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Netscape 6 is Spyware?

michael posted more than 12 years ago | from the green-dinosaur-now-more-threatening dept.

Netscape 656

spoon00 writes: "AOL is collecting information on what Netscape 6 users are searching for on sites like google.com. IP address, the date Netscape was installed and a unique ID number are other bits of information AOL is also collecting."

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FP! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3131883)

FP! FP! FP!

eat it buffs (-1)

trollercoaster (250101) | more than 12 years ago | (#3131884)


102-73

any surprise? (0, Troll)

lostkeyes (321776) | more than 12 years ago | (#3131887)

Really once aol took over is this any real surprise?

Re:any surprise? (0)

The MoMo King (562894) | more than 12 years ago | (#3131940)

Not really ... but its sad when a one time good guy turn bad.

Re:any surprise? (5, Insightful)

Zeinfeld (263942) | more than 12 years ago | (#3132069)

Really once aol took over is this any real surprise?

I hope so because that is what any privacy suit would turn on. Does the user expect AOL to intercept searches and log the results?

The Windows XP 'powertool' has a very useful feature that allows you to enter a shortcut for a search engine. So if I type 'g privacy' it sends off a search to Google for 'privacy'.

I just hope that the Slashdot community will have the guts to go after AOL for this in the same way they would Microsoft. As it is I suspect the response will be a bit like the response in Congress to administration stonewalling or the like. Outrage at the actions if it is the other party, appologism if it is their own party, or even outrage that people would even complain.

Netscape has never been pro-privacy. They invented cookies so that advertisers could track readers and now they are tracking them directly themselves.

Figures! (0)

optize (248582) | more than 12 years ago | (#3131888)

We can't get any privacy around here at all. Every program we run has some kind of SPY thing with it.

Re:Figures! (-1, Troll)

MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM (537317) | more than 12 years ago | (#3132085)

Talking about privacy. Please stop dancing like a lunatic while you are in the shower, I'm only interested to look at your genitals.

Big Surprise (1, Redundant)

Heem (448667) | more than 12 years ago | (#3131889)

I hope this doesn't come as a surprise to anyone. Sell something to AOL and say goodbye to privacy. I just hope it does not effect any Mozilla releases.

Re:Big Surprise (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3132045)

Care to explain HOW this could affect Mozilla releases, considering the Mozilla/Netscape source has already been released?

first post! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3131892)

Everyone that's at Caltech is gay!

So is /.!

F*CK THE POLICE!!!!!!

Ian Fette, MC motherfuckin P

AOL/Netscape (-1, Troll)

Tin Weasil (246885) | more than 12 years ago | (#3131893)

Just another reason to use Konqueror and an Open Source / Free OS.

Re:AOL/Netscape (-1, Flamebait)

Markusis (46739) | more than 12 years ago | (#3131954)

This may be a reason to use konqueror, but it has nothing to do with open source or which OS is used. I'm fairly sure that this is happening with Linux versions of Netscape 6, and even if it isn't...it still has nothing to do with the OS. Oh, and just a reminder, Netscape 6 is OSS. :o)

Re:AOL/Netscape (2, Informative)

reaper20 (23396) | more than 12 years ago | (#3132033)

You wouldn't happen to have a link to the NS 6.2.1 source code would you? There isn't one.

Netscape 6 is definately NOT OSS ... Mozilla is.

Re:AOL/Netscape (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3132072)

Hello, mod the parent down, please. Netscape 6 is not open source, it is closed source ona all platforms. If it was open I could recompile it and get rid of the "feature". The paren post is extremely ignorant

Re:AOL/Netscape (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3131972)

Just another reason to use Konqueror and an Open Source / Free OS.

Yeah, cause Open Source / Free OS really matters here.

Come on, if you are gonna spout off the usual /. bigotry, stick to the subject.
Mozilla and Konqeror, yes... but free OS?
Netscape on Linux (note, linux is an Open Source / Free OS) still gets tracked.

Re:AOL/Netscape (1)

Viqsi (534904) | more than 12 years ago | (#3131976)

Konqueror over Mozilla? Maybe from a UI perspective, but they're still not quite up to speed with standards. Konqueror's CSS2 support right now is somewhere just below MSIE's.

(disclaimers vs. kneejerk replies: a) Note very carefully that I said CSS2. Konq's CSS1 support is excellent. b) I haven't played with any KDE 3 betas. I hear it's improved a bit. The point still remains, though, that at current Konq's CSS2 support is substandard.)

So?? (1)

dagoalieman (198402) | more than 12 years ago | (#3131900)

It seems to me everytime we see this stuff, the spyware is generally nested in something intended to make your life easier. Password storers, quick search buttons, etc. Yes, we complain about it every time.

But maybe we should keep this in mind, and look at those type programs to find the real offenders.

Re:So?? (2, Funny)

nickyj (142376) | more than 12 years ago | (#3131950)

Correct... the next wave is a browser that goes to the site you wanted based off your past browsing pattern. Load up Nutscrape at 4am and it knows your looking for porn, and BAM! it's in your face as the startup page. :P

Re:So?? (1)

jeffy124 (453342) | more than 12 years ago | (#3131983)

rtfa. The netscape software is actually connecting out to a server whenever one does a search from the address bar. The server is not the one the user wants to use for a search. why submitter wrote in google is anyone's guess

Re:So?? (0)

nickyj (142376) | more than 12 years ago | (#3132018)

If you ever used Netscape 6 you can change your default search engine to Google instead of the defaulted Netscape Search Engine. There are actually 5 default engines to choose from, and they all come up in the sidebar search and popup when searching from the URL input.

Re:So?? (1)

dagoalieman (198402) | more than 12 years ago | (#3132079)

It goes to the server that the person intends, but it just takes a small stop inbetween. Not, per se, spyware, but good enough for government and techie posting board's work.

I wasn't saying So about the searching. I was saying So, because we should expect it by now.

Glad I use mozilla... (2, Informative)

Exantrius (43176) | more than 12 years ago | (#3131903)

...But this is a non-issue. According to the article it only affects those that type it into the search bar...

...Which I don't use because google is my homepage...
/ex

Re:Glad I use mozilla... (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3131942)

Google is your homepage? Do you consider yourself a multi-billion company, or are you simply retarded? :-p

Re:Glad I use mozilla... (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3131959)

What the fuck does that mean?

Are you retarded?

Re:Glad I use mozilla... (1, Redundant)

Gaijin42 (317411) | more than 12 years ago | (#3132035)

He means that google isnt your homepage, its your startpage. google is the homepage of the google corporation.

Your homepage (if you have one) is a page about you!

Re:Glad I use mozilla... (4, Insightful)

reaper20 (23396) | more than 12 years ago | (#3131995)

True, but considering that a lot of people still think that Mozilla == Netscape, it still becomes a problem for Mozilla, granted it's only perception, but try explaining that to the "average" user.

Re:Glad I use mozilla... (4, Insightful)

FatRatBastard (7583) | more than 12 years ago | (#3132050)

Show me the "average" user who even knows what Mozilla is!

I'm not knocking the browser, its the browser of choice on my Lin box, but lets face facts: its a geek browser. Joe user has no idea what it is.

Re:Glad I use mozilla... (4, Insightful)

AlexDeGruven (565036) | more than 12 years ago | (#3132031)

The problem with that is, it works exactly the way they want it to. The computer savvy people in the world know what they want to search for, and how to find the engine of their choice. What they're targeting are the inexperienced users who don't know any better. They are the ones that will actually use the Netscape search function, and not notice the fact that your information is being redirected to the parent company before it actually goes where you intended it.
It falls under the same category as the Ameritech/SBC debacle here in MI. People who don't read all the way through their phone bill may not have noticed the "SBC/Ameritech intends to sell it's customer data to a 3rd party marketing firm, if you don't want your information to be included, be sure to call 800-xxx-xxxx to be removed from the list." in very fine print in an obscure section of the bill.
Hardline marketing strikes again.

Re:Glad I use mozilla... (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3132046)

Have you personally done an audit on the source to Mozilla? If not, how do you know it isn't doing the same thing?

What's the betting... (1, Insightful)

Jon Chatow (25684) | more than 12 years ago | (#3131905)

... that this is an overblown response over a mistake, thinking that the crash reports might be sending spyware-like data - e.g. which windows are open right now and their URIs, etc? And, umm, the IPs would be part of that TCP/IP connection.

Well, it's worth considering. But then, I use Mozilla nightlies, so I'm submitting pretty often...

Re:What's the betting... (1)

Titanium Angel (557780) | more than 12 years ago | (#3131986)

I don't think so. I mean, AOL bought them, and what can we expect from them? Personally, I am not surprised. Since Microsoft killed off Netscape, they've been in big problems, and AOL might see spyware as a last resort to collect some money by selling the info to third party companies and/or using it for some in-house analysis.

AOL IS evil after all, right? :)

Re:What's the betting... (0, Offtopic)

Pope Slackman (13727) | more than 12 years ago | (#3132068)

... that this is an overblown response over a mistake,

It's funny how since this is about Netscape, this comment got modded up.
I'd bet you a round of beers that if this article was about IE, you'd already be at "Troll" or "Flamebait".

C-X C-S

Re:What's the betting... (2)

phil reed (626) | more than 12 years ago | (#3132074)

Uh, no. This was reported in Risks Digest a couple of days ago. If you type a search into the location bar, even if you have selected Google as your search engine, the request is also sent to Netscape. It was verified by watching the data go through a proxy - the browser was contacting Google and Netscape/AOL.

Mozilla (-1, Redundant)

bobibleyboo (13303) | more than 12 years ago | (#3131907)

Does this affect mozilla as well?

Big deal (2, Informative)

cnkeller (181482) | more than 12 years ago | (#3131908)

You're getting a product for free. If netscape needs information to sell/share to it's partners so it can get more revenue and keep producing great products, that's fine. You don't have to use their browser. A more interesting question is that did you agree to it in the EULA?

Re:Big deal (1)

LoveShack (190582) | more than 12 years ago | (#3131984)

Great products? I really fail to see how Netscape qualifies as a great product. Mozilla...yeah, I think that's pretty great. But once AOL has its tendrils wrapped around it...really, they should pay me to use it. Stealing my info? Certainly not. Though the EULA thing is a good point. It just doesn't relate to the greatness of the product.

Any data mining a product does on user (5, Insightful)

Vicegrip (82853) | more than 12 years ago | (#3132008)

behavior and information is something a product should clearly and regularly identify it is doing to the customer. Customers are generally willing to cooperate when they perceive there is value to the free product/service they are getting-- but only if they understand exactly what is being recorded, when, and how.

Having to worry about software doing stuff behind your back without informing you is exactly the reason why I go to great lengths to avoid using Windows Media and why I don't use a number of current gnutella clients.

What great product? (1)

whos_opie (561271) | more than 12 years ago | (#3132028)

True, but the only problem with that argument is that bundled Netscape isnt a great product. Perhaps if Netscape still rocked we could cut them some slack...

Is this really a problem for us? (2, Insightful)

DickPhallus (472621) | more than 12 years ago | (#3131909)

I mean how many people actually use NS6?

Anytime a Navigator user performs a search by typing terms into the browser's URL bar and pressing the adjacent Search button, or by using the Search tab on the browser's My Sidebar feature

And out of those that do, how many use the URL bar to search?

Personally, I don't give a rip, 'cos I don't use NS and never will...

Re:Is this really a problem for us? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3131968)

>I mean how many people actually use NS6?

And by that comment, I sure hope you mean that everybody should be switching to Opera or something else than NS6, 'cause I sure as hell won't use MSIE.

Re:Is this really a problem for us? (1)

DickPhallus (472621) | more than 12 years ago | (#3132057)

Of course, switch to whatever you want. I mean there are a few alternatives out there... Mozilla, Galleon, Konqueror, and ya, Opera too.

Now it's time.. (5, Funny)

dimer0 (461593) | more than 12 years ago | (#3131914)

Now it's time to skew their numbers, .. I think I'm going to have to do about 14million automated searches for "CROSSDRESSING MONKEY PORNO" using their search bar..

Easy Solution (5, Informative)

BurritoWarrior (90481) | more than 12 years ago | (#3131915)

Don't use it. Uninstall NS6 and use Mozilla instead. Same browser - without the unnecessary extra crud AOL bundles into it anyhow.

Re:Easy Solution (2, Insightful)

TheMatt (541854) | more than 12 years ago | (#3132015)

Actually, a better browser, usually, since NS6 is often far behind the latest Mozilla. In fact, now that Mozilla Mail is so nice, there went the last vestige of Netscape on my XP box.

Kinda sad, really. I can still remember laughing at MS because "mighty" Netscape was beating them -- especially be putting out a better product. Now, though, IE is tons better than the bloat that is NS6.

For God's sake (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3131916)

Netscape gives you the browser for free.

Netscape pays dozens of engineers to keep improving the browser and gives you the source code. (You can count on one hand the number of Mozilla developers who don't get an AOL paycheck).

And you're bitching about AOL collecting some lousy anonymized demographics???

If you don't like it, write your own damn browser. And stop making companies that contribute to the Open Source movement feel like they're wasting their time.

Re:For God's sake (1, Insightful)

Markusis (46739) | more than 12 years ago | (#3132009)

Anonymous they may be, but it's still collecting a unique ID. I think that using this they could collect a list of all the searches you've done, then target ads at you (by checking your IP). It may be anonymous and entirely passive, but it still shouldn't be done...regardless of the price of the browser.

Re:For God's sake (1)

Le Marteau (206396) | more than 12 years ago | (#3132078)

Did you even read the article? The user's IP address is sent to Netscape, along with a "unique ID". That is not exactly "anonymized".

When will laws be passed? (3, Insightful)

CitznFish (222446) | more than 12 years ago | (#3131917)

When will we all finally be so fed up at the consistent invasions of our privacy by media moguls like Real networks, AOL, Netscape (yeah one and the ame..)? We neeed to contact our legislators and demand these practices stop. Maybe if anonymous data was gathered, but to tie it with an IP address really goes beyond any justifiable data collection.

Re:When will laws be passed? (1)

OpenDirectX (557031) | more than 12 years ago | (#3132073)

You are not making any sense.

When you use netscape (free software) you agree to a EULA, this I would assume contains a clause that says something to the effect of 'I agree to allow my information to be collected' (or some rot like that.

If you don't like it, don't use it. There are plenty of other options to pick from.

These companies need to make money doing something. They have AOL, er kids to feed.

Letters of Protest! (2, Interesting)

gspeare (470147) | more than 12 years ago | (#3131918)

This is ridiculous...how can they have set this up without knowing that a) it would be discovered and b) it was thoroughly and completely Orwellian?

I think that we should all write letters of protest...into the Google search field. :)

Shocking development (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3131919)

Spyware is in your cereal! Who cares. You get what you pay for. If you want something better build it yourself.

And the #1 search term intercepted by AOL? (1, Redundant)

kajoob (62237) | more than 12 years ago | (#3131923)

You guessed it...... CowboyNeal

Re:And the #1 search term intercepted by AOL? (5, Funny)

TheMatt (541854) | more than 12 years ago | (#3132041)

I was going to say: "uninstalling Netscape".

Maybe that will be today's!

Very old news. (5, Insightful)

Doktor Memory (237313) | more than 12 years ago | (#3131924)

Netscape's internal search components have been collecting information (to be processed by Alexa [alexa.com] ) since the late 4.x versions.

You stole my signature! :P (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3131965)

I had that exact signature up for about an hour the other night on my +5 post. Tee hee.

-- SlashChick

Re:You stole my signature! :P (2)

Doktor Memory (237313) | more than 12 years ago | (#3132064)

Heh, yeah, it was too good not to nick. I've been an adsubtract user since back when it was "interMute" and Barry was distributing it from his MIT account. Easily the best $30 I have ever spent on any software ever.

Re:Very old news. (0, Flamebait)

perlfish (305161) | more than 12 years ago | (#3132003)

If you are using IE, the search bar routes through MSN.com. Hello? Does this practice surprise anybody?

Mozilla? (1)

Markusis (46739) | more than 12 years ago | (#3131925)

The article makes no reference to Netscape 6's derivation from Mozilla. I would imagine that this practice isn't being done in Mozilla, but I wonder if the mozilla project had anything to do with making this possible, or if Netscape just did it all on their own. I'm leaning towards the latter.

Nestcape phone home. (2)

InsaneCreator (209742) | more than 12 years ago | (#3131928)

This sure makes me glad that MS products never "phone home". E.T.^H^H^H^H N.N. phone home.

What the fuck (-1)

Genghis Troll (158585) | more than 12 years ago | (#3131933)

is google.com? If it's a search engine, then who needs it when you've got AOL?

Re:What the fuck (-1)

govtcheez (524087) | more than 12 years ago | (#3132026)

Good point...

All these people talk about things like "Google" and "Linux", when we all know the only thing the Internet can possibly be used for is chat rooms and e-mail!

Don't use the search button and you're probably ok (2, Interesting)

fetta (141344) | more than 12 years ago | (#3131935)

Worth noting from the article:
"Navigator users can avoid having Netscape log their searches by directly accessing a third-party search engine by typing its address into the browser rather than using the Search button or Sidebar."

Of course, this doesn't change the privacy issue.

Doesn't XP/IE 6 Do The SameThing? (5, Insightful)

Tesser (177743) | more than 12 years ago | (#3131938)

According to IE 6/XP's "Search Companion", this feature "provides task suggestions and automatically sends your search to other search engines."

How does this occur if it doesn't transmit the information to Microsoft as well?

Sure, if I add a search engine into the preferences, I can type "google keyword" all I want to go directly to Google. I suspect, though, that if I rely on the "features" that Microsoft provides, they have access to exactly the same information-- regardless of what the article might claim.

It pays not to be lazy (0, Flamebait)

TrollMan 5000 (454685) | more than 12 years ago | (#3131943)

Navigator users can avoid having Netscape log their searches by directly accessing a third-party search engine by typing its address into the browser rather than using the Search button or Sidebar.

Now that this workaround to the spyware feature has been published, how long will it take for Netscape users to be required to use the search button or sidebar, somehow disabling the direct URL?

As bad as Microsoft is, at least they're not logging our searches. At least not yet.

Studies have been done... (1)

FortKnox (169099) | more than 12 years ago | (#3131945)

The most searched topics are adult oriented.

Basically, everyone is usually searching for porn.

Wish I had a link to some of the studies. Does anyone have any links to back me up?

makes you wonder... (2)

thrillbert (146343) | more than 12 years ago | (#3131948)

If these companies really think that everyone is stupid and will never figure it out.

I mean, sure, if you're running AOL there's a pretty good chance you're not exactly the sharpest tool in the shed. But to design software, which grabs so much information and sends it to central servers, and think that no one out there will figure it out, it seems to me they are the ones a few french fries short of a happy meal(tm).

---
I'm a few morsels short of a toll-house cookie myself...

Ya know what... (2, Funny)

suckwhat (562959) | more than 12 years ago | (#3131949)

I was just thinking, I need more spyware on my PC. A browser is a great idea. Why doesn't AOL just surf for me. Put out an automated browser, and the sites just come up randomly. That way, I don't have to decide what sites I want to pull up. At every site that comes up, they ask you for Name, Address, Zip Code, Date of Birth, Mother's Maiden Name, SSN, Credit Card number, shoe size, and sexual preference.

I can't wait.

Simple solution (4, Funny)

Vortran (253538) | more than 12 years ago | (#3131951)

pico /etc/hosts

127.0.0.1 www.netscape.com

Re:Simple solution (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3131990)

lol you use pico....what a lewser...try a real editor like VI next time dumbass.

Re:Simple solution (1, Troll)

mosch (204) | more than 12 years ago | (#3132023)

easier solution:
cat >> /etc/hosts
127.0.0.1 www.netscape.com
^D

The only reason to use pico is if you're too fuckwitted to learn how to use a real editor.

Re:Simple solution (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3132042)

that wont work... use this domain instead
info.netscape.com

Re:Simple solution (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3132070)

pico /etc/hosts

127.0.0.1 www.netscape.com


Urgh...

echo "127.0.0.1 info.netscape.com" >/etc/hosts

Re:Simple solution (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3132081)

rtfa.

you need to:
127.0.0.1 info.netscape.com

(Note: if you do that, you lose the ability to search from the address bar, unless you have a script on your local apache that will redirect you to your search engine)

so what this really means.... (2, Funny)

Dark Marmot (445517) | more than 12 years ago | (#3131957)

is that AOL will have logs of all 5 Netscape users.... they aren't marketing genius's for nuthin!!!!

No one noticed this in the code..? (1)

Chicane-UK (455253) | more than 12 years ago | (#3131958)

Was the spyware feature somthing that was bolted on AFTER the code was built up from its 'Mozilla' state? If not, how come somthing like this wasnt noticed in the source code sooner.

There should be a law... (1, Insightful)

Ghengis (73865) | more than 12 years ago | (#3131961)

Anytime some piece of software is spying... I should be informed during the install of this. I have a right to know who's watching me do what from my own home. How this would be enforced is beyond me, but I have the right to know.

Its called the EULA (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3132034)

you agreed to it

Mozilla Plug (1)

skunkeh (410004) | more than 12 years ago | (#3131963)

www.mozilla.org [mozilla.org]

It's better than Netscape 6 (more up to date rendering engine and surrisingly stable considering it's still in beta) and there's no chance of any nasty behaviour on the behalf of the developers thanks to its open source nature.

Re:Mozilla Plug (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3132076)

there's no chance of any nasty behaviour on the behalf of the developers thanks to its open source nature


How do you know? Have you looked at the source yourself? If you haven't, are you relying on the possibility that someone who actually cares about this has? What if they haven't? Last I heard most of the primary Mozilla developers are actually Netscape engineers, and we already know that they don't care about it.

I overreact as much as the next guy... (5, Insightful)

quinto2000 (211211) | more than 12 years ago | (#3131964)

but the article is pretty clear that the data are anonymized and for billing purposes only. Microsoft might not need to collect data on how often their users use affiliated search engines, but Netscape isn't in a position where they are free to lose money.

Netscape needs to collect information about the frequency of searches in order to bill the search engines correctly. The very fact that it only occurs in the "Search bar" shows that they are very likely to be telling the truth. It wouldn't be hard to log much much more data than they apparently do.

The commment about the ip address was misleading as well. Any time that information is sent to my computer, I can log the IP address. It doesn't mean that I am going to be doing anything with it.

Re:I overreact as much as the next guy... (1)

CitznFish (222446) | more than 12 years ago | (#3132065)

The commment about the ip address was misleading as well. Any time that information is sent to my computer, I can log the IP address. It doesn't mean that I am going to be doing anything with it.

It also doesn't mean that you won't be doing anything with it...

So what if it's not a surprise.... (4, Insightful)

Muddie (72996) | more than 12 years ago | (#3131966)

It shouldn't be tolerated. People shouldn't be informed they are being spied on and say, "Eh, I figured as much anyway." Would you say that if you found that the CIA had been wiretapping your phone line and/or DSL/Cable line for the past 6 months?
I haven't read the licence agreement to Netscape 6 recently, but I don't care if it says anything about monitoring your browsing trends (it's hard to call them 'habits' due to the very definition of the word). It almost appears as people are becoming complacient about this. If you get used to it, they will just push further once they have their hand in your privacy and you don't flinch. Eventually, it may come down to a /. headline, "MS-AOL using tiny dust-sized robot probes that ship with Windows 3K that get into your nostrils, sit behind your eyes and monitor everything you do." *shutter*
Once more a large company is stepping on your rights and your privacy, and while maybe you shouldn't be suprised, you should be outraged.
Please?
Pretty please?

Netscape's back stabbing... (1)

Mainframer (530235) | more than 12 years ago | (#3131969)

Are we surprised? Definitely not me anyway. I've always been suspicious of AOL and their sleazy habits so when they bought Netscape I automatically put it on my banned software list. Anybody using anything from AOL is asking for trouble as far as I'm concerned.

A little out of hand (1)

anball (555994) | more than 12 years ago | (#3131975)

I'm speechless, I just don't know what to say. I know this isn't new or anything, but I still can't believe it! I never thought that Netscape would stoop so low. (I realize that it's not necessarily the Netscape Developer Team's fault, but still...). Has AOL no shame?

Netscape's been doing similar things for a while (2, Informative)

ciscoeng (411359) | more than 12 years ago | (#3131989)

Netscape's "smart browsing" sends the addresses of sites you visit to them.
http://www.netscape.com/escapes/smart_brows ing/

Bah (1)

binford2k (142561) | more than 12 years ago | (#3131992)

Big whoop. Like he said in the article, it is used for billing the search engines who pay for inclusion. If you don't like it, just write your own sidebar, it is quite simple to do so. Look at a simple dict.org sidebar I wrote. [kalifornia.com]

Coincidences. (0, Flamebait)

saintlupus (227599) | more than 12 years ago | (#3131994)

Netscape 6 is Spyware?

Oddly, it's also utter dogshit. Congratulations, Netscape, you're finally catching up with Microsoft!

--saint

Mozilla is not affected by this. (2, Informative)

Yushiro (542833) | more than 12 years ago | (#3131999)

I just did a bit of digging around in Mozilla and it definately does *NOT* use the search button in the same way as Netscape 6. So it appears that us Mozilla users are not affected. :)

Two alternatives (0)

Lunar82 (541435) | more than 12 years ago | (#3132000)

opera [opera.com] mozilla [mozilla.org]

open sores mozilla fags are behind it (-1)

neal n bob (531011) | more than 12 years ago | (#3132006)

this is just part of their quest to find more scat sites - and who better to find those than netscape users

Big Deal? (2)

sourcehunter (233036) | more than 12 years ago | (#3132010)

Anytime a Navigator user performs a search by typing terms into the browser's URL bar and pressing the adjacent Search button, or by using the Search tab on the browser's My Sidebar feature, the user data is sent to a server at info.netscape.com using a uniform resource locator (URL) forwarding system.

Am I the only one who doesn't see this as an issue? The unique ID number is a bit much, but the url forwarding system?

Don't get me wrong, I dispise AOL/TW and I haven't used Netscape since version 5 because I don't like the way it works - (Shoot me - I like IE) but I just don't see what the big deal of using a url forward is. If you can, according to the article, disable it by typing "http://www.google.com" directly into the address bar, whats the deal?

Well? (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3132011)

We're talking AOL here. Did you expect a big sloppy kiss?

Sloppy Journalism (5, Interesting)

guttentag (313541) | more than 12 years ago | (#3132013)

From the article:
According to a network traffic analysis performed by Newsbytes, Netscape is capturing Navigator 6 users' search terms, along with their Internet protocol (IP) address, the date Navigator was installed and a unique identification number.
This should be easy for AOL to deny, since there is no product called Navigator 6. It's simply called "Netscape 6" now. You could argue that this is a minor detail the reporter screwed up, but I think you have to question the reporter's understanding of a subject if he doesn't know the name of the product he's writing about.

In journalism schools, getting a name wrong earns you an automatic failure. Apparently Newsbytes doesn't hold its reporters to such a high standard.

is some software phoning home really that bad? (2, Informative)

CheechBG (247105) | more than 12 years ago | (#3132016)

I use Google toolbat in IE. I have installed it with the "advanced features" that relay the URL that I am looing at to Google. I find it funny that I search for something that is on the page that I'm on and my page is the first one up. Do I feel threatened by this? No, actually, I feel special for helping the best search engine in the world get better.

So? (2, Troll)

Wakko Warner (324) | more than 12 years ago | (#3132017)

Who here has been locked in jail or harassed or abused by AOL or the authorities because of what they typed into their netscape 6 search bar? Hm, nobody? Okay, nothing to see here. Move along. - A.P.

Winamp (1)

reznorbot (266559) | more than 12 years ago | (#3132020)

I wonder if winamp is collecting stats on what I'm listening to? Although i dont see this as a reason to use an "open source/free OS", since this has nothing to do with the operating system.

Re: (1)

rmohr02 (208447) | more than 12 years ago | (#3132022)

I think that finding out what people are searching for is ok, but also registering their IP address goes a little too far. But then again, this is only for people who do use the search bar, and they probably don't care as much. I, for one, don't use Netscape in favor of MSIE, but my homepage is /. and I search from the Google! menubar on /.'s homepage, so no matter what browser I use they wouldn't be able to get it.

More of an issue... (2, Interesting)

joshjs (533522) | more than 12 years ago | (#3132038)

...when you consider that the parent isn't just AOL, but AOL/TW.

IBM's drives not for extended use (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3132049)

Check out the new info on NOT using IBM's 120GXP drives in servers/or extended periods of time. Story is at http://www.tech-report.com

Enough Already (2, Insightful)

erasmus_ (119185) | more than 12 years ago | (#3132056)

Dear sources, please stop giving us reasons to use Netscape, we already know it's a horrible browser with rapidly declining market share. Adding insult to injury is almost .. sad.
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