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The Past and Future of the Hard Drive

chrisd posted more than 12 years ago | from the 120-tb-and-only-a-bernoulli-for-backup dept.

Hardware 223

Snags writes "Brian Hayes of American Scientist has written a nice little historical review of hard drive technology, from the first hard drive (nice pic) made by IBM in 1956 to what may be available in 10-15 years. He muses on how to fill up a 120 TB hard drive with text, photos, audio, and video (60,000 hours of DVD's). Kind of ironic that this came in my mailbox today considering IBM's announcement."

cancel ×

223 comments

f1rst p0st! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3363837)

werd. jeff kim fucking faggot.

Re:f1rst p0st! (-1)

Carp Flounderson (542291) | more than 12 years ago | (#3363845)

join in for the penii intifada.

Things To Do Today (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3363996)

1. Glance at genitalia of freshly shorn ewe

2. Feel strangely aroused

What's next? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3363840)

Love looking at the history of technology and all that, but what about looking into the future?

We've got holographic drives coming soon for your digital cameras. [wired.com] We've got more space than you know what to do with. [seagate.com]

With IBM out of the picture, the microdrives of the future will have to come from somewhere else.

Where? Whom?

Re:What's next? (1)

BakaMark (531548) | more than 12 years ago | (#3363881)

IBM is not completely out of the picture.

Besides they still have to put something into their high end systems to work as data storage, and at the moment anything other than "spinning platters with various magnetic coatings" is not as effective.

There have been a lot of different mediums in the past to try and displace Hard Drives. Maybe IBM have decided to distance themselves a little more from the hard drive business so they can set their R&D guys on the next thing to try and take hard drives on.

Either that or the "bean counters" are involved again....

Re:What's next? (1)

demonbug (309515) | more than 12 years ago | (#3363909)

More likely they just decided that the consumer HD market is too fiercely competitive, the very low profit margins totally unforgiving of any mistakes that requires warranty service. It's just a guess, but I'd say that replacing a faulty drive under warranty probably costs them more than they make from selling fifty of the suckers. That may be a bit of an exaggeration, but really, hard drive profit margins have been incredibly low for the past few years.

Re:What's next? (1)

Gefd (562296) | more than 12 years ago | (#3363890)

Where? Whom?
Singapore! Hitachi!

Re:What's next? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3364017)

"wanna-be-hub-of-everything" of asia? KIASU at its best.

it may be the most advance country in asia but only in terms of economic, and luxury.

Yeah, (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3363957)

Too bad it's all in their heads. :P

Re:What's next? (2)

khuber (5664) | more than 12 years ago | (#3363991)

Love looking at the history of technology and all that, but what about looking into the future?

Did you even read the article?

When conventional disk technology finally tops out, several more-exotic alternatives await. A perennial candidate is called perpendicular recording. All present disks are written longitudinally, with bit cells lying in the plane of the disk; the hope is that bit cells perpendicular to the disk surface could be packed tighter. Another possibility is patterned media, where the bit cells are predefined as isolated magnetic domains in a nonmagnetic matrix. Other schemes propose thermally or optically assisted magnetic recording, or adapt the atomic-force microscope to store information at the scale of individual atoms.

-Kevin

I only say this because I love you (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3364032)

Did you even read the article?

When responding to a post that is among the first 5 posts of a story, the odds of the poster actually having read the story are slim to none. It is unnecessary and redundant to ask the question, because obviously in my fervor to grab the top post I didn't have time to actually read the article.

Thank you for the quote from the article, but I had already read it by the time you responded. To paraphrase the law of the land 'round these parts: Post first, read the article later.

He's wrong though (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3364150)

Solid state media will become dirt cheap in the near future, thin film memory cell's will see to that.

Sniff Sniff Memories.... (2)

phunhippy (86447) | more than 12 years ago | (#3363841)

I remember going to the Trenton Computer Fair 8 years ago and finding a great bargain! a 5.25 full height drive that could hold 1gb!!! our bbs was gonna rock(loved them 0-day warez d00d).. we paid 20 dollars for it..which at the time was like a dream.. so it was probably hot... but it worked :)

Re:Sniff Sniff Memories.... (-1)

Trollificus (253741) | more than 12 years ago | (#3363853)

one gig?!
Geez. My first hard disk looked like a freakin' tank, and only had 30 megs on it.

Re:Sniff Sniff Memories.... (-1)

Carp Flounderson (542291) | more than 12 years ago | (#3363882)

I once saw a tandy with a read only hard drive. This is one of the funniest ways to reduce tech support... I can't wait till Dell re-discovers this cost saver!

Re:Sniff Sniff Memories.... (-1)

Carp Flounderson (542291) | more than 12 years ago | (#3363865)

SNIFF SNIFF??? [trollaxor.com]

You damn perverts make me sick!

Re:Sniff Sniff Memories.... (2)

heliocentric (74613) | more than 12 years ago | (#3363874)

I remember going to the TCF back when it was at Mercer County Community College... now I have to drive all the way to Edison.

There was just something nice about that whole spread out deal, with dealers in the gym and around the classrooms and a good hike to the outdoor area. I just don't feel at home there anymore.

Re:Sniff Sniff Memories.... (2)

phunhippy (86447) | more than 12 years ago | (#3364061)

Yeah i feel the same way.. it moved to edison and sucked.. there was nothing like the 2000 out door dealers :) all useful crap too.. got bunches of sparc 1+'s there and mac parts.

my first hard drive... (1)

demonbug (309515) | more than 12 years ago | (#3363842)

The first hard drive on my very own computer was 40 megabytes. I managed to fit Wing Commander 2 on it twice, though why I did this escapes me...

Take me home tonight (-1)

Mao Zedong (467890) | more than 12 years ago | (#3363848)

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More space.. (3, Insightful)

PopeAlien (164869) | more than 12 years ago | (#3363850)

I don't care how much space you give me.. its never enough. I'm running around 300 gigs right now and it mostly full. Why? because I do video work and motion graphics design, and I'm not very organized. I've got tons of source files from archive.org and I really don't want to go through the trouble of burning CD's or backing up to tape - I love to have it all accesible quickly via harddrive.

So of course I'm not going to fill all that space with typed notes, but even if I dont do as the article suggest and "document every moment of our lives and create a second-by-second digital diary". I still want that space for massive amounts of easily accesible data.. There's no reason I should ever have to delete anything ever again..

Uh. Except that I cant find anything I'm looking for anymore.. Can't this search function go faster?

Re:More space.. (3, Interesting)

heliocentric (74613) | more than 12 years ago | (#3363894)

I really don't want to go through the trouble of burning CD's or backing up to tape...There's no reason I should ever have to delete anything ever again..

Ok, I like the idea of having all my stuff handy as well, but you need to think beyond just you deleting something... There are other reasons to backup your data including natural disaster. And no, burning stuff to a single CD and wiping it so you can play back your MP3s isn't a backup - you've just made the natural disaster issue portable.

Uh. Except that I cant find anything I'm looking for anymore.. Can't this search function go faster?

No clue what OS you use, do you have some form of *nix where you've got access to the locate command where it's not actively polling the drive when you request the info (however data can be stale)?

Re:More space.. (1, Offtopic)

dimator (71399) | more than 12 years ago | (#3364037)

And no, burning stuff to a single CD and wiping it so you can play back your MP3s isn't a backup - you've just made the natural disaster issue portable.

It would truly be a disaster if my vast archive of Celine Dione mp3's got damaged...

Re:More space.. (2, Insightful)

Nogami_Saeko (466595) | more than 12 years ago | (#3363943)

Yup, join the party - 400 gigs here and I still need more. DVD authoring, HD Film work, graphics post, you name it.

Thankfully though, it's on my own machine at home due to the falling price of technology, both hardware and software. I can work at home with the music cranked up, without people bugging me, and get stuff finished faster than in an office.

Then just pop in the 80 or 160gb removable IDE drive to drop the files on and courier them back to the client or the post-house. Great stuff, this cheap storage.

But I could still easily use 1tb or more of space to allow me to work on larger sequences, store more video, etc.

One of the great uses of this amount of space that the author suggests is something like completely capturing an entire digital sat/cable stream.

No more "using the VCR" to tape the show you're going to miss, but storing an entire weeks' worth of programming or more. Don't have to worry about missing something because you've got the entire broadcast from every channel archived and ready to watch.

That would be cool. A "central multimedia server" [like central heating?] that would store every TV program received, every radio station programmed, every CD I buy [ya, really!], every DVD I own, etc. Great use for nearly unlimited storage.

I'm sure that the old folks at the MPAA/RIAA are going into panic-mode even THINKING about that sort of idea, but it's the future folks, deal with it.

Re:More space.. (2, Informative)

g1n3tix2k (219791) | more than 12 years ago | (#3364002)

I cant remember who posted about it but it was on /. not long ago. A professor in the US has designed a hard-drive with works just like RAM. Its blisteringly fast but is resistant. IE: after a reboot will not lose data. Resistant Random Access Memory. Apparently the limitations on size for these babies are phenomenal. were talking terabytes and terabytes. however if this is going to be produced, or if its just vapourware is yet to be seen. I would however revolutionarize our current data storage!

you'd keep 7 years of video? (4, Insightful)

upper (373) | more than 12 years ago | (#3364003)

The article's hypothetical drive is 120TB -- 400 times as much space as you complain about filling up. I know video editing takes a lot of space, but would you keep 7 years of video? A movie a day for your whole life? Or 30,000 copies of the one you're working on? I doubt it.

I used to think that my files would expand to fill all available space, but not anymore. Different tasks, different tools, and different personalities mean different thresholds, but I think everyone has a threshold above which they won't keep their disks full. For me, my disks stopped being full around 10 gigs. My wife's antique PC (running msdos 2.0 and used strictly as a text editor) had a 15 meg drive and never went above 10% full. Obviously your threshold is higher, but I'm sure it exists.

Even after they hit their thresholds, most people's use will grow over time, but slowly. We'll also start writing things in ways that don't try to conserve disk space. Compression will be used almost exclusively for data transmission. Future filesystems will probably keep every version of every file ever saved. (Hopefully with an option to delete the occasional residue of an indiscretion and accidental copy of /dev/hda). But even these things won't increase our use by us more than a factor of 10 or so. If we really do get 120TB drives, we won't talk about buying new ones very often.

Re:you'd keep 7 years of video? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3364013)

Good point. My "threshold", as you put it, lies around 6 Gb at home and 30 Gb at work.

Re:More space.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3364028)

"because I do video work and motion graphics design"

So that's what people call pr0n nowadays. Gotcha!

120TB isn't that much... (3, Insightful)

wumarkus420 (548138) | more than 12 years ago | (#3363854)

120TB seems like an enormous capacity, but multi-terabyte storage mediums will be a neccessary in the future with REAL streaming media. What I'm worried about is the network connection - that has been my current bottleneck (even at 1.5Mbps). When we eventually combine HDTV PVR's, MP3 players, DVD archives, and pictures into a giant media database, the numbers don't look as staggering. But transferring that much data from one machine to another may prove to be the hardest part of all. 120Tbps network connection -now THAT'S impressive!

Re:120TB isn't that much... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3364046)

Any kind of hardware connection is going to be restricted, the only real way to connect systems at a rate like 120Tbps would be to use some kind of high-frequency transmitted transfer. The main disadvantages to this would be that it might cause a situation like this: The Pope Makes Poop

So the Pope was hanging out in the Vatican talking to like the bishops or whatever when he got hit
with a diarrhea wave. The Pope excused himself and starts hustling to the bathroom - but he
didn't want to actually run - him being the Pope and all. "Jesus!" the Pope thought, "if you allow
me to make it to the bathroom in time and I will try harder to bring peace to the world..." But the
doody pressure built steadily and soon he realized he was having a brown-emergency.

The Pope took off his pointy hat, threw it to the ground and broke into a sprint - sweating as his
robes flapped behind him. He had hit a pretty fast stride but turned a corner and panicy realized
he had a long way to go before he reached his personal pope doody room. He ran with god's
speed and thanked Jesus along the way for delaying the accident waiting to happen.

All of a sudden his robes caught under his feet and he was airborne. The Pope flew through the
air and landed hard infront of a pack of nuns. They were all, "Oh my god! Your holiness!" and
like tried to help him up. The Pope's anus was barely holding things in and this jarring crash
didn't help matters. He told the nuns to get the hell away from him and stumbled to his feet all
tangled up in his robes. "Fuck this shit..." the Pope mumbled as he pulled his long white robes
over his head and dropped them at his feet. The nuns were all gawking staring at the naked Pope.
(Pope always freeballs it) It's wow enough for the nuns to see a naked man... but naked Pope!
They were all speechless.

The Pope sensed the doody dynamite getting ready to burst out and he turned to run toward his
holy dumping room. With his backside to the nuns he took one step... but it was too late - his
holiness lost control. The Pope put his hands on his knees and admitted defeat. The race was over
and the Pope came in second. The diarrhea had built up so much pressure that it blasted out
explosively. The Pope greatly appreciated the feeling of wet farty relief and allowed himself to
continue to unload spraying diarrhea out of his butt - grunting "Jesus... Jesus..." as he buhblasted
out the wet chunk style doody. It seemed to continue for at least two minutes - constant fart
ripping diarrhea splatter splat. Finally relieved, he bent over and picked up his robe. His backside
needed wiping and there was only the holy cloth available - so he had to make use of it. The soft
white silk of his robes felt nice on his bottom and it was quite absorbent too. He streaked it with
doo d oo skidmarks. With his butt semi-clean he turned to look at his freshly made holy doody.
As he turned - he remembered that he was not alone. The pack of nuns were still standing there...
and they were absolutely covered in diarrhea splatter. The nuns were bombarded with the Pope's
holy shit. They stood there stone-faced smiling at the Pope looking like all shocked out. The nuns
looked as if someone had thrown a bucket of diarrhea all over them. The Pope, always thinking
fast on his feet cleared his throat and said, "Sisters... the new blessing is upon you... Jesus told me
that the holy fecal matter will bring you one step closer to heaven and it was Jesus' wish that I
bless you in this fashion... congratulations..."

And lemme tell you, as the Pope headed back to his chambers he was real thankful for his quick
thinking during an awkward situation. And hey, Jesus must have made doody when he was tacked
up on the cross - so I don't see what's so wrong with a pack of shit splattered nuns thinking
they're blessed.

Where has this guy been? (1)

HiQ (159108) | more than 12 years ago | (#3363855)

How will you pay for it all? At current prices, buying 120 million books or 40 million songs or 30,000 movies would put a strain on most family budgets

Don't we have Napster, Gnutella, KaZaa and the likes? We don't pay for that stuff, we **cough* borrow **cough** it!

Karma Whore (1, Informative)

fahrvergnugen (228539) | more than 12 years ago | (#3363856)

In case of inevitable /. effect, or if you don't want to read it html for some reason, it's also available in other formats:

Re:Karma Whore (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3363897)

In case of inevitable /. effect...

So you just link back to the main site? How's that going to avoid the effect? Besides, it's now 3:30AM Easter time, the effect should be low now and distributed over time as everyone else wakes and connects at their own pace.

Re:Karma Whore (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3363984)

> Besides, it's now 3:30AM Easter time, the effect should be low now

why don't americans understand that there's more than just them in the world?

fuckin yanks.

Re:Karma Whore (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3363993)

Yup, there's more than just Americans, but I'll bet you bucks for euros that the /. effect is only in session when the eastern seaboard of the US wakes up. Yup, there's more to life than Ameri"can"s but truth of the matter is that for this senario they are the key players.

Re:Karma Whore (2)

roguerez (319598) | more than 12 years ago | (#3364060)

They are the key players. In America.

Nice try :-( (1)

Observer (91365) | more than 12 years ago | (#3364015)

We now get /. effect * 4 as people try each alternative in turn, and they're all at the same location....

IBM's first (1)

foniksonik (573572) | more than 12 years ago | (#3363858)

Anybody know how much that first hard drive's capacity was?

Re:IBM's first (1)

foniksonik (573572) | more than 12 years ago | (#3363870)

ugh... read the article first.. then post... yeah yeah..

Re:IBM's first (2)

igrek (127205) | more than 12 years ago | (#3363871)

It was 5 MB

not enough (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3363867)

not enough space for my porn divx and 500dpi porn images

Blah (0)

dlbia (533702) | more than 12 years ago | (#3363872)

I couldn't care less for the amount of disk space. I want faster disks with lower seek times...

Harddrive Firmware (2)

GoRK (10018) | more than 12 years ago | (#3363873)

I remember trying to cram as much as possible on my little 20mb hard drive -- I had DoubleSpace and then Stacker running to compress that thing to the utter maximum -- and I backed it up on floppies, too!

What my real question is, with as much abstraction going on between the ide controller and the drive platters as there is now, why haven't we seen more in the way of harddrive firmware except for better bad-sector remapping and the like? What about hardware compression? A little flash memory or a dedicated on-disk area and a compress/expand chip and we could probably fit quite a bit more on existing physical head/platter technology with not much speed loss -- In fact, we might see some speed GAIN if we only have to pull 100 bytes off of the disk to return 1000 bytes of data, etc.. Of course, it wouldn't give you any more space for your DivX ;-) collections, but for those of us who actually store mostly normal files, a lot of source code, etc, it'd be great!

I guess, unfortunately, it requires a bit (ok a lot) of work getting an OS to play nice with such a gimmik, but would installing a "driver" for your hard drive compression electronics really be all that much different than for your video card or drive controller itself? -- then of course there is the question of a filesystem that can handle the indeterminate capacity of this kind of system. IE you couldn't necessarily delete a 100M file and fit another 100M file in the same physical storage space...

ideas. something to muse over

Re:Harddrive Firmware (1)

mlk (18543) | more than 12 years ago | (#3363887)

If it was in the Fireware of IDE controller no new drivers would be needed.
NTFS already supports disks which can change size, as can many others (as shown by the fact NTFS can compress files, and have the size change aviable, and progs like VMWare which can use virtual disks of an undetemed size).

mlk

Re:Harddrive Firmware (2)

big_hairy_mama (79958) | more than 12 years ago | (#3364009)

Not to nitpick, but VMWare makes you specify the size when you create the virtual disk; while the file that actually gets saved to the host machine can be variable, as far as the virtual OS is concerned, it's fixed. This is necessary for the partition tables AFAIK, so some new scheme for partitioning will have to become available before we can have truly variable disks at anything below the filesystem level (ie., AFAIK hardware compression is not possible with today's OS's).

Re:Harddrive Firmware (3, Informative)

mors (1419) | more than 12 years ago | (#3363946)

Adding electronics to drives to gain more space is not a particular good idea in this day and age. You are not going to get 1000 bytes out of a 100 byte read very often, probably only if you are reading text. As you note Video and Graphics are usually stored in formats that are already compressed, so storing them on a drive with hardware compression wont win you much. And as the article says, text doesn't take up any noticable amount of space anyway. So even if you mostly care about your source code etc, you probably doesn't have anywhere near a GB, which is 1% of a modern drive.

Furthermore, compression and decompression takes time, so it would lower the performance of the drive somewhat (no idea how much, but some).

Wasn't Stacker those guys who made a piece of hardware to place between your drive and the IDE controller, to do the compression?

Re:Harddrive Firmware (2)

Kris_J (10111) | more than 12 years ago | (#3364069)

If Drivespace had been updated to support Fat32 I'd still be using it -- mostly for installed applications though, not my data.

There was a single hardware accellerated disk compression product at one stage but it never took off as a concept, which is a shame.

I love disk compression as a concept - it's so twisted. I think I managed to get about 800MB out of a 630MB hard drive using Drivespace 3. Makes uninstalling it tricky ;)

"Zip Folders" are really the closest thing that survived, but I never bought the Win98 Plus pack. These days I mostly use RAR for compression and I do it manually. Perhaps I should investigate something like Rarissimo [karefil.com] .

Re:Harddrive Firmware (1)

jantheman (113125) | more than 12 years ago | (#3364124)

err... NTFS does this (i.e. compressed files) - I can get a 4Gb sybase DB seg' (OK, so it isn't full yet) into 2Gb of physical space.
& yes, it's slower.

Re:Harddrive Firmware (1)

jantheman (113125) | more than 12 years ago | (#3364131)

Oh. Hardware compression.
You should have said it louder (too much Sven Coop till too late :) )

120TB?! It's not enough already (5, Funny)

Nathdot (465087) | more than 12 years ago | (#3363877)

He muses on how to fill up a 120 TB hard drive

Let's see - if the history of the internet serves as an apt model - 120TB drives probably won't meet consumer demands for long.

First harddrives will start to fill up with fully-imersive holo-pr0n, followed quickly, due to adaptive marketing trends by fully-imersive unsolicitted holo-spam.

There... that solves that ol' capacity problem quite nicely then.

:)

Re:120TB?! It's not enough already (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3363905)

120TB drives probably won't meet consumer demands for long...

Consumer demands or base install size demands? It's not just MS stuff that is growing over time...

Fully-immersive holo-pr0n & spam (1)

rjamestaylor (117847) | more than 12 years ago | (#3364018)

  • First harddrives will start to fill up with fully-imersive holo-pr0n, followed quickly, due to adaptive marketing trends by fully-imersive unsolicitted holo-spam.
Of course, this will require the Macromedia Flesh plug-in...

8-bit computing (1)

byolinux (535260) | more than 12 years ago | (#3363878)

I remember in the days of 8-bit home computing, when the Amstrad CPC, Spectrum and Commode 64 were the kings, there would always be some little company who was *about* to release a harddisk for said machine. Usually no more than 80Mb, and usually costing around 500 quid. Never happened though, no doubt someone's got one out by now though?

Re:8-bit computing (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3363994)

It did happen [tu-darmstadt.de] for the C64.

It was both expensive and very rare, though. A few other companies made similiar harddisks which did not catch on either.

Bomb the Russians! (-1)

GafTheHorseInTears (565684) | more than 12 years ago | (#3363886)

bomb the russians
bomb the russians
bomb the russians
then they'll never get to you

bomb the russians
bomb the russians
bomb the russians
then we'll see who buries who

strike while the iron is hot
strike they won't get off a shot
strike so our bombs from space
protect the all american race

strike end this menace red
strike they'd be better off dead
strike when their last blood is shed
then we won't worry who's ahead

bomb the russians
bomb the russians
bomb the russians
we don't have to take their shit

bomb the russians
bomb the russians
bomb the russians
we'll be better of for it

strike while they're all asleep
strike kill the commie creeps
strike they messed with the best
now they die like the rest

strike give 'em one for me
strike put it on t.v.
strike cause the "duke" would do it
he would make the russkies chew it

bomb the russians
bomb the russians
bomb the russians

Re:Bomb the Russians! (-1)

Mao Zedong (467890) | more than 12 years ago | (#3363967)

Outstanding.

Windows 2012 (0)

fliptw (560225) | more than 12 years ago | (#3363888)

Will probably be required by law to be installed in every harddrive, and the removal of said os will result in a prison term. This can happen. And I will not put it past MS to suck up 80TiB in a windows install.

How to fill up 120TB of space (1)

Anonymous Squonk (128339) | more than 12 years ago | (#3363893)

That will be simple, once we get three dimensional display technology figured out. Full length three dimensional movies will eat up 500GB of memory easily...

Damn, just how much memory would it really require to do a simple Holodeck simulation?

Re:How to fill up 120TB of space (1)

mlk (18543) | more than 12 years ago | (#3363901)

Depend on the images, storage wise it's the same as redering something like that CGI cartoon-masive-introseq (err Final Fantise).

Re:How to fill up 120TB of space (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3364027)

you've been watching too much startrek

Summary: (-1)

Genghis Troll (158585) | more than 12 years ago | (#3363898)

The past of the hard drive: used mainly to store porn.
The future of the hard drive: used mainly to store more porn.

Re:Summary: (-1)

flaw1 (572429) | more than 12 years ago | (#3364040)

What about pirated rap MP3s and shitheaps of useless open sores sauce code because Lunix homofags can't deal with binary distribution?

120 TB enough? (3, Insightful)

quantaman (517394) | more than 12 years ago | (#3363902)

Sure it can holds 60,000 hours of DVD. That's why when the time comes we'll come up will a more precise format. I don't believe we will had enoguht space until it can store a lifetime's worth of information in a format indistinguistable from reality to human senses. Until that point we will always be able to make it a little more lifelike, a little longer, there will always be somrething else to eat up the space, clockcycles and bandwidth. My 1 GB filled up just as fast as my 256 MB and I'm sure that my 60 GB will fill up as well. We still have a long way to go before we have "enough" space.

Re:120 TB enough? (0, Redundant)

PsychoElf (571371) | more than 12 years ago | (#3363918)

My 100mb filled up terribly quick when C&C came out, then my 1.6gb filled up with mp3s, then my 10gb filled up with mp3's and games, then my 20gb with mp3s, games, and the discovery of divx, now my 80gb is filled with divx, mp3, games, books, ripped dvds....somehow, i doubt we will ever have enough space

Re:120 TB enough? (2)

glwtta (532858) | more than 12 years ago | (#3364156)

Why only one life time? Certainly other people's lifetimes (or parts of them) as well as fictional ones will be interesting to you as well? And why human senses? There will be applications that need more precision than that... I agree with you, I just think the bar is a little higher still.

Re:120 TB enough? (-1)

Commienst (102745) | more than 12 years ago | (#3364159)

Hit preview and read your post next time.

Back in the day... (2, Interesting)

SynKKnyS (534257) | more than 12 years ago | (#3363906)

My dad would come home from work and tell me that the computer (probably something 8 bit) at work would fail several times a day. Mainly the hard drive (which was as huge as an ATX full tower case and only stored 10 mb) would stop accessing so they would have to reboot the computer. How did they do that? They gave a swift kick to the hard drive and the machine started right back up.

Data fills its space? (2, Interesting)

zorba1 (149815) | more than 12 years ago | (#3363907)

A well-known corollary of Parkinson's Law says that data, like everything else, always expands to fill the volume allotted to it.

I don't think this extends to distributed computing; I hardly think the collective drivespace of the WWW has been filled to the brim. Even a few percent free space per drive per server equates to huge amounts of unfilled sectors.

Large Storage (-1, Troll)

PsychoElf (571371) | more than 12 years ago | (#3363912)

I have a fridge size storage device. It has a capacity of 1 gigakeg which is equal to 100 megabeers. Now if I were to drink those megabeers 24/7 it would take me 5 hangovers to get rid of them.

Proof (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3363964)

Proof that /. has no sense of humor

120 TB == one snapshot (5, Interesting)

Gis_Sat_Hack (101484) | more than 12 years ago | (#3363913)

There are already a number of Terra satellites downlinking data at about 4GB/hr, circling from pole to pole in orbits lasting under 2hrs.

There are multitudes of airborne surveys churning out digital snapshots at 400MB a frame.

Mosaiced together at 1m resolution with R,G,B and mean height above sea level, how much storage will a single global snapshot of the earth take ?

Then consider for historical and environmental reasons, most urban/semi rural areas deserve a mosaiced snap at least once a year.

120 TB is just the start . . .

Re:120 TB == one snapshot (2)

larien (5608) | more than 12 years ago | (#3363921)

As it says in the article, there will easily be cases which need vast amounts of storage (like your satellite imagery above). However, those situations alone won't make these technologies profitable; what they're after is 120TB drives coming in new PCs that "Mom & Pop" users would buy. As is said, how much will they really use?

Re:120 TB == one snapshot (1)

Gis_Sat_Hack (101484) | more than 12 years ago | (#3364120)

As I see it, a single one metre resoltion image of the earth's surface *is* a Mom & Pop application that in 5-6 years time if it's not standard with every computer should at least be in every school and library of the world.

It makes an ideal backdrop for xchat, can show children were the ares damaged by radiation are, and can have little blinking lights for all the toxic waste ghost ships floating about looking for somewhere to dock.

The 'high - storage' demand apps are those that have the above data in a time series or with deep 3D layers for seismic exploartion of atmospheric modelling, etc.

I'm just talking about a good school atlas of the near future. :)

This is quite long (-1)

Mao Zedong (467890) | more than 12 years ago | (#3363919)

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HTTP/1.1 200 OK Date: Thu, 18 Apr 2002 07:21:59 GMT Server: Apache/1.3.20 (Unix) mod_perl/1.25 mod_gzip/1.3.19.1a X-Powered-By: Slash 2.003000 Connection: close Content-Type: text/html; charset=iso-8859-1
OK
The server encountered an internal error or misconfiguration and was unable to complete your request.
Please contact the server administrator, pater@slashdot.org and inform them of the time the error occurred, and anything you might have done that may have caused the error.

More information about this error may be available in the server error log.

HTTP/1.1 200 OK Date: Thu, 18 Apr 2002 07:21:59 GMT Server: Apache/1.3.20 (Unix) mod_perl/1.25 mod_gzip/1.3.19.1a X-Powered-By: Slash 2.003000 Connection: close Content-Type: text/html; charset=iso-8859-1
OK
The server encountered an internal error or misconfiguration and was unable to complete your request.
Please contact the server administrator, pater@slashdot.org and inform them of the time the error occurred, and anything you might have done that may have caused the error.

More information about this error may be available in the server error log.

HTTP/1.1 200 OK Date: Thu, 18 Apr 2002 07:21:59 GMT Server: Apache/1.3.20 (Unix) mod_perl/1.25 mod_gzip/1.3.19.1a X-Powered-By: Slash 2.003000 Connection: close Content-Type: text/html; charset=iso-8859-1
OK
The server encountered an internal error or misconfiguration and was unable to complete your request.
Please contact the server administrator, pater@slashdot.org and inform them of the time the error occurred, and anything you might have done that may have caused the error.

More information about this error may be available in the server error log.

HTTP/1.1 200 OK Date: Thu, 18 Apr 2002 07:21:59 GMT Server: Apache/1.3.20 (Unix) mod_perl/1.25 mod_gzip/1.3.19.1a X-Powered-By: Slash 2.003000 Connection: close Content-Type: text/html; charset=iso-8859-1
OK
The server encountered an internal error or misconfiguration and was unable to complete your request.
Please contact the server administrator, pater@slashdot.org and inform them of the time the error occurred, and anything you might have done that may have caused the error.

More information about this error may be available in the server error log.

HTTP/1.1 200 OK Date: Thu, 18 Apr 2002 07:21:59 GMT Server: Apache/1.3.20 (Unix) mod_perl/1.25 mod_gzip/1.3.19.1a X-Powered-By: Slash 2.003000 Connection: close Content-Type: text/html; charset=iso-8859-1
OK
The server encountered an internal error or misconfiguration and was unable to complete your request.
Please contact the server administrator, pater@slashdot.org and inform them of the time the error occurred, and anything you might have done that may have caused the error.

More information about this error may be available in the server error log.

HTTP/1.1 200 OK Date: Thu, 18 Apr 2002 07:21:59 GMT Server: Apache/1.3.20 (Unix) mod_perl/1.25 mod_gzip/1.3.19.1a X-Powered-By: Slash 2.003000 Connection: close Content-Type: text/html; charset=iso-8859-1
OK
The server encountered an internal error or misconfiguration and was unable to complete your request.
Please contact the server administrator, pater@slashdot.org and inform them of the time the error occurred, and anything you might have done that may have caused the error.

More information about this error may be available in the server error log.

HTTP/1.1 200 OK Date: Thu, 18 Apr 2002 07:21:59 GMT Server: Apache/1.3.20 (Unix) mod_perl/1.25 mod_gzip/1.3.19.1a X-Powered-By: Slash 2.003000 Connection: close Content-Type: text/html; charset=iso-8859-1
OK
The server encountered an internal error or misconfiguration and was unable to complete your request.
Please contact the server administrator, pater@slashdot.org and inform them of the time the error occurred, and anything you might have done that may have caused the error.

More information about this error may be available in the server error log.

HTTP/1.1 200 OK Date: Thu, 18 Apr 2002 07:21:59 GMT Server: Apache/1.3.20 (Unix) mod_perl/1.25 mod_gzip/1.3.19.1a X-Powered-By: Slash 2.003000 Connection: close Content-Type: text/html; charset=iso-8859-1
OK
The server encountered an internal error or misconfiguration and was unable to complete your request.
Please contact the server administrator, pater@slashdot.org and inform them of the time the error occurred, and anything you might have done that may have caused the error.

More information about this error may be available in the server error log.

HTTP/1.1 200 OK Date: Thu, 18 Apr 2002 07:21:59 GMT Server: Apache/1.3.20 (Unix) mod_perl/1.25 mod_gzip/1.3.19.1a X-Powered-By: Slash 2.003000 Connection: close Content-Type: text/html; charset=iso-8859-1
OK
The server encountered an internal error or misconfiguration and was unable to complete your request.
Please contact the server administrator, pater@slashdot.org and inform them of the time the error occurred, and anything you might have done that may have caused the error.

More information about this error may be available in the server error log.

HTTP/1.1 200 OK Date: Thu, 18 Apr 2002 07:21:59 GMT Server: Apache/1.3.20 (Unix) mod_perl/1.25 mod_gzip/1.3.19.1a X-Powered-By: Slash 2.003000 Connection: close Content-Type: text/html; charset=iso-8859-1
OK
The server encountered an internal error or misconfiguration and was unable to complete your request.
Please contact the server administrator, pater@slashdot.org and inform them of the time the error occurred, and anything you might have done that may have caused the error.

More information about this error may be available in the server error log.

HTTP/1.1 200 OK Date: Thu, 18 Apr 2002 07:21:59 GMT Server: Apache/1.3.20 (Unix) mod_perl/1.25 mod_gzip/1.3.19.1a X-Powered-By: Slash 2.003000 Connection: close Content-Type: text/html; charset=iso-8859-1
OK
The server encountered an internal error or misconfiguration and was unable to complete your request.
Please contact the server administrator, pater@slashdot.org and inform them of the time the error occurred, and anything you might have done that may have caused the error.

More information about this error may be available in the server error log.

HTTP/1.1 200 OK Date: Thu, 18 Apr 2002 07:21:59 GMT Server: Apache/1.3.20 (Unix) mod_perl/1.25 mod_gzip/1.3.19.1a X-Powered-By: Slash 2.003000 Connection: close Content-Type: text/html; charset=iso-8859-1
OK
The server encountered an internal error or misconfiguration and was unable to complete your request.
Please contact the server administrator, pater@slashdot.org and inform them of the time the error occurred, and anything you might have done that may have caused the error.

More information about this error may be available in the server error log.

HTTP/1.1 200 OK Date: Thu, 18 Apr 2002 07:21:59 GMT Server: Apache/1.3.20 (Unix) mod_perl/1.25 mod_gzip/1.3.19.1a X-Powered-By: Slash 2.003000 Connection: close Content-Type: text/html; charset=iso-8859-1
OK
The server encountered an internal error or misconfiguration and was unable to complete your request.
Please contact the server administrator, pater@slashdot.org and inform them of the time the error occurred, and anything you might have done that may have caused the error.

More information about this error may be available in the server error log.

HTTP/1.1 200 OK Date: Thu, 18 Apr 2002 07:21:59 GMT Server: Apache/1.3.20 (Unix) mod_perl/1.25 mod_gzip/1.3.19.1a X-Powered-By: Slash 2.003000 Connection: close Content-Type: text/html; charset=iso-8859-1
OK
The server encountered an internal error or misconfiguration and was unable to complete your request.
Please contact the server administrator, pater@slashdot.org and inform them of the time the error occurred, and anything you might have done that may have caused the error.

More information about this error may be available in the server error log.

HTTP/1.1 200 OK Date: Thu, 18 Apr 2002 07:21:59 GMT Server: Apache/1.3.20 (Unix) mod_perl/1.25 mod_gzip/1.3.19.1a X-Powered-By: Slash 2.003000 Connection: close Content-Type: text/html; charset=iso-8859-1
OK
The server encountered an internal error or misconfiguration and was unable to complete your request.
Please contact the server administrator, pater@slashdot.org and inform them of the time the error occurred, and anything you might have done that may have caused the error.

More information about this error may be available in the server error log.

HTTP/1.1 200 OK Date: Thu, 18 Apr 2002 07:21:59 GMT Server: Apache/1.3.20 (Unix) mod_perl/1.25 mod_gzip/1.3.19.1a X-Powered-By: Slash 2.003000 Connection: close Content-Type: text/html; charset=iso-8859-1
OK
The server encountered an internal error or misconfiguration and was unable to complete your request.
Please contact the server administrator, pater@slashdot.org and inform them of the time the error occurred, and anything you might have done that may have caused the error.

More information about this error may be available in the server error log.

HTTP/1.1 200 OK Date: Thu, 18 Apr 2002 07:21:59 GMT Server: Apache/1.3.20 (Unix) mod_perl/1.25 mod_gzip/1.3.19.1a X-Powered-By: Slash 2.003000 Connection: close Content-Type: text/html; charset=iso-8859-1
OK
The server encountered an internal error or misconfiguration and was unable to complete your request.
Please contact the server administrator, pater@slashdot.org and inform them of the time the error occurred, and anything you might have done that may have caused the error.

More information about this error may be available in the server error log.

HTTP/1.1 200 OK Date: Thu, 18 Apr 2002 07:21:59 GMT Server: Apache/1.3.20 (Unix) mod_perl/1.25 mod_gzip/1.3.19.1a X-Powered-By: Slash 2.003000 Connection: close Content-Type: text/html; charset=iso-8859-1
OK
The server encountered an internal error or misconfiguration and was unable to complete your request.
Please contact the server administrator, pater@slashdot.org and inform them of the time the error occurred, and anything you might have done that may have caused the error.

More information about this error may be available in the server error log.

HTTP/1.1 200 OK Date: Thu, 18 Apr 2002 07:21:59 GMT Server: Apache/1.3.20 (Unix) mod_perl/1.25 mod_gzip/1.3.19.1a X-Powered-By: Slash 2.003000 Connection: close Content-Type: text/html; charset=iso-8859-1
OK
The server encountered an internal error or misconfiguration and was unable to complete your request.
Please contact the server administrator, pater@slashdot.org and inform them of the time the error occurred, and anything you might have done that may have caused the error.

More information about this error may be available in the server error log.

HTTP/1.1 200 OK Date: Thu, 18 Apr 2002 07:21:59 GMT Server: Apache/1.3.20 (Unix) mod_perl/1.25 mod_gzip/1.3.19.1a X-Powered-By: Slash 2.003000 Connection: close Content-Type: text/html; charset=iso-8859-1
OK
The server encountered an internal error or misconfiguration and was unable to complete your request.
Please contact the server administrator, pater@slashdot.org and inform them of the time the error occurred, and anything you might have done that may have caused the error.

More information about this error may be available in the server error log.

HTTP/1.1 200 OK Date: Thu, 18 Apr 2002 07:21:59 GMT Server: Apache/1.3.20 (Unix) mod_perl/1.25 mod_gzip/1.3.19.1a X-Powered-By: Slash 2.003000 Connection: close Content-Type: text/html; charset=iso-8859-1
OK
The server encountered an internal error or misconfiguration and was unable to complete your request.
Please contact the server administrator, pater@slashdot.org and inform them of the time the error occurred, and anything you might have done that may have caused the error.

More information about this error may be available in the server error log.

HTTP/1.1 200 OK Date: Thu, 18 Apr 2002 07:21:59 GMT Server: Apache/1.3.20 (Unix) mod_perl/1.25 mod_gzip/1.3.19.1a X-Powered-By: Slash 2.003000 Connection: close Content-Type: text/html; charset=iso-8859-1
OK
The server encountered an internal error or misconfiguration and was unable to complete your request.
Please contact the server administrator, pater@slashdot.org and inform them of the time the error occurred, and anything you might have done that may have caused the error.

More information about this error may be available in the server error log.

HTTP/1.1 200 OK Date: Thu, 18 Apr 2002 07:21:59 GMT Server: Apache/1.3.20 (Unix) mod_perl/1.25 mod_gzip/1.3.19.1a X-Powered-By: Slash 2.003000 Connection: close Content-Type: text/html; charset=iso-8859-1
OK
The server encountered an internal error or misconfiguration and was unable to complete your request.
Please contact the server administrator, pater@slashdot.org and inform them of the time the error occurred, and anything you might have done that may have caused the error.

More information about this error may be available in the server error log.

HTTP/1.1 200 OK Date: Thu, 18 Apr 2002 07:21:59 GMT Server: Apache/1.3.20 (Unix) mod_perl/1.25 mod_gzip/1.3.19.1a X-Powered-By: Slash 2.003000 Connection: close Content-Type: text/html; charset=iso-8859-1
OK
The server encountered an internal error or misconfiguration and was unable to complete your request.
Please contact the server administrator, pater@slashdot.org and inform them of the time the error occurred, and anything you might have done that may have caused the error.

More information about this error may be available in the server error log.

HTTP/1.1 200 OK Date: Thu, 18 Apr 2002 07:21:59 GMT Server: Apache/1.3.20 (Unix) mod_perl/1.25 mod_gzip/1.3.19.1a X-Powered-By: Slash 2.003000 Connection: close Content-Type: text/html; charset=iso-8859-1
OK
The server encountered an internal error or misconfiguration and was unable to complete your request.
Please contact the server administrator, pater@slashdot.org and inform them of the time the error occurred, and anything you might have done that may have caused the error.

More information about this error may be available in the server error log.

HTTP/1.1 200 OK Date: Thu, 18 Apr 2002 07:21:59 GMT Server: Apache/1.3.20 (Unix) mod_perl/1.25 mod_gzip/1.3.19.1a X-Powered-By: Slash 2.003000 Connection: close Content-Type: text/html; charset=iso-8859-1
OK
The server encountered an internal error or misconfiguration and was unable to complete your request.
Please contact the server administrator, pater@slashdot.org and inform them of the time the error occurred, and anything you might have done that may have caused the error.

More information about this error may be available in the server error log.

HTTP/1.1 200 OK Date: Thu, 18 Apr 2002 07:21:59 GMT Server: Apache/1.3.20 (Unix) mod_perl/1.25 mod_gzip/1.3.19.1a X-Powered-By: Slash 2.003000 Connection: close Content-Type: text/html; charset=iso-8859-1
OK
The server encountered an internal error or misconfiguration and was unable to complete your request.
Please contact the server administrator, pater@slashdot.org and inform them of the time the error occurred, and anything you might have done that may have caused the error.

More information about this error may be available in the server error log.

HTTP/1.1 200 OK Date: Thu, 18 Apr 2002 07:21:59 GMT Server: Apache/1.3.20 (Unix) mod_perl/1.25 mod_gzip/1.3.19.1a X-Powered-By: Slash 2.003000 Connection: close Content-Type: text/html; charset=iso-8859-1
OK
The server encountered an internal error or misconfiguration and was unable to complete your request.
Please contact the server administrator, pater@slashdot.org and inform them of the time the error occurred, and anything you might have done that may have caused the error.

More information about this error may be available in the server error log.

HTTP/1.1 200 OK Date: Thu, 18 Apr 2002 07:21:59 GMT Server: Apache/1.3.20 (Unix) mod_perl/1.25 mod_gzip/1.3.19.1a X-Powered-By: Slash 2.003000 Connection: close Content-Type: text/html; charset=iso-8859-1
OK
The server encountered an internal error or misconfiguration and was unable to complete your request.
Please contact the server administrator, pater@slashdot.org and inform them of the time the error occurred, and anything you might have done that may have caused the error.

More information about this error may be available in the server error log.

HTTP/1.1 200 OK Date: Thu, 18 Apr 2002 07:21:59 GMT Server: Apache/1.3.20 (Unix) mod_perl/1.25 mod_gzip/1.3.19.1a X-Powered-By: Slash 2.003000 Connection: close Content-Type: text/html; charset=iso-8859-1
OK
The server encountered an internal error or misconfiguration and was unable to complete your request.
Please contact the server administrator, pater@slashdot.org and inform them of the time the error occurred, and anything you might have done that may have caused the error.

More information about this error may be available in the server error log.

HTTP/1.1 200 OK Date: Thu, 18 Apr 2002 07:21:59 GMT Server: Apache/1.3.20 (Unix) mod_perl/1.25 mod_gzip/1.3.19.1a X-Powered-By: Slash 2.003000 Connection: close Content-Type: text/html; charset=iso-8859-1
OK
The server encountered an internal error or misconfiguration and was unable to complete your request.
Please contact the server administrator, pater@slashdot.org and inform them of the time the error occurred, and anything you might have done that may have caused the error.

More information about this error may be available in the server error log.

HTTP/1.1 200 OK Date: Thu, 18 Apr 2002 07:21:59 GMT Server: Apache/1.3.20 (Unix) mod_perl/1.25 mod_gzip/1.3.19.1a X-Powered-By: Slash 2.003000 Connection: close Content-Type: text/html; charset=iso-8859-1
OK
The server encountered an internal error or misconfiguration and was unable to complete your request.
Please contact the server administrator, pater@slashdot.org and inform them of the time the error occurred, and anything you might have done that may have caused the error.

More information about this error may be available in the server error log.

HTTP/1.1 200 OK Date: Thu, 18 Apr 2002 07:21:59 GMT Server: Apache/1.3.20 (Unix) mod_perl/1.25 mod_gzip/1.3.19.1a X-Powered-By: Slash 2.003000 Connection: close Content-Type: text/html; charset=iso-8859-1
OK
The server encountered an internal error or misconfiguration and was unable to complete your request.
Please contact the server administrator, pater@slashdot.org and inform them of the time the error occurred, and anything you might have done that may have caused the error.

More information about this error may be available in the server error log.

HTTP/1.1 200 OK Date: Thu, 18 Apr 2002 07:21:59 GMT Server: Apache/1.3.20 (Unix) mod_perl/1.25 mod_gzip/1.3.19.1a X-Powered-By: Slash 2.003000 Connection: close Content-Type: text/html; charset=iso-8859-1
OK
The server encountered an internal error or misconfiguration and was unable to complete your request.
Please contact the server administrator, pater@slashdot.org and inform them of the time the error occurred, and anything you might have done that may have caused the error.

More information about this error may be available in the server error log.

HTTP/1.1 200 OK Date: Thu, 18 Apr 2002 07:21:59 GMT Server: Apache/1.3.20 (Unix) mod_perl/1.25 mod_gzip/1.3.19.1a X-Powered-By: Slash 2.003000 Connection: close Content-Type: text/html; charset=iso-8859-1
OK
The server encountered an internal error or misconfiguration and was unable to complete your request.
Please contact the server administrator, pater@slashdot.org and inform them of the time the error occurred, and anything you might have done that may have caused the error.

More information about this error may be available in the server error log.

HTTP/1.1 200 OK Date: Thu, 18 Apr 2002 07:21:59 GMT Server: Apache/1.3.20 (Unix) mod_perl/1.25 mod_gzip/1.3.19.1a X-Powered-By: Slash 2.003000 Connection: close Content-Type: text/html; charset=iso-8859-1
OK
The server encountered an internal error or misconfiguration and was unable to complete your request.
Please contact the server administrator, pater@slashdot.org and inform them of the time the error occurred, and anything you might have done that may have caused the error.

More information about this error may be available in the server error log.

HTTP/1.1 200 OK Date: Thu, 18 Apr 2002 07:21:59 GMT Server: Apache/1.3.20 (Unix) mod_perl/1.25 mod_gzip/1.3.19.1a X-Powered-By: Slash 2.003000 Connection: close Content-Type: text/html; charset=iso-8859-1
OK
The server encountered an internal error or misconfiguration and was unable to complete your request.
Please contact the server administrator, pater@slashdot.org and inform them of the time the error occurred, and anything you might have done that may have caused the error.

More information about this error may be available in the server error log.

HTTP/1.1 200 OK Date: Thu, 18 Apr 2002 07:21:59 GMT Server: Apache/1.3.20 (Unix) mod_perl/1.25 mod_gzip/1.3.19.1a X-Powered-By: Slash 2.003000 Connection: close Content-Type: text/html; charset=iso-8859-1
OK
The server encountered an internal error or misconfiguration and was unable to complete your request.
Please contact the server administrator, pater@slashdot.org and inform them of the time the error occurred, and anything you might have done that may have caused the error.

More information about this error may be available in the server error log.

HTTP/1.1 200 OK Date: Thu, 18 Apr 2002 07:21:59 GMT Server: Apache/1.3.20 (Unix) mod_perl/1.25 mod_gzip/1.3.19.1a X-Powered-By: Slash 2.003000 Connection: close Content-Type: text/html; charset=iso-8859-1
OK
The server encountered an internal error or misconfiguration and was unable to complete your request.
Please contact the server administrator, pater@slashdot.org and inform them of the time the error occurred, and anything you might have done that may have caused the error.

More information about this error may be available in the server error log.

HTTP/1.1 200 OK Date: Thu, 18 Apr 2002 07:21:59 GMT Server: Apache/1.3.20 (Unix) mod_perl/1.25 mod_gzip/1.3.19.1a X-Powered-By: Slash 2.003000 Connection: close Content-Type: text/html; charset=iso-8859-1
OK
The server encountered an internal error or misconfiguration and was unable to complete your request.
Please contact the server administrator, pater@slashdot.org and inform them of the time the error occurred, and anything you might have done that may have caused the error.

More information about this error may be available in the server error log.

HTTP/1.1 200 OK Date: Thu, 18 Apr 2002 07:21:59 GMT Server: Apache/1.3.20 (Unix) mod_perl/1.25 mod_gzip/1.3.19.1a X-Powered-By: Slash 2.003000 Connection: close Content-Type: text/html; charset=iso-8859-1
OK
The server encountered an internal error or misconfiguration and was unable to complete your request.
Please contact the server administrator, pater@slashdot.org and inform them of the time the error occurred, and anything you might have done that may have caused the error.

More information about this error may be available in the server error log.

HTTP/1.1 200 OK Date: Thu, 18 Apr 2002 07:21:59 GMT Server: Apache/1.3.20 (Unix) mod_perl/1.25 mod_gzip/1.3.19.1a X-Powered-By: Slash 2.003000 Connection: close Content-Type: text/html; charset=iso-8859-1
OK
The server encountered an internal error or misconfiguration and was unable to complete your request.
Please contact the server administrator, pater@slashdot.org and inform them of the time the error occurred, and anything you might have done that may have caused the error.

More information about this error may be available in the server error log.

HTTP/1.1 200 OK Date: Thu, 18 Apr 2002 07:21:59 GMT Server: Apache/1.3.20 (Unix) mod_perl/1.25 mod_gzip/1.3.19.1a X-Powered-By: Slash 2.003000 Connection: close Content-Type: text/html; charset=iso-8859-1
OK
The server encountered an internal error or misconfiguration and was unable to complete your request.
Please contact the server administrator, pater@slashdot.org and inform them of the time the error occurred, and anything you might have done that may have caused the error.

More information about this error may be available in the server error log.

HTTP/1.1 200 OK Date: Thu, 18 Apr 2002 07:21:59 GMT Server: Apache/1.3.20 (Unix) mod_perl/1.25 mod_gzip/1.3.19.1a X-Powered-By: Slash 2.003000 Connection: close Content-Type: text/html; charset=iso-8859-1
OK
The server encountered an internal error or misconfiguration and was unable to complete your request.
Please contact the server administrator, pater@slashdot.org and inform them of the time the error occurred, and anything you might have done that may have caused the error.

More information about this error may be available in the server error log.

HTTP/1.1 200 OK Date: Thu, 18 Apr 2002 07:21:59 GMT Server: Apache/1.3.20 (Unix) mod_perl/1.25 mod_gzip/1.3.19.1a X-Powered-By: Slash 2.003000 Connection: close Content-Type: text/html; charset=iso-8859-1
OK
The server encountered an internal error or misconfiguration and was unable to complete your request.
Please contact the server administrator, pater@slashdot.org and inform them of the time the error occurred, and anything you might have done that may have caused the error.

More information about this error may be available in the server error log.

HTTP/1.1 200 OK Date: Thu, 18 Apr 2002 07:21:59 GMT Server: Apache/1.3.20 (Unix) mod_perl/1.25 mod_gzip/1.3.19.1a X-Powered-By: Slash 2.003000 Connection: close Content-Type: text/html; charset=iso-8859-1
OK
The server encountered an internal error or misconfiguration and was unable to complete your request.
Please contact the server administrator, pater@slashdot.org and inform them of the time the error occurred, and anything you might have done that may have caused the error.

More information about this error may be available in the server error log.

HTTP/1.1 200 OK Date: Thu, 18 Apr 2002 07:21:59 GMT Server: Apache/1.3.20 (Unix) mod_perl/1.25 mod_gzip/1.3.19.1a X-Powered-By: Slash 2.003000 Connection: close Content-Type: text/html; charset=iso-8859-1
OK
The server encountered an internal error or misconfiguration and was unable to complete your request.
Please contact the server administrator, pater@slashdot.org and inform them of the time the error occurred, and anything you might have done that may have caused the error.

More information about this error may be available in the server error log.

HTTP/1.1 200 OK Date: Thu, 18 Apr 2002 07:21:59 GMT Server: Apache/1.3.20 (Unix) mod_perl/1.25 mod_gzip/1.3.19.1a X-Powered-By: Slash 2.003000 Connection: close Content-Type: text/html; charset=iso-8859-1
OK
The server encountered an internal error or misconfiguration and was unable to complete your request.
Please contact the server administrator, pater@slashdot.org and inform them of the time the error occurred, and anything you might have done that may have caused the error.

More information about this error may be available in the server error log.

HTTP/1.1 200 OK Date: Thu, 18 Apr 2002 07:21:59 GMT Server: Apache/1.3.20 (Unix) mod_perl/1.25 mod_gzip/1.3.19.1a X-Powered-By: Slash 2.003000 Connection: close Content-Type: text/html; charset=iso-8859-1
OK
The server encountered an internal error or misconfiguration and was unable to complete your request.
Please contact the server administrator, pater@slashdot.org and inform them of the time the error occurred, and anything you might have done that may have caused the error.

More information about this error may be available in the server error log.

HTTP/1.1 200 OK Date: Thu, 18 Apr 2002 07:21:59 GMT Server: Apache/1.3.20 (Unix) mod_perl/1.25 mod_gzip/1.3.19.1a X-Powered-By: Slash 2.003000 Connection: close Content-Type: text/html; charset=iso-8859-1
OK
The server encountered an internal error or misconfiguration and was unable to complete your request.
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The Past and Future of the Hard Dick (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3363922)

It's served a guy well in the past, and I think with Viagra, etc, we'll see new frontiers in penile length. [goatsx.cx] Wonder if penis length is herditary -- that could be the next big thing.

Don't Pay Lars (2)

graveyhead (210996) | more than 12 years ago | (#3363952)

Information itself becomes free (or do I mean worthless?), but metadata?the means of organizing information?is priceless.
Put that in your pipe and smoke it, Lars Ulrich! Because graveyhead is a database/sql nerd he becomes the star because he can organize all the worthless Metallica tracks!

Reminds me of a conversation I had (4, Insightful)

interstellar_donkey (200782) | more than 12 years ago | (#3363958)

15 years ago, I was speaking with a freind of my fathers about these new exotic 'hard drives' you could get. He was a big time computer guru, and I was a little kid.

I said to him that I thought a 10 megabyte hdd would be perfect, and that someday we would be able to buy one for less then $1,000. He scoffed.

I still remember this very clearly. "Why in heavens name would you ever need that much space in a hard drive"

I worked it out, and every concievable program I'd use, including saved files, all told would only need 2 megs. It was just impossible to think up enough applications at the time that a home PC really needed.

I'd love to run into him again and ask him if he remembers that conversation. In 10 years, 100 Terrabyte drives will seem 'quaint'.

Re:Reminds me of a conversation I had (2)

phalse phace (454635) | more than 12 years ago | (#3364020)

"I'd love to run into him again and ask him if he remembers that conversation."

If I'm not mistaken, I think you'll be able to find your "big time computer guru" [microsoft.com] somewhere in Redmond, Washington.

Wasn't he also the one who said that 640Kb memory should be enough for everybody?

Re:Reminds me of a conversation I had (-1)

flaw1 (572429) | more than 12 years ago | (#3364051)

Wasn't he also the one who said that 640Kb memory should be enough for everybody?

No, he's not actually. That's a commonly seen misquote, you stupid fuck.

Your sig (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3364091)

Ought that not be "f`f"f`f""?

Or at least "fyfjfX"?

Re:Reminds me of a conversation I had (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3364121)

my

Re:Reminds me of a conversation I had (2)

glwtta (532858) | more than 12 years ago | (#3364153)

Wasn't he also the one who said that 640Kb memory should be enough for everybody?

Gods, will you give it a rest? That was how many years ago?

In case the main page is /.'d (-1)

Mao Zedong (467890) | more than 12 years ago | (#3363959)

The Past and Future of the Hard Drive
Posted by chrisd on Thursday April 18, @03:06AM
from the 120-tb-and-only-a-bernoulli-for-backup dept.
Snags writes "Brian Hayes of American Scientist has written a nice little historical review of hard drive technology, from the first hard drive (nice pic) made by IBM in 1956 to what may be available in 10-15 years. He muses on how to fill up a 120 TB hard drive with text, photos, audio, and video (60,000 hours of DVD's). Kind of ironic that this came in my mailbox today considering IBM's announcement."
The Past and Future of the Hard Drive
Posted by chrisd on Thursday April 18, @03:06AM
from the 120-tb-and-only-a-bernoulli-for-backup dept.
Snags writes "Brian Hayes of American Scientist has written a nice little historical review of hard drive technology, from the first hard drive (nice pic) made by IBM in 1956 to what may be available in 10-15 years. He muses on how to fill up a 120 TB hard drive with text, photos, audio, and video (60,000 hours of DVD's). Kind of ironic that this came in my mailbox today considering IBM's announcement." The Past and Future of the Hard Drive
Posted by chrisd on Thursday April 18, @03:06AM
from the 120-tb-and-only-a-bernoulli-for-backup dept.
Snags writes "Brian Hayes of American Scientist has written a nice little historical review of hard drive technology, from the first hard drive (nice pic) made by IBM in 1956 to what may be available in 10-15 years. He muses on how to fill up a 120 TB hard drive with text, photos, audio, and video (60,000 hours of DVD's). Kind of ironic that this came in my mailbox today considering IBM's announcement." The Past and Future of the Hard Drive
Posted by chrisd on Thursday April 18, @03:06AM
from the 120-tb-and-only-a-bernoulli-for-backup dept.
Snags writes "Brian Hayes of American Scientist has written a nice little historical review of hard drive technology, from the first hard drive (nice pic) made by IBM in 1956 to what may be available in 10-15 years. He muses on how to fill up a 120 TB hard drive with text, photos, audio, and video (60,000 hours of DVD's). Kind of ironic that this came in my mailbox today considering IBM's announcement." The Past and Future of the Hard Drive
Posted by chrisd on Thursday April 18, @03:06AM
from the 120-tb-and-only-a-bernoulli-for-backup dept.
Snags writes "Brian Hayes of American Scientist has written a nice little historical review of hard drive technology, from the first hard drive (nice pic) made by IBM in 1956 to what may be available in 10-15 years. He muses on how to fill up a 120 TB hard drive with text, photos, audio, and video (60,000 hours of DVD's). Kind of ironic that this came in my mailbox today considering IBM's announcement." The Past and Future of the Hard Drive
Posted by chrisd on Thursday April 18, @03:06AM
from the 120-tb-and-only-a-bernoulli-for-backup dept.
Snags writes "Brian Hayes of American Scientist has written a nice little historical review of hard drive technology, from the first hard drive (nice pic) made by IBM in 1956 to what may be available in 10-15 years. He muses on how to fill up a 120 TB hard drive with text, photos, audio, and video (60,000 hours of DVD's). Kind of ironic that this came in my mailbox today considering IBM's announcement." The Past and Future of the Hard Drive
Posted by chrisd on Thursday April 18, @03:06AM
from the 120-tb-and-only-a-bernoulli-for-backup dept.
Snags writes "Brian Hayes of American Scientist has written a nice little historical review of hard drive technology, from the first hard drive (nice pic) made by IBM in 1956 to what may be available in 10-15 years. He muses on how to fill up a 120 TB hard drive with text, photos, audio, and video (60,000 hours of DVD's). Kind of ironic that this came in my mailbox today considering IBM's announcement." The Past and Future of the Hard Drive
Posted by chrisd on Thursday April 18, @03:06AM
from the 120-tb-and-only-a-bernoulli-for-backup dept.
Snags writes "Brian Hayes of American Scientist has written a nice little historical review of hard drive technology, from the first hard drive (nice pic) made by IBM in 1956 to what may be available in 10-15 years. He muses on how to fill up a 120 TB hard drive with text, photos, audio, and video (60,000 hours of DVD's). Kind of ironic that this came in my mailbox today considering IBM's announcement." The Past and Future of the Hard Drive
Posted by chrisd on Thursday April 18, @03:06AM
from the 120-tb-and-only-a-bernoulli-for-backup dept.
Snags writes "Brian Hayes of American Scientist has written a nice little historical review of hard drive technology, from the first hard drive (nice pic) made by IBM in 1956 to what may be available in 10-15 years. He muses on how to fill up a 120 TB hard drive with text, photos, audio, and video (60,000 hours of DVD's). Kind of ironic that this came in my mailbox today considering IBM's announcement." The Past and Future of the Hard Drive
Posted by chrisd on Thursday April 18, @03:06AM
from the 120-tb-and-only-a-bernoulli-for-backup dept.
Snags writes "Brian Hayes of American Scientist has written a nice little historical review of hard drive technology, from the first hard drive (nice pic) made by IBM in 1956 to what may be available in 10-15 years. He muses on how to fill up a 120 TB hard drive with text, photos, audio, and video (60,000 hours of DVD's). Kind of ironic that this came in my mailbox today considering IBM's announcement." The Past and Future of the Hard Drive
Posted by chrisd on Thursday April 18, @03:06AM
from the 120-tb-and-only-a-bernoulli-for-backup dept.
Snags writes "Brian Hayes of American Scientist has written a nice little historical review of hard drive technology, from the first hard drive (nice pic) made by IBM in 1956 to what may be available in 10-15 years. He muses on how to fill up a 120 TB hard drive with text, photos, audio, and video (60,000 hours of DVD's). Kind of ironic that this came in my mailbox today considering IBM's announcement." The Past and Future of the Hard Drive
Posted by chrisd on Thursday April 18, @03:06AM
from the 120-tb-and-only-a-bernoulli-for-backup dept.
Snags writes "Brian Hayes of American Scientist has written a nice little historical review of hard drive technology, from the first hard drive (nice pic) made by IBM in 1956 to what may be available in 10-15 years. He muses on how to fill up a 120 TB hard drive with text, photos, audio, and video (60,000 hours of DVD's). Kind of ironic that this came in my mailbox today considering IBM's announcement." The Past and Future of the Hard Drive
Posted by chrisd on Thursday April 18, @03:06AM
from the 120-tb-and-only-a-bernoulli-for-backup dept.
Snags writes "Brian Hayes of American Scientist has written a nice little historical review of hard drive technology, from the first hard drive (nice pic) made by IBM in 1956 to what may be available in 10-15 years. He muses on how to fill up a 120 TB hard drive with text, photos, audio, and video (60,000 hours of DVD's). Kind of ironic that this came in my mailbox today considering IBM's announcement." The Past and Future of the Hard Drive
Posted by chrisd on Thursday April 18, @03:06AM
from the 120-tb-and-only-a-bernoulli-for-backup dept.
Snags writes "Brian Hayes of American Scientist has written a nice little historical review of hard drive technology, from the first hard drive (nice pic) made by IBM in 1956 to what may be available in 10-15 years. He muses on how to fill up a 120 TB hard drive with text, photos, audio, and video (60,000 hours of DVD's). Kind of ironic that this came in my mailbox today considering IBM's announcement." The Past and Future of the Hard Drive
Posted by chrisd on Thursday April 18, @03:06AM
from the 120-tb-and-only-a-bernoulli-for-backup dept.
Snags writes "Brian Hayes of American Scientist has written a nice little historical review of hard drive technology, from the first hard drive (nice pic) made by IBM in 1956 to what may be available in 10-15 years. He muses on how to fill up a 120 TB hard drive with text, photos, audio, and video (60,000 hours of DVD's). Kind of ironic that this came in my mailbox today considering IBM's announcement." The Past and Future of the Hard Drive
Posted by chrisd on Thursday April 18, @03:06AM
from the 120-tb-and-only-a-bernoulli-for-backup dept.
Snags writes "Brian Hayes of American Scientist has written a nice little historical review of hard drive technology, from the first hard drive (nice pic) made by IBM in 1956 to what may be available in 10-15 years. He muses on how to fill up a 120 TB hard drive with text, photos, audio, and video (60,000 hours of DVD's). Kind of ironic that this came in my mailbox today considering IBM's announcement." The Past and Future of the Hard Drive
Posted by chrisd on Thursday April 18, @03:06AM
from the 120-tb-and-only-a-bernoulli-for-backup dept.
Snags writes "Brian Hayes of American Scientist has written a nice little historical review of hard drive technology, from the first hard drive (nice pic) made by IBM in 1956 to what may be available in 10-15 years. He muses on how to fill up a 120 TB hard drive with text, photos, audio, and video (60,000 hours of DVD's). Kind of ironic that this came in my mailbox today considering IBM's announcement." The Past and Future of the Hard Drive
Posted by chrisd on Thursday April 18, @03:06AM
from the 120-tb-and-only-a-bernoulli-for-backup dept.
Snags writes "Brian Hayes of American Scientist has written a nice little historical review of hard drive technology, from the first hard drive (nice pic) made by IBM in 1956 to what may be available in 10-15 years. He muses on how to fill up a 120 TB hard drive with text, photos, audio, and video (60,000 hours of DVD's). Kind of ironic that this came in my mailbox today considering IBM's announcement." The Past and Future of the Hard Drive
Posted by chrisd on Thursday April 18, @03:06AM
from the 120-tb-and-only-a-bernoulli-for-backup dept.
Snags writes "Brian Hayes of American Scientist has written a nice little historical review of hard drive technology, from the first hard drive (nice pic) made by IBM in 1956 to what may be available in 10-15 years. He muses on how to fill up a 120 TB hard drive with text, photos, audio, and video (60,000 hours of DVD's). Kind of ironic that this came in my mailbox today considering IBM's announcement." The Past and Future of the Hard Drive
Posted by chrisd on Thursday April 18, @03:06AM
from the 120-tb-and-only-a-bernoulli-for-backup dept.
Snags writes "Brian Hayes of American Scientist has written a nice little historical review of hard drive technology, from the first hard drive (nice pic) made by IBM in 1956 to what may be available in 10-15 years. He muses on how to fill up a 120 TB hard drive with text, photos, audio, and video (60,000 hours of DVD's). Kind of ironic that this came in my mailbox today considering IBM's announcement." The Past and Future of the Hard Drive
Posted by chrisd on Thursday April 18, @03:06AM
from the 120-tb-and-only-a-bernoulli-for-backup dept.
Snags writes "Brian Hayes of American Scientist has written a nice little historical review of hard drive technology, from the first hard drive (nice pic) made by IBM in 1956 to what may be available in 10-15 years. He muses on how to fill up a 120 TB hard drive with text, photos, audio, and video (60,000 hours of DVD's). Kind of ironic that this came in my mailbox today considering IBM's announcement." The Past and Future of the Hard Drive
Posted by chrisd on Thursday April 18, @03:06AM
from the 120-tb-and-only-a-bernoulli-for-backup dept.
Snags writes "Brian Hayes of American Scientist has written a nice little historical review of hard drive technology, from the first hard drive (nice pic) made by IBM in 1956 to what may be available in 10-15 years. He muses on how to fill up a 120 TB hard drive with text, photos, audio, and video (60,000 hours of DVD's). Kind of ironic that this came in my mailbox today considering IBM's announcement." The Past and Future of the Hard Drive
Posted by chrisd on Thursday April 18, @03:06AM
from the 120-tb-and-only-a-bernoulli-for-backup dept.
Snags writes "Brian Hayes of American Scientist has written a nice little historical review of hard drive technology, from the first hard drive (nice pic) made by IBM in 1956 to what may be available in 10-15 years. He muses on how to fill up a 120 TB hard drive with text, photos, audio, and video (60,000 hours of DVD's). Kind of ironic that this came in my mailbox today considering IBM's announcement." The Past and Future of the Hard Drive
Posted by chrisd on Thursday April 18, @03:06AM
from the 120-tb-and-only-a-bernoulli-for-backup dept.
Snags writes "Brian Hayes of American Scientist has written a nice little historical review of hard drive technology, from the first hard drive (nice pic) made by IBM in 1956 to what may be available in 10-15 years. He muses on how to fill up a 120 TB hard drive with text, photos, audio, and video (60,000 hours of DVD's). Kind of ironic that this came in my mailbox today considering IBM's announcement." The Past and Future of the Hard Drive
Posted by chrisd on Thursday April 18, @03:06AM
from the 120-tb-and-only-a-bernoulli-for-backup dept.
Snags writes "Brian Hayes of American Scientist has written a nice little historical review of hard drive technology, from the first hard drive (nice pic) made by IBM in 1956 to what may be available in 10-15 years. He muses on how to fill up a 120 TB hard drive with text, photos, audio, and video (60,000 hours of DVD's). Kind of ironic that this came in my mailbox today considering IBM's announcement." The Past and Future of the Hard Drive
Posted by chrisd on Thursday April 18, @03:06AM
from the 120-tb-and-only-a-bernoulli-for-backup dept.
Snags writes "Brian Hayes of American Scientist has written a nice little historical review of hard drive technology, from the first hard drive (nice pic) made by IBM in 1956 to what may be available in 10-15 years. He muses on how to fill up a 120 TB hard drive with text, photos, audio, and video (60,000 hours of DVD's). Kind of ironic that this came in my mailbox today considering IBM's announcement." The Past and Future of the Hard Drive
Posted by chrisd on Thursday April 18, @03:06AM
from the 120-tb-and-only-a-bernoulli-for-backup dept.
Snags writes "Brian Hayes of American Scientist has written a nice little historical review of hard drive technology, from the first hard drive (nice pic) made by IBM in 1956 to what may be available in 10-15 years. He muses on how to fill up a 120 TB hard drive with text, photos, audio, and video (60,000 hours of DVD's). Kind of ironic that this came in my mailbox today considering IBM's announcement." The Past and Future of the Hard Drive
Posted by chrisd on Thursday April 18, @03:06AM
from the 120-tb-and-only-a-bernoulli-for-backup dept.
Snags writes "Brian Hayes of American Scientist has written a nice little historical review of hard drive technology, from the first hard drive (nice pic) made by IBM in 1956 to what may be available in 10-15 years. He muses on how to fill up a 120 TB hard drive with text, photos, audio, and video (60,000 hours of DVD's). Kind of ironic that this came in my mailbox today considering IBM's announcement."
The Past and Future of the Hard Drive
Posted by chrisd on Thursday April 18, @03:06AM
from the 120-tb-and-only-a-bernoulli-for-backup dept.
Snags writes "Brian Hayes of American Scientist has written a nice little historical review of hard drive technology, from the first hard drive (nice pic) made by IBM in 1956 to what may be available in 10-15 years. He muses on how to fill up a 120 TB hard drive with text, photos, audio, and video (60,000 hours of DVD's). Kind of ironic that this came in my mailbox today considering IBM's announcement." The Past and Future of the Hard Drive
Posted by chrisd on Thursday April 18, @03:06AM
from the 120-tb-and-only-a-bernoulli-for-backup dept.
Snags writes "Brian Hayes of American Scientist has written a nice little historical review of hard drive technology, from the first hard drive (nice pic) made by IBM in 1956 to what may be available in 10-15 years. He muses on how to fill up a 120 TB hard drive with text, photos, audio, and video (60,000 hours of DVD's). Kind of ironic that this came in my mailbox today considering IBM's announcement." The Past and Future of the Hard Drive
Posted by chrisd on Thursday April 18, @03:06AM
from the 120-tb-and-only-a-bernoulli-for-backup dept.
Snags writes "Brian Hayes of American Scientist has written a nice little historical review of hard drive technology, from the first hard drive (nice pic) made by IBM in 1956 to what may be available in 10-15 years. He muses on how to fill up a 120 TB hard drive with text, photos, audio, and video (60,000 hours of DVD's). Kind of ironic that this came in my mailbox today considering IBM's announcement." The Past and Future of the Hard Drive
Posted by chrisd on Thursday April 18, @03:06AM
from the 120-tb-and-only-a-bernoulli-for-backup dept.
Snags writes "Brian Hayes of American Scientist has written a nice little historical review of hard drive technology, from the first hard drive (nice pic) made by IBM in 1956 to what may be available in 10-15 years. He muses on how to fill up a 120 TB hard drive with text, photos, audio, and video (60,000 hours of DVD's). Kind of ironic that this came in my mailbox today considering IBM's announcement." The Past and Future of the Hard Drive
Posted by chrisd on Thursday April 18, @03:06AM
from the 120-tb-and-only-a-bernoulli-for-backup dept.
Snags writes "Brian Hayes of American Scientist has written a nice little historical review of hard drive technology, from the first hard drive (nice pic) made by IBM in 1956 to what may be available in 10-15 years. He muses on how to fill up a 120 TB hard drive with text, photos, audio, and video (60,000 hours of DVD's). Kind of ironic that this came in my mailbox today considering IBM's announcement." The Past and Future of the Hard Drive
Posted by chrisd on Thursday April 18, @03:06AM
from the 120-tb-and-only-a-bernoulli-for-backup dept.
Snags writes "Brian Hayes of American Scientist has written a nice little historical review of hard drive technology, from the first hard drive (nice pic) made by IBM in 1956 to what may be available in 10-15 years. He muses on how to fill up a 120 TB hard drive with text, photos, audio, and video (60,000 hours of DVD's). Kind of ironic that this came in my mailbox today considering IBM's announcement." The Past and Future of the Hard Drive
Posted by chrisd on Thursday April 18, @03:06AM
from the 120-tb-and-only-a-bernoulli-for-backup dept.
Snags writes "Brian Hayes of American Scientist has written a nice little historical review of hard drive technology, from the first hard drive (nice pic) made by IBM in 1956 to what may be available in 10-15 years. He muses on how to fill up a 120 TB hard drive with text, photos, audio, and video (60,000 hours of DVD's). Kind of ironic that this came in my mailbox today considering IBM's announcement." The Past and Future of the Hard Drive
Posted by chrisd on Thursday April 18, @03:06AM
from the 120-tb-and-only-a-bernoulli-for-backup dept.
Snags writes "Brian Hayes of American Scientist has written a nice little historical review of hard drive technology, from the first hard drive (nice pic) made by IBM in 1956 to what may be available in 10-15 years. He muses on how to fill up a 120 TB hard drive with text, photos, audio, and video (60,000 hours of DVD's). Kind of ironic that this came in my mailbox today considering IBM's announcement." The Past and Future of the Hard Drive
Posted by chrisd on Thursday April 18, @03:06AM
from the 120-tb-and-only-a-bernoulli-for-backup dept.
Snags writes "Brian Hayes of American Scientist has written a nice little historical review of hard drive technology, from the first hard drive (nice pic) made by IBM in 1956 to what may be available in 10-15 years. He muses on how to fill up a 120 TB hard drive with text, photos, audio, and video (60,000 hours of DVD's). Kind of ironic that this came in my mailbox today considering IBM's announcement." The Past and Future of the Hard Drive
Posted by chrisd on Thursday April 18, @03:06AM
from the 120-tb-and-only-a-bernoulli-for-backup dept.
Snags writes "Brian Hayes of American Scientist has written a nice little historical review of hard drive technology, from the first hard drive (nice pic) made by IBM in 1956 to what may be available in 10-15 years. He muses on how to fill up a 120 TB hard drive with text, photos, audio, and video (60,000 hours of DVD's). Kind of ironic that this came in my mailbox today considering IBM's announcement." The Past and Future of the Hard Drive
Posted by chrisd on Thursday April 18, @03:06AM
from the 120-tb-and-only-a-bernoulli-for-backup dept.
Snags writes "Brian Hayes of American Scientist has written a nice little historical review of hard drive technology, from the first hard drive (nice pic) made by IBM in 1956 to what may be available in 10-15 years. He muses on how to fill up a 120 TB hard drive with text, photos, audio, and video (60,000 hours of DVD's). Kind of ironic that this came in my mailbox today considering IBM's announcement." The Past and Future of the Hard Drive
Posted by chrisd on Thursday April 18, @03:06AM
from the 120-tb-and-only-a-bernoulli-for-backup dept.
Snags writes "Brian Hayes of American Scientist has written a nice little historical review of hard drive technology, from the first hard drive (nice pic) made by IBM in 1956 to what may be available in 10-15 years. He muses on how to fill up a 120 TB hard drive with text, photos, audio, and video (60,000 hours of DVD's). Kind of ironic that this came in my mailbox today considering IBM's announcement." The Past and Future of the Hard Drive
Posted by chrisd on Thursday April 18, @03:06AM
from the 120-tb-and-only-a-bernoulli-for-backup dept.
Snags writes "Brian Hayes of American Scientist has written a nice little historical review of hard drive technology, from the first hard drive (nice pic) made by IBM in 1956 to what may be available in 10-15 years. He muses on how to fill up a 120 TB hard drive with text, photos, audio, and video (60,000 hours of DVD's). Kind of ironic that this came in my mailbox today considering IBM's announcement." The Past and Future of the Hard Drive
Posted by chrisd on Thursday April 18, @03:06AM
from the 120-tb-and-only-a-bernoulli-for-backup dept.
Snags writes "Brian Hayes of American Scientist has written a nice little historical review of hard drive technology, from the first hard drive (nice pic) made by IBM in 1956 to what may be available in 10-15 years. He muses on how to fill up a 120 TB hard drive with text, photos, audio, and video (60,000 hours of DVD's). Kind of ironic that this came in my mailbox today considering IBM's announcement." The Past and Future of the Hard Drive
Posted by chrisd on Thursday April 18, @03:06AM
from the 120-tb-and-only-a-bernoulli-for-backup dept.
Snags writes "Brian Hayes of American Scientist has written a nice little historical review of hard drive technology, from the first hard drive (nice pic) made by IBM in 1956 to what may be available in 10-15 years. He muses on how to fill up a 120 TB hard drive with text, photos, audio, and video (60,000 hours of DVD's). Kind of ironic that this came in my mailbox today considering IBM's announcement." The Past and Future of the Hard Drive
Posted by chrisd on Thursday April 18, @03:06AM
from the 120-tb-and-only-a-bernoulli-for-backup dept.
Snags writes "Brian Hayes of American Scientist has written a nice little historical review of hard drive technology, from the first hard drive (nice pic) made by IBM in 1956 to what may be available in 10-15 years. He muses on how to fill up a 120 TB hard drive with text, photos, audio, and video (60,000 hours of DVD's). Kind of ironic that this came in my mailbox today considering IBM's announcement." The Past and Future of the Hard Drive
Posted by chrisd on Thursday April 18, @03:06AM
from the 120-tb-and-only-a-bernoulli-for-backup dept.
Snags writes "Brian Hayes of American Scientist has written a nice little historical review of hard drive technology, from the first hard drive (nice pic) made by IBM in 1956 to what may be available in 10-15 years. He muses on how to fill up a 120 TB hard drive with text, photos, audio, and video (60,000 hours of DVD's). Kind of ironic that this came in my mailbox today considering IBM's announcement." The Past and Future of the Hard Drive
Posted by chrisd on Thursday April 18, @03:06AM
from the 120-tb-and-only-a-bernoulli-for-backup dept.
Snags writes "Brian Hayes of American Scientist has written a nice little historical review of hard drive technology, from the first hard drive (nice pic) made by IBM in 1956 to what may be available in 10-15 years. He muses on how to fill up a 120 TB hard drive with text, photos, audio, and video (60,000 hours of DVD's). Kind of ironic that this came in my mailbox today considering IBM's announcement." The Past and Future of the Hard Drive
Posted by chrisd on Thursday April 18, @03:06AM
from the 120-tb-and-only-a-bernoulli-for-backup dept.
Snags writes "Brian Hayes of American Scientist has written a nice little historical review of hard drive technology, from the first hard drive (nice pic) made by IBM in 1956 to what may be available in 10-15 years. He muses on how to fill up a 120 TB hard drive with text, photos, audio, and video (60,000 hours of DVD's). Kind of ironic that this came in my mailbox today considering IBM's announcement." The Past and Future of the Hard Drive
Posted by chrisd on Thursday April 18, @03:06AM
from the 120-tb-and-only-a-bernoulli-for-backup dept.
Snags writes "Brian Hayes of American Scientist has written a nice little historical review of hard drive technology, from the first hard drive (nice pic) made by IBM in 1956 to what may be available in 10-15 years. He muses on how to fill up a 120 TB hard drive with text, photos, audio, and video (60,000 hours of DVD's). Kind of ironic that this came in my mailbox today considering IBM's announcement." The Past and Future of the Hard Drive
Posted by chrisd on Thursday April 18, @03:06AM
from the 120-tb-and-only-a-bernoulli-for-backup dept.
Snags writes "Brian Hayes of American Scientist has written a nice little historical review of hard drive technology, from the first hard drive (nice pic) made by IBM in 1956 to what may be available in 10-15 years. He muses on how to fill up a 120 TB hard drive with text, photos, audio, and video (60,000 hours of DVD's). Kind of ironic that this came in my mailbox today considering IBM's announcement." The Past and Future of the Hard Drive
Posted by chrisd on Thursday April 18, @03:06AM
from the 120-tb-and-only-a-bernoulli-for-backup dept.
Snags writes "Brian Hayes of American Scientist has written a nice little historical review of hard drive technology, from the first hard drive (nice pic) made by IBM in 1956 to what may be available in 10-15 years. He muses on how to fill up a 120 TB hard drive with text, photos, audio, and video (60,000 hours of DVD's). Kind of ironic that this came in my mailbox today considering IBM's announcement." The Past and Future of the Hard Drive
Posted by chrisd on Thursday April 18, @03:06AM
from the 120-tb-and-only-a-bernoulli-for-backup dept.
Snags writes "Brian Hayes of American Scientist has written a nice little historical review of hard drive technology, from the first hard drive (nice pic) made by IBM in 1956 to what may be available in 10-15 years. He muses on how to fill up a 120 TB hard drive with text, photos, audio, and video (60,000 hours of DVD's). Kind of ironic that this came in my mailbox today considering IBM's announcement." The Past and Future of the Hard Drive
Posted by chrisd on Thursday April 18, @03:06AM
from the 120-tb-and-only-a-bernoulli-for-backup dept.
Snags writes "Brian Hayes of American Scientist has written a nice little historical review of hard drive technology, from the first hard drive (nice pic) made by IBM in 1956 to what may be available in 10-15 years. He muses on how to fill up a 120 TB hard drive with text, photos, audio, and video (60,000 hours of DVD's). Kind of ironic that this came in my mailbox today considering IBM's announcement." The Past and Future of the Hard Drive
Posted by chrisd on Thursday April 18, @03:06AM
from the 120-tb-and-only-a-bernoulli-for-backup dept.
Snags writes "Brian Hayes of American Scientist has written a nice little historical review of hard drive technology, from the first hard drive (nice pic) made by IBM in 1956 to what may be available in 10-15 years. He muses on how to fill up a 120 TB hard drive with text, photos, audio, and video (60,000 hours of DVD's). Kind of ironic that this came in my mailbox today considering IBM's announcement." The Past and Future of the Hard Drive
Posted by chrisd on Thursday April 18, @03:06AM
from the 120-tb-and-only-a-bernoulli-for-backup dept.
Snags writes "Brian Hayes of American Scientist has written a nice little historical review of hard drive technology, from the first hard drive (nice pic) made by IBM in 1956 to what may be available in 10-15 years. He muses on how to fill up a 120 TB hard drive with text, photos, audio, and video (60,000 hours of DVD's). Kind of ironic that this came in my mailbox today considering IBM's announcement." The Past and Future of the Hard Drive
Posted by chrisd on Thursday April 18, @03:06AM
from the 120-tb-and-only-a-bernoulli-for-backup dept.
Snags writes "Brian Hayes of American Scientist has written a nice little historical review of hard drive technology, from the first hard drive (nice pic) made by IBM in 1956 to what may be available in 10-15 years. He muses on how to fill up a 120 TB hard drive with text, photos, audio, and video (60,000 hours of DVD's). Kind of ironic that this came in my mailbox today considering IBM's announcement." The Past and Future of the Hard Drive
Posted by chrisd on Thursday April 18, @03:06AM
from the 120-tb-and-only-a-bernoulli-for-backup dept.
Snags writes "Brian Hayes of American Scientist has written a nice little historical review of hard drive technology, from the first hard drive (nice pic) made by IBM in 1956 to what may be available in 10-15 years. He muses on how to fill up a 120 TB hard drive with text, photos, audio, and video (60,000 hours of DVD's). Kind of ironic that this came in my mailbox today considering IBM's announcement." The Past and Future of the Hard Drive
Posted by chrisd on Thursday April 18, @03:06AM
from the 120-tb-and-only-a-bernoulli-for-backup dept.
Snags writes "Brian Hayes of American Scientist has written a nice little historical review of hard drive technology, from the first hard drive (nice pic) made by IBM in 1956 to what may be available in 10-15 years. He muses on how to fill up a 120 TB hard drive with text, photos, audio, and video (60,000 hours of DVD's). Kind of ironic that this came in my mailbox today considering IBM's announcement." The Past and Future of the Hard Drive
Posted by chrisd on Thursday April 18, @03:06AM
from the 120-tb-and-only-a-bernoulli-for-backup dept.
Snags writes "Brian Hayes of American Scientist has written a nice little historical review of hard drive technology, from the first hard drive (nice pic) made by IBM in 1956 to what may be available in 10-15 years. He muses on how to fill up a 120 TB hard drive with text, photos, audio, and video (60,000 hours of DVD's). Kind of ironic that this came in my mailbox today considering IBM's announcement." The Past and Future of the Hard Drive
Posted by chrisd on Thursday April 18, @03:06AM
from the 120-tb-and-only-a-bernoulli-for-backup dept.
Snags writes "Brian Hayes of American Scientist has written a nice little historical review of hard drive technology, from the first hard drive (nice pic) made by IBM in 1956 to what may be available in 10-15 years. He muses on how to fill up a 120 TB hard drive with text, photos, audio, and video (60,000 hours of DVD's). Kind of ironic that this came in my mailbox today considering IBM's announcement." The Past and Future of the Hard Drive
Posted by chrisd on Thursday April 18, @03:06AM
from the 120-tb-and-only-a-bernoulli-for-backup dept.
Snags writes "Brian Hayes of American Scientist has written a nice little historical review of hard drive technology, from the first hard drive (nice pic) made by IBM in 1956 to what may be available in 10-15 years. He muses on how to fill up a 120 TB hard drive with text, photos, audio, and video (60,000 hours of DVD's). Kind of ironic that this came in my mailbox today considering IBM's announcement." The Past and Future of the Hard Drive
Posted by chrisd on Thursday April 18, @03:06AM
from the 120-tb-and-only-a-bernoulli-for-backup dept.
Snags writes "Brian Hayes of American Scientist has written a nice little historical review of hard drive technology, from the first hard drive (nice pic) made by IBM in 1956 to what may be available in 10-15 years. He muses on how to fill up a 120 TB hard drive with text, photos, audio, and video (60,000 hours of DVD's). Kind of ironic that this came in my mailbox today considering IBM's announcement." The Past and Future of the Hard Drive
Posted by chrisd on Thursday April 18, @03:06AM
from the 120-tb-and-only-a-bernoulli-for-backup dept.
Snags writes "Brian Hayes of American Scientist has written a nice little historical review of hard drive technology, from the first hard drive (nice pic) made by IBM in 1956 to what may be available in 10-15 years. He muses on how to fill up a 120 TB hard drive with text, photos, audio, and video (60,000 hours of DVD's). Kind of ironic that this came in my mailbox today considering IBM's announcement." The Past and Future of the Hard Drive
Posted by chrisd on Thursday April 18, @03:06AM
from the 120-tb-and-only-a-bernoulli-for-backup dept.
Snags writes "Brian Hayes of American Scientist has written a nice little historical review of hard drive technology, from the first hard drive (nice pic) made by IBM in 1956 to what may be available in 10-15 years. He muses on how to fill up a 120 TB hard drive with text, photos, audio, and video (60,000 hours of DVD's). Kind of ironic that this came in my mailbox today considering IBM's announcement." The Past and Future of the Hard Drive
Posted by chrisd on Thursday April 18, @03:06AM
from the 120-tb-and-only-a-bernoulli-for-backup dept.
Snags writes "Brian Hayes of American Scientist has written a nice little historical review of hard drive technology, from the first hard drive (nice pic) made by IBM in 1956 to what may be available in 10-15 years. He muses on how to fill up a 120 TB hard drive with text, photos, audio, and video (60,000 hours of DVD's). Kind of ironic that this came in my mailbox today considering IBM's announcement." The Past and Future of the Hard Drive
Posted by chrisd on Thursday April 18, @03:06AM
from the 120-tb-and-only-a-bernoulli-for-backup dept.
Snags writes "Brian Hayes of American Scientist has written a nice little historical review of hard drive technology, from the first hard drive (nice pic) made by IBM in 1956 to what may be available in 10-15 years. He muses on how to fill up a 120 TB hard drive with text, photos, audio, and video (60,000 hours of DVD's). Kind of ironic that this came in my mailbox today considering IBM's announcement." The Past and Future of the Hard Drive
Posted by chrisd on Thursday April 18, @03:06AM
from the 120-tb-and-only-a-bernoulli-for-backup dept.
Snags writes "Brian Hayes of American Scientist has written a nice little historical review of hard drive technology, from the first hard drive (nice pic) made by IBM in 1956 to what may be available in 10-15 years. He muses on how to fill up a 120 TB hard drive with text, photos, audio, and video (60,000 hours of DVD's). Kind of ironic that this came in my mailbox today considering IBM's announcement." The Past and Future of the Hard Drive
Posted by chrisd on Thursday April 18, @03:06AM
from the 120-tb-and-only-a-bernoulli-for-backup dept.
Snags writes "Brian Hayes of American Scientist has written a nice little historical review of hard drive technology, from the first hard drive (nice pic) made by IBM in 1956 to what may be available in 10-15 years. He muses on how to fill up a 120 TB hard drive with text, photos, audio, and video (60,000 hours of DVD's). Kind of ironic that this came in my mailbox today considering IBM's announcement." The Past and Future of the Hard Drive
Posted by chrisd on Thursday April 18, @03:06AM
from the 120-tb-and-only-a-bernoulli-for-backup dept.
Snags writes "Brian Hayes of American Scientist has written a nice little historical review of hard drive technology, from the first hard drive (nice pic) made by IBM in 1956 to what may be available in 10-15 years. He muses on how to fill up a 120 TB hard drive with text, photos, audio, and video (60,000 hours of DVD's). Kind of ironic that this came in my mailbox today considering IBM's announcement." The Past and Future of the Hard Drive
Posted by chrisd on Thursday April 18, @03:06AM
from the 120-tb-and-only-a-bernoulli-for-backup dept.
Snags writes "Brian Hayes of American Scientist has written a nice little historical review of hard drive technology, from the first hard drive (nice pic) made by IBM in 1956 to what may be available in 10-15 years. He muses on how to fill up a 120 TB hard drive with text, photos, audio, and video (60,000 hours of DVD's). Kind of ironic that this came in my mailbox today considering IBM's announcement." The Past and Future of the Hard Drive
Posted by chrisd on Thursday April 18, @03:06AM
from the 120-tb-and-only-a-bernoulli-for-backup dept.
Snags writes "Brian Hayes of American Scientist has written a nice little historical review of hard drive technology, from the first hard drive (nice pic) made by IBM in 1956 to what may be available in 10-15 years. He muses on how to fill up a 120 TB hard drive with text, photos, audio, and video (60,000 hours of DVD's). Kind of ironic that this came in my mailbox today considering IBM's announcement." The Past and Future of the Hard Drive
Posted by chrisd on Thursday April 18, @03:06AM
from the 120-tb-and-only-a-bernoulli-for-backup dept.
Snags writes "Brian Hayes of American Scientist has written a nice little historical review of hard drive technology, from the first hard drive (nice pic) made by IBM in 1956 to what may be available in 10-15 years. He muses on how to fill up a 120 TB hard drive with text, photos, audio, and video (60,000 hours of DVD's). Kind of ironic that this came in my mailbox today considering IBM's announcement." The Past and Future of the Hard Drive
Posted by chrisd on Thursday April 18, @03:06AM
from the 120-tb-and-only-a-bernoulli-for-backup dept.
Snags writes "Brian Hayes of American Scientist has written a nice little historical review of hard drive technology, from the first hard drive (nice pic) made by IBM in 1956 to what may be available in 10-15 years. He muses on how to fill up a 120 TB hard drive with text, photos, audio, and video (60,000 hours of DVD's). Kind of ironic that this came in my mailbox today considering IBM's announcement." The Past and Future of the Hard Drive
Posted by chrisd on Thursday April 18, @03:06AM
from the 120-tb-and-only-a-bernoulli-for-backup dept.
Snags writes "Brian Hayes of American Scientist has written a nice little historical review of hard drive technology, from the first hard drive (nice pic) made by IBM in 1956 to what may be available in 10-15 years. He muses on how to fill up a 120 TB hard drive with text, photos, audio, and video (60,000 hours of DVD's). Kind of ironic that this came in my mailbox today considering IBM's announcement." The Past and Future of the Hard Drive
Posted by chrisd on Thursday April 18, @03:06AM
from the 120-tb-and-only-a-bernoulli-for-backup dept.
Snags writes "Brian Hayes of American Scientist has written a nice little historical review of hard drive technology, from the first hard drive (nice pic) made by IBM in 1956 to what may be available in 10-15 years. He muses on how to fill up a 120 TB hard drive with text, photos, audio, and video (60,000 hours of DVD's). Kind of ironic that this came in my mailbox today considering IBM's announcement." The Past and Future of the Hard Drive
Posted by chrisd on Thursday April 18, @03:06AM
from the 120-tb-and-only-a-bernoulli-for-backup dept.
Snags writes "Brian Hayes of American Scientist has written a nice little historical review of hard drive technology, from the first hard drive (nice pic) made by IBM in 1956 to what may be available in 10-15 years. He muses on how to fill up a 120 TB hard drive with text, photos, audio, and video (60,000 hours of DVD's). Kind of ironic that this came in my mailbox today considering IBM's announcement." The Past and Future of the Hard Drive
Posted by chrisd on Thursday April 18, @03:06AM
from the 120-tb-and-only-a-bernoulli-for-backup dept.
Snags writes "Brian Hayes of American Scientist has written a nice little historical review of hard drive technology, from the first hard drive (nice pic) made by IBM in 1956 to what may be available in 10-15 years. He muses on how to fill up a 120 TB hard drive with text, photos, audio, and video (60,000 hours of DVD's). Kind of ironic that this came in my mailbox today considering IBM's announcement." The Past and Future of the Hard Drive
Posted by chrisd on Thursday April 18, @03:06AM
from the 120-tb-and-only-a-bernoulli-for-backup dept.
Snags writes "Brian Hayes of American Scientist has written a nice little historical review of hard drive technology, from the first hard drive (nice pic) made by IBM in 1956 to what may be available in 10-15 years. He muses on how to fill up a 120 TB hard drive with text, photos, audio, and video (60,000 hours of DVD's). Kind of ironic that this came in my mailbox today considering IBM's announcement." The Past and Future of the Hard Drive
Posted by chrisd on Thursday April 18, @03:06AM
from the 120-tb-and-only-a-bernoulli-for-backup dept.
Snags writes "Brian Hayes of American Scientist has written a nice little historical review of hard drive technology, from the first hard drive (nice pic) made by IBM in 1956 to what may be available in 10-15 years. He muses on how to fill up a 120 TB hard drive with text, photos, audio, and video (60,000 hours of DVD's). Kind of ironic that this came in my mailbox today considering IBM's announcement." The Past and Future of the Hard Drive
Posted by chrisd on Thursday April 18, @03:06AM
from the 120-tb-and-only-a-bernoulli-for-backup dept.
Snags writes "Brian Hayes of American Scientist has written a nice little historical review of hard drive technology, from the first hard drive (nice pic) made by IBM in 1956 to what may be available in 10-15 years. He muses on how to fill up a 120 TB hard drive with text, photos, audio, and video (60,000 hours of DVD's). Kind of ironic that this came in my mailbox today considering IBM's announcement." The Past and Future of the Hard Drive
Posted by chrisd on Thursday April 18, @03:06AM
from the 120-tb-and-only-a-bernoulli-for-backup dept.
Snags writes "Brian Hayes of American Scientist has written a nice little historical review of hard drive technology, from the first hard drive (nice pic) made by IBM in 1956 to what may be available in 10-15 years. He muses on how to fill up a 120 TB hard drive with text, photos, audio, and video (60,000 hours of DVD's). Kind of ironic that this came in my mailbox today considering IBM's announcement." The Past and Future of the Hard Drive
Posted by chrisd on Thursday April 18, @03:06AM
from the 120-tb-and-only-a-bernoulli-for-backup dept.
Snags writes "Brian Hayes of American Scientist has written a nice little historical review of hard drive technology, from the first hard drive (nice pic) made by IBM in 1956 to what may be available in 10-15 years. He muses on how to fill up a 120 TB hard drive with text, photos, audio, and video (60,000 hours of DVD's). Kind of ironic that this came in my mailbox today considering IBM's announcement." The Past and Future of the Hard Drive
Posted by chrisd on Thursday April 18, @03:06AM
from the 120-tb-and-only-a-bernoulli-for-backup dept.
Snags writes "Brian Hayes of American Scientist has written a nice little historical review of hard drive technology, from the first hard drive (nice pic) made by IBM in 1956 to what may be available in 10-15 years. He muses on how to fill up a 120 TB hard drive with text, photos, audio, and video (60,000 hours of DVD's). Kind of ironic that this came in my mailbox today considering IBM's announcement." The Past and Future of the Hard Drive
Posted by chrisd on Thursday April 18, @03:06AM
from the 120-tb-and-only-a-bernoulli-for-backup dept.
Snags writes "Brian Hayes of American Scientist has written a nice little historical review of hard drive technology, from the first hard drive (nice pic) made by IBM in 1956 to what may be available in 10-15 years. He muses on how to fill up a 120 TB hard drive with text, photos, audio, and video (60,000 hours of DVD's). Kind of ironic that this came in my mailbox today considering IBM's announcement." The Past and Future of the Hard Drive
Posted by chrisd on Thursday April 18, @03:06AM
from the 120-tb-and-only-a-bernoulli-for-backup dept.
Snags writes "Brian Hayes of American Scientist has written a nice little historical review of hard drive technology, from the first hard drive (nice pic) made by IBM in 1956 to what may be available in 10-15 years. He muses on how to fill up a 120 TB hard drive with text, photos, audio, and video (60,000 hours of DVD's). Kind of ironic that this came in my mailbox today considering IBM's announcement." The Past and Future of the Hard Drive
Posted by chrisd on Thursday April 18, @03:06AM
from the 120-tb-and-only-a-bernoulli-for-backup dept.
Snags writes "Brian Hayes of American Scientist has written a nice little historical review of hard drive technology, from the first hard drive (nice pic) made by IBM in 1956 to what may be available in 10-15 years. He muses on how to fill up a 120 TB hard drive with text, photos, audio, and video (60,000 hours of DVD's). Kind of ironic that this came in my mailbox today considering IBM's announcement."
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why not the past and the future of something else? (-1)

User 956 (568564) | more than 12 years ago | (#3363972)

Why not the past and the future of something else?Like Star Trek: Voyager. Preferably we can put that suck-ass show in the past. Permanently in the past. So we never have to see it, or hear it again.

Just like my 8-year old girlfriend that "mysteriously disappeared".

She did suck a mean one though.

obligatory... (0)

Sean5033 (246214) | more than 12 years ago | (#3363975)

120 TB ought to be enough for anybody...

human imagination (2, Insightful)

sahala (105682) | more than 12 years ago | (#3363985)

First off, great article. Well written and even understandable for someone non-technical (we should all take note).

I do question some of his statements, however, particularly about human creativity:

Now it seems we face a curious Malthusian catastrophe of the information economy: The products of human creativity grow only arithmetically, whereas the capacity to store and distribute them increases geometrically. The human imagination can't keep up.

Or maybe it's only my imagination that can't keep up.

I'd say that the bolded part above is very likely. He states that he individually can't think of what to do with 120 TB, but collectively I'm confident we'll find a use for it. I've read through a dozen posts already where we've come up with some suggestions for use. Not to be critical or anything, but the surface has barely been scratched. It's not going to be all about data warehouses, streamable content, and how many dvd movies we can rip. Tell the whole world that 120 TB is available for storage, and a variety of uses will come up.

I'm pretty convinced that the actual consumer use of 120 TB will be for something that, if suggested now, we'll all laugh at and ask why the hell we'd want to pursue such an insane idea. For instance, the article mentioned mounting tiny cameras on eyeglasses to document one's whole life. The article also mentions home digital media hubs. Both are probably uses, but I actually think they are rather conservative ideas in the grand scheme of things. A successful idea now to think of an interesting and probably use of that much space in the future is more likely to come out of the mouth of some random guy while intermittently taking puffs out of a giant bong than any mature, prominent engineer.

Then again, some founders of successful companies were allegedly (I don't have any factual evidence) pretty fond of the herb [mac.com] .

autopr0n (5, Funny)

Renraku (518261) | more than 12 years ago | (#3363987)

"Thus the 120-terabyte disk will hold some 60,000 hours worth of movies; if you want to watch them all day and all night without a break for popcorn, they will last somewhat less than seven years." Most people can't even last seven minutes with high-res pr0n playing, much less seven YEARS.

If the corps have their way... (1)

CrazyDuke (529195) | more than 12 years ago | (#3364001)

Not trying to troll or flame...but...

That 120TB will be filled with heavily bloated DRM, compulsery spyware, and 1200x1024x32bit+ advertisement videos with embeded scripts that have almost virus like "features" (mark all pics and vids on HD with logos, insert advertisements in documents, make system not boot without reading advertisement, randomly play comercials, etc.) Then there is the 72GB+ windows install if you go that way...

Just an observation of the way things are going... :/

An MS challenge... (2)

nordicfrost (118437) | more than 12 years ago | (#3364008)

Suppose I could reach into the future and hand you a 120-terabyte drive right now. What would you put on it? You might start by copying over everything on your present disk--all the software and documents you've been accumulating over the years--your digital universe. Okay. Now what will you do with the other 119.9 terabytes?


A cynic's retort might be that installing the 2012 edition of Microsoft Windows will take care of the rest, but I don't believe it's true. "Software bloat" has reached impressive proportions, but it still lags far behind the recent growth rate in disk capacity.


I think they would have no problem occupying 20% of a 120 TB HDD, MS products have done that to my drives for years...

'Hard Drive' (1)

Observer (91365) | more than 12 years ago | (#3364030)

ie, hard-disk drive, aka HDD: the terms only came into general use after 'floppy disks' became a familiar storage medium for 'microcomputors', as they were once called. Pre-floppy, we just called them 'disk drives'.

Yes, it's a slow day at the office, how could you tell?

Whatever (2)

Kris_J (10111) | more than 12 years ago | (#3364035)

I bought a 20 Gig drive a couple of years back and it's still doing fine, a couple of Gig left, and it's got pretty much everything I've downloaded or created since, ooo, the early 90s. I'm just upset that I deleted my collection of DOS games I bought in Hong Kong and Malaysia some time around 1990 in a fit of morality. My .MOD/.S3M and .JPG collection (all on floppy disks) went around the same time. Mind you, all of that put together would still only add a couple of hundred meg to my collection.

A friend burns CDs like there's some sort of deadline. I've only just got myself a CD burner [imation.com] . Maybe if I downloaded MP3s through work I might run out of space a bit faster, but the 20gig I mentioned at the top of this comment is an IDE drive in a removable bay with a USB connection. If I need more storage I just buy another cheap drive and another tray.

At work, and I am fairly new here so I might get this wrong, we currently have about 6Gig of network storage for students which is more or less full, but our solution is simply to have Zip drives in every PC. Students have a quota and really their data is their own problem. Staff have 30Gig to play with and 5 is still free. And 9 of that is a backup of the Ghost images of the student labs that I made when I arrived.

Speaking of backups, it's been my experience that hard drive space is useless without the same amount of backup space available. DDS3 tapes only go up to something like 12/24 Gig if they haven't changed in a year or so, meaning that cheap and easy backup really ends at 20Gig. Personally, my 20Gig hard drive is more or less the backup, with data burnt to CD the same time it's moved from my portable's 4Gig to the 20Gig drive. But burning CDs isn't the best solution for stuff that changes frequently. (Although it seems to be the best option for Mac-oriented graphics designers who have to live in an otherwise PC-only corporate enviroment.)

My interest in retro gaming also probably helps keep my storage requirements low. Recently I burnt an 8Mbyte Dreamcast image that had an Atari 2600 emulator and over 100 (Public Domain) ROMs.

And I mean, who needs 120TB of random access storage? Seriously. I mean, sure it's nice to be able to skip instantly to a particular chapter of a movie, but how often do you do it, really? And the "Random" button on any given MP3 player is fun, but if you had to listen to the tracks in a particular order it wouldn't be the end of the world (imagine a DDS3 MP3 player - that's 12 days of music, solid, and it would probably be able to be smaller than the original Sony Walkman).

Wow, that was a long post.

Re:Whatever (2)

glwtta (532858) | more than 12 years ago | (#3364141)

And I mean, who needs 120TB of random access storage?Right now, probably no one, unless they are archiving the net or something. Fairly soon it will be scientists, sometime after that artists (around which time this sort of capacity will probably start getting on the desktop), after that pr0n collectors and gamers and around the same time developers. At least that's what I would think, if there is one thing that time has show is that statements like "who could ever need that much <computer aspect>?" are usually shown wrong after some time. Besides if I can think of applications requiring this now, certainly the need will come along sooner or later.

Also, since when is it being nice not reason enough to have something? I mean we are chargin ahead with this whole computer innovation thing, not just struggling to get by.

Physical size increases? (1)

Black Rabbit (236299) | more than 12 years ago | (#3364080)

It seems to me that, in order to get capacity increases beyond 120 Tb, they might just have to increase the physical size of the drive. After all, the form factor they have been working with for the past while has been these 3.5", half height things.

I have two boatanchors at home, 10 Gb each, which take up essentially two complete 5.25" bays. (Is this what a full height drive is?) What would happen if they applied the technology used in the smaller form factor to something this size? After all, they should be able to fit something like 12-20 platters inside one of these things, and those platters will be wider. Will cramming all those platters inside a larger box yield some savings in overhead, too?

OSes & Applications will use Full-Motion Video (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3364085)

The larger disks of the future will be used up by full-motion video.

One easy example is a complete set of examples of how to perform every possible task ... a set of "video man pages".

Nobody has yet imagined the best possible use of full motion video for OS and application use, but when they do, those disks won't seem so large.

Kenneth J. Hendrickson

What will be on it in 10 -15 years (I hope) (1)

Gryftir (161058) | more than 12 years ago | (#3364103)

First off, virtual reality files, especially with photorealistic motion images, kineorealistic tactile sensation, and sound, (plus possibly smell).

Then comes your logs, because your going to log everything. with the encryption we will have, we can do it without fear. The only data we have to worry about is the data we have to compress for movement.

Program Files for the media. While right now we currently mostly use our data for media, I predict an explosion of data formats, which will require bulky reading/viewing/listening/VR software to operate.

Distributed computing data.
Your computer will be part of a p2p distributed computer project of some sort. Of course, since the project is either curing cancer, or earning you money, or evolving an ai, you don't mind.

Intelligent agents
IA (ai with a purpose :) you need to search your data, and if you want it to be at all intutive when you have over a million files you will need a program to organize it for you. plus aol-time warner sony will want to have your (hopefully) anonymous user data.

Device controllers for everything
everything will be controlled, even your toaster (toaster/oven/microwave/pressure cooker etc. of course). after all, who wouldn't want there auto drive to know what's in their appointment books :).

now, lets hope somebody will repost this with links and get modded up

Gryftir

Re:What will be on it in 10 -15 years (I hope) (5, Funny)

glwtta (532858) | more than 12 years ago | (#3364123)

First off, virtual reality files, especially with photorealistic motion images, kineorealistic tactile sensation, and sound, (plus possibly smell).

Mmmm.... future pr0n.

Article good but important things are left out (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3364110)

I really love the articles that go deep into the future technology of hard drives, processors and so on. I enjoyed reading this one too and I agreed in many points on the futuristic stuff. However, he leaves many important points out! So what the heck do I mean? Read on..

Today's hard drives are just like the very first IBM disk: it consists of several platters which rotate continuously. If the techies can make platters which fill, say 30 TB each, then it means we do no longer need big hard drives. We won't need two, three, four or five platters inside. Portable computers will be smaller. Hard drives will not require the same amount of power. There will be less heat. They will be so much faster since the header will read a lot of information from an already fast-spinning disk with denser information on every square inch!

The article also states the fact that it will take too long to fill up 120 TB! When I read this, I was actually surprised to see a professional write something that stupid. I tend to see a repetitive pattern here. I remember Microsoft's own Bill Gates stating that no one will EVER need more than 1.5 MB (or so) of disk space. Today, Microsoft has an operating system that eats up, say 1-2 GB of disk space. I know the same thing will happen in the future. We might say that 120 TB is something we will never fill up, but I am absolutely positively sure that 1000 TB will be ridiculously low in my life-time as well (and I am 19, Swedish citizen, will live for a long time). Why'd I say this then? Think about it. Technology advances. The article has a word up on mp3-files and such stuff. Guess what: the mp3 format is available because most people got slow connections. In the future, when we sit on real fast ones, mp3 will not be the cool stuff. Maybe compressed 24-bit music (if compressed at all) will be the thing. Also, software developers will no longer need to feel that they must limit the size of a software on the hard disk. There's just so much that will be developed..

Another thing that came to my mind is: what happens in the next evolution of computers? Surely, we will see a real breakthrough soon in this industry in, say, graphics cards? Maybe pixel graphics will be dropped into really demanding vertex-like stuff that requires huge bandwidth and makes an image file of this format like many megabytes of worth! Why not?

And then to my last question: isn't "unlimited" hard drive space kind of a good thing? I'd rather buy a hard disk that I will never fill up. I don't want to have two hard disks in my computer that take up space, power and more. The article also says that it's tough organizing files at the level of terabytes (if anyone wants to install files of that worth). Heard of partitions? If I had 120 TB of hard drive space (pretending my current motherboard, OS etc would support it), I'd make many partitions and put names on them. One would be Windows (or Linux), one would be Temp, one would be Games, one would be.. Oh you know what I mean.

One last thing too. The hard disk development is actually controlling a lot of things. Software developers depend on hard disk space and so much more. If we all have at least 50 TB of hard disk space, don't you think the market will understand that and develop products that require a big load of this?

Summary summarum: the more, the better.

& what about when... (1)

jantheman (113125) | more than 12 years ago | (#3364115)

...you drop/kill one of these 120Tb drives?
Surely we want more effort into making them bulletproof. (+ it's only just one spindle).

Future of CD-ROM storage (2)

jafuser (112236) | more than 12 years ago | (#3364138)

The article mentions how we'd needs hundreds of thousands of CD-ROM's to make a dent in the 120TB drive, but the author didn't consider the future of optical storage. One company I've been keeping my eye on is Constellation 3D [c-3d.net] . They are making a "Fluorescent Multi-layer Disc" (FMD) which holds information in many layers (12-30), with an initial storage capacity of about 20-100 Gigabytes. I really hope this takes off, as I remember a day when a CD-ROM was a massive amount of information (exceeding most hard drives at the time), but nowadays we use them as we did floppy drives back then :)

It'd be nice to have an optical disk capacity comparable to hard drives again so that it is practical to do backups.

Article is a little inaccurate (1)

Beliskner (566513) | more than 12 years ago | (#3364155)

The article is fascinating but a little overcharismatic,
David A. Thompson and John S. Best of IBM write: An engineer from the original RAMAC project of 1956 would have no problem understanding a description of a modern disk drive.
No problem, I'd love to see them explain to a cryogenically frozen engineer from 1956 Reed-Solomon Error Correction codes realtime FPGA/ASIC design (Hamming basics), RLL coding standards, GMR head construction using nanometer technology, realtime control design of servo-actuated heads' feedback mechanism (to keep on track without resonant head movements), electron beam lithography [eetimes.com] to debug the IDE on-drive electronics.

I'll admit though once they cover all that, the differences between SCSI/EIDE plus ATA will be a walk in the park.

Plus can IBM be sued for fraud or illegal trading because of their 120GXP drives being way off 200,000 hours MTBF specification? It must be written down in stone somewhere.

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