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Glowing Nanobots Map Microscopic Surfaces

timothy posted more than 12 years ago | from the sure-they-do dept.

Science 16

parad0x writes: "This article in Nature describes researchers at the University of Washington in Seatlle developing molecular robots which can produce maps of microscopic structures and devices with extremely high revolution, at times exceeding the abilities of conventional microscopes."

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proofreaders drinking on the job again? (2, Funny)

KnightStalker (1929) | more than 12 years ago | (#3067509)

devices with extremely high revolution,

Cool! High-res maps of propellers in motion!

Borg? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3067512)

UW is nearby Redmond...

Nano-bo...

uh oh...

LONG LIVE HIS MAJESTY HENGIST DUVAL! (-1)

Crapflooder (554043) | more than 12 years ago | (#3067682)

Yes, dear people, it's like that, who did not want to travel to the US sometimes and do it anally there? Indeed, everyone has played several times with this thought already.

Many may be deterred now by intensified controls at the airports before flights with US airlines. These would be extremely well suited for anyone wanting to benefit from hard anal sex during the flight.

You may also ask yourself now, what else the USians do, apart from having anal parties? Jaaa, they plug their US flags into their anuses! After that some of them have been astonished, why the stars are suddenly brown instead of white! Oh shit, the USians then cry, and launch a few F-16s to demonstrate they can also do it at supersonic speeds... and from behind!!

This inventor spirit is unique in the world and should be rewarded with a heavy load in the ass. But nevertheless, not here in Germany; why, such a ripped apart USian is a disturbance, and only available to people over 18. In the sales compartment behind the curtain, of course. For the real fanatics there is the same model also with a swastika, tattooed on the balls, if there still are some. And who hasn't experienced an anal orgasm yet? If not, dial into the Telekom network and ask behind the backdoor of the dragon around the corner!

Happy holidays, and keep your eggs warm, it's Easter time soon!

10,000 resolutions per minute. (1)

English Nazi (561761) | more than 12 years ago | (#3067942)

1. Seattle. Not Seatlle.
2. Resolution. Not revolution. Unless you're referring to my freshman English teacher, spinning in her grave.

No way! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3068604)

You mean, no one cares about another nano tech 'breakthrough?'

omg,..is anyone not amazed about this? (1)

nicene (142288) | more than 12 years ago | (#3068720)

HOLY SH*T. is any one not astounded by this article? i noticed that no one has commented about these nanobots. either the article is a joke or it must be a really bad@ss technology. i'm willing to give it the benefit of the doubt. what does everyone else think?

Re:omg,..is anyone not amazed about this? (1)

cp99 (559733) | more than 12 years ago | (#3068821)

Given that it's been published in one the best scientific journals, and that there is nothing unbelivable in it, I'd say that it isn't a joke.

Re:omg,..is anyone not amazed about this? (2)

Negadecimal (78403) | more than 12 years ago | (#3072926)

i noticed that no one has commented about these nanobots

Well they're not really nanobots... at least not in the sense that they're manmade, capable of motion, or even controllable.

What these guys have called nanobots are nothing but tiny fragments of microtubules. They "move" about the cell by being pushed around by kinesin proteins coating the membrane surface...kind of like surfing across a big mosh pit.

Our cells contain kinesin molecules that blindly "walk" down the length of microtubules, moving cargo from one part of a cell to another. If anything, these are the real nanobots, since they actually do the moving.

Nanotechnology (1)

Guru1 (521726) | more than 12 years ago | (#3071268)

I've found that this site: http://www.nanotechplanet.com/ [nanotechplanet.com] is a great reference to the business side of the nanotechnology field. If you're interested in learning more about the current research going on, or about what company to invest in, I think it's a pretty good starting point.

Self-propelled nanobots? (2, Interesting)

Guru1 (521726) | more than 12 years ago | (#3071351)

To create self-propelled nanoscale robots, Vogel's team reversed nature's arrangement. By fixing kinesin molecules all over a surface, wormlike microtubules propel themselves randomly all over the surface. By attaching a fluorescent dye to the microtubules, the researchers can follow where they go - and where they don't.

Anyone else notice the slight jump in nanotechnology? Just a few months ago scientists were excited because someone had made a very small bull: http://www.nanotechnews.com/nano/997993091/index_h tml [nanotechnews.com] .

While I understand the bull is a lot smaller, the actual light & movement from these new nanobots seems to be a much more utilitarian view of nanotechnology.

Interesting yet incomplete (1)

bigmouth_strikes (224629) | more than 12 years ago | (#3071789)

It would have been nice to see the article compare this to the latest technologies in STM (scanning tunneling microscopy).

It seems like STM's are not what is referred to as conventional microscopes, which makes sense, but it might be noteworthy that resolutions like those mentioned in the article are not particularly hard to achieve.

Re:Interesting yet incomplete (2)

Negadecimal (78403) | more than 12 years ago | (#3072786)

It would have been nice to see the article compare this to the latest technologies in STM (scanning tunneling microscopy).

It doesn't compare. These images are film/CCD captured. What these guys have done is to put flourescent molecules on proteins that "walk" down microtubules. So instead of just seeing the whole microtubule skeleton at once (which you could do with a specific stain), you see a version that "develops" as the proteins traverse it. Yea.

Re:Interesting yet incomplete (1)

Negadecimal (78403) | more than 12 years ago | (#3072962)

What these guys have done is to put flourescent molecules on proteins that "walk" down microtubules.

I got that backwards. See my earlier post. Flourescent microtubule fragments are randomly pushed around on a fixed surface of kinesin.

artificial life? (1)

Merik (172436) | more than 12 years ago | (#3081124)

So, they took a molecular tube structure normally found in cell walls called tubulin, then they attached "motor protiens" called kinesin that are also found in living cells.

so now you have a little piece of cell wall !crawling ! around.

So we construct a "self-propelled nanoscale robot" out of cellular material.

If we found something similar to these robots on another planet? Wouldn't we consider it, a simple form life?

Sheesh, I'm only 22, I'm going to see some f$@#ed things in my life.

folks, that's molecular biology (3, Insightful)

markj02 (544487) | more than 12 years ago | (#3082083)

This is molecular biology. Very neat molecular biology, to be sure. But it has nothing to do with nanotechnology. If you call this stuff "nanobots", then your big toe is mostly composed of nanobots.

Nature, feh. (1)

petie123 (562575) | more than 12 years ago | (#3087570)

Sorry, but Nature is often more tabloid than journal. Same for Science. Remember cold fusion? Of course ya do.
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