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Intel Developing Cellular Internet Chip

Hemos posted more than 12 years ago | from the pretty-cool-advancement dept.

Intel 158

yoey writes "Brief article at The Marker states, "The chip will enable laptop users to connect directly to cellular networks without the need of a modem in the same way that PCs in a local network connect with each other. [The] solution will enable laptop users to use cellular communication networks as if they were a local communications network. Intel will thus be able to realize an old company dream - the development of a computer enabling users to be connected, any time and any place, to the Internet."

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158 comments

fp? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#2963518)

fp!

suck my balls (-1, Troll)

Ophidian P. Jones (466787) | more than 12 years ago | (#2963521)

if you are lithe enough

180 (-1)

medicthree (125112) | more than 12 years ago | (#2963522)

yep. this time it's personal.

fp (-1, Offtopic)

Phil McCrackin (556979) | more than 12 years ago | (#2963527)

first post.

Hasn't this already been done.. (1)

dag2001 (545994) | more than 12 years ago | (#2963531)

Intel will thus be able to realize an old company dream - the development of a computer enabling users to be connected, any time and any place, to the Internet.

.. with 802.11b (or whatever) wireless connections?

Re:Hasn't this already been done.. (1)

IIOIOOIOO (517375) | more than 12 years ago | (#2963547)

I assume that they intend to use the existing cellular network to move packets around, greatly increasing the range of such connections. Have no doubt though, this kind of connection will be FAR from free.

Re:Hasn't this already been done.. (0, Flamebait)

dag2001 (545994) | more than 12 years ago | (#2963624)

Yes, of course - an Intel version, only propietary.

Re:Hasn't this already been done.. (1)

Filarion (548689) | more than 12 years ago | (#2963568)

No, using existing cellular airwaves.

Re:Hasn't this already been done.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#2963958)

Why hasnt this been modded down. Its not 802.11b jackass its cellular. This means it will work anywhere your cellphone works not anywhere you are within range of an 802.11b access point. Try reading a little more.

Business in Israel (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#2963541)

It's amazing that any work gets done in Israel at all considering the violence that is escalating over there.

Also, how do they get clean room facilities when the whole place is covered in dust?

How much is the fun going to cost you? (1)

Filarion (548689) | more than 12 years ago | (#2963544)

Now the interesting question is, how much will this cost the enduser? I can't imagine there being a lot of bandwidth on cellular networks, so access is going to cost quite a bit.

Re:How much is the fun going to cost you? (3, Insightful)

darien (180561) | more than 12 years ago | (#2963938)

I would imagine it will be charged like GPRS, on a per-packet basis, since it looks like it will work exactly the same way. Obviously, though, you wouldn't be stuck having to run WAP micro-browsers on tiny screens: you'd be running a "real" computer, so you could run the real IE6 or whatever. Or, better still, Opera or Mozilla - cos if you think unrequested pop-ups are annoying now, wait until you're being charged per byte you receive!

As for the actual rates, there's obviously no way of predicting, but I imagine they'll be very high at first, because businesses will be willing to pay serious money for this. Just imagine - the whole sales force out on the road being constantly connected (via VPN I imagine) to the company network. No more waiting until a sales rep can come into the office to pick up the latest 40Mb chunk of sales data; his computer could just suck it up in real time as he drives up the M6.

Just great... (0, Offtopic)

Proaxiom (544639) | more than 12 years ago | (#2963549)

Now we'll have to listen to politicians and journalists rant on and on about why surfing the Internet and driving shouldn't be allowed at the same time.

Just when I was hoping those cell phone folks might be shutting up soon.

Re:Just great... (-1)

returnofthe_spork (552824) | more than 12 years ago | (#2963887)

Hey, guess what...driving and talking on the phone should be illegal. Just like owning guns. You're a menace to society if you drive and talk or own a gun.

What kind of port? (3, Interesting)

cryptochrome (303529) | more than 12 years ago | (#2963556)

Will this come with an Cat5-10bT ethernet adapter, or a usb connection, or what? Depending on your laptop you might have trouble hooking up.

Re:What kind of port? (1)

Osiris Ani (230116) | more than 12 years ago | (#2963662)

Will this come with an Cat5-10bT ethernet adapter, or a usb connection, or what?

It's a processor; not a computer. It can come with whatever land-based connectivity hardware features the computer manufacturer chooses to incorporate.

Try reading the article next time.

Re:What kind of port? (2)

cryptochrome (303529) | more than 12 years ago | (#2963729)

I did read the article - which is why I'm asking the question they didn't answer. Sure it could be any port, but if you're in the market for a cell phone what options will you have? Will it be a standard feature, to drive adoption of the service, or only available on pricier models of phones? What kind of dongle will you include to connect it? If they use USB, will they bother to write drivers for linux or mac? How will you make those drivers available to the user if you do? What if the laptop doesn't have an ethernet port? What about PDAs? 802.11b so you don't need a dongle at all?

This isn't a question for the manufacturers - it's a question for the end users, phone manufacturers, and service providers.

Re:What kind of port? (1)

einstein (10761) | more than 12 years ago | (#2963946)

uh. it will be a chip in the computer. it won't be a thingie in a cell phone. (though I suppose it could be) there won't be any "attachment"
---

None (3, Informative)

brunes69 (86786) | more than 12 years ago | (#2963691)

This seems to be a modem chip that will, though probably have an external option, will mainly be installed inside notebooks.

Re:What kind of port? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#2963964)

Christ - how is this 'interesting'?? Mod this idiot down.

>>Depending on your laptop you might have
>>trouble hooking up.

again... *READ* *THE* *DAMN* *ARTICLE*.

There are no ports...... no phones..... no dongles.... no nothing.

IT'S A CHIP.

YOU PUT THE CHIP ON YOUR MOTHERBOARD, IT GIVES YOU CELLULAR CONNECTIVITY. Do you have to plug your cellular phone into something so you can talk? No - it has CHIPS inside it that do that. Guess what intel is working on.... same thing but for a PC......

I don't know how simpler it can be made for you.

What kind of port were you expecting? So you could plug it into your ass?

ugh. it's moron day.

I cannot believe I get a top 10 post! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#2963557)

yes, it is true, a little hard work, and you can do anything.

http://www.iraqis.org/bomb

Yep, too ez.

Re:I cannot believe I get a top 10 post! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#2963605)

Nice link. Thank the gods for "killall -9 mozilla-bin". :-)

It would have been even better if you had the balls to post it logged in, or at least signed.

Bah

--SC

(AC to preserve karma for more important things...)

Re:I cannot believe I get a top 10 post! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#2963634)

One of the primary reasons for checking out
suspicious links with Lynx! - ya live and
learn.

-- Penguin Kicka

Re:I cannot believe I get a top 10 post! (-1, Offtopic)

SweetAndSourJesus (555410) | more than 12 years ago | (#2963799)

[gay.jpg]

fascinating. I can only imagine what kind of fun gay.jpg is.

Scale (3, Insightful)

SilentChris (452960) | more than 12 years ago | (#2963559)

*Weighs scale*

Always-on cellular connection at slow bandwidth, vs. always-on 802.11 connection, provided we have thousands of free nodes so we can roam city to city, always having an internet connection (and not having to pay by the minute). Hmm...

Re:Scale (2)

Gaijin42 (317411) | more than 12 years ago | (#2963680)

If "free" nodes like you want are ubiquitous, the bandwidth each node provider pays for (their cable, t1, dsl etc) prices will start to go up rather sharply. In the end, you will probably pay the same. TANSTAAFL.

If on the other hand, you want to make a LAN that goes everywhere, and eveyrone runs their webservers on the LAN rather than the internet, then you will gain all the functionality, because you aren't connecting to anything other than yourselves, and the infrastructure costs are distributed across all nodes.

This would be a competitor to the internet though, not free access to the internet.

Re:Scale (1)

Takeel (155086) | more than 12 years ago | (#2963735)

Always-on cellular connection at slow bandwidth, vs. always-on 802.11 connection, provided we have thousands of free nodes so we can roam city to city, always having an internet connection (and not having to pay by the minute). Hmm...

Infrastructure that's already in place, vs. spending a *lot* of money to add an entirely new infrastructure...

Hmm.

But the upside is... (3, Insightful)

mblase (200735) | more than 12 years ago | (#2963772)

...you can get on a cellular network almost anywhere, while 802.11 is still occasional at best. The idea isn't to deploy the best product, but the most useful one.

Re:Scale (1)

GodInHell (258915) | more than 12 years ago | (#2963782)

Just because the leach user dosen't pay by the minute does not mean that someone isn't paying for their service. Either the node provider, his ISP, or their connection company.

Any way you cut it, we have to push for state backed network-by-air systems like Daley here in chicago has been talking about lately.

-GiH

Not 802.11b... (1)

GuyZero (303599) | more than 12 years ago | (#2963563)

It sounds more like some sort of ethernet inetrface or some other high-level "web-tone" interface that would provide direct tcp/ip connectivity from the end user's point-of-view.

The big drag with using cell phones for internet connectivity now is that you need a separate ISP to dial up to... blah. This sounds much cooler.

thank you (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#2963565)

If you can read this then you're reading at -1.
We'd like to thank you.

Troll Network Associates

your welcome (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#2963808)

your welcome

You're名elcome!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#2963812)

In¦fact¦if¦it¦wasnt¦for¦losers¦like¦you¦each¦day¦I ¦wouldnt¦feel¦so¦good¦knowing¦my¦life¦is¦great!¦Th ank¦you!

Somebody's afraid (2, Interesting)

TheRain (67313) | more than 12 years ago | (#2963569)

Sounds like some cellular company feels threatened by the thought of small wireless networks springing up all over the place. It seems to me that there is no real advantage to having cellular capability built into the processor than having the card except that it would cause people to choose it over wireless networking. Having it in a card provides the same functionality.

If the service is cheap, though, why not?

Re:Somebody's afraid (3, Insightful)

SaDan (81097) | more than 12 years ago | (#2963616)

At least it will give people a choice between 802.11b networks and a fairly established cellular network.

Some people might be able to function just fine with 802.11b, some might prefer using the cellular system. Some might need both.

Choice is good.

Re:Somebody's afraid (1)

natslovR (530503) | more than 12 years ago | (#2963626)

Or maybe they feel that businesses would be prepared to pay to access a reliable national 'wireless' network rather than having to rely on drips-and-drabs access depending on how good the free wireless community network is in the town you happen to be in at the moment.

Any Time and Place Hopefully @# +1 ; Correct #@ (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#2963577)

Without

Jon Katz.

Cheers,

Woot_spork (Gore in '04)

Monopoly? (0, Flamebait)

a3d0a3m (306585) | more than 12 years ago | (#2963579)

If intel conveniently places their cellular network chip on every board they produce, I wonder how conveniently they can partner/setup their own service provider across the USA and make it very convenient for people to use their service and very inconvenient to try and use a third party service?
Also, is this going to be one of those cell phone technologies that we never see in USA and only europe?

adam

Re:Monopoly? (1)

DrSpin (524593) | more than 12 years ago | (#2963861)

Its a fairly safe bet it won't be targeted at Europe. No one here would be able to afford the line rental, AND it costs us more to call the house next door than it costs you to call us from across the atlantic.

Here in the UK, we have fully working broadband, with 80% coverage, but no one can afford it! (175 subscribers at last count).

Socialism rulez! (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#2963581)

Long live free software, open source should burn in hell.

I'm So Excited! (1)

Thakandar2 (260848) | more than 12 years ago | (#2963583)

Now, where can I read something on it specifically? The article seemed to be much more of a financial report than a tech article, which leads me to believe this is in very early designs, and will take a long time to run from conceptual designs to an actual integrations.

On another note, will this let me eventually take my Palm and DoS all the cell phones in the general area of the movie theater? Just a thought...

DoS Cell Phones (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#2963759)

"C-Guard is one of a handful of cell phone jammers commercially available today."

http://www.newhousenews.com/archive/story1a09220 0. html

Some Restrictions Apply. (5, Funny)

saintlupus (227599) | more than 12 years ago | (#2963586)

Intel will thus be able to realize an old * company dream ** - the development of a computer enabling users to be connected, any time and any place, to the Internet. ***

*by "old," we mean last quarter.

**by "dream," we mean product.

***by "Internet," we mean AOL/TW Extra-Fun Super-Happy content network.

--saint

Re:Some Restrictions Apply. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#2963642)

errata:

by "Internet", we mean a really bad remake of "Pong" that can be played between 2 cell phones within 5' of each other.

Child Psychiatry is a fraud (-1)

IAgreeWithThisPost (550896) | more than 12 years ago | (#2963590)

The drugging of children should be stopped.

Irresponsible parents tell them Just Say No and then force feed them Ritalin/Concerta etc after being blackmailed by schools

Come on (3, Funny)

Wind_Walker (83965) | more than 12 years ago | (#2963600)

Who would want a cellular phone that you have to attach a heatsink to?

Although I guess the open-air environment of cell phones would make air circulation a breeze (pun intended)

(ok, one more) Would dropping my cell phone into a toilet be counted as "water-cooling"?

Re:Come on (1)

warpSpeed (67927) | more than 12 years ago | (#2964015)


Ok, imagine a cluster of these chips? No really, if you stood to close, would it be considered a cancer cluster?

~Sean

That's just silly. (2, Insightful)

Guppy06 (410832) | more than 12 years ago | (#2963604)

So Intel is trying to give me the same functionality I get when I plug my cell phone into my laptop, but for the price of two cellular accounts instead of just one? I'll pass, thanks.

Just a way to sell more GHz (1)

Mick D. (89018) | more than 12 years ago | (#2963608)

So, since the cellular network around the US is slower than molasses at the north pole, this will be the incentive for faster CPU's.

The faster you can compress and decompress data the faster the network seems. I'll bet 10 years from now 50% of the processing by that brand spanking new Itanium 9 will be in compression and decompression over 56K cell networks.

This could make celluar phone makers nervous. (1, Redundant)

aao-brad (542582) | more than 12 years ago | (#2963609)

Think about it. A laptop that can access the cellular networks. It would only be a matter of time before the laptop manufacturers build in a "hands-free" phone attachment.

Newer PDAs could have the chip installed standard, and have a mic and speaker... instant cell phone.

Not at all. (1)

FreeLinux (555387) | more than 12 years ago | (#2963690)

This would make the cell phone networks VERY happy. Presently you have a cell phone with a 1000 minute plan. That's a lot of chitchat for the money and it may well last you all month. Now, with Intel's plan, you're laptop is connected to the cell network "always on", just like when you are making a call on your phone. Now, instead of the 1000 minutes lasting all month your laptop eats them up in two days. That means you have to buy more minutes from the cell networks. They win!! Big time!!!

Re:Not at all. (1)

aao-brad (542582) | more than 12 years ago | (#2963697)

I agree, but I was looking at it from the cellular hardware aspect. I know the cell companies would LOVE this kind of thing...

Will it contain the new manditory location device? (2, Interesting)

Unknown Poltroon (31628) | more than 12 years ago | (#2963614)

THe one thats being built into cellphones? I ALWAYS want the athorities to know where i and my laptop are.

Re:Will it contain the new manditory location devi (1)

Takeel (155086) | more than 12 years ago | (#2963751)

Yeah. Watch out for black helicopters when you're surfing pr0n wirelessly.

Re:Will it contain the new manditory location devi (1)

Unknown Poltroon (31628) | more than 12 years ago | (#2963838)

Thats whyi always look at the source code for the jpegs instead of the pictures. Lets see the black helicopetrs tempest systems figure out what im looking at.

Re:Will it contain the new manditory location devi (2, Funny)

-eddy (20859) | more than 12 years ago | (#2963934)

Hmmm... Location specific SPAM and popup windows.

'Hello consumer! we noticed you are near McDonalds on 7th and main. Here is a 25 cents off of a Big Mac and Coke coupon!'

-eddy

wow (-1)

IAgreeWithThisPost (550896) | more than 12 years ago | (#2963619)

and here on first read I thought Intel had developed a chip integrated into a human cell.

I can see theregister.co.uk headline now: INTEL creates BORG.

good thing i reread that.

Stephen King, author, dead at 54 (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#2963620)


I just heard some sad news on talk radio - Horror/Sci Fi writer Stephen King was found dead in his Maine home this morning. There weren't any more details. I'm sure everyone in the Slashdot community will miss him - even if you didn't enjoy his work, there's no denying his contributions to popular culture. Truly an American icon.

Its在een地奸ong宇ime.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#2963851)

gettin¦from¦there¦to¦here...
but¦you¦know¦what?¦u¦suck

Goatman Dies today (-1)

senior_troll (553809) | more than 12 years ago | (#2963629)

In other important news...

The infamous goatman, and his associated site at www.goatse.cx died today at the ripe old internet age of 2. This misunderstood dark corner of the internet brought laughter and shock to millions of visitors before it was taken down. Attempts at doing whois and nslookups on the domain has turned up nowhere, allmost as if the mysterious goatman completely disaperred off the map of the internet.

I think I can speak for all the trolls here, goatse, we will miss you.

Yours Truly
Senior Troll

Anywhere?? (1)

MysteryMilk (553413) | more than 12 years ago | (#2963631)

"Intel will thus be able to realize an old company dream - the development of a computer enabling users to be connected, any time and any place, to the Internet." Any place except for Downey. California's cell phone black hole.

Can you say ..ScRIPZ Kid33z Dr3AM ? (3, Funny)

CDWert (450988) | more than 12 years ago | (#2963635)

I know this is a technolgy implementation from a chip side. That said can you imagin what fun screwing with people would be at this level of connectivity, gives a whole new meaning to Ghost in the machine. Everyone connected everwhere.....I will change my Job Occupation to farmer and wait for the 50 megaton nuke in the atmosphere to create and EMP thatll take everyone offline. Can you Imagine how many more posers at Starbucks this'll create, if impleneted on a wide scale ?

Not to mention all the Geniuses in Govt, thinking they have the most important job in the free world and insisting they need to be connected all the time, this is the Armageddon , I can see it now.

This is pretty nifty , but until they integrate it directly to a proccesor an memory in the same package, ....Just Imagine you could have a Beowulf cluster in your pocket,...lol

*Note, If you take me seriously you need more of some alkaloid, nicotene, caffiene, etc.

i don't get it (-1)

neal n bob (531011) | more than 12 years ago | (#2963637)

what does this have to do with the price of dead penis birds in china?

hey fag0tz (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#2963639)

fark.com has black history month boobies [google.de]

Always available (3, Insightful)

t0ph3rus (551031) | more than 12 years ago | (#2963647)

Intel will thus be able to realize an old * company dream ** - the development of a computer enabling users to be connected, any time and any place, to the Internet.

Great!!! and now my company will realize an old dream of having me available 24X7. There is such a thing as being too connected. Even though it is a pretty cool and useful concept.

Market Fluff Alert, Must Be Micro$haft. (2, Insightful)

Erris (531066) | more than 12 years ago | (#2963652)

[The] solution will enable laptop users to use cellular communication networks as if they were a local communications network. Intel will thus be able to realize an old company dream - the development of a computer enabling users to be connected, any time and any place, to the Internet.

When I see shine on language like that, I know that M$ or some other huckester is behind what's being talked about and it won't live up the hype. The word Enable is usually the biggest tip. What's wrong with direct language and specs? You know something along the lines of, "Intel designed the new chip to provide NetBios over WhateverRadioThingy with a 3 mile radius of communications. Several companies are planning to build a grid comunications network in several major cities, BLAH BLAH." That would be informative, and then people would know what to expect rather than excited and ready to spend more money.

Buzzzz, how hateful it is. It brings back memories -twitch- of VB endoctrination videos I was encouraged to watch for a job once. It dronned on about, "Totally new approaches to programing." and "Iteractive methods rather than proceedural methods." while building a dinky little database front end Mr. Potatoe Head style.

Re:Market Fluff Alert, Must Be Micro$haft. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#2963896)

Yea. But can you imagine Mr Potatohead designing databases in Fortran?

VB is cooler than an Intel CPU!

Xscale and 3G GPRS ? what are you raveing about ? (2)

johnjones (14274) | more than 12 years ago | (#2963658)

this is the biggest load of B** I have seen

you can archive this now just 3G using an up to date ARM processor like XScale and connecting it to a 3G network

you can pull down broadcast quality video in real time and get you emails SMS chat rooms and all the rest its NOT exactly NEW

wake up AMD building a MIPS chip is news !!!

regards

john jones

2002-02-06 10:57:47 AMD now a makes a MIPS processor (articles,amd) (rejected)

No modem? Come on, now. (2, Insightful)

crgrace (220738) | more than 12 years ago | (#2963663)


The chip will enable laptop users to connect directly to cellular networks without the need of a modem in the same way that PCs in a local network connect with each other


Give me a break. If it is wireless, I guarantee that there is modulation and demodulation involved. That means MODEM! The news here is that it is supposedly a monolithic solution and so it does in a chip what before was done on a board.

This reminds me of an argument I had once with an "expert" who tried to explain to me that a cable modem wasn't really a modem. Sheesh.

Re:No modem? Come on, now. (1)

Casca (4032) | more than 12 years ago | (#2963706)

There is a fundamental difference between an analog modem and a device that sends digital data like a cable-modem or isdn router. Sheesh.

Re:No modem? Come on, now. (1)

crgrace (220738) | more than 12 years ago | (#2963917)

There is a fundamental difference between an analog modem and a device that sends digital data like a cable-modem or isdn router. Sheesh.

Sure, they are different, but they are both modems, and they use some form of modulation (time or frequency domain) to send digital data over an analog channel. All modern modems (including 56k, cable, etc.) are mixed-signal devices including an analog front-end along with digital processing. We haven't had purely analog modems since the 1200 bps days. Sheesh.

Re:No modem? Come on, now. (3, Funny)

geekoid (135745) | more than 12 years ago | (#2963790)

no no, the whole system will be analog, really. ;)

Re:No modem? Come on, now. (2, Informative)

jfengel (409917) | more than 12 years ago | (#2963792)

Yeah, there's modulation and demodulation involved. And it's already built into your cell phone. Why should you have to add another layer on top of it?

The second generation of cellular phone networking is already in place, and is already digital and packetized. Layering protocols on that would be much more efficient that turning bits into sound, sound back into bits, and then into waves, and back.

Re:No modem? Come on, now. (2, Informative)

EMIce (30092) | more than 12 years ago | (#2963794)

Yes, but with your typical modem you must modulate onto audible frequencies, there is a big difference. Audible frequencies can't carry as much data as higher ones. Although current cell phones already modulate data directly onto the higher frequncies they use - for internet access too, ask your provider - but for some reason they still say the speed limit is 19200bps. Presumably because so many other users are sharing that high bandwidth.

cellular CPU's, huh? (5, Informative)

cats-paw (34890) | more than 12 years ago | (#2963669)

By far the most complex part of a cell phone is the RF design. Saying you have a CPU which allows cell phone connections is meaningless marketing drivel. Intel will NOT be putting the RF into their CPU in our lifetimes.

Look at how small cell phones are right now. It's completely conceivable that you could simply put everything you need in a PCMCIA card or a USB attachment widget. Especially for laptops what's so un-portable about that ?

The problem with internet cellular connections is that the DSP's and operating firmware in cell phones are competely dedicated to moving voice-data. They expect voice-data at both ends. If you take an oldish cell phone (still digital) it is simply not aware, and cannot be made aware, that you just want to pass pure data.

Wait it gets worse. The cell-site expects everything to be voice data too. You have to go in and replace the firmware in the DSP's and controllers in the phones AND the cell sites to make this all work.

Now that we've had some hindsight on this issue, the correct design decision is to move data with QOS. Then you see how much BW you have available for voice data and design your codec appropriately.

Basically that's why there is now something called 3G.

This is the silliest press release I've seen in a long time.

Tumors and my jewels????? (1)

t0ph3rus (551031) | more than 12 years ago | (#2963694)

Cell phones supposedly cause tumors. Well this doesn't make me feel to good considering my laptop ussualy sits on top of where the majority of us do our real thinking!!

Re:Tumors and my jewels????? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#2963918)

Don't worry: cell phones are quite safe so long as you dont shove them up your a**.

OTOH, if americans are in the habit of using microwave ovens to dry their cats, I suppose its impossible to imagine what they might do with a cellphone!

Re:Tumors and my jewels????? (1)

t0ph3rus (551031) | more than 12 years ago | (#2963947)

I don't know if cell phones are that safe. Over in the UK there is currently a lot of buzz in the news about cell phones and health. Even if mobiles don't cause tumors, they still give me a headache. However, the headache is probably caused by the coworker at the other end. Either way it can't be good for me

Any time, any place? (1)

BlueFall (141123) | more than 12 years ago | (#2963722)

Now if I could only get my cell phone to work any time, any place...

Road Warrior (2)

DeadBugs (546475) | more than 12 years ago | (#2963726)

I can't wait to see the look on the other drivers faces as I try and drive while talking on my LapTop.

Great (2, Funny)

geoffeg (15786) | more than 12 years ago | (#2963753)

Now everytime I switch cell phone providers I'll have to buy a new laptop to work with the providers network! :)

TI already did it....Palm to use it (1)

hirschma (187820) | more than 12 years ago | (#2963757)

TI's OMAP chip does this today. Yawwwn.

Info here... [ti.com]

outlawed before it gets started? (3, Funny)

Em Emalb (452530) | more than 12 years ago | (#2963760)

Some states have a hands free cell phone policy. I can see a bunch of techno-wannabees out there DRIVING and trying to IM each other. Can you say crash? And not just the blue screen kind...

leet_loser_1: dude, hold up, I just got into an
accident :(

leet_loser_2: bummer :(

One benefit I can see would be if people actually pulled over when they are lost, looking for a place to eat, etc. Other than that, I don't see much.

Re:outlawed before it gets started? (2)

ekrout (139379) | more than 12 years ago | (#2963876)

Ever hear of voice recognition? (pun intended)

Current cell phones do this (1)

EMIce (30092) | more than 12 years ago | (#2963775)

Current digital cell phones allow direct serial connection to the network with a phone company provided ip. It doesn't use slip or ppp directly, instead the phone emulates a modem so your dialer thinks it's connecting to an isp via the plain old telephone system. So what's the big advance? speed? At 19200 bps, serial is all you need.

First generation chip? (1)

yonnage (131665) | more than 12 years ago | (#2963786)

Lets just hope it can divide :P

CPDP (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#2963801)

Maybe it is just me, but are they just putting CPDP on the chipset? After metricom went under I had to start to use the CPDP network to get wireless access. It only has a max speed of 19.2kbps, and it rarely gets that. Granted this article didn't go into detail, but unless there is some major improvement to the cellular network I don't see this being very successful.

Oh great.. (3, Funny)

jabber01 (225154) | more than 12 years ago | (#2963833)

You know, with GSM this might not be such a bad idea.. But as it is, I'd need a laptop for Sprint, another for Verizon, another still for Cingular... Boy! This is sure to be good for the economy..

Great! (1)

Neutropia_1 (123467) | more than 12 years ago | (#2963843)

Now instead of getting "network busy" signals on my sprint PCS (the all digital from the ground up - yet lacking capacity to support its user base) phone - I'll be getting them on my laptop.

Seriously, I don't know how they plan on pulling this off without a massive upgrade in infrastructure - unless they team up with a cellular provider that already has most of the coverage in the US (verizon, sprint, etc). I don't know about you but I already experience the growing pains of my CSP (cellular service provider). Who else out there hasn't had the experience of dropped calls, busy signals, and vertiable cellular "black holes," where service doesn't even exist?

I say that before they even THINK about doing something like this that they have a plan in place to isolate the computer service from the handset service. Otherwise all of the spoiled 12 and 13 year olds out there won't be able to chat away all night long on their very own cell phones due to log-jammed cell switches.....

Just my $.02

"old company dream" (2)

Boone^ (151057) | more than 12 years ago | (#2963857)

Guess that sums up the technological advances of our age.. an "old company dream" such as this can't be more than 6-8 years old, can it?

As the tech train keeps accelerating, the time delta between the introduction of a technology to public adoption (not just geek adoption) will get smaller and smaller.

IPv6 (1)

Blue Lozenge (444566) | more than 12 years ago | (#2963937)

I hope that technology like this will further increase the demand for IPv6. Needless to say, it's long overdue.

Probably decently useless (3, Insightful)

kawaichan (527006) | more than 12 years ago | (#2963944)

Yeah, it's kind of weird, but I doubt seeing the true usefulness of a intergrated cell unit in a CPU. I mean, is the chip going to support all the network or just one? so are yout tell me that instead of using those space for better performance or leaving it out to save power and cost, my laptop's cell would only work in NA.

But they might ultimately intergrate 802.11 into the CPU that would really make this community WLAN thing fly, imagine every device has 802.11, oh yeah.

Mobile Hip-Hub (1)

iamcadaver (104579) | more than 12 years ago | (#2963952)

I still think the bluetooth personal wireless broadband hub is the right way for the industry to go. Hell, everything should go that way.

I first read about it here on /, if anyone else is interested: a central wireless device that is 'personalized' for you, then all your myriad little devices communicate through it. Phone, PDA, laptop, mp3, radio, pager, gps, whatever, uses the connection provided via the hub.

Make it an OpenSpec. I don't care if my little hub is 3com or Nokia, and it shouldn't matter, either.

Of course, this is not the Capitalist Way. There is no sharing anymore, everyone will want thier own recurring revenue stream for thier little device, and we all will suffer for it.

Dedicated laptop "cellphones" are old news. (1)

Greger47 (516305) | more than 12 years ago | (#2963970)

Both Nokia and Ericsson have been selling PC cards that give you instant GSM access for years now.

For example the Nokia CardPhone 2.0 [nokia.com]

Bulding the chip and antenna directly into the laptop is a trivial matter of engineering.

Oh joy (2, Insightful)

MoneyT (548795) | more than 12 years ago | (#2963981)

Because we all know how gosh durned reliable cell phones are for simple voice, now we're goign to trust the same technology with our data.

Not to mention the hell this will cause with cellular service. Just imagine, thousands of kiddies downloading porn in the mean time, some poor soul in an accident is trying to call for help and he's getting "Thank you for using the Verizon/AOL cell service, all our lines are busy right now but you will be notified as sonn as one opens up.

No, the reason cell phones and the cell laptop connections work currently is because the actual numbr of people on the system at any given time is relatively low compared to the number of users. THis will kill our systems the same way 9/11 killed the cell service when everyone was calling everyone else to find out who was hurt.

3G...so what (1)

drwho (4190) | more than 12 years ago | (#2963988)

It looks as though it's just another 3G wireless chip. I don't see what the big deal is. This article is devoid of any useful information. Except for Palestinians and other Enemies of Israel. The Mossad might be able to trigger a cellphone to blow up. At the very least, I'll expect Mossad will sabotage the crypto.

An IDEA (2)

clinko (232501) | more than 12 years ago | (#2964119)

Here's an idea... Ok, what if we just put the equiv. of wireless hubs in all cell phones. The internet would be where the phones are. That's where the people would be. Clouds of internet access would float around with the population. Such a kool idea!

How is this different... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#2964194)

How is this different than me taking my Nokia 6185 and plugging it into my palm pilot, laptop, or desktop pc?

Right now I have a cable with one end that plugs into my Nokia, and the other end is a standard 9 pin serial. All I need is an ISP to "dial-up" to.

Pbbt. (1)

Scoria (264473) | more than 12 years ago | (#2964202)

While I haven't read the article, I've ascertained that the cellular chip is embedded into the motherboard from the comments on this thread.

Let's hope that there aren't any security vulnerabilities [slashdot.org] built into the hardware.

Not here (1)

Peter Simpson (112887) | more than 12 years ago | (#2964219)

Israel, I believe uses GSM. Which means they have GPRS (General Packet Radio System) service. UNLIKE here in the US, where most of us assumed (before we read the article) this was happening.

People in Europe are WAY ahead of us in having a cellular phone network that they can actually use.
In the US, it's going to be a while longer...
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