Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Ask Cryptome's John Young Whatever You'd Like

timothy posted more than 12 years ago | from the use-your-posts-wisely dept.

Censorship 152

John Young of Cryptome, though trained as an architect, has garnered recognition in another field entirely. Since 1996, he's been publishing timely, trenchant news online as the mind behind crypto jya.com and Cryptome. ("Our goal is to be the most disreputable publisher on the Net, just after the world's governments and other highly reputable bullshitters." ) This has put him on the forefront of various online liberty issues, from the MPAA's DeCSS crackdown on DeCSS (he fought the lawyers -- and won), to Carnivore, to Dmitry Sklyarov's continuing imprisonment, and now the several fronts along which electronic communications are threatened by current and upcoming legislation. He recently posted this to the front page: "Cryptome and a host of other crypto resources are likely to be shutdown if the war panic continues. What methods could be used to assure continued access to crypto for homeland and self-defense by citizens of all nations against communication transgressors?" Now's your chance to ask him about the fight for online freedom. Please pose just one question per post; we'll send 10-15 of the highest moderated ones on to John for his answers.

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

Wow... (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#2503222)

I didn't try first toast [drtoast.com] , but since its still up without a comment, here goes.

-DFW

Re:Wow... (0, Offtopic)

jayant_techguy (441933) | more than 12 years ago | (#2503483)

should i shut down my site http://www.nibbleguru.f2s.com ???

Question (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#2503226)

Dear John, where do babies come from?

Re:Question (-1)

Guns n' Roses Troll (207208) | more than 12 years ago | (#2503334)

In Michael Sims' case, straight from his flappy asshole lips [goatse.cx] .

cube farms got ya down? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#2503233)

thinkgeek has turned really lame. is it just me, or are the advertisements they use on slashdot just fucking stupid? who would pay this much for this shit? hello pricewatch.com?

who gives a shit about caffeinated drinks...coke works great and it's only 99 cents per two liter with no shipping.

the latency associated with some dot-com "companies" has apparently hit thinkgeek. thankfully it will die very soon.

My penis feels like burning. (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#2503235)

My penis feels like burning.

Turnaround on backdoors? (4, Interesting)

jeffy124 (453342) | more than 12 years ago | (#2503238)

Immediately after the events of 11 September, lawmakers twiddled with the idea of backdoors in crypto products. Last week I read somewhere (not sure if it was on slashdot or some other news site) that lawmakers were backing down on this for some reason (can't remember why).

Is this 'backing down' accurate? What do you think caused the change of heart? And what is your opinion of backdoors in general? Do you think they would work as lawmakers intend them to?

Re:Turnaround on backdoors? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#2503243)

you know the answers yourself. stop being an ass-kissing karma whore.

Re:Turnaround on backdoors? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#2503269)

Dude, Karma.

Re:Turnaround on backdoors? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#2503271)

fuck you

Re:Turnaround on backdoors? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#2504314)

alright! who's the jerk that marked that thing overrated! the guy is asking a legit question about backdoors for cryin out loud

First Post? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#2503239)

First Post!

Taking it easy (1)

tooler (36824) | more than 12 years ago | (#2503246)

Do you ever start to update your website and think, "You know, I'm just going to have a beer and watch some TV"?

Re:Taking it easy (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#2503582)

forgot my /. login... but mark this one up...I wanna see the answer... higher score moderators...please...

Re:Taking it easy (0)

$0 31337 (225572) | more than 12 years ago | (#2503650)

I like this question too... Please moderate this one up so we can all find out the answer to this all important question.

Dear john.. (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#2503249)

Can you please tell me why JonKatz is a stupid communist fag? Thanks!

Encryption (4, Interesting)

JMZero (449047) | more than 12 years ago | (#2503253)

The current means of doing public/private key encryption (via large primes) seems pretty much universal. Should we be looking for an alternative if/when someone finds a way to break it?

Encrypting email (5, Interesting)

CmdrTroll (412504) | more than 12 years ago | (#2503264)

Mr. Young,

Currently the vast majority of email travels unencrypted through the Internet, ripe for eavesdropping by Carnivore/DCS1000/Echelon/etc. This is a bit of a "last mile" problem, as I can't reasonably expect my grandmother on AOL to be able to read my PGP-encrypted messages to her unless encryption is made into a standard part of the infrastructure. Otherwise 99% of the users won't bother and that's the situation we have now.

What do you see as being the catalyst that forces the majority of software and service providers to make encrypted email standard equipment? Will it be public outrage over eavesdropping, bribery of ISPs and Microsoft by Verisign or Thawte, or something else altogether? And do you forsee more success for a decentralized standard, like OpenPGP, or for a centralized standard like S/MIME?

-CT

I don't do anything illegal (3, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#2503267)

I do nothing illegal in my life (okay, a little speeding) and don't really care if some government worker who I will never meet reads my e-mail. Should I be concerned about any of this stuff the gov't is trying to push?

Re:I don't do anything illegal (1)

loteck (533317) | more than 12 years ago | (#2503381)

You know there are so many books full of so many laws in this ridiculous judicial system that you could fill a substantial sized house with them?

The point being, you may THINK that you don't do anything illegal, but none of us know all the laws that are on the books, so you never really KNOW. And, of course, ignorance of the law is no excuse...

Let me give you some words to look up:

-Freedom

-Privacy

-Liberty

-Sovereignty

-Constitution

And you probably represent the majority of americans... *sigh*

may our chains rest lightly upon us

Re:I don't do anything illegal (3, Insightful)

Negadecimal (78403) | more than 12 years ago | (#2504034)

I do nothing illegal in my life (okay, a little speeding)

That's because you happen to agree with the government's book definition of "illegal"... you're assuming that there are no corrupt politicians or vague laws waiting to be twisted against the common man (like Dmitry). Thomas Jefferson recognized the fallibility of government - if politicians were perfect, we wouldn't have referendum, jury nullification, judicial review, vetos, appointments, recall, and legislative override.

hmm (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#2503272)

Just rember those people in the publishing industry need a few things.

1. To lower prices
2. Talk no shit
3. Before its time

The gnomes ago said to what zilla called a "justice system"=man. IT zilla called the courts said, to the various recording institutions, that yes if you rip off enough people, why sure, they will do what ever to get the stuff you sell at a lower price. That above garbage is called ECONOMICS.

hmm, hum, ok, now back to work you slackers

Government and Privacy (5, Interesting)

AlephNot (177467) | more than 12 years ago | (#2503275)

Do you believe that it is even possible for any kind of government--be it theocratic, totalitarian, or democratic--to coexist on peaceful terms with the existence of individual and corporate privacy and secure communications?

Hi John (4, Interesting)

Scott Lockwood (218839) | more than 12 years ago | (#2503286)

What's your opinion on Alan Cox's recient decision to censor security related fixes in his change log announcements on LKML? He cited the DCMA. Also, given that civil liberties are often the first casuality of war, and given that we're "at war" now with Afganistan, when if ever do you think we will see a sucessful court challange that will get this bad law (the DMCA) overturned?

Use slashcode for Cryptome or offer news in RDF? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#2503290)

Regarding the accesibility of the news presented
in Cryptome, do you plan to use a news system
like slashcode or more generaly offer the news
in an RDF format?

It would be good to have Cryptome news being able to be retrieved in RDF format so that they can be made available to ticker apps/slacode sites/evolution/other www sites as headlines.

MD5 Question (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#2503293)

Dear John,
My question has to do with both privacy and encryption. Recently, some web sites have taken to hiding the IP addresses of their visitors using MD5 before storing these IP addresses in a database. This feature exists in order to keep the IP addresses of visitors secure from data mining. Do you believe that using the MD5 signature of an IP address rather than the actual IP address provides real privacy to users? Would an attack to MD5 all known IP addresses be trivial, or extremely difficult?

Thanks for your time.

Re:MD5 Question (1)

return 42 (459012) | more than 12 years ago | (#2503412)

There are only 2^32 possible IP addresses under IPv4, so it wouldn't take very long. Now, if they appended a secret salt value before applying MD5, that would be another matter.

Re:MD5 Question (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#2503486)

That's actually not an uncommon problem at all. I have seen several sites that do the same thing (or vary it - perhaps using a CRC-32 instead of MD5).

It is usually a result of poor design decisions [slash.org] and incompetent coders [http] .

The best way to avoid it is simply to have a comprehensive data retention policy, which makes the data expire (say, after a month or so). Unfortunately that is beyond the reach of many coders so the MD5 crap stays.

Re:MD5 Question (2)

mmontour (2208) | more than 12 years ago | (#2503708)

Would an attack to MD5 all known IP addresses be trivial, or extremely difficult?

There are at most 2^32 possible IPv4 addresses (fewer once all the "special" ranges like 127/8 and multicast are taken out). MD5 produces a 128-bit (16-byte) hash, and an IP address can be stored in 4 bytes.

You could construct a lookup table with 20 columns (16 bytes for the hash, and 4 for the IP address that produced it) and 2^32 rows. That's about 85GB - a consumer-level hard drive, these days.

Generating the table wouldn't take much time (I'd guess a few hours) and would only need to be done once. So I'd rate this as an "easy" dictionary attack.

Now if a random salt value was hashed along with each possible IP address, you'd have to re-generate the entire 85GB table for each salt value. So this would make the attack more difficult, but it would still be possible to recover several IP addresses per day on a regular PC.

Mirroring, now and in the future (5, Insightful)

Roundeye (16278) | more than 12 years ago | (#2503294)

Your efforts (and your unwillingness to flinch in the face of 800-lb. corporate and governmental gorillas) have made cryptome an invaluable resource, for which I certainly thank you. At least once in recent memory you've made a call for mirroring sensitive software and information.

1. What can normal people do to help out with mirroring important information (e.g., crypto information, documentation on civil liberties threats, reverse engineering and Fair Use securing tools, etc.)? How can we stay out of trouble with the law while we're helping out?

2. Have you ever considered providing a mirroring clearing house? That is, devoting a section of cryptome to listing, in an up-to-date manner, resources which need mirroring in various parts of the world?

Thanks!

Certified email? (4, Interesting)

jeffy124 (453342) | more than 12 years ago | (#2503298)

Due to the current wave of anthrax troubles in the US, do you think a system will be developed somewhere to allow for Certified Email that employes the applications of crpyto to certifying digital signitures, certificate authority, etc? Even if such a service is funneled through a government agent like the Postal Service at like 5 cents per message to be certified, do you think such a service would be useful?

Optimistic or pessimistic overall? (4, Interesting)

Jerf (17166) | more than 12 years ago | (#2503299)

I keep track of the kind of thing Cryptome covers. It affects you, after a while.

Overall, are you optimistic or pessimistic that we will eventually (call it 5-20 years) have a society that you would find reasonably acceptable? Or do you think we're destined for one form or another of effective totalitarianism?

Sources? (4, Interesting)

SupahVee (146778) | more than 12 years ago | (#2503303)

I read Cryptome regularly, generally every day or so, and the only question that I can think of is, Where do you get your information from? I'd like to know os that I canstart researching things much the same way.

Question: (4, Interesting)

atrowe (209484) | more than 12 years ago | (#2503304)

John, I've heard a lot of debating lately on Slashdot and other discussion sites regarding the US governments recent initiative to include a government accessible "back door" into all new crypto tools.

Supporters of this program claim that such a program will allow day-to-day communications among law-abiding citizens to remain private, whilst still allowing the FBI and CIA to monitor the communications of suspected terrorists(with a warrant, of course).

The liberal media opposition to this initiative is claiming that by installing government accessible backdoors into encryption tools, we are giving up our right to privacy in favor of increased public safety. For the purposes of this post, I'm going to ignore the fact that nowhere in our Constitution or Bill of Rights, are we guaranteed anonimity or absolute privacy. It seems to me that if we cannot trust our policing agencies to be responsible with the power they have been given, the problem is not with the cryptography, but the government itself, and this problem needs to be addressed as such.

My question to you is: What is Cryptome's, and your personal, stance on government accessible backdoors installed in cryptography. Would the benefit to law enforcement, and the increased homeland security outweigh the possible implications to the loss of privacy. Do you think open-sourcing popular cryptographic tools would help alleviate people's fears about the integrity of their data security?

Adam, (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#2503344)

There's other places [cnn.com] to get your news than /.

Re:Question: (4, Insightful)

Steve B (42864) | more than 12 years ago | (#2503449)

Supporters of this program claim that such a program will allow day-to-day communications among law-abiding citizens to remain private, whilst still allowing the FBI and CIA to monitor the communications of suspected terrorists(with a warrant, of course).

A backdoor which does not require anyone outside the agency to assist, or even know about, the tap makes the warrant requirement unenforceable, of course.

The liberal media opposition to this initiative

What color is the sky in your world? If anything, the opposition to increased government snooping is from the conservative and libertarian factions of US politics.

For the purposes of this post, I'm going to ignore the fact that nowhere in our Constitution or Bill of Rights, are we guaranteed anonimity or absolute privacy.

That's good, because the Constitution specifically requires [cornell.edu] that position.

It seems to me that if we cannot trust our policing agencies to be responsible with the power they have been given, the problem is not with the cryptography, but the government itself, and this problem needs to be addressed as such.

The obvious first step in addressing the problem of government abuse is to avoid aggrivating the situation by giving the abusers additional powers.

Re:Question: (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#2503814)

For the purposes of this post, I'm going to ignore the fact that nowhere in our Constitution or Bill of Rights, are we guaranteed anonimity or absolute privacy.

Maybe not literally, but ask any group of law students or law professors about what the Fourth Amendment [cornell.edu] (thanks to Steve B. for the link in the previous post) says and a substantial number will tell you that it can be read in very nearly this way.

Re:Question: (1)

dlehman (533368) | more than 12 years ago | (#2504007)

I think there is a point you have missed. Not all programmers and companies are bound by US law. By putting a backdoor stranglehold on _US_ Encryption, you lessen overall security for those who _do_ abide by the law, but do nothing to prevent those who could care less about it from obtaining non-backdoored encryption outside of the US. How does providing a backdoor to our encyption stop these people? We still have the problem of decrypting the same level of security. Now the criminals have a leg up, and law enforcement is no better off for our surrendered security.

Is Coding Free Speech? (5, Interesting)

EccentricAnomaly (451326) | more than 12 years ago | (#2503306)

I know it's a basic question - but it seems to be at the heart of the Free-Crypto debate. Free speech should be free whether its in English, French, FORTRAN or Perl. What arguments do you hear against programming being protected as free speech? Can you use the First Amendment against DMCA, ITAR, etc?

Whatever (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#2503308)

Even if crypto is "outlawed", enemies of the state will still use it beacuse 1) they are by definition outlaws, thus have no fear of reprecussions, 2) US laws will most likely not apply them due to jurisdictional issues. So, this new wave of legislation will allow the criminals to use crypto, but not law abiding citizens. Face it, the crypto cat is out of the bag. If the US will no longer export strong crypto, customers will just get it from somewhere else or roll their own from plethora of public information available.

DIY hardware crypto (0, Interesting)

Guns n' Roses Troll (207208) | more than 12 years ago | (#2503311)

Any advice for people who might be interested in DIY hardware crypto boards? Is it possible to easily make them? Would you be able to buy parts without raising flags?

Re:DIY hardware crypto (1)

RGRistroph (86936) | more than 12 years ago | (#2504269)

What do you mean by a "crypto board" ? A hardware random number generator ? An embedded computer ?

It seems to me that crypto stuff is not necessarily well suited for special hardware, it can all be done just fine in ordinary software.

Appealing to the masses (3, Interesting)

mttlg (174815) | more than 12 years ago | (#2503314)

The main problem when dealing with all of these technical/legal issues (legal access to encryption, fair use, privacy, etc.) is that the masses simply don't care. Many people will gladly give up their future rights to ever record a television broadcast again for the chance to watch higher quality (picture-wise, not content-wise) Friends reruns. My question is this - at what point will enough people say "Keep your laws out of my data!" to create a movement that is likely to change the way legislators look at these issues?

I can ask ANYTHING I like? (0, Troll)

unformed (225214) | more than 12 years ago | (#2503316)

So, when'd you lose your virginity?

Re:I can ask ANYTHING I like? (0)

vishitrollxp (533178) | more than 12 years ago | (#2504101)

I can ask ANYTHING I like? Does your DRESSING ROOM have enough ASPARAGUS??

Re:I can ask ANYTHING I like? (2)

unformed (225214) | more than 12 years ago | (#2504530)

actually, no ... I'm looking for some more

Passport and Windows XP Privacy concerns (5, Interesting)

Alrocket (191107) | more than 12 years ago | (#2503317)

Hi John,

What do you think of XP, particularly with regard to Passport and privacy concerns?

Thanks,
Al.

Re:Passport and Windows XP Privacy concerns (1)

dlehman (533368) | more than 12 years ago | (#2504021)

My personal opinion is that centralizing personal data without oversight is a mistake. Now, layer on top of that a company that has consistantly placed marketing and profit above security and public interest, and a less than optimal security record, I'm a bit scared of the idea. How many non-techs would be entering their information into Passport if they didn't think that was the only way to access the Internet through XP? On the conservative side, I would say 3 out of 4 (my thought would be less than half, but I will give MS the benefit of the doubt).

Wow, now this is interesting AND geeky (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#2503318)

Do you want good luck to follow you and your offspring for geneations to come? This troll has the solution for you...

All you have to do is copy this troll onto two to four of the discussion threads of your choice! That's right! Just copy this into a new message and click "post anonymously." That's all there is to it!

Tired of that idiot talking about geek culture? Stick one of these babies on it! And it's good for the economy!

Marge Gentry of Cambridge, Minnesota participated, and the next day she received a large fruit basket outside of her door from a secret admirer. Unfortunately, Marge was hit by a truck the next day, so she didn't get to the Granny Smith apples.

Commander Taco of Hole-in-the-ground West Virginia didn't participate, and he was violated by a group of raging homosexuals. Since the gang was headed by Jon Katz, Taco had no recourse to the law because the entire town knew about their previous relationship. The unfortunate outcome is enshrined forever at goatse.cx.

So if you want to get the fruit basket and not get poked in the bread basket, just copy this troll onto two of the discussions threads of your choice. We could have this place blanketed by sundown

Re:Wow, now this is interesting AND geeky (-1, Offtopic)

vishitrollxp (533178) | more than 12 years ago | (#2504318)

Ah yes, slashdot culture at its best. Choice.

DeCSS antics... (0, Offtopic)

Nijika (525558) | more than 12 years ago | (#2503321)

Hi John, did the "antics" revolving around the DeCSS software name help or hurt your fight?

Re:DeCSS antics... (-1)

Guns n' Roses Troll (207208) | more than 12 years ago | (#2503387)

Your website sucks shit-encrusted cock. Why look at those stinky, hairy, nasty slurpee-serving pigs when we have proof that perfection is already here [anna-fans.com] .

general encryption and anonymity (5, Interesting)

b-side.org (533194) | more than 12 years ago | (#2503327)

Given modern computing's advances, it's now much easier to encrypt casual traffic than it has been in the past. Have you ever considered providing https:// or some other encrypted form of access to your sites for the general public?

Fear and Personal Saftey... (5, Interesting)

Bonker (243350) | more than 12 years ago | (#2503331)

Despite how everyone on /. talks a big storm about bucking the government, it's got to be pretty damn scary when the feds come knocking at your door. You've no doubt made some powerful, big-time enemies in both the private sector and the government.

Do you ever fear for your own or your family's saftey because of this. Have you ever been threatened? By whom, government agents or private individuals?

If you don't fear for your saftey, what factors about what you do make you feel 'immune' from being 'removed' clandestinely?

Re:Fear and Personal Saftey... (3, Funny)

TheTomcat (53158) | more than 12 years ago | (#2503481)

If you're not at liberty to discuss said threats, cough twice.
(-:

Mirroring, now and in the future (3, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#2503349)

Your efforts (and your unwillingness to flinch in the face of 800-lb. corporate and governmental gorillas) have made cryptome an invaluable resource, for which I certainly thank you. At least once in recent memory you've made a call for mirroring sensitive software and information. 1. What can normal people do to help out with mirroring important information (e.g., crypto information, documentation on civil liberties threats, reverse engineering and Fair Use securing tools, etc.)? How can we stay out of trouble with the law while we're helping out? 2. Have you ever considered providing a mirroring clearing house? That is, devoting a section of cryptome to listing, in an up-to-date manner, resources which need mirroring in various parts of the world? Thanks!

A few questions (5, Interesting)

xmedar (55856) | more than 12 years ago | (#2503350)

Are you ever worried about being shutdown / arrested / bugged / having a smear campaign run against you?

Do you think that all the muck flinging by both governments and corporations is going to lead to somone developing a virtual, anonymous, secure network running over the Net that will be untouchable by governments (i.e. legally secure from attack by dint of listening to the Harvard Law types and using their knowledge combined with technological solutions)?

Do you expect show trials by governments to show that the laws they areintroducing now (RIPA in the UK, USA-Patriot in the US etc) are effective, and how long do you think before there will be miscarragies of justice based on political expedeincy?

Public CA (5, Interesting)

imrdkl (302224) | more than 12 years ago | (#2503357)

Hi,

Thanks for your efforts. My question was discussed recently on a thread regarding the decision by Thawte to discontinue selling CodeSigning certificates to individuals.

What are the biggest obstacles to a public CA which is supported and funded by, say, the FSF? Is such a thing possible for the Free software community? I guess insurance and certification would be the biggest stumbling blocks. Are there other dimensions to such an undertaking which have not been considered?

FUCK YOU (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#2503363)

FUCK slashdot and it's ass monkey staff.

If you have nothing to hide... (3, Interesting)

thryllkill (52874) | more than 12 years ago | (#2503364)

In your opinion Sir, what would be the best response to those who feel this monitoring should be fully funded and supported? My personal feelings are just if it is my business, it probably isn't any of yours.

Also, since most e-commerce is conducted on so called "secure" connections, how would the installation of government backdoors effect e-commerce. If a government back door was hacked and my credit information stolen and exploited, who would the blame fall on? The credit card company, the business I ordered from, or the government agency who installed a faulty back door?

How will world government deal with an AI economy? (3, Interesting)

Mentifex (187202) | more than 12 years ago | (#2503365)

Extremely serious efforts are underway to create artificially intelligent minds, such as at http://sourceforge.net/projects/mind [sourceforge.net] -- just one of 365 open-source projects in artificial intelligence (AI). Do you expect that the World Trade Organization (WTO) or other allances -- either governmental or corporate -- will attempt to control the emergence of AI technology and of an AI-based cybernetic economy?

As an architect, do you have any interest in the architecture of the mind?

Is there any likelihood that AI research will be outlawed or otherwise subjected to illiberal control?

Re:How will world government deal with an AI econo (1)

Tolchz (19162) | more than 12 years ago | (#2504338)

Someone mod the parent down. Bringing up AI in EVERY article pretty much constitutes trolling in my book.

Passport. (4, Interesting)

Soko (17987) | more than 12 years ago | (#2503367)

Is there any way you can think of that would help convince people (based on scientific principles) that centralised security services are a bad idea? That convenience should not come before security?

Soko

the Right Stuff (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#2503378)

So as a veteran of the Gemini, Apollo, and Space Shuttle programs, having walked on the moon, and flying more aircraft / spacecraft you could shake a stick at, what do consider to be your greatest accomplishment? And do you still have The Right Stuff?

Re:the Right Stuff (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#2504087)

Apparently the moderators don't know who the real John Young [nasa.gov] is.

Well....... (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#2503380)

Dear John, what are you wearing? Do you like pie? Where do babies come from? you hung? Do you like to eat pie, made from doodie? I saw chuck Norris at Ginos pizza!!!!! he was there promoting his movie sidekicks! and last but not least Your efforts (and your unwillingness to flinch in the face of 800-lb. corporate and governmental gorillas) have made cryptome an invaluable resource, for which I certainly thank you. At least once in recent memory you've made a call for mirroring sensitive software and information. 1. What can normal people do to help out with mirroring important information (e.g., crypto information, documentation on civil liberties threats, reverse engineering and Fair Use securing tools, etc.)? How can we stay out of trouble with the law while we're helping out? 2. Have you ever considered providing a mirroring clearing house? That is, devoting a section of cryptome to listing, in an up-to-date manner, resources which need mirroring in various parts of the world? Thanks!

Wil Wheaton wouldn't answer, can you? (0, Offtopic)

wrinkledshirt (228541) | more than 12 years ago | (#2503384)

So... Deanna Troy, Tasha Yar or Dr. Crusher?

"from the MPAA's DeCSS crackdown on DeCSS" (1)

Wakko Warner (324) | more than 12 years ago | (#2503391)

So what was it they cracked down on again?

- A.P.

Why (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#2503392)


Why does Shlashdot and Slashcode suck so bad??

Is it because of Linux or is it because of the Slashcrew?

25 44 msgs ago (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#2503399)

The super court of where flu'd ago, cough cough, said all Hackers are mostly good, so if the congress prints paper that makes most any man become a criminal then snots wipes it face off ya.

snizzled ago, that was

Personal Background (5, Interesting)

andrew cooke (6522) | more than 12 years ago | (#2503406)

What do you do all day? From what I've read on Cryptome it's clear you remain interested in Architecture - do you still have any professional involvement (info in the on-site BIO tails off at 98)? If not, how do you pay the bills? How did you get from architecture to cryptome? Do you have any interest in computers and the internet other than as a tool (would you consider yourself a hacker, in the positive sense)?
I know, it's more than one question, but they're all in the same direction. I'm curious about the guy.

Re:Personal Background (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#2503749)

I'm curious as well. I have a lot of respect for John Young. Folks as smart and gutsy as him are the real patriots.

Re:Personal Background (1)

andrew cooke (6522) | more than 12 years ago | (#2504003)

Wow. Didn't expect this to be rated so high. Thanks. If it does get through, could you fix my capitalization?!

The Panopticon (5, Interesting)

der raketemensch (529146) | more than 12 years ago | (#2503425)

The theory of the panopticon state bounces around on Cryptome and Cartome quite a lot. It is interesting that Cryptome and JYA in a certain sense have been set up to watch the watchers and mitigate the power of the panopticon.

My question is: how aggressive can you/should you be in trying to detail the actions of the (insert three letter acronyms and governments here) pushing panopticonism as the solution to society's problems?

You are clearly willing to put yourself in legal peril, but surely there is a point of diminishing returns. How do you balance things, and have you withheld, or would you ever withhold, information that you would like to publish? (...and yes there are two question marks, but they are pretty related)

And thanks!!

Absolute Right to Privacy (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#2503436)

Should citizens' have a right to keep personal documents/data private from anyone, including their government?

Careers (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#2503450)

Isn't it dangerous to your career to be assocciated with Slashdot?

Will Slashdot ever return to respectabillity?

Freenet (1)

return 42 (459012) | more than 12 years ago | (#2503466)

Any thoughts about possible future legal threats to Freenet [sourceforge.net] , and technical / political / legal countermeasures? Speaking primarily from a U.S. perspective.

John Young and _The_Barnhouse_Effect_ (4, Interesting)

Thagg (9904) | more than 12 years ago | (#2503511)

John, I find the service that you provide as Cryptome to be essential. You remind me strongly of the title character in Vonnegut's short story
Report on the Barnhouse Effect [http] . Your reporting keeps the entire world somewhat more honest; and I can't think that it's possible that governments are more careful knowing that someone is watching.

The end of the story, is, of course, of the passing of the torch to Barnhouse's apprentice. I am worried that there's nobody with the combination of integrity, fearlessness, and intelligence to carry on with your work, when your time to perform it is over. Do you worry about that, and are there people to carry the load?

thad

What countries are still free? (4, Interesting)

Azog (20907) | more than 12 years ago | (#2503534)

I've been watching the United States slow slide towards becoming a police state since the early 90's, when I discovered the Clipper Chip fiasco on comp.org.eff.talk. Thanks for your dedicated work to fight this trend, it won't be forgotten, even if it fails...

So, my question is: If the United States becomes a hostile place for freedom (DMCA, SSSCA, extreme anti-terrorism laws, etc.) where are some good places to flee to?

I write and use free software, and I expect I'll be leaving the US within a couple of years. (I've got a great job, otherwise I'd be leaving already). I don't mind learning a different language... Do you know of any comparative study of different countries of the world, considering at least:

- free speech
- free software
- software patents
- Privacy
- public awareness of the above issues (Most important, perhaps!)
- A just and fair, uncorrupted legal system
- Reasonable balance of taxation, government spending on useful things like education, health care, etc.
- High standard of living

Where would you go?

Re:What countries are still free? (1)

return 42 (459012) | more than 12 years ago | (#2503605)

I used to think in those terms. Then it occurred to me that the U.S. is a nuclear power, and unlike the Soviet Union, it's not balanced by any other large nuclear power. If it goes all the way totalitarian, the rest of the world is fucked. So we'd damned well better keep it honest.

Re:What countries are still free? (1)

Azog (20907) | more than 12 years ago | (#2503891)

Yes, well... I think the general population of the US can probably be brainwashed into thinking that things like the DMCA and SSSCA are good, but I don't think they'll ever be convinced that it would be a good idea to go to war against... oh, Finland, say, "because those Scandanavian bastards are writing evil communist Free software that lets people copy music, and hurting American Industry!"... I think people would start thinking "uh, wait a minute, why do we have to go over there and get in a war when we could just outlaw it here?"

God help us all if anything like this ever happens.

Re:What countries are still free? (2, Interesting)

t_allardyce (48447) | more than 12 years ago | (#2504246)

The UN Freedom Index:

"This is a devastating statistic for those who believe that America's greater commitment to individualism translates into greater individual freedom. In reality, the social democracies of Northern Europe are the freest societies in the world."

Places America pretty low on the freedom scale
(google: UN freedom index)

Also, a very interesting node on e2:
http://www.everything2.com/index.pl?node_id=3855 79 &lastnode_id=124
were Sweden came out top and America didn't even make number 10 lol :)

Looks like your too late, you better hope someone anthraxes Bush before he does any more damage

Re:What countries are still free? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#2504686)

As a Swede I can't comment wheater or not the UN index of freedom is correct listing Sweden as #1 in the 'freedom' chart. But overall, I feel rather good about living the last 30 years there instead of in the US (where I have numerous job offers from).

This is not a bashing of US, but it's just a feeling I have.

Furthermore I feel that lately, freedom has taken a beating in the US - and since from the outside many parts of the US seems to treasure individual freedom ( guns, censorship, religion ), why aren't there any visual movements protecting freedom of speech and encryption figuring on CNN?

(Pardon me for my bad english, it's late .. )

Ig

Benefits/ Detriments of Real Identity (5, Interesting)

Tucan (60206) | more than 12 years ago | (#2503565)

John,
At some point you decided to run cryptome and publish controversial materials under your true identity rather than under a pseudonym.

What benefits and detriments have you found to using your real identity for your efforts instead of a pseudonym?

what will make people care? (5, Interesting)

renard (94190) | more than 12 years ago | (#2503649)

Dear Mr. Young,

In your opinion, what will it take - either in terms of EFF-style activism or in terms of 1984-style government repression - to make the average person-on-the-street care about our digital freedoms?

In the current environment it seems that most people have adopted the attitude of Britain's John Major who said - as his Tories wired the UK with videocameras - ``If you have nothing to hide, you have nothing to fear.''

-Renard

"Younglish" - How do you DO it??? (4, Interesting)

Seth Finkelstein (90154) | more than 12 years ago | (#2503787)

Dear John:

Many people will undoubtably ask wide and far-reaching questions about civil-liberties, activism, and running cryptome.org. In contrast, I would like to ask a question perhaps trivial in comparison, but also in the hearts of so very many of your fans.

If this is really ask whatever we'd like ...

How in the world do you generate that unique hash of free-association, bafflegab, verbing, just-this-side-of-understandable wording (not sure which side), "Younglish" writing, for which you are reknowned?

Are consciousness-altering substances ever involved? Where they ever involved? Is it effortless, or do you work at it?

This is nowhere in the same league as DMCA, terrorism, and whatnot.

But believe me, inquiring minds want to know.

Sig: What Happened To The Censorware Project (censorware.org) [sethf.com]

*coughcough* (2)

Glytch (4881) | more than 12 years ago | (#2504090)

"Renowned". [dictionary.com]

Convincing the unwashed masses (2, Interesting)

phiz187 (533366) | more than 12 years ago | (#2503868)

Invariably the first argument encountered when I go on a tirade about the choking off of our civil liberties, someone responds to the wiretap question with: "So what,? I don't do anything wrong." In my mind I know they are completely missing the point, but I have yet to come up with a quick, pithy, persuasive argument to open up their mind. What are the dangers of widespread monitoring that the average american (that hasn't read 1984)can grasp?

Reality is most people are uneducated (2)

johnjones (14274) | more than 12 years ago | (#2503932)

Often people dont quite understand things

Examples such as the FBI having misgivings about mobile phones and crypto
(GSM includes a simple hash which while easy to break the FBI like their plain scanners)
and US politicos asking for back doors in algorithms
(while I can pick up AES or serpent which both do not have US involvement)

you can get crypto and use it rather simply

how do people think they can make me give it back ?
e.g. in the U.K. they say that you can use strong crypto but when asked by a court you must give over your keys or go to jail for up to 19 years !
What they dont say is that the law has yet to be tested, there is a wealth of past history where people have written in secret diaries and they cant make them decode it and these people are not put away under this scheme.
(so IMHO it will fall on its face and I am not giving over any keys !)

my question is what is the stupidest thing you have ever heard of ?


regards

john jones

USA vs Usama Bin Laden, Part II (2, Interesting)

Introspective (71476) | more than 12 years ago | (#2504005)

I've been an avid cryptome reader for some time, even to the extent that I followed most of the USA-vs-UBL trial transcripts - that was a great effort on your behalf.

My question is - do you think that you will be in a position to publish the transcripts for the trial of the Sept.11 events ?

Assuming, of course, that at least some of the perpetrators are brought to trial and that this will probably be well into the future.

Completely Unrelated Question For Mr. Young (0, Offtopic)

Hektor_Troy (262592) | more than 12 years ago | (#2504026)

What is the stupidest question you have ever been asked about life, the universe and everything? If that's too dificult to answer, then narrow the field down to ... say ... I don't know ... what about encryption?

No wait - everybody else is asking you questions about encryption. Sex! What's the stupidest question you have ever been asked about sex?

That's it. Sex. The reason we're all alive. Well ... some of us don't have a life, but we're still technically alive.

mod to heaven (0)

Jingle Returno (531353) | more than 12 years ago | (#2504040)

The form hangs and relays a blank message. In what sense is this offtopic?

The "security" of the State vs. the individual (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#2504174)

John,

Let me begin by thanking you for your unflinching adherence to the principals of disclosure and freedom of information. I am a great fan of your continuing work. My question follows:

You have in the past, and continue to, post "dangerous" information like names of former intelligence agents, details of government cover-ups, radically contrarian opinions, and open calls for subversive action.

A good example of this is Cryptome's continuing threads on the structural failure of the WTC and potential vulnerabilities of other landmarks. Some would claim that this kind of conversation should take place in closed-door meetings - that open discussion like this could only benefit evil and your support of such discussion is irresponsible.

What are the principals and moral guidelines you use when publishing Cryptome? Are there any lines you would not cross? What are the implications of shifting public opinion (70% favor a national ID card) and mounting US totalitarianism to Cryptome?

Recent Times? (1)

rsimmons (248005) | more than 12 years ago | (#2504237)

I would like to know if you have been more careful about what material you publish, in light of the terror attacks on September 11th?

In a talk that you gave to the USENIX Security '01 you had mentioned that you try to publish most anything that is given to you that fits within your guidelines. Basically, have you changed those guidelines at all?

Transition from Architecture to Technology (3, Interesting)

Dynedain (141758) | more than 12 years ago | (#2504250)

As an architecture student who is also a geek - I'm curious as to how you made the transition to the technology sector. What prompted you to make the change and how did you do it? Was there anyone instrumental in providing you an opportunity? Do you still try to make a connection back to your architecture roots?

Is it true that... (3, Funny)

Black Art (3335) | more than 12 years ago | (#2504272)

You are channeling Dr. Bronner?

Encrypt! Encrypt! OK!

Backups? (4, Interesting)

rsimmons (248005) | more than 12 years ago | (#2504275)

Also, during your talk at USENIX Security '01 you talked about different ways that you are keeping backups of your data. Including having other sites ready to host the data at a moment's notice, and sending out backups of the site to whoever wants copies. You had also mentioned work on a distributed storage system that would be more resistant to having one node shut off. Have you made any progress with this?

What can regular people do? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#2504373)

Besides writing to gov't reps, what can I, Joe-Computer-User, do to help prevent all this information from being destroyed in a panic?

Here's my Question (1)

Mysticalfruit (533341) | more than 12 years ago | (#2504546)

To a certain degree, the encryption genie is out of the bottle. How would the goverment go about reeling in the use of SSH and SSL all over the place? Could they possibly pass a law that said you had to upload your private keys or face prosecution? (I don't think they could get away with that but who knows)

Thanks,
Mysticalfruit

freenet and/or freeweb mirror? (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#2504628)

Dear Mr. Young;

I've been a long time fan of your site, and I hope it never gets shut down and/or censored. There's not much you can do if you get shut down, but have you considered using freenet and/or freeweb to mirror your content? Once content is on those systems, it won't come down until nobody wants it.

If not, why not? Are there any changes in those systems that would make you reconsider?

Thanks for talking to /.!
Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?