaders issued a formal declaration that "Georgia and Ukraine will be in NATO."

Just yesterday, Ukrainian Prime Minister Arseny Yatsenyuk used his Facebook page to claim that, with the approval of Parliament that he has requested, the path to NATO membership is open. Yatsenyuk, of course, was Washington’s favorite pick to become prime minister after the February 22 coup d’etat in Kiev. "Yats is the guy," said Assistant Secretary of State Victoria Nuland a few weeks before the coup, in an intercepted telephone conversation with US Ambassador to Ukraine Geoffrey Pyatt. You may recall that this is the same conversation in which Nuland said, "Fuck the EU."

Timing of the Russian "Invasion"

The conventional wisdom promoted by Kiev just a few weeks ago was that Ukrainian forces had the upper hand in fighting the anti-coup federalists in southeastern Ukraine, in what was largely portrayed as a mop-up operation. But that picture of the offensive originated almost solely from official government sources in Kiev. There were very few reports coming from the ground in southeastern Ukraine. There was one, however, quoting Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko, that raised doubt about the reliability of the government’s portrayal.

According to the "press service of the President of Ukraine" on August 18, Poroshenko called for a "regrouping of Ukrainian military units involved in the operation of power in the East of the country. Today we need to do the rearrangement of forces that will defend our territory and continued army offensives," said Poroshenko, adding, "we need to consider a new military operation in the new circumstances."

If the "new circumstances" meant successful advances by Ukrainian government forces, why would it be necessary to "regroup," to "rearrange" the forces? At about this time, sources on the ground began to report a string of successful attacks by the anti-coup federalists against government forces. According to these sources, it was the government army that was starting to take heavy casualties and lose ground, largely because of ineptitude and poor leadership.

Ten days later, as they became encircled and/or retreated, a ready-made excuse for this was to be found in the "Russian invasion." That is precisely when the fuzzy photos were released by NATO and reporters like the New York Times’ Michael Gordon were set loose to spread the word that "the Russians are coming." (Michael Gordon was one of the most egregious propagandists promoting the war on Iraq.)

No Invasion – But Plenty Other Russian Support

The anti-coup federalists in southeastern Ukraine enjoy considerable local support, partly as a result of government artillery strikes on major population centers. And we believe that Russian support probably has been pouring across the border and includes, significantly, excellent battlefield intelligence. But it is far from clear that this support includes tanks and artillery at this point – mostly because the federalists have been better led and surprisingly successful in pinning down government forces.

At the same time, we have little doubt that, if and when the federalists need them, the Russian tanks will come.

This is precisely why the situation demands a concerted effort for a ceasefire, which you know Kiev has so far been delaying. What is to be done at this point? In our view, Poroshenko and Yatsenyuk need to be told flat-out that membership in NATO is not in the cards – and that NATO has no intention of waging a proxy war with Russia – and especially not in support of the ragtag army of Ukraine. Other members of NATO need to be told the same thing.

For the Steering Group, Veteran Intelligence Professionals for Sanity

        William Binney, former Technical Director, World Geopolitical & Military Analysis, NSA; co-founder, SIGINT Automation Research Center (ret.)
        David MacMichael, National Intelligence Council (ret.)
        Ray McGovern, former US Army infantry/intelligence officer & CIA analyst (ret.)
        Elizabeth Murray, Deputy National Intelligence Officer for Middle East (ret.)
        Todd E. Pierce, MAJ, US Army Judge Advocate (Ret.)
        Coleen Rowley, Division Counsel & Special Agent, FBI (ret.)
        Ann Wright, Col., US Army (ret.); Foreign Service Officer (resigned)

Re:Veteran Intelligence Professionals for Sanity (1)

horza (87255) | about 1 month ago | (#47806475)

I don't get it. Germany is the most dependent on Russian gas and Angela Merkel has been the one most dragging their heels on even sanctions. Why would the open letter be addressed to her? Why all the Iraq WMD comparisons when the open letter even admits Germany didn't even want to get involved there? The Baltics states will be the only ones pushing for direct action, and Britian the only one able to take any.

In fact reading through their previous open letters they all seem a bit confused. The only common thread appears to be Russia should be allowed to deny Ukraine access to NATO and a bunch of odd vaguely but not really related historical incidents being thrown in to make the letters appear longer. Their language such as calling the separatists "anti-coup federalists" makes the letters appear to come from a Russian rather than a non-Russian perspective.

I think the "bury out heads in the sand and hope Russia doesn't do anything" is a little late. He's already invaded Georgia once and Ukraine twice. His home propaganda is a resounding success, with the people prepared to back future invasions, and the parliament is filled with his puppets. Ukraine joining NATO or falling under New Soviet rule seems inevitable and they probably prefer the former.

Phillip.

Re:Veteran Intelligence Professionals for Sanity (1)

u38cg (607297) | about 1 month ago | (#47807257)

I've seen several versions of this letter floating around. Frankly, I think it would be interesting to learn more about the people involved and their backgrounds.

Pro Putin shills are up early (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 1 month ago | (#47806161)

Naff off to the lot of you !!

Re:Pro Putin shills are up early (1)

93 Escort Wagon (326346) | about 1 month ago | (#47806583)

Putin not need sleep! Is strong like bear!

There is no russian invasion in Ukraine. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 1 month ago | (#47806201)

Since when Slashdot copypastes CNN headlines?

Re:There is no russian invasion in Ukraine. (1)

superwiz (655733) | about 1 month ago | (#47806373)

Ha? Of course, there is. If you believe the satellite images come from a video game, which game?

Re:There is no russian invasion in Ukraine. (1)

DocSavage64109 (799754) | about 1 month ago | (#47808205)

How did we go from our paranoia of the NSA having back doors into nearly everything, to suddenly believing digital pictures are irrefutable proof, in the span of just one year?

old Russia is coming back (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 1 month ago | (#47806283)

Soon we are going to be hearing about disappearing kernel developers....

At least we arent to that point yet

Re:old Russia is coming back (1)

rubycodez (864176) | about 1 month ago | (#47806645)

Na, old Russia had KGB thugs. New Russia is ruled by former KGB thugs and their buddies.

And Nothing of Value Was Lost (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 1 month ago | (#47806491)

Good. He should learn his place in society, and will, through reeducation. This idea that people can defy their government without consequences is ridiculous.

Re:And Nothing of Value Was Lost (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 1 month ago | (#47807845)

How has Poe's Law not claimed this one?

VC (3, Funny)

pr0nbot (313417) | about 1 month ago | (#47806939)

Was he arrested for subversion? He should assure them he's a git user! *rimshot*

Solution. (-1, Flamebait)

MrL0G1C (867445) | about 1 month ago | (#47807003)

Obvious solution nuke Russia, it's the only way.

Ukraine not invaded by 'Russian armed forces' (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 1 month ago | (#47807961)

Can we please just stop this lie already? Russian forces are not invading Ukraine. What is happening is that Russian soldiers who are on leave are crossing the border to fight alongside the separatists. They are not there in their capacity as Russian soldiers. They are just spending their vacation doing something they are passionate about.

Nazi junta? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 1 month ago | (#47808151)

Ever so slowly the anti-Ukraine revolution folks quietly slither off to dark corners as Russia compounds its crimes in Europe. Gone are claims of "nazi junta" — the youth of Eastern Ukraine that fought off Putin's puppets are looking wiser with each passing day. Unlike Putin's subjects, they at least aren't subject to political "reeducation."

Does *anyone* have a link to a news story? (1)

whitroth (9367) | about 1 month ago | (#47808369)

Or anything other than this? I mean, "detained for 15 days" - is that like "arrested and jailed for two weeks (or whatever) for disobeying a police officer", that happens in the US all the time? And at least he didn't put his hands up and yell "I'm not armed", and get shot down by the police officer.....

Now, for you slashdotters who have no clues whatever, who've never actually, you know, gone out to a protest in the RW, in their meat bodies, here's what actually happens: a) there's the folks in the legal protest area; b) if it includes this, there's the civil disobedience area, where they sit down, and the cops arrest them and put them in a holding tank in jail, c) there's the roving civil disobedience, and d) there's the crazies and agents provocateurs who break windows, or (rarely) burn cars, etc.

Now about a news story: where was Dmitry, and how did he happen to face a police officer, and what happened? The story, as posted, is not a story, just a few tweets by the guy in question.

                    mark

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