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Interview with David Faure of Mandrake & KDE

timothy posted more than 12 years ago | from the providing-us-with-free-good-stuff dept.

KDE 195

JigSaw writes: "OSNews features an interesting interview with David Faure, the french KDE developer who works for Mandrake Software. His code can be found on Konqueror, KFM, KWord and he is also the main bug hunter for KDE. David talks about KDE 3's enhancements and speed improvements, the future of KWord, the debugging tools under Linux, and even Gnome2, .NET, MacOSX and Mozilla."

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First Post? (-1, Offtopic)

DrPascal (185005) | more than 12 years ago | (#3066205)

Had to.

Re:First Post? (-1)

OsamaBinLager (532628) | more than 12 years ago | (#3066293)

Linux sucks. [slashdot.org]

first post... (-1, Offtopic)

xtrat (549214) | more than 12 years ago | (#3066206)

Actually I was trying to post to the "chilling effect" story... but maybe I'll be first post :)

NO YOU WILL NOT POST FIRST. (-1)

L.Torvalds (548450) | more than 12 years ago | (#3066212)

You should consider suicide a viable alternative to failed FP attempts.

Re:NO YOU WILL NOT POST FIRST. (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3066229)

May I suggest the colorado blvd bridge (just east of fair oaks, running along side the 134) in pasadena. Nice and tall, and concrete below.

this post is off topic (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3066215)

please mod it down accordingly.

This post is amusing (-1)

Mayor McPenisman (557253) | more than 12 years ago | (#3066262)

this post be amusing be ye says I

Arrrr!

Number 5 (-1)

Ralph Malph Alpha (551824) | more than 12 years ago | (#3066227)


This Fifth Post is a failed attempt to post first. Four people have come before me to pave my way. They baptize you with water, but I will baptize you with fire.

Propz to all dead Joanie, my pubes are red with blood.

Slashdotted already? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3066230)

Don't worry, here is googles cached copy [google.com] ;)

fuck off gnome (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3066231)

yeah KDE 3 owns it is 20000 far ahead than GNOME 2 will ever be.

somehow KDE will always be.

GNOME developers are arrogant assholes.

Re:fuck off gnome (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3066246)

Hello,

I fear you have a typo in your third, and final sentence. Please correct with this appropriate patch.


--- text Mon Feb 25 11:05:38 2002
+++ text.2 Mon Feb 25 11:05:59 2002
@@ -2,5 +2,5 @@

somehow KDE will always be.

-GNOME developers are arrogant assholes.
+LINUX users are arrogant assholes.

Re:fuck off gnome (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3066261)

I agree, but even though gnomes a fucked up piece of DOG SHIT theres lots of Good GTK apps that don't need gnomes shit. Like mozilla, gimp and the kick ass *drake setup tools :),

Re:fuck off gnome (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3066340)

heh the gimp!

dude look at the new gtk2 it depends on a lot of gnome shit e.g. icons, e.g. gnome developers etc. the influence the roadmap of gtk and the gimp. they hung out on the same irc network all the time and usually gtk/gimp/gnome the same people idle there i bet my underpants that sooner or later they all merge into one piece of GNOME niggerware.

Well obviously the KDE developers don't think so (1)

FooBarWidget (556006) | more than 12 years ago | (#3066794)

Oviously the KDE developers don't think so.

monday (-1)

SweetAndSourJesus (555410) | more than 12 years ago | (#3066232)

It sucks. It doesn't suck too bad, though, I'm unemployed. I had beer for breakfast.

I actually enjoy the competition... (3, Insightful)

Archie Steel (539670) | more than 12 years ago | (#3066240)

...between GNOME and KDE. Despite what some Windows fans may claim, I don't think it's detrimental to have two leading desktop managers for Linux. As I see it, the competition is really pushing the two development teams to outdo themselves. Healthy competition -- as long as it does not translate into flame wars on the Internet -- is a good thing, and we're all the better for it. I mean, look at how the UI for Windows has evolved in the past five years (and I'm not talking about eye-candy here - yes, alpha channels are cool, but it does not add any kind of usability)...It seems obvious to me that MS could use a little competition on the desktop before its GUI stagnates further.

(Hmm..."stagnate further"...is that an oxymoron?)

Re:I actually enjoy the competition... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3066249)

Despite what some Windows fans may claim, I don't think it's detrimental to have two leading desktop managers for Linux

Thinking you have a leading desktop manager, let alone two leading desktop managers, is detrimental to Linux.

Re:I actually enjoy the competition... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3066278)

Hell, thinking you have a desktop manager at all is just plain incorrect.

(Posting anonymously because this account is for karma whoring, despite being $rtbl'ed)

Re:I actually enjoy the competition... (3, Insightful)

TheReverand (95620) | more than 12 years ago | (#3066255)

True. But on the other hand, try explaining to the average Windows user that they have to change the themes they're using in at least two places (gtk and Qt) for it to work. Oh, and of course your favourite theme for one set isn't available for the other.

Re:I actually enjoy the competition... (1)

Dikarika (526153) | more than 12 years ago | (#3066296)

Why are you telling a windows user to use both?

I don't even use both. I'm a KDE man...

Telling a new Linux user to use both is just asking for trouble. I should know, I'm still a noob. I think I will be for a long time. Linux is tough, but it is a good pain. :)

Re:I actually enjoy the competition... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3066473)

So you don't use any Gtk programs in KDE then?!

Re:I actually enjoy the competition... (1)

Dikarika (526153) | more than 12 years ago | (#3066684)

I use Gimp and whatever else I can. I'm afraid you seem to be tripping me up a bit, as I am not very knowleged yet. I have tried Gnome, but I didn't like it. Just not my cup of tea...

Re:I actually enjoy the competition... (2)

fader (107759) | more than 12 years ago | (#3066977)

(Slightly OT, but does pertain to KDE/GNOME)

I think it says a good deal about the 'usability problems' between the two desktops when users don't even realize they're using pieces from both.

This isn't a flame or anything -- I think it's the way things *should* work. Users shouldn't have to care whether their app is QT or GTK... as long as QT apps work under GNOME and GTK apps work under KDE, everybody's happy.

(Hooray for X, etc. etc.)

Re:I actually enjoy the competition... (3, Insightful)

JanneM (7445) | more than 12 years ago | (#3066317)

Hopefully, a common theme distribution mechanism will eventually surface.

Meanwhile, I find that I use very few KDE apps on my desktop, but when I do, I'm not bothered by the different look compared to the rest of my apps. Far more important would be to get a consensus on keybindings...

/Janne

Re:I actually enjoy the competition... (2)

Archie Steel (539670) | more than 12 years ago | (#3066391)

I agree. Themes that work on both distribution would be very sweet indeed! I was actually looking for a nice "Aqua" theme for Gnome, but it seems none of them work with the new theme engine...meanwhile, there are plenty of them for KDE...

Re:I actually enjoy the competition... (3, Interesting)

neuroticia (557805) | more than 12 years ago | (#3066323)

First: The average Windows user is highly unlikely to swap OSes in the first place. They use what came on their computer. "Hey dude, want to upgrade that toaster of yours to be able to handle bagels?" Uhm. no.

Second: I have both KDE and Gnome installed on the computers that I manage, and I allow the users to choose which to use, they always choose one based on their first 10 minutes of impression, or even based on which one I show them first. "Yeah, that's fine." They do not want to learn the workings of two window managers, one is hard enough for the "average user".

The choice that is afforded by having both Gnome and KDE is great--Depending on the work habits of the individual they'll find one of the two more comfortable and gravitate towards it. Applications work under both, so that's not really a deciding factor.

-Sara

Re:I actually enjoy the competition... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3066355)

"Hey dude, want to upgrade that toaster of yours to be able to handle bagels?"

More like "Hey dude, want to downgrade your toster so that it will only work with 1% of the breads out there, and insted of it automaticly popping your tost up when cooked, you now need to sit by and watch it cooking the bread so you can pop it up manually?" BUT trust me it's better because you will no longer be a slave to the evil MicroTost.

Umm, no, slut.

Re:I actually enjoy the competition... (2)

Satai (111172) | more than 12 years ago | (#3066458)

I was curious about this - on my system, I've got a particular GTK theme set. It looks terrible. But when I use "startkde" in .xinitrc, all the GTK stuff looks very nice - consistent with the KDE theme, as well as with the KDE widget style.

If this is the case, why do we need any more integration?

Re:I actually enjoy the competition... (5, Informative)

ChaosDiscordSimple (41155) | more than 12 years ago | (#3066656)

But on the other hand, try explaining to the average Windows user that they have to change the themes they're using in at least two places (gtk and Qt) for it to work. Oh, and of course your favourite theme for one set isn't available for the other.

I expect the average Windows user would take it pretty well. Your average Windows user is used to dealing with software that has private theming/skinning support (WinAmp, Windows Media Player) and software that ignores the global theme settings and does its own thing (most CD burning software, Cable modem branded Internet Explorer, RealPlayer, QuickTime). Your average Windows user is used to Microsoft changing interface styles leaving a glaring difference between new and old apps (addition of gradient title bars (originally on MS Office only), the new XP widgets).

Many software developers feel the need to be arty and throw the standard Windows interface out the window. It's unfortunate, (It hurts usability and accessability), but it's the current situation. Windows is no better than Unix with X-Windows. The only way to get highly consistent theming in Windows is to use Microsoft applications exclusively. To get highly consistent theming under Unix, pick either Gnome or KDE and stick with it.

Re:I actually enjoy the competition... (2)

Arandir (19206) | more than 12 years ago | (#3066686)

If Windows users won't try Linux/BSD/Unix merely because there's not some hegemon forcing a single desktop on them, then they can keep Windows for all I care.

And if they're complaining that not every application has the same theme, they've obviously not used Windows much. Think Quicktime and WinAmp which cannot have the Windows "theme", and Media Player and Netscape, which allow themes not available for other applications. Until Windows users start complaining to Apple for the inconsistant theme of Quicktime, I'll ignore their spurious complaints.

And talk about shallow! Not even the Sahara Ocean is that shallow!

linux on the desktop is too slow (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3066332)

I prefer to use Windows simply because the windowing system works at a sensible speed.
Okay, the Microsoft "Windowing system" is hardly full featured, but it works quickly, and it seems to fit well together.

Re:linux on the desktop is too slow (2, Informative)

jjeff (80578) | more than 12 years ago | (#3066367)

I prefer to use Windows simply because the windowing system works at a sensible speed.

Try ROX [sourceforge.net] and something like icewm or sawfish.
and programs like abiword and gnumeric are very speedy (without having to do the M$ trick of loading it into memory when your system starts).

Re:linux on the desktop is too slow (2)

Archie Steel (539670) | more than 12 years ago | (#3066372)

I see no speed difference between Gnome and Windows 2000 on my machine. Both are fast enough for me (I have an Athlon 900 with 640MB of RAM).

If you have an older machine, Gnome and/or KDE may be slower than Windows - but you can always use something like IceWM or Sawfish (without Gnome). Both are very fast and require little memory.

Re:linux on the desktop is too slow (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3066678)

Admittedly, I am not straining my system using Star Office's word processor, which is supposed to be a slow loader, on my office Linux box. I just have an Athlon 1.4G unit with 3/4 of a Gig of RAM (the latter is a story unto itself).

Get a box with a good processor and a bit <i>less</i> ram and you too might find Linux desktop more than satisfactory

he hit the nail on the head with CUPS (5, Insightful)

Ween (13381) | more than 12 years ago | (#3066243)

I think that the print side of Linux is still very very lacking in ease of use and setup. Theres really no reason for this, especially when I can install Mandrake and have a nice wysiwyg gui ask me a bunch of questions and things just work (for the most part). CUPS should just come with something this powerful itself (and yes, im aware of the web interface, but it lacks.. bad).

Re:he hit the nail on the head with CUPS (4, Interesting)

garcia (6573) | more than 12 years ago | (#3066294)

I very much agree. I am pretty well versed in userland apps and setting them up (samba, etc) yet CUPS was a pain in the ass, a real big pain in the ass.

Anytime I have to sit here and seriously think about what I have to install just is not right.

An additional complaint is that my HP960c still prints color like all-hell. I have to print over the network from my Win98 laptop if I really want to print some sort of color page if I want it to look at all like it should.

printtool worked wonders for my HP400 but not for this printer. Old printers aren't around anymore. We need some real support for some real printers :(

Re:he hit the nail on the head with CUPS (1)

yugami (102988) | more than 12 years ago | (#3066316)

just use CUPS, cupsomatic from linux-print and the hpijs driver from on sourceforge (from HP) my HP 960c prints very, very, very well.

using debian the setup is extreamly simple too

Re:he hit the nail on the head with CUPS (3, Interesting)

garcia (6573) | more than 12 years ago | (#3066412)

using CUPS, using Debian. Still looks like shit when it prints color.

print to the printer in color using Windows, then print again using Linux. Tell me what you see.

Re:he hit the nail on the head with CUPS (1)

yugami (102988) | more than 12 years ago | (#3066483)

the same thing.

what driver are you using?

Re:he hit the nail on the head with CUPS (2)

garcia (6573) | more than 12 years ago | (#3066563)


Info HP Deskjet 960c
Location /dev/lp0
DeviceURI parallel:/dev/lp0
State Idle
Accepting Yes
JobSheets none none
QuotaPeriod 0
PageLimit 0
KLimit 0

Re:he hit the nail on the head with CUPS (1)

chfleming (556136) | more than 12 years ago | (#3067000)

If you have an HP deskjet printer, then the print quality will always be extremely dependent on the driver.

You should frequent hpinkjet.sourceforge.net to get the latest drivers supplied by HP. These usually are not provided by distros because of licensing issues.

Re:he hit the nail on the head with CUPS (1)

sc00p18 (536811) | more than 12 years ago | (#3066543)

just use CUPS, cupsomatic from linux-print and the hpijs driver from on sourceforge (from HP) my HP 960c prints very, very, very well. using debian the setup is extreamly simple too

I've tried using the same setup tools you describe but I can't get my deskjet 932C to print! I suspect that it has something to do with it being a usb printer. I agree that this is definitely an area of linux that needs improvement for newbies like me.

Re:he hit the nail on the head with CUPS (3, Interesting)

jonathan_ingram (30440) | more than 12 years ago | (#3066353)

We need some real support for some real printers :(

Just about every Epson is supported very well with the gimp-print CUPS drivers. This is because Epson printers are not stupid win-printers, like many of the new HP's, and because the Epson printer language is quite well documented and understood.

So, real printers are supported. Terrible printers aren't.

Re:he hit the nail on the head with CUPS (1, Interesting)

einer (459199) | more than 12 years ago | (#3066414)

Great, Epson printers are supported. But my HP printer is not. I could give a damn about Epson.

We need some real support for some real printers.

This statement is true, since the only real printers to me, are the ones that I own. HP, not Epson.

So, real printers are supported. Terrible printers aren't.

Calling HP Printers terrible is plain stupid, elitist, and damaging to the progress of Open Source. People like you are the reason that Linux advocates are seen as belligerant pompous assholes. The claim that the print support in Linux sucks is true until HP printers are supported. I don't care if the HP print language is obfuscated assembler. I care that Linux can't print.

Andrew

Re:he hit the nail on the head with CUPS (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3066518)

Start hacking, whiner.
If you don't have the skills to contribute, give some money to someone who does.

Quit being a freeloader.

Re:he hit the nail on the head with CUPS (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3066972)

Did not notice your name, hence, it is impossible to document <ib>your</ib> contributions to open source (or perhaps even to free) software. Thus, I tend to doubt your pretence and instead would advise the recipient of your post to regard you instead as a fraud.

Not everyone can write printer drivers even if the specifications are freely available. I suspect you would find it a daunting task. Go to some kitty game site and prance around freely giving your useless wisdom to others equally uninformed as yourself.

Re:he hit the nail on the head with CUPS (-1)

real_b0fh (557599) | more than 12 years ago | (#3066618)

and you, my friend, are a stupid fuck.

*IF* I was a CUPS developer and HP will not document their printer language so I can write drivers for it, I could give HP a rat's ass. I'd just use whatever printer works (like epsons). If you want shitty obscure HP printers, use windoze, you sissie.

enjoy.

Re:he hit the nail on the head with CUPS (3, Insightful)

scotch (102596) | more than 12 years ago | (#3066655)

Calling HP Printers terrible is plain stupid, elitist, and damaging to the progress of Open Source

I disagree. Calling bad hardware "terrible" is neither stupid, elitist, or particularly damanging to Open Source (though this is more of a linux issue than a general Open Source issue). Here's why: supporting every single piece of hardware takes time. Most of this time is given freely by volunteers although some is supported by commercial distributions. Every piece of hardware someone chooses to support results in other hardware they don't support. If the hardware in question is poorly designed, has a bad interface, poor documentation, or some completely braindead feature like being a WinPrinter, then that hardware is going to probably take more time than it deserves.

This is hardly elitest or stupid or damaing to Open Source - this is reality. We don't have infinite resources. If you want to help with printers in particular, donate your time, or buy a distribution that is working on the problem.

People like you are the reason that Linux advocates are seen as belligerant pompous assholes. The claim that the print support in Linux sucks is true until HP printers are supported. I don't care if the HP print language is obfuscated assembler. I care that Linux can't print.

This is of course a selfish and wrong way of looking at linux (see above). Hardware companies that can't be bothered to make it easy on people voluntarily writing device drivers for linux will suffer by having their hardware poorly supported. People who buy said hardware are better off buying hardware know to be supported by linux or using another operating system (unless they want to help). Also, for every operating system out there, there is some hardware not supported. Therefore, by your argument, all operating systems suck.

QED.

Re:he hit the nail on the head with CUPS (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3066883)

The elitists are the fookers making your hardware that won't write drivers for any OS other than Windows, or give enough good specs to hackers trying to help *them* by writing drivers for them. You think Microsoft supports all those printers? Not likely. It's the hardware makers that's doing it. If they don't want to support Linux then they can bite me and, no, I won't buy their hardware and I won't call it "good". Why should Linux volunteer hackers have to give up valuable time to reverse engineer printer specs, when the people making the money (i.e. HP) aren't lifting a finger to make their hardware usable for *all* of their customers? (please note that this is just an example, I have no opinion at this point on HP specifically)

That said, anyone know why my Epson 740 Photo keeps cutting off 1/6 of the way through a page using CUPS? Same result on x86 or PPC using Debian stable or YDL2.1 with CUPS built from most recent source, whether on USB or serial port. The printer works fine from Mac OS.

semi off-topic question (2)

SCHecklerX (229973) | more than 12 years ago | (#3066867)

I have a question...

I recently set up a epson stylus c60 for my g/f. It works great, but... She is on redhat 7.2, and I used printtool with the latest packages from the redhat site to configure everything.

It looks like when I print plaintext, the printer does a great job, printing using the black cartridge and doing it very fast.

For ANYTHING postscript (ie, web pages from mozilla, or text from abiword), the printer makes black by mixing color, even if there is NO COLOR on the page (hell, even if there is, if the text is black, print it with black ink, dammit!!! (it did this with the redhat postscript test page too). Is there a way around this stupid behavior short of creating a 'black-only' print queue?? Never mind that solution too, since many times I want color, but I want anything black to print using BLACK!

I am using the stp driver for the Stylus 760, since there wasn't a C60 specific driver listed. Would switching over to cups solve my problem? Is there a way to get this working with the current LPRng supplied with redhat?

Re:semi off-topic question (1)

chfleming (556136) | more than 12 years ago | (#3066975)

I do not know the true solution to this, but I know of a work around.

Use the RedHat printconfig to set up two printers lp_bnw and lp_color, but both point to the same physical printer and both use the same driver.

However, set the driver settings so that one always uses black and white and the other always uses color.

Re:he hit the nail on the head with CUPS (1)

Paradoxish (545066) | more than 12 years ago | (#3066924)

So, real printers are supported. Terrible printers aren't.

This is why Linux is never, ever going to reach the level of popularity it deserves. As long as the Linux community and its developers continue to shrug and say, "Hey.. it's not the kind of [hardware goes here] that I like, so it deserves to not be supported" it's never going to get anywhere. How is Linux supposed to advance when the attitude is "Well, it was designed for Windows so we give up"? Newsflash: If you want to get anywhere with the Windows crowd you need to support their hardware, whether it's bad or not. If people wanted to go out and buy a whole new computer so they could use a different operating system they might as well buy an (egh) Mac.

Re:he hit the nail on the head with CUPS (1)

electroniceric (468976) | more than 12 years ago | (#3066706)

Amen!
I've poured hours upon hours into trying to make KDE/OpenOffice print to our Solaris-Samba printserver, which supports BOTH lpd and samba queues, and it hasn't worked since I installed Mandrake 8.1. Period. The GUI tool is nice, makes nice test pages, but no printing.

CUPS is a great idea, and is coming along well, but it needs a lot more work before anyone can say that *nix has proper printing. This straw will break the camel's back if it stays there.

Sigh, time to reboot into Windows to print...

Re:he hit the nail on the head with CUPS (1)

aussersterne (212916) | more than 12 years ago | (#3066349)

I should have an easy print setup... my printer is a postscript printer with gobs of memory... and yet in KOffice nothing prints as it appears on-screen and printing from things like Konqueror doesn't work, because a single text page in Konqueror creates something like a 2MB job (!) in which all of the fonts come out very tiny, as though they were being printed as bitmaps instead of using the PostScript font facilities.

Printing from WordPerfect Office 2000 and Mozilla, on the other hand, works without a hitch, is very fast, and looks great.

Anyone else have experience with this kind of print problem and KDE? It's my one major complaint about KDE2... in every other way, it's great!

Mandrake 10? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3066247)

I can see it now, all the best open source including KDE 3.0, Mozilla 1.0, Open office 1.0, and Xfree86 5.0 :). Plus its fast and much better than a broken window :)

osnews... (0, Offtopic)

Derwen (219179) | more than 12 years ago | (#3066269)


"OSNews features an interesting interview with David Faure..."
Hey you've linked to so many interesting stories on osnews lately that I've changed my lynx homepage from slashdot to osnews.
Don't worry, though, I'll still open slashdot every day to *not* read the Jon Katz articles ;-)

- Derwen

Eugenia is having bandwidth issues... (-1, Redundant)

Mr. Quick (35198) | more than 12 years ago | (#3066275)

...she posted that her costs were getting really high, so here's the interview...

Interview with Mandrake's & KDE's David Faure

By Eugenia Loli-Queru - Posted on 2002-02-25 17:32:22
in OSNews [http://www.osnews.com/]

David Faure [http://people.mandrakesoft.com/~david/] is a well known developer in the KDE & Linux community. His work can be found in KFM, Konqueror source code and he recently also picked up KOffice's KWord [http://www.koffice.org] development. David is also one of the people who have commited in bug squashing under KDE, especially after he got hired by Mandrake Software. Read more for our interview with David regarding Konqueror, KDE object prelinking, Gnome and much more.

1. KDE 3 comes out soon. What is the best new advancement/feature found in KDE 3 in your opinion?

David Faure: I think the most important improvement in KDE3 is the greatly improved Javascript and DHTML support in Konqueror. I'm not only saying this because I took part in the work on Javascript, but also because this was said to be the most important drawback of Konqueror in KDE 2 by many users. The IMAP support in KMail comes to mind too, as an important new feature, for those using IMAP. KDE 3 is not a big architectural change (such as KDE 2.0 was), it is simply a continuation in the work on all applications, adding the features that the user requested, as well as improving speed and stability.

2. Are the KDE people going to do something for the C++ loader problem in Linux, which results on slow KDE loading times? Is the object prelinked method 'safe', or work is being done to the loader itself, to add the needed functionality?

David Faure: You said it all ;)
The linker has indeed been identified as a cause for slowdown when starting C++ applications. Work is being done in that area, though not by the KDE developers themselves. The objprelink method does not appear to be stable enough to work around this problem, it is known to be the reason for crashes in the Javascript engine and in KMail. I'm not aware of the details, but it seems objprelink is rather a "hack", i.e. a quick change that doesn't address the whole issue. On the other hand, rumours have it that the gcc/ld developers are working on prelinking, which is something different, cleaner, faster, and stable.

3. Some people call you the "KDE Bug Crasher". Windows enjoy the presense of some very advanced development tools, like the new VS.NET debugger or Purify/Quantify by Rational. How the Linux developers are coping when they are in need to debug big projects like KDE or Gnome or Star Office? What tools do you use and how they compare to the Windows equivelant?

David Faure: Those calling me that never told me :) Let's talk about the development tools then. In addition to the obvious compiler, debugger and text editor, Linux comes with pretty decent development tools such as XEmacs, vim, and kdevelop. On the subject of XEmacs, the KDE developers have been developing some macros (lisp code) that help developing C++ with it, this is available in kdesdk/scripts. For advanced debugging such as memory leaks, kmtrace (in kdesdk) seems to do a good job too. What was missing for a long time was a memory debugger, to detect use of uninitialized or deleted memory etc., such as Purify provides. This is now available thanks to Julian Seward, who developed a GPL tool call valgrind [http://devel-home.kde.org/~sewardj/].

Although still under development, this tool allows to find many non-obvious bugs in the code. But for the most common types of bugs (wrong code paths etc.) kdDebug() (the equivalent of printf or cout) and gdb do the job quite well ;)

4. What do you think about .NET the Framework? Have you had a look to this new API yet? What are your thoughts of dotGNU and Ximian's Mono?

David Faure: From what I've seen - I admit I haven't looked very much into the API though -, .NET is basically Microsoft's reinvention of Java, with the possibility for any object-oriented language to be compiled into C# bytecode, which isn't possible with Java itself. I'm quite fond of Java, and C# seems to be the same kind of language, but speed has always been a problem with Java. It can be either interpreted or compiled just in time, but none of those beat compiled code. However I realize that's primarily a problem in browsers, native applications written in either of those could be "pre-compiled" to native code, I suppose. But the idea of cross-platform applications written in any programming language is indeed appealing, and goes the right way in the long term. I'm just not too fond of using a Microsoft solution for that, as "open" as they claim it to be. For that reason, DotGNU looks much better to me than implementing Microsoft's .NET, if I understand DotGNU correctly.

Anyway, KDE's stand on the question is that "when we'll be at a point where we need to add support for .NET or DotGNU, we will, not before". So this might come when there are many .NET applications out there, primarily developed for Windows, and people will want to run those under Linux/Unix, with KDE/Qt widgets. The compiler and interpreter are independent from the desktop or toolkit anyway, so there is no need for developing KDE-specific versions of those. Personnally, I'd rather concentrate on providing the applications people need under Linux, such as a word processor (I work on KWord, part of KOffice). However, others seem more interested in this, and for instance a CLI disassembler has just been started by a KDE/Qt developer (see kdenonbeta/kcli in CVS).

Despite previous claims, Gnome is apparently in need for an object-oriented language, much more adapted to develop graphical applications, and this is probably why they are jumping to .NET much before KDE. For us and our users, C++ does the job just fine, I don't see us throwing that away just yet.

5. The two major browsers under Linux are Konqueror and Mozilla these days. However, both are not so responsive, many times they feel sluggish. What do you think about a KDE application that only uses the KHTML KPart to achieve the same goals and speed as Galeon does for Mozilla?

David Faure: The improvements I mentionned in the first paragraph are very related to this. KHTML has been much improved for KDE 3.0, making rendering noticeably faster, and the Javascript engine has been greatly sped up too. I think you are mistaken about Konqueror itself. The fact that it can embed other components than KHTML does not make it slower or more bloated than a separate application using KHTML. All it adds to KHTML is the user interface (menus and toolbars).

On that subject, one area of speed improvement in KDE 3 is that Konqueror's bookmarks are not loaded right away anymore, even when a bookmark toolbar is shown. To come back to the comparison with Galeon and Mozilla: the comparison doesn't stand. Those two are very different, whereas a separate application using KHTML and providing a user interface for it would end up being Konqueror itself! It's all about the same toolkit here, unlike the Galeon vs Mozilla case. Anyway, users should be pleased at the speed and stability improvements brought by KDE 3 - and I expect many more improvements to be done before the final release, since many KDE developers are meeting for a week of heavy bugfixing, in a few days.

6. Have you had a look at Gnome 2? What is your opinion of GTK+ 2 and Gnome 2?

David Faure: I am sorry to say that I haven't had a look at either of those. Users have time to look around and test things. Myself, I have two of the most used KDE applications (Konqueror and KWord) to attend to, and this keeps me quite busy, especially when added to sysadmin work for KDE, helping developers on the mailing-lists and IRC, writing articles about KDE development (see the article [http://www-106.ibm.com/developerworks/linux/libra ry/l-kparts/] I recently wrote about KParts for IBM developerWorks)... Believe it or not, time is always the limiting factor, even for a paid full-time developer.

7. Where do you see KDE in 1-2 years? What new features you would like to see added to the popular desktop environment?

David Faure: To be frank, I'm not really a "visionary". I have recently realized that all the major changes in KDE which I took part in, were all initiated by someone else, I simply joined in and offered my help, usually doing quite an important share of the work. This made me a bit sad, realizing I'm the man-power behind innovation, but not the innovator himself ;)

I guess it's my rather conservative nature ("better keep what we have and improve it than start from scratch and break everything"), although my work on KWord has been an exception to that ;).

Anyway, I hope to see KDE much more widely used, even more user-friendly, and I hope to see many more developers on KOffice - most people don't seem to realize how few developers are behind KOffice :).

In the long run, I'd really like to see many more KDE applications being developed, to cover everyone's needs. We are developing the applications that most people need (mail client, file manager, office suite etc.), but what's preventing many people from switching to Linux is the lack of more specialized applications. For instance, 3D modelling, audio/video editing, advanced scientific apps, accountancy apps... I know that there is some development in most of those areas, but at the moment it doesn't look like Linux provides as many specialized applications as Windows does, nor the same level of functionality. The relation with KDE is that it helps the user if all graphical applications have a consistent look-n-feel - with emphasis on behavior even more than on looks.

8. KOffice has come a long way. What is the roadmap for KWord, which is the specific part you maintain? What new features you would like to implement?

David Faure: The story of KWord development is that after KOffice-1.0, the original author switched to other things and no development happened at all anymore. After 6 months, and seeing the numerous requests from users, I decided to work on KWord, redesigning it around a new text layout engine - developed in Qt by the former KWord author, so experience was built upon, not lost. This work, with the help of a few other developers, has led to KOffice-1.1.1, which most people agree is the first useable version of KWord, stable and providing the most important features. Since then, I've been working on WYSIWYG support, frame z-order, and other developers have been working onimproved table handling and DCOP scriptability. Much work is still to be done, the users have requested many features, and that's basically the roadmap :). Personnally, I plan to look at background spell-checking (underlining mispelled words during typing), page size handling, footnotes, double-underline, and then looking at the buglist again to see what else is missing ;)

9. There is a lot of talk lately, both camps with good arguments as to if Linux will make it on the desktop or not. What do you think? What should be done on Linux to become easily administrated/maintaned by the average JoeUser?

David Faure: I do think that Linux will make it on the desktop. I think it has already made it to some desktops, and will continue to improve, thanks to user-friendly interfaces such as KDE, "konquering" (pun intended) JoeUser's desktop.

My own family is obviously the testing bed for this, I have my own usability labs in the persons of my wife, her sister and my parents.

I think that what is currently missing for non-technical users is better error reporting (e.g. sending errors to log files is not enough - any CUPS developer listening? ;), and more focus on stability everywhere - users should never ever have to face a crash. System administration has finally been made rather accessible, especially thanks to the distributor's tools, but this was also a crucial missing point for long, and it surely still needs improvements. As far as KDE is concerned, the portability on all Unix flavours doesn't always make things easy. For instance I have been working on a "share this directory" feature for Mandrake, as a Konqueror patch, but this hasn't been integrated to KDE itself yet due to the numerous differences between Linux distributions, and between Unix variants.

10. What do you think of MacOSX and the way they have wrapped Unix under a pretty and usable desktop?

David Faure: See the question about Gnome. I haven't had time to have a look, but the idea sounds quite nice. Wrapping Unix in a pretty and useable desktop is exactly what KDE is about, but the main difference is that KDE is free and opensource :)

( Original Story URL at http://www.osnews.com/story.php?news_id=704 )
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Re:Eugenia is having bandwidth issues... (0, Offtopic)

(startx) (37027) | more than 12 years ago | (#3066292)

nice karma whoring.....

Re:Eugenia is having bandwidth issues... (2)

Mr. Quick (35198) | more than 12 years ago | (#3066307)

http://www.osnews.com/story.php?news_id=586

read this...

Re:Eugenia is having bandwidth issues... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3066299)

Reproduction of stories by OSNews is granted only by explicitly asking authorization from OSNews and if credit is given to OSNews.com.

Re:Eugenia is having bandwidth issues... (1)

Mr. Quick (35198) | more than 12 years ago | (#3066320)

oops... well, that was a mistake...
i did give credit though...

Re:Eugenia is having bandwidth issues... (3, Informative)

Eugenia Loli (250395) | more than 12 years ago | (#3066392)

Mr Quick,
if you can, PLEASE edit OUT the copy/paste you did on Slashdot of the OSNews article. The bandwidth problems we have is mostly when we have MANY and BIG images on our articles, NOT on articles like this. Please edit out our article from the Slashdot forum. It is a violation of our copyright. You should have asked us first... :(

Thank you,
Eugenia

Re:Eugenia is having bandwidth issues... (1)

mESSDan (302670) | more than 12 years ago | (#3066521)

Slashdot doesn't work like that, it has no post editing capabilities.

Kind of funny that you have an account here but didn't know that.

Re:Eugenia is having bandwidth issues... (0, Offtopic)

prizzznecious (551920) | more than 12 years ago | (#3066539)

Thank you! Your letter will be duly added to the archives at ChillingEffects.org, the internet's Cease & Desist letter repository!

Re:Eugenia is having bandwidth issues... (1)

segfaultdot (462810) | more than 12 years ago | (#3066647)

If everyone gets upset when someone "caches" a web site on /. in case it get's /.'ed, then my karma whoring days are over. :(

It's funny. Laugh.

Re:Eugenia is having bandwidth issues... (2)

rlowe69 (74867) | more than 12 years ago | (#3066785)

Please edit out our article from the Slashdot forum. It is a violation of our copyright. You should have asked us first..

I'm sorry, but there's just a fine line here. If half the people out there can't read the article because it's Slashdotted, how can you benefit? Would you rather Slashdot not link you at all?

I don't know how many times I've had to read an article from a post because the site gets railed. Frankly, I'm glad there are people like Mr. Quick out there - otherwise I'd miss half the articles on this site.

Don't look a gift horse in the mouth.

ingenious (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3066839)

If half the people out there can't read the article because it's Slashdotted, how can you benefit? Would you rather Slashdot not link you at all?

Gotta love it when dipshits on /. tell
people how to run their business.

Me, I'd trust a /. weenie to tell me what
I want any day of the week. But I wouldn't
presume to try to convince anyone that
what I thought they needed was actually what
they needed.

You must be a consultant.

Re:Eugenia is having bandwidth issues... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3066956)

How is it a gift horse? Posting the entire article here robs the publisher of his/her rightful traffic. That they are currently overloaded (an assertion which I find no evidence to support) is scarcely an excuse. That's like saying you have a right to copy books all over the place because the bookstore is temporarily out of stock.

Re:Eugenia is having bandwidth issues... (3, Interesting)

Eugenia Loli (250395) | more than 12 years ago | (#3066996)

>I'm sorry, but there's just a fine line here.

Indeed.

>If half the people out there can't read the article because it's Slashdotted.

This is the fine line. OSNews is *NOT* Slashdotted. Slashdot has linked us over *25 times* the last few months, and we were never down because of it. We are always prepared for Slashdot. We have the bandwidth needed for Slashdot's links and we delivered accordingly.

Each time I put a bigger article online, I calculate what we can handle and what not. If our bandwidth can't handle something, I just do not put it online, or I use one of our 4 mirrors (OSNews uses some mirrors for some of its images).

So, your excuse does not hold. At least in this case.

OSama Bin Larger has a slashdot account! (-1)

OsamaBinLager (532628) | more than 12 years ago | (#3066279)

Click here [slashdot.org]

Ashamed Mandrake User (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3066281)

I really like mandrake, but God, why did the French have to make it? I'm so ashamed.

how come (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3066282)

How come that the very first beta of KDE 3 was so nice, and all the following betas are so unstable? :-)

KDE 3: The Windows Killer

other interviews (3, Informative)

I Want GNU! (556631) | more than 12 years ago | (#3066300)

Here [linux.org] is an interview that he with linux.org. A little outdated but still interesting.

FREE SLASHDOT ACCOUNT! (-1)

OsamaBinLager (532628) | more than 12 years ago | (#3066301)

Click here [slashdot.org]

HaHaHaHa! (-1)

OsamaBinLager (532628) | more than 12 years ago | (#3066312)

CMDR Lamo and friends have changed the default order by to be newest first.....

Cooleo! Now I have the first post!

Linux Portal (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3066319)

Linux Buttsex HOW-TO

by Alan Cocks

Introduction

This HOW-TO explains how to perform Buttsex in the Linux Operating System w/Enterprise Resources (LOSER). This HOW-TO assumes basic knowledge of general Linux operation.

Preparation
Most basically, all Linux Buttsex requires is a machine running the Linux Operating System, a penis (also referred to as a "cock" or "dick"), and a willing friend. However, you benefit greatly, especially when starting out, if you posess standard Buttsex tools.

Standard Buttsex Tools

Lubricant - Slippery stuff you smear on your johnson and your friend's manpussy, to ease the transition into Buttsex mode. Vaseline will do in a pinch, but water-based lubricants such as KY Jelly and Astroglide are preferable.
Contraception - Protective barrier between your schlong and the inside of your friend's love canal. Breeders use them to prevent pregnancy, but we queer nancies usually use them to protect ourselves from the deadly AIDS virus. While some enterprising faggots have made do with plastic wrap or masking tape, there is no substitute for a latex condom. Most all condoms will do, as long as they aren't the "extra-thin" type. Some condoms are labelled as beiong superior for Buttsex, but are not necessary.

Step One -- Prepare the Anus
This step is especially important if your friend has never taken a willie in the ass before. Prepare his anus for the width and girth of your manhood with the "finger" command. It is used like so:

% finger [insert your friend's name here]

Begin with your index or middle finger, and then both middle AND index fingers, at the same time. Ten to fifteen minutes should do. If you wish, you may felate him or suck his balls, while you're fingering him.

Step Two -- Entry
Here the fun starts. Have your friend lay prone on the bed, or even better, get down "on all fours". Optionally, place a couple pillows beneath him to make him more comfortable. Now position yourself behind him, and spread his asscheeks. Apply lubricant, generously, to both your sexrod, and his pit of pleasure. It is advisable to stick your fingers partially inside in his anus, to make sure that the entire edge of the entry is covered.

Your penis must be fully erect in order to make a sucessful entry. If you are not already "hard as a rock", you may rub your penis in his asscrack, while tweaking his nipples (or stroking his cock), and saying intimidating things, such as "I am going to make you squeal like a pig, boy. Squeal, like a pig!".

When your sexstick is sufficiently engorged with blood, it is time to being entry. Place the head of your cock firmly against his brown anal starfish. Begin applying firm pressure forwards, optionally using your hand to guide your dick on a true course into sodomy. Your friend is most likely moaning in agony or yelping, and you may either ignore this, or in a snide tone, say "You like that, bitch?".

When your penis is in, move on to the next step.

Step Three -- Hardcore Assramming
This is fairly simple. Move your dick around in his ass, towards and then back, at varying speeds. If for some reason your dick pops out, put in back in, undaunted. Continue pumping and thrusting until you feel you are ready to move on to Step Four.

Step Four -- Orgasm
When ready to blow your load, use this command:

% stdout > ass

This redirects your standard output stream into your friend's pink tunnel of shit. Enter the command, then with one final thrust, placing the entire length of your cock inside his body. Your penis will then eject about a quart of sticky white semen, accompanied by tremendous pleasure.

Step Five -- Cleanup

If you wore a condom, cleanup is simple. Remove the condom and toss it out your window. Then sop up any other jizz, anal juice, shit, or lubricant with Brawny(R) brand paper towels.

If you did not wear a condom, your friend will have a steady drip of cum out of his ass for the next few hours. Tell him to "buck up" and stuff some toilet paper in his underwear.

Afterward

Congratulations! You are now a l337 LUN1X 4$$r4mm3r, just like Linux Toreballs and his gay minions! Celebrate by masturbating to the sensual gay erotica found at http://www.goatse.cx/ .

Troubleshooting

My penis isn't long enough to get past the buttcheeks!
Only Jon Katz has this problem. Jon, I've told you to just get the damned surgery.

I have a really small penis, but it's still difficult to get in in the ass!
Only Jon Katz has this problem, because he fucks little boys. Jon, get the damned surgery, and find a lover over the age of 12.

Do you know where I can find kiddie pr0n?
Please go away, Katz.

Re:Linux Portal (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3066354)

his name is Anal Cocks and not Alan Cocks.

Bad use of the word hack (0, Redundant)

felipeal (177452) | more than 12 years ago | (#3066337)

I'm not aware of the details, but it seems objprelink is rather a "hack", i.e. a quick change that doesn't address the whole issue.

I undesrtand what he tried to explain, but I think it gives a negative conotation to term "hack", which already has a bad reputation of meaning "crack" (thanks mainly to the mainstream press).

Given the fact that the audience of the site is not yout typical Joe-AOL dude, the author could have ommitted that i.e. explanation without compromising his answer...

Re:Bad use of the word hack (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3066411)

get over it already...

Re:Bad use of the word hack (1)

gregfortune (313889) | more than 12 years ago | (#3066946)

Please tell me you've spoke of something you wrote as "an evil hack", "an ugly hack", "a shweeeet hack", etc.... Oh, that's right, I forget we have mortals among us sometimes..

New Features (1)

beowulf_26 (512332) | more than 12 years ago | (#3066350)

"KDE 3 comes out soon. What is the best new advancement/feature found in KDE 3 in your opinion?"

Heheh, screw functionality and "the greatly improved Javascript and DHTML support in Konqueror". What users REALLY want is translucent window backgrounds [kde.org] .

Seriously though, it does look might sweet. :-P

Re:New Features (-1)

anal-johnson (528597) | more than 12 years ago | (#3066721)

that's transparent konsole, already in kde 2, dickweed.

Re:New Features (2)

Arandir (19206) | more than 12 years ago | (#3066725)

What users REALLY want is translucent window backgrounds

They already have it. You're screen shot shows a transparent konsole. That's been around since 2.0.

this is true (3, Insightful)

donglekey (124433) | more than 12 years ago | (#3066368)

but what's preventing many people from switching to Linux is the lack of more specialized applications. For instance, 3D modelling, audio/video editing, advanced scientific apps, accountancy apps...

This is very true. People talk about Linux 'taking over the desktop' which is good, but there is much more immediate niches to fill in other areas. They are good spot for Linux because the people doing that need a complete system, but don't need it to work with every other computer out there, and aren't worried about being able to buy the latest games etc. Printing is another one which he didn't mention but someone here did. Linux needs a better print system, and whoever is in a position to do it could probably even take a look at MacOS X for some very good ideas. 3D is getting the royal treatment and is a very good place for linux right now with XFS, ReiserFS, PRman, BMRT, Mental Ray, Maya, Shake, Softimage XSI 2.0, Houdini, and all sorts of high end graphics stuff, no 3D production studio is locked into windows or SGI anymore. Video and audio on the other hand, really need work. The video toaster ran on an Amiga for fucks sake, that should be proof that ultimate compatibility isn't needed and a self reliant system can do the job well. This is where I really see Linux taking off, is with distributions specifically made for different niches. They could come with all the libraries needed for the different programs you might run, and of course have all the free ones already installed. It will take a few startups to do something like this, however, and startups aren't in a good position right now.

Re:this is true (5, Interesting)

digitalhermit (113459) | more than 12 years ago | (#3066590)

This is where I really see Linux taking off, is with distributions specifically made for different niches.


This is a good point; the appeal of Linux is ultimately the ease by which it can be tailored to different audiences. This is not to say that the audience should do the tailoring, but that an interested party *could* do it. For example, I'm still looking for a distribution tailored to the needs of a student. I.e., one containing a bunch of necessary mathematics and beginning programming applications, good mp3 and DVD support, ability to talk with Macs and Windows with equal ease, good word processing tools with automatic formatting of documents for English 101, etc.. All these packages already exist, but no one actually puts them together as an integrated solution. As a result you have students trying out Linux, but having to boot back into Winders to do their research paper in a pirated copy of Word.

Re:this is true (2, Insightful)

abdulla (523920) | more than 12 years ago | (#3066779)

i don't see how XFS and Maya go together, but i'm trying to see your point through an onion skin

Mr. Faure seems to ignore the competition a bit. (3, Interesting)

Bollie (152363) | more than 12 years ago | (#3066375)

About .NET:
From what I've seen - I admit I haven't looked very much into the API though

About GNOME 2 and GTK+ 2:
I am sorry to say that I haven't had a look at either of those.

IMHO this is not necessarily a bad thing. Designing software from a "fresh" perspective allows for innovation and truly creative ideas. However, I think the time has come for KDE and GNOME to cooperate. It was a brilliant idea having two competing desktops, but unfortunately today we are stuck with two desktops (if you don't count the other windowmanagers and wannabes) where half of the apps work on one and their counterparts are broken on the other.

A common ground would go a heck of a long way into solidifying the toehold Linux has in the desktop market. Actually, if Gnome and KDE merges somehow (where the best of each survives) we might not get stuck in a world where equivalent apps have complementary bugs.

Yes, yes, I know that KDE apps run in Gnome and vice versa, but the best browser for Linux (Mozilla, all the way!) is based on a different model entirely.

I hope the next hackers set upon Gnome and/or KDE are given the task of interoperability in stead of writing another "equivalent" app.

Urg. Tired of ranting. must go sleep now.

NIH (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3066724)


IMHO this is not necessarily a bad thing. Designing software from a "fresh" perspective allows for innovation and truly creative ideas.



Yes it is necessarily a bad thing.
The model to follow should be "keep the good,
lose the bad". You can't do that working
in a vacuum.

Have you ever heard of the disease NIH?
It runs rampant in Linux-oriented communities.
It's toll is grievous, and it is among
the most difficult diseases to treat.

Successful treatment of the NIH disease consists
of a constant ego check, as well as reminding
oneself that they aren't the smartest fuck on the
planet and that someone smarter than them probably
already solved the particular problem in question.
It's a very difficult mindset to maintain, and
only the most disciplined of developers is ever
able to sustain it for long periods of time.

toolkits vs. desktops (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3066749)

Your rant is misdirected.

Most of your comments are re: toolkits,
not re: desktops.

Keep in mind that Xt plus (Motif, Athen, OW)
provided the "one ring to rule them all"
and it was written in the early 80's.

All this Qt, GTK, Mozilla crap has only surfaced
recently. I agree with the other coward re: NIH.

The problem with having two toolkits (2)

javilon (99157) | more than 12 years ago | (#3066382)

Is that people ends up not writing configuration utilities for any of them.
They rather write a html administration tool, and this is not allways the best option.

If the kde is going to keep breaking ground, they should start thinking about writing kde/qt configuration tools for XFree, samba, cups, networking, fstab, nfs, maybe apache, sendmail, etc. Basically all the tools that come now from the distros but are different for each of them.
Something like a linuxconf front end. This toguether with LSB, could give us an easy to administer system.

Also, They could write a xml DTD for configuration files, where the configuration gui is generated automatically from the configuration file. This would unify the mess we are in with all different configuration file formats.

Re:The problem with having two toolkits (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3066578)

They could probably just take the ximian setup tools and change the front ends to qt/kde. I assume this would be possible.

More info on Faure... (2, Informative)

Bish.dk (547663) | more than 12 years ago | (#3066393)

Can be found at the dot. [kde.org]

Read All About It @# +3 ; Fomenting #@ (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3066418)

Read about the

The Unholy Trinity [democratic...ground.com]

Re:Read All About It @# +3 ; Fomenting #@ (0, Offtopic)

dinotrac (18304) | more than 12 years ago | (#3066515)

I see the left-wing hate groups are still out their doing their thing.

Freedom must really bug those guys.

Hoard SMP malloc library and MicroQuill (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3066431)

the letter, and a request for prior art:

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/hoard/message/273 [yahoo.com]

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/hoard/message/274 [yahoo.com]

and finally surrender...

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/hoard/message/276 [yahoo.com]

posted to wrong slashdot story - mod away (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3066491)

oops

Thanks for the work! (5, Insightful)

bluGill (862) | more than 12 years ago | (#3066439)

To be frank, I'm not really a "visionary". I have recently realized that all the major changes in KDE which I took part in, were all initiated by someone else, I simply joined in and offered my help, usually doing quite an important share of the work.

Thank you! We don't need more visionaries. Anyone can be visionary. I'm a visionary, and I have a lot of ideas. We don't really need more though. We need someone with the dedication to get the work done. Once the current vision is achived we need the next one. (actually we need some overlap there)

Remember, anyone can have an idea. good ideas are rare. Someone willing to do the work to make an idea reality is not common. So for those who get the work done: Thank you.

Refreshment (0, Troll)

salmo (224137) | more than 12 years ago | (#3066444)

I just wanted to say that this article was refreshing. He cited lack of knowledge and refused to answer rather than falling into the flamewar trap the interviewer was trying to set with the GNOME and Mac OSX questions.

Socrates would be proud! Remember kids: "Know thyself".

David Faure (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3066625)

I thought Mandrake's name is Geoff Harrison..?

Artists and KParts (2, Interesting)

abdulla (523920) | more than 12 years ago | (#3066809)

I'm a big KDE fan, so i'll get that out of the way, but I think KDE REALLY needs a flash designer/artist to make the whole thing looks spanky, i mean from the programming perspective its a work of art, but from the aesthetic view, someone needs to give it a coat of paint Just with Kparts, I was just thinking there might be a faster way to make applications aware of plugins and use them no matter what type of plugin they are, this is just arbitrary thought, until i actually try something i can't know how right or wrong i am
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