Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Cat Recognition Algorithms?

michael posted more than 12 years ago | from the bad-kitty dept.

Technology 430

skunkeh writes "So your cat keeps bringing dead (or half dead) animals in to your house. What do you do? Obviously, you set up a digital camera to monitor the cat door and lock her out if she has something in her mouth..."

cancel ×

430 comments

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

First goat! (-1)

Klerck (213193) | more than 12 years ago | (#3217023)

First goat! [bearcountryusa.com]

klerck! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3217040)

you goat rapist! nice to see you back here on shitdot! i love you, klerck.

Fuck Safe Sex (-1)

Original AIDS Monkey (315494) | more than 12 years ago | (#3217056)

That shit is for faggots only. If you've never shot your load up into a girl's Fallopian tubes, you're still a virgin in my book. Fucking a girl while wearing a condom is no better than jerking off into a sock.

KEVIN EALY=KLERCK (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3217140)

Klerck's real name is Kevin Ealy. He lives in Charleston North Carolina. He lived at 14 Stanhope Road, Goose Creek, South Carolina about a year ago. He might be employed somewhere in the technology/computer business, attending school, or living off his parents. He posts on www.shacknews.com [shacknews.com] very often with his username [shacknews.com] like he has no life. Click here [shacknews.com] to see how big of a fag with no life he is. Kevin has a website klerck.org [klerck.org] . He uses Windows XP and Internet Explorer 6. He might look like this [angelfire.com] minus the gigantic penis of course. He enjoys photography with his Cannon digital camera and is a member of an internet art club. Probably not much older than 20 or 21 and might live with his parents. He might also troll under the names of Patrick Bateman [slashdot.org] and Mr. Nutty.

Please distribute this information in order to destroy the pathetic life of Kevin Ealy.

If you have any further information, please reply.

Thank you.

bukkake (-1, Offtopic)

PogiTalonX (449644) | more than 12 years ago | (#3217029)

bukkake

Nugget (-1)

The Lyrics Guy (539223) | more than 12 years ago | (#3217030)

Cake - Nugget

Heads of State who ride and wrangle,
Who look at your face from more than one angle,
Can cut you from their bloated budgets
Like sharpened knives through Chicken McNuggets.

Now Heads of State who ride and wrangle,
Who look at your face from more than one angle,
Can cut you from their bloated budgets
Like sharpened knives through Chicken McNuggets.

Shut the fuck up.
Shut the fuck up.
Learn to buck up.
Shut the fuck up.
Learn to buck up.

Now nimble fingers that dance on numbers
Will eat your children and steal your thunder,
While heavy torsos that heave and hurl
Who crunch like nuts in the mouths of squirrels.

Now nimble fingers that dance on numbers
Will eat your children and steal your thunder,
While heavy torsos that heave and hurl
Who crunch like nuts in the mouths of squirrels.

Shut the fuck up.
Shut the fuck up.
Learn to buck up.
Shut the fuck up.
Learn to buck up.

Now simple feet that flicker like fire
And burn like candles in smoky spires
Do more to turn my joy to sadness
Than somber thoughts of burning planets.

Now clever feet that flicker like fire
And burn like candles in smoky spires
Do more to turn my joy to sadness
Than somber thoughts of burning planets.

Re:Nugget (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3217052)

Hello welcome to ICQ

Where do you live, my little sweaty friend?

This is quite spiffy. (3, Insightful)

dotderf (548723) | more than 12 years ago | (#3217031)

Great application of technology! If it can recognize cats, I bet it can recognize terrorists (*groan*) But practically speaking, why not just get up and let the cat in?

Re:This is quite spiffy. (3, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3217044)

> But practically speaking, why not just get up and let the cat in?

The whole point is to *not* let the cat in if the cat's brought home a little ..present.. for you.

Re:This is quite spiffy. (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3217058)

I know. When you let the cat in, you can see if it has a present! I wonder what the accuracy on this thing is.

Re:This is quite spiffy. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3217080)

I'm not letting the cat in until it brings me a pot of gold and rumplestiltskin. It has an equal chance of learning it's lesson to not bring mice and cicadas inside.

Re:This is quite spiffy. (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3217059)

the issue is that cats often want to get into the house at times when the occupants are asleep or unavailable, and finding a dead animal lying in your living room in the morning is no fun. This is a fairly simple application of the technology, but one that thousands of cat owners can certainly appreciate.

Re:This is quite spiffy. (0, Redundant)

56ker (566853) | more than 12 years ago | (#3217097)

Yes - but this cat flap already lets the cat in automatically! What the owner has done is modify it to only let the cat in when its not carrying a dead animal in its mouth.

Re:This is quite spiffy. (1)

jsimon12 (207119) | more than 12 years ago | (#3217076)

Well, it is a pain to let the cat in, cause like a 2 year old they want to go right back out again, so a kitty door is the best choice (also lets em crap outside with is better then cleaning a box).

On the application note, yes this is cool tech, it could be coupled with a security badge system and make installtions secure, since someone couldn't just take a badge and pretend to be someone else, could also speed up airports.

Re:This is quite spiffy. (0, Offtopic)

ore (122541) | more than 12 years ago | (#3217079)

I concur, it's absolutely a great idea for pet owners who might have to deal with occasionaly stinky offering from their loving pets. I particularly enjoyed the the details the author went into concerning the image analysis itself.

Several strikes against this story though.

First, if you'll note from one of the snapshots, the machine it's running on is on Winders. Doh! And second (and I've been resisting doing this for several weeks now), although not about the story itself, Slashdot has got stop recycling content from Daypop [daypop.com] . It starting to show through guys. At least, if you're going to re-post what is old news to quite a few of us, make a serious effort of getting the attributions (i.e. give Daypop credit for making you aware of it) correct. And perhaps, try to add something new.

Re:This is quite spiffy. (0, Offtopic)

Peyna (14792) | more than 12 years ago | (#3217120)

/. editors don't have to give Daypop credit for the story, since skunkeh is the one who submitted the story, for all we know, he found it on his own.

Asking them to give credit to Daypop for this would be like asking a local TV station to give credit to another for a story on a car accident. Obviously it's something that exists independently of either TV station, or in this case, news reporting website.

Re:This is quite spiffy. (0, Offtopic)

ore (122541) | more than 12 years ago | (#3217146)

You could absolutely be right in this case. Point taken. But there has been an alarming rise in frequency of content from the Daypop Top40 being posted on /. 3-10 days after it hits. It's just a little lame.

Re:This is quite spiffy. (1)

56ker (566853) | more than 12 years ago | (#3217082)

The cat flap lets the cat in already (because of its collar) - what the story is about is not letting it in when its got a dead animal in its mouth.

Re:This is quite spiffy. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3217137)

Well, the dead animal doesn't have a magnetic tag, or a collar, so what's the big deal? The door isn't gonna let it in.

Re:This is quite spiffy. (5, Funny)

Profe55or Booty (540761) | more than 12 years ago | (#3217098)

If it can recognize cats, I bet it can recognize terrorists (*groan*)

that is, if the terrorist has a rat in it's mouth.

Re:This is quite spiffy. (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3217142)

I think the chances of that are pretty good.... damn starving afgi refugees.

Re:This is quite spiffy. (5, Insightful)

darkonc (47285) | more than 12 years ago | (#3217100)

I have a cat door. It allows my cats to go in and out of the house at will. One cat even learned to use a second floor cat door by jumping across from the neighbour's roof.

I'm not up to the idea of waking up at 4AM to let my cat out for 35 minuts before he decides it's too wet out and he want's back in. Better to let him implement his indoor/outdoor policy.

Re:This is quite spiffy. (2)

interiot (50685) | more than 12 years ago | (#3217107)

The cat gets to go in and out 10 times a day... eg. the cat gets to be comfortable and happy even when the humans have to leave for a while.

damn it!! (1)

thefunkychicken (55010) | more than 12 years ago | (#3217032)

god damn!! that would have been a good neural net to do for bishes project!! ohh well, already passed the module without the novel app!!...

man meat (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3217035)

Would you like to pet my sweaty man thing?

hello welcome to ICQ

Cool (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3217036)

If only it worked on in-laws.

Cats are monsters (-1, Flamebait)

roguerez (319598) | more than 12 years ago | (#3217039)

The average house cat that walks outside for a couple of hours a day kill tens of rodents/birds monthly.

In other words: cats are animals (!). I'ld rather have a puppy.

Re:Cats are monsters (-1)

ArchieBunker (132337) | more than 12 years ago | (#3217072)

Till that puppy turns into a dog that kills someone carrying in her groceries. I don't wany any pet capable of taking me out.

Re:Cats are monsters (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3217101)

But master, I only want to be your friend. I'd hate anything to happen to you, master.

--Your future dog

Re:Cats are monsters (2, Funny)

torqer (538711) | more than 12 years ago | (#3217112)

Dogs are poop machines. I'd rather own a predator (i.e. cat) than having to cart around a dumb animal's(i.e. dog's) feces in a plastic bag... immediately after it has just produced said poop.

Re:Cats are monsters (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3217156)

Get a basset hound. They eat their own poop, will bite your hand if you try to pick it up before they can get to it.

Re:Cats are monsters (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3217168)

hey, just like a self upgrading linux distro!

Re:Cats are monsters (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3217123)

dogs are just as capable of killing, they just usually eat the whole thing, rather than bringing it back in.

Re:Cats are monsters (5, Funny)

darkonc (47285) | more than 12 years ago | (#3217135)

I once had two cats in an area that didn't seem to have many of them. It was rather interesting. They'd bring in a mouse or a bird almost every other day. They'd eat the birds (leaving behind what I cam to call 'bird bits' -- beaks, feathers, etc., but they'd leave the mice for me as 'gifts'.

Then one day, when I was sick, I got up to go to the bathroom and found that they'd left me a bird. I was touched by the gesture... I thanked them heartfully -- and burried the bird.
_____

Then, of course, there was the day that my larger cat brought in a seagull... completely freaked my roommate out.

Or when their mother (they were born to the cat of an earlier incarnation of roommate) brought in a whole pot roast for her kittens (with the string still on). I have no idea where she got a pot roast from, but I'm sure that somebody's barbecue was inexplicably short that day.
They were eating peices off of that pot roast for the better part of a week.

Re:Cats are monsters - Bird Book. (5, Funny)

refactored (260886) | more than 12 years ago | (#3217145)

I always wanted a book entitled - "Identification of Common garden Birds and small Mammals - A field guide for Cat lovers."

I'm sure with a digital camera and a good ratter, you could go quite far....

Someone could create a web site where you can submit photos of your own moggies trophies, and assist other proud owners in their identification and interpretation of entrails.

I remember walking, zombie-like at 2am to the bathroom and been struck by the question. "Why is there a large Rat, buried up to the neck in the concrete floor?"

Then my cat came up proudly going WowWowWowrrrr!

Closer inspection reveal that the rat wasn't buried, it was just that the rest of it was missing, presumably regurgitated under my bed.

The words (0, Flamebait)

56ker (566853) | more than 12 years ago | (#3217047)

haven't they got something better to do with their time? spring to mind.

Re:The words (3, Insightful)

pgrote (68235) | more than 12 years ago | (#3217055)

You're kidding, right?

This isn't just some cobbled hack. This is really solid use of image recognition in daily life.

Re:The words (1)

56ker (566853) | more than 12 years ago | (#3217065)

Yes but I'm sure you don't need *that* much hardware to do it! Have you looked at the bottom photo yet?

wouldn't it be nice (4, Funny)

Profe55or Booty (540761) | more than 12 years ago | (#3217048)

wouldn't it be nice to have that much free time? =P

Re:wouldn't it be nice (1)

56ker (566853) | more than 12 years ago | (#3217114)

or even just to have a cat in the first place? :o/

Re:wouldn't it be nice if you didn't nick my joke (0, Redundant)

56ker (566853) | more than 12 years ago | (#3217127)

& get three mod points for it?
The words (Score:1)
by 56ker on Sunday March 24, @09:00PM (#3217047)
(User #566853 Info | http://www.level80.co.uk/)


haven't they got something better to do with their time? spring to mind.

Oh well - c'est la vie.

Re:wouldn't it be nice if you didn't nick my joke (0, Offtopic)

Profe55or Booty (540761) | more than 12 years ago | (#3217147)

yeah. i saw yours after i posted mine. if you'll notice, there's a 1 minute difference. *hug*

Re:wouldn't it be nice if you didn't nick my joke (0, Flamebait)

56ker (566853) | more than 12 years ago | (#3217172)

:0) Oh we both thought of it at the same time - but you did less typing - ok? Anyway I just got another of my funny comments modded up to 4 so I'm happy enough now.

Re:wouldn't it be nice if you didn't nick my joke (0, Offtopic)

56ker (566853) | more than 12 years ago | (#3217185)

It seems to have got modded back down to 2 - so it can't have been as funny as we thought.

Re:wouldn't it be nice (1)

alexmeaden (165589) | more than 12 years ago | (#3217164)

Umm, I think you'll find that this is being done as an R&D project by an image analysis/recognition company, not just as a hobby.

Howtos : Sex with linux (-1)

3.141592653589793 (565525) | more than 12 years ago | (#3217050)

./configure -device=/dev/penis -target=/dev/anuss make make install

anonymous coward karma whoring (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3217053)

We consider any image to be a collection of a finite number of discrete features. This is a novel approach to images - until now they were always thought of as continuous. Of course, when we talk about a discrete set of elements, we don't mean pixels. Pixels represent discreteness which has nothing to do with the content of the image; it simply is a property of the display or image acquisition device. If the same object is photographed by two digital cameras with different resolutions, different orientations in space, etc., we get two very different pixel-based descriptions. It would be useless to try to compare them pixel by pixel - the pixel values are not going to match. Yet to the human eye it is immediately obvious that the two photographs have the same content. Why? Because, we believe, our brain records an image not as an array of pixels, but as a discrete set of features - like the tip of the nose, a fork on a branch, an end of a stick, etc. The existance of these is not affected by the resolution of the camera or its orientation.

If we can fully describe an image as a discrete collection of features, we can easily solve the image recognition problem. Unlike pixel values, features have to match. If they do, we declare that the two images have the same content. Of course, if the first image contains a single face and the second one is a group photo with the same face and some others, only some of the features in the two descriptions are going to match. Still, something has to match.

Is it possible to determine if two images have the same content without describing them as discrete sets of features? Of course. A purely continuous approach relies on the fact that if two images have the same content, they are going to match pixel for pixel after one of them is translated, rotated, scaled, distorted and have its brightness and contrast adjusted in a certain specific way. Of course, you don't know in advance the transformation (if any) that is going to make these two images identical. Finding this transformation is one of the tasks of the image recognition algorithm. A considerable number of such algorithms have been developed, mostly based on the Neural Networks approach.

There is one problem, however, inherent in any such algorithm. Let's suppose we want to develop a Web search engine based on image content. The user submits, let's say, a picture of a face. The engine has to find all the images on the Web containing this same face. The problem is that a meaningful image contains hundreds of thousands of pixel values, and there are millions of images on the Web. No matter how efficient the image comparison algorithm is, it has to perform at least a few operations per pixel (realistically, more than just a few), so we are talking about many trillions of operations - every time somebody requests a search.

Let us compare this with text-based search engines. There are also millions of text strings, but each string is a small discrete and ordered set of characters. If the first character does not match (and roughly speaking, in 25 cases out of 26 it does not), the whole string does not match. Thus on average it takes just a little more than one operation to compare two text strings. This is very manageable even with millions and hundreds of millions of text strings to compare to. Image-based Web search can only become a reality if we create for images a situation similar to the one that exists for text strings: that is, we convert pixel-based image descriptions into the feature-based descriptions mentioned above. The latter will be small and discrete, easy to compare. Of course, this conversion will require accessing all the images on the Web in their regular pixel-based form and running a complicated algorithm on them - and this, as mentioned above, is slow. However, this needs to be done only once, not every time somebody wants to do a search.

The same is true in any situation where an image has to be checked against a large database of images. Dealing with all these images on the pixel level every time a search is needed is horrendously inefficient.

How do we know that it is possible to fully describe an image as a discrete collection of features? That a function can generally be described by a finite set of parameters is not the sort of a statement that you can encounter in your calculus textbook. In fact, you will encounter exactly the opposite statement there. And yet in our everyday lives we always describe images as finite sets of features. We perceive the letter 'S' as having two bends, while to a mathematician it is a curve - an infinite set of points - whos curvature changes continuously along it. We can verbally describe the shape of an unknown object by enumerating its bumps, dents, and other such features. It will only require a finite number of words and it will be useful when trying to describe this object to another person who has never seen it. Is it possible to create a mathematical algorithm that converts pixel-based description into such a description enumerating features? We were able to make a considerable progress towards this goal in our Flo Control Project.

We finally catch up... (4, Funny)

cethiesus (164785) | more than 12 years ago | (#3217061)

It's about time we started monitoring those cats. They've been doing it to us for too long....

This may also train the cat to... (5, Funny)

RyanFenton (230700) | more than 12 years ago | (#3217063)

1. Drop the undesirable object.

2. Trigger the door.

3. Pick up undesirable object and walk through door.

So don't count the cat out yet (when it has the unwanted object)!

:^)

Ryan Fenton

Re:This may also train the cat to... (1)

LiENUS (207736) | more than 12 years ago | (#3217095)

the cat has to go through a tunnel in theory they could put preasure sensitive plates in the tunnel and make sure all items on the preasure plates match the shape of the kittys paw prints.

Re:This may also train the cat to... (2)

RyanFenton (230700) | more than 12 years ago | (#3217153)

It would have to be heat-sensitive rather than pressure-sensitive. Unlike an enclosed camera, a pressure plate would quickly fall pray to accumulating dust, twigs, and other debris. If a newspaper or package were put on the pressure plate, for instance, then the cat could not get in.

Even then, this is assuming live/dead prey and other undesired objects would be warm enough to differentiate from the background - which may in turn train the cat to only bring sufficiently old dead things back to the house. That may not be the desired result.

:^)

Ryan Fenton

Re:This may also train the cat to... (1)

56ker (566853) | more than 12 years ago | (#3217159)

The tunnels thing sounds too complicated to do in practice - couldn't the camera just move left/ right and look for any dropped animals?

Re:This may also train the cat to... (2)

RyanFenton (230700) | more than 12 years ago | (#3217178)


Unlike the cat, random items would likely not be as simple to recognize. Because the door is outside, it is subject to unexpected change. For instance, if some landscaping blew over in front of the door, it might not be distinct enough to differentiate from prey that the can might bring in.

Perhaps then a solution might be so create an intermediate step - a small "kitty airlock" where the cat must enter first, which is kept clean, and only if it appears to be just the cat will the cat be allowed in.

:^)

Ryan Fenton

Re:This may also train the cat to... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3217103)

If you think cats can be trained, then you haven't known many cats!

Re:This may also train the cat to... (2, Informative)

LiENUS (207736) | more than 12 years ago | (#3217115)

the reason cats dont train too well is they really are very intelligent so they have a tendincy to ignore you if they dont want to do something. cats can even be toilet trained, you need to give them more credit.

Re:This may also train the cat to... (4, Interesting)

RyanFenton (230700) | more than 12 years ago | (#3217129)

Actually, my family owns a small pet store. Cats CAN be trained in a sense. Much like squirrels, they learn how to get resources in the most direct manner possible through trial and error. They don't want a "treat" or to please their owner, they want to master their environment for themselves. So, when presented with a annoying door lock, instead of giving up their prey, they can recognize the signs that the door is unlocked (by sound), and also recognize what causes this response (nothing in mouth). It's not training in terms of what the owner wants, but it is training nonetheless.

:^)

Ryan Fenton

Re:This may also train the cat to... (2, Funny)

teslatug (543527) | more than 12 years ago | (#3217122)

also don't count out the skunk...it may someday force the cat to go first or worse cut off...ok that's too gruesome

Kitty Kat... (2, Funny)

rapidweather (567364) | more than 12 years ago | (#3217064)

I'm feeding my cat Hill's Science Diet Hairball Control Formula, light. He comes in and eats that when he gets hungry. Too fat to catch anything, and the neighborhood dogs get first crack at the dead squirrels. He's not gonna bring anything in, and if he does, we'll fry it up and serve it for dinner!

Re:Kitty Kat... (-1)

YourMissionForToday (556292) | more than 12 years ago | (#3217086)

Dude, Squirrelman gets first crack at dead squirrels in my neighborhood. He was in 'Nam, goddammit!

get out of my house! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3217067)

can you use it to keep the pesky neighbor cats from terrorizing your house while you're away?

Sorry Cats are too intelligent (5, Funny)

Slashamatic (553801) | more than 12 years ago | (#3217068)

One of the issues is that the door is optically controlled. Great idea, but cats have been known to hold doors open once they have been unlocked.

A lady friend of mine had a cat who would get lonely when she went out to work. She would return to find the cat there with half a dozen of her mates lounging around and scoffing at the cat food.

She tried the magnetic collar. No good. It appears that the cat would prevent the door from closing until her friends were there. This was seen.

You could imagine in this particular situation. Drop mouse on floor, smile for camera, door unlocks and then pick up mouse and enter. I don't think this would work too well. The moggy is too likely to work it out.

Note the presentation of kills to a cats master or mistress is a sign of fealty. They are acknowledging your authority with the gift. If you don't greatfully accept the mouse/bird whatever, the cat will be bewildered!!!!!

Re:Sorry Cats are too intelligent (-1)

YourMissionForToday (556292) | more than 12 years ago | (#3217113)

Go back to the Sceptered Isle you rotten mouthed, jewel-encrusted FRUIT LOOP!!!

Re:Sorry Cats are too intelligent (1)

mdwebster (158623) | more than 12 years ago | (#3217117)

If you don't greatfully accept the mouse/bird whatever, the cat will be bewildered!!!!!

OHNO! That's terrible! How come no one ever told me before?!? God forbid that a cat ever be bewildered!!!

Re:Sorry Cats are too intelligent (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3217149)

Your sarcasm, I like it. Please keep it up.

Re:Sorry Cats are too intelligent (3, Funny)

Monkelectric (546685) | more than 12 years ago | (#3217163)

I can one up ya, we used to have this pursian cat, and it drank out of the toilets when it wanted water ... in our house by the bathroom door there was a sewing table. So one day Im walking down the hall and the bathroom door is closed ... The cat is standing on the sewing table pawing the door knob in what looked like a twisting motion. Im not sure the cat knew to twist the knob (it couldn't if it wanted to), but I think she had picked up that humans *used* the door knob in some capacity to open the door. End of story: I opened the door for her and she drank at the toilet.

The real question is. (3, Funny)

tcd004 (134130) | more than 12 years ago | (#3217070)

Not how well the system works but, how long before you cat outsmarts the system.

Read our Oscar Predictions [lostbrain.com]
tcd004

A more sophisticated approach... (1)

Alexis Morissette (211656) | more than 12 years ago | (#3217071)

How about just placing a sign above the cat door: "NO HALF-DEAD RATS ALLOWED"?

Idea for a Dog Door (5, Funny)

Emugamer (143719) | more than 12 years ago | (#3217073)

have the same setup as this type of auto-locking door except have some sort of scent detecting algorithm that won't let them in if they have been:

rolling around in a dead animal carcass

eating the trash

sprayed by a skunk

decided to swim in the neighborhood swamp

If any of these 4 conditions apply, apply auto-hose and shampoo... (mini dog-wash)

I'd make millions, really

Re:Idea for a Dog Door (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3217078)


Considering how well the average dog behaves, you would ensure that owners of your device never see thier pet in the house...

Live art project (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3217088)

Hey, thanks.

You just gave me a perfect idea for live art project! Dump the dog, bring on the artist.

The mark 2 (4, Funny)

56ker (566853) | more than 12 years ago | (#3217074)

gives the cat an electric shock & pours cold water over it if it tries to come in with a dead mouse. :o)

I have the solution! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3217075)

A bell around the neck! There, saved *months* of research!

What about other cats? (5, Insightful)

rehannan (98364) | more than 12 years ago | (#3217083)

Very cool. It seems to be pretty good at blocking other animals (skunks, etc...), but what about another cat?

If possible, they should combine the image recognition with the magnetic collar. This would allow the door to open *only* for a rodent-less Flo and not just any ol' rodent-less cat.

Re:What about other cats? (4, Informative)

jheinen (82399) | more than 12 years ago | (#3217105)

If you look through the whole site you'll see tht the system can apparently recognize individual cats. There are two other cats that are allowed in (Ellipse & Squirrel). There's a log page that logs each day's events and identifies each cat by name and whether they were allowed in.

Re:What about other cats? (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3217190)

But does the system greet them and pronounce in a computer generated voice, "Good day to you, (cat name here)" ???? i mean, what type of a system would it be without this feature?? =P (on the other hand, the thing could say, "SKAT!!!" to stray cats trying to gain access)

Re:What about other cats? (1)

Anders (395) | more than 12 years ago | (#3217116)

It seems to be pretty good at blocking other animals (skunks, etc...), but what about another cat?

As noted on their index page [quantumpicture.com] , their software has a new feature: "our image recognition algorithm can now determine which of the two cats is entering.".

You can even watch it in real time [quantumpicture.com] . The pictures will have a label telling the name of the cat that was allowed access.

Cute :-).

Okay, I got to admit... (1)

wilkinsm (13507) | more than 12 years ago | (#3217085)

...This is pretty cool. This sort of stuff should really be submitted to Scientific American's "The Amateur Scientist" as well.

But will it work on my kittens? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3217087)

kittys [bonsaikitten.com]

isnt that against nature? (1)

HanzoSan (251665) | more than 12 years ago | (#3217090)

why punish cats for doing what cats do?

Re:isnt that against nature? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3217128)

Fuck nature.

Don't tell me you wouldn't train a dog to not shit on the floors inside.

Re:isnt that against nature? (3)

FredGray (305594) | more than 12 years ago | (#3217144)

why punish cats for doing what cats do?

This device doesn't really punish the cat. It just keeps the less desirable animals out of the house.

Re:isnt that against nature? (3, Troll)

HanzoSan (251665) | more than 12 years ago | (#3217155)

cats catch mice, thats what they do

see thats why i dont believe in having house pets

having pets are fine when you are ina cabin in the woods, but when you torture a cat or dog keeping it locked up in a house, and over feed it, then modify its behavior with gadgets like this, i just feel its wrong.

Let the cat be a cat

Re:isnt that against nature? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3217177)

Do you think your parents were wrong for modifying your behavior? Teaching you not to shit on the floor, not to steal, etc.

will this work on my mother? (2, Interesting)

augros (513862) | more than 12 years ago | (#3217093)

i'm interested in whether this will have deterring value. will the cat eventually give up bringing rodents in? or come in less? the pictures of the skunk and bird are a riot; it's like caller ID for animals!

i thought.. (5, Funny)

2MuchC0ffeeMan (201987) | more than 12 years ago | (#3217094)

i thought i was a geek when i nuetered my cuecat, but this way beyond that.

i love it though, now if i only had the money for a digital camera...

I wonder... (5, Funny)

Jucius Maximus (229128) | more than 12 years ago | (#3217104)

...if CmdrTaco could set a virtual one of these up on Slashdot for JohnKatz, not letting him in if he's got a article in hand...

Re:I wonder... (-1)

October_30th (531777) | more than 12 years ago | (#3217161)

not letting him in if he's got a article in hand

Or Hemos with a penis in hand.

Cat reasoning (0)

dolphin558 (533226) | more than 12 years ago | (#3217111)

Will the cat learn to not bring anymore dead animals from this technology? I can see how it saves you from going to the door and finding out for yourself but this does nothing to help train your cat NOT to bring dead animals in.

weight (0)

llevylyn (568656) | more than 12 years ago | (#3217125)

Hi, It seems to me that it'd be quite difficult to determine whether your cat carries some prey by image recognition. First of all there are various different, possibly partially dismembered, types of animals it could potentially drag in. Secondly your cat might not always give you a nice upfront image (although that could be circumvented I guess). Furthermore you'd want to have pretty good lightning conditions at all times (I assume your cat goes out at night as well).
Also, the color of your cat might play a role. If your cat would eg be snow white that would certainly help things too :) (in that case you could eg make the snow white cat stand in front of a snow white piece of cardboard and just look at color values and hope it didn't make itself dirty while outside :) )
Perhaps this'd be an idea though: put some form of scale in front of the cat entrance. If it exceeds, your cats weight + some, deny entry. Of course there'd also be some problems with this you'd have to sort out. Also I'm not sure how much the weight of your cat varies per day, although my guess is that its less then the weight of a bird (don't have a cat myself) If your cat actually eats prey outside this might be a problem though :)
anyway, just my 2ct

Re:weight (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3217133)

And if the mouse is in the cat's belly it'd weigh the same.

Didn't read the webpage, eh? (2)

rarose (36450) | more than 12 years ago | (#3217165)

If you had, you'd realize what an elegent solution they'd come with for all of those problems!

Geez....

He knows more about technology than cats. (5, Interesting)

dbc (135354) | more than 12 years ago | (#3217136)

I grant that this is very clever, and gets many tech cool points. However...


Mother cats teach their young to hunt, first by bringing dead animals to the nest, then not-quite-dead animals, and finally injured but fairly lively prey. When the youngters can dispatch a wiggling dinner, they are ready to go on a hunt. What cats are doing when they bring dead or nearly-dead animals to the house is they are trying to teach the slow-witted and lazy humans that they live with to hunt!! We just don't get it.


Never has a cat had a student more resistant to instruction.

More pet cams.. (1)

Frank of Earth (126705) | more than 12 years ago | (#3217138)

pet cams at camville [camville.com]

Really cool though.

Got to (3, Funny)

Treeluvinhippy (545814) | more than 12 years ago | (#3217141)

love the irony. Here I am reading an article about facial reconition for a cat, after skimming the comments I read the slashdot quote at the bottom of the page.

"All most men really want in life is a wife, a house, two kids and a car, a cat, no maybe a dog. Ummm, scratch one of the kids and add a dog. Definitely a dog. "

Cat scan (1)

Anders (395) | more than 12 years ago | (#3217160)

It seems someone should mention the Cat Scan site [cat-scan.com] .

There! Someone did :-).

Cats and Birdkill (2, Offtopic)

FFFish (7567) | more than 12 years ago | (#3217162)

From several web sources:

"Despite the difficulties in showing the effect most predators have on their prey, cats are known to have serious impacts on small mammals and birds. Worldwide, cats may have been involved in the extinction of more bird species than any other cause, except habitat destruction."

"Most domesticated cats gobble endless bags of cat chow. But they also like dining outdoors where their meals comprise 70 percent small mammals, 20 percent birds, and 10 percent assorted live bait. "

"Cats cause the deaths of more songbirds than any other animal. ...an outdoor cat can kill up to 1,000 animal per year."

" The combined total of pets and free-ranging cats in the U.S. is probably more than 100 million."

"...rural free-ranging domestic cats in Wisconsin may be killing between 8 and 217 million birds each year. The most reasonable estimates indicate that 39 million birds are killed in the state each year. Nationwide, rural cats probably kill over a billion small mammals and hundreds of millions of birds each year. Urban and suburban cats add to this toll."

It may be argued that responsible cat owners not only neuter their cats, but also keep them strictly indoors or on a leash.

I like the daily log of cat activity (5, Informative)

hattig (47930) | more than 12 years ago | (#3217166)

It does show some false negatives though: 4th March [quantumpicture.com]

But pretty neat. And the site has withstood Slashdot somehow - something that bigger sites fail on regularly.

IMHO (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3217171)

if i had a cat that was constantly dragging half dead creatures into the house such as rats or birds, only to have them drip blood all over the carpet and potentially harm the children by attack or spreading disease, i can't think of anything more practical to spend your time developing.

Essence of Conditioning (3, Interesting)

seinethinker (129155) | more than 12 years ago | (#3217189)

As a scientist by heart, this is a very interesting and crafty experiment. Of course it works off the findings of Pavlov's Conditioning.

You are conditioning the cat to either (1) drop the dead animal if it wishes to come inside or (2) remain outdoors.

As a animal lover, it bothers me should this actually be put to use as a consistant system. Whether humans understand or not, animals are far more intelligent than we think. The behavior of animals is quite instinctual and what would be the circumstances if we were to change their modes of thinking. Would it be possible by to ascertain that one of the following things might happen from this experiment:

(1) Cat runs away as it instinctually cannot assert its confidence. Much comparison has been made between dogs and cats. Cats seem predestined to take a singluar, individualistic, confident role in the food chain compared to dogs that rely on a class of relationship or borg mentality. Well dogs aren't completely borg but they seek out affection more out of insecurity and reassurance than cats.

(2) cat becomes feral or wild due to lack of fealty and companionship toward owner.

Cats aren't complete loners, ya' know.

Just some thoughts to cast out for conversation.

Ciao!

Cat killing tips wanted (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3217191)

I posting this message on behalf of a friend. He is really pissed off with his neighbour. His neighbour, who I shall refer to 'Mark', is a unreasonable person. He refuses to stop his cat from pissing and shitting on my friend lawn, and sometimes his motorbike. Anyway, killing a cat is not illegal in my country if they are on your own property. So, does anyone have tips for my friend? Could any use be made of his motorbike in this plan?
Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?