Beta

Slashdot: News for Nerds

×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

cancel ×

246 comments

It's hot out there! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3375497)

Have an ice cold FR0STY P1ST on me!

"Online Privacy" (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3375498)

Sounds good to me.

I would glady trade my privelege of "online privacy" (whatever that means) in order to live safely in a world free of terror.

What makes you think that you have some inherent right to "online privacy" or "online freedom"? I don't see that in the bill of rights or the constitution itself, do you?

We are living in a new era. Get used to it or go somewhere else⦠Delta is ready when you are.

Re:"Online Privacy" (0, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3375544)

I might not agree, but I'll fight to the death to ensure your rights to post blatantly fucking obvious trolls.

Lovely (-1)

Mao Zedong (467890) | more than 12 years ago | (#3375500)

I just threw up.

Re:Lovely (-1, Offtopic)

Tasty Beef Jerky (543576) | more than 12 years ago | (#3375508)

I was wondering where that came from. Let me guess, you had carrots with lunch?

Re:Lovely (-1)

Mao Zedong (467890) | more than 12 years ago | (#3375533)

I think it's because I ate something right after taking some doxycycline.

Article read better with special hat (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3375511)

The article reads better with a tin-foil hat.

God you people with the free speech and shit...

Get a grip, your rights aren't being killed....

For the love of christ!

Re:Article read better with special hat (2)

Alien54 (180860) | more than 12 years ago | (#3375623)

The article reads better with a tin-foil hat. God you people with the free speech and shit... Get a grip, your rights aren't being killed....

This is in keeping with the biblial imperative:

"Thou shalt not kill"

Torture is another matter entirely, however.

Re:Article read better with special hat (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3375677)

The only torture going on is the torture you do to yourselves screwing every single thing up to be "This is the worst thing that's ever happeded!"

Re:Article read better with special hat (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3375700)

Bad interpretation.. should be Thou Shalt Not Murder. If we all spoke Hebrew, we would understand this [pfoim.org] .

Re:Article read better with special hat (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3375798)

Hmm. Murder, not Kill? That might explain the ease with which the Israelis just took out all those Palestineans in Jenin.

'Course, I'd call it murder, were I feeling blasphemous today.

Re:Article read better with special hat (1, Offtopic)

FortKnox (169099) | more than 12 years ago | (#3375737)

Torture is another matter entirely, however

I'll get modded down for this (and you) are completely off topic, but toture [crosswalk.com] is just as bad.

Interesting read? Try Matthew 5 - 7: Sermon on the Mount [crosswalk.com] . That's some radical religious thinking for you.

Don't mean to stir up a religious battle or flamewar. Just thought I'd respond to your misperception.

Re:Article read better with special hat (0)

L1nUx h4x0r (574828) | more than 12 years ago | (#3375683)

They're out there. Just trying to take away all of our rights. So far they haven't been able to completely succeed. However, do you really know what's in the water? That's right, government mind control drugs! In addition, they're watching, listening, and even smelling you 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. They know when you take a piss in your neighbors pool, even though you don't think anyway was watching. They were, believe me.

Just because you don't want to face reality doesn't mean it isn't true!

Don't turn off your telescreen, just turn it down and go into the corner to read. I wouldn't use anything more than a candle for light, though. They'll see it anyway.

Re:Article read better with special hat (3, Interesting)

MaxwellStreet (148915) | more than 12 years ago | (#3375724)

Losing your rights (and especially your right to privacy) is not going to happen in one fell swoop.

Rather, it's more like the oft-spoken-of boiling frog - if privacy is taken away in tiny little increments, then before long it will be compromised in a big way without any substantial opposition.

I'm not saying that we should all wear tinfoil hats - but constantly recognizing (and opposing, where necessary) the gradual erosion of our right to privacy and governmental abuse of information is our only defense against being... boiled alive.

The government wants to know more and more about us these days - the excuse du jour is homeland security and counter-terrorism. Throw in stopping child-porn and just about any legislator will support any bill that enables more monitoring of citizens.

Better to be watchful and vocal - without screaming that the sky is falling - than to sit quietly, watching the privacy we enjoy now disappear for our children.

Re:Article read better with special hat (1)

sugrshack (519761) | more than 12 years ago | (#3375794)

not with a bang but with a whimper right? read some of this guy [zmag.org]

Re:Article read better with special hat (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3375729)

Already starting on that winter wool coat? But, winter just ended...

Ignoring the wolves doesn't make them go away.

I got a letter from the government, the other day (-1)

neal n bob (531011) | more than 12 years ago | (#3375527)

I opened and read it, it said they were suckers.

Re:I got a letter from the government, the other d (-1)

GoatTroll (556420) | more than 12 years ago | (#3375565)

I think you meant to say:

First Chuck-D Post!

Michael- (-1, Offtopic)

Da w00t (1789) | more than 12 years ago | (#3375539)

Is there a reason your author link is 'michael@@slashdot.org'?

Re:Michael- (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3375554)

You know, @-@ and @-st...

Hacktivism (3, Insightful)

BrianGa (536442) | more than 12 years ago | (#3375564)

You know, the antics of the music industry (and the kind of thing that MS is kowtowing to with their DRM scheme) really pisses me off, but also convinces me that there will eventually come something to replace them both. But, know what? It's their property. If they want to fuck up their distribution channels, fuck em. I can do without "so-called" modern music anyway. I go see live bands locally, get lit, and have a great time and I didn't need to buy a fucking copy-protected by the DMCA CD or cassette or anything. These guys are out there trying to make a living, maybe you should check em out. And if you catch them after the show, you might can convince them that they should distribute their songs on CD's for cheap and ask them (ask them) about how they feel about MP3's and music-sharing in general. Of course, they might not agree with you (or myself), but they have that *right* to do so. So, I encourage, nay I *challenge* each and every one of you who would boycott MS or the RIAA to pick up a local newspaper and see what's going on in y our town this weekend. Chances are, there's a band or two actually worth checking out, and hey, it's not like you're going to meet chicks sitting behind your monitor. Oh, and on-topic: Rock on Beale! I'm encouraged to see that grassroots hactivism coming alive! :) (hacker used in "coder" definition) Keep up the good work and keep fighting the good fight.

Rock On (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3375736)

I *challenge* each and every one of you who would boycott MS or the RIAA to pick up a local newspaper and see what's going on in y our town this weekend.

Challenge excepted. Live music, chics, and getting lit - cheers to that.

Since Slashdot Doesn't Care (0, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3375569)

Mozilla 1.0 RC1 [mozilla.org] has been released. If we all remember Windows 2000 RC1 this means "pretty damn stable" (but since this is open sores, I'm skeptical). Get your copy today! [mozilla.org]

Civil disobedience (4, Funny)

Dr Caleb (121505) | more than 12 years ago | (#3375570)

In Mauritania - as in most countries - owners of cybercafés are required to supply government intelligence agents with copies of e-mail sent or received at their establishments.

If anyone is ever in a cybercafe in Mauritania or Elbonia, let's mail them 64k of encrypted random data. Let the government snoops try to decode that!

Re:Civil disobedience (2)

bartyboy (99076) | more than 12 years ago | (#3375585)

"Elbonia - where gambling and prostitution are not only legal, they're mandatory." - Dilbert

(or was that Elstonia?)

Re:Civil disobedience (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3375748)

Elbonia. Fag.

Random data versus encrypted random data? (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3375634)

It's the same thing.

Re:Civil disobedience (1)

Ed Avis (5917) | more than 12 years ago | (#3375646)

What is the difference between encrypted random data and random data?

Re:Civil disobedience (3, Funny)

pizen (178182) | more than 12 years ago | (#3375725)

What is the difference between encrypted random data and random data?

Just put the "PGP Message Follows" header thingy in front of your random data. Hours of enjoyment for the whole family.

Re:Civil disobedience (2)

Dr Caleb (121505) | more than 12 years ago | (#3375786)

When the NSA's new supercomputer 8 qBit quantum computer crunches through it and breaks the encryption, it'll still be garbage but they had to work for it.

It's like finding a treasure map, finding the treasure, digging it up, only to get an empty box.

Re:Civil disobedience (1)

Ed Avis (5917) | more than 12 years ago | (#3375840)

What I meant was you could generate random data and they could 'break' the encryption on it just as well. In either case for any key chosen it'll decrypt to garbage (almost certainly).

If the encryption system is any good, it's not possible to distinguish between 'some random data' and 'some random data which has been encrypted with a key I'm not telling you'. They are effectively the same thing. IANAC.

Re:Civil disobedience (5, Informative)

blibbleblobble (526872) | more than 12 years ago | (#3375738)

No need. Just email a valid, encrypted file to somebody in the UK. They can go to prison for 2 years if they fail on request by the police to decrypt it.

The legal burden is on the owner of an encrypted file to prove that they never had the key, and anyone using encryption is guilty until proven innocent, on the basis that anyone using encryption must be a snuff-child-porn baron

Re:Civil disobedience (2)

Dr Caleb (121505) | more than 12 years ago | (#3375806)

But wouldn't that come back to the sender of the email, not the reciever?

It would be like asking someone on the street to prove they didn't have the key to the house they happened to be walking by.

Re:Civil disobedience (1)

ethereal (13958) | more than 12 years ago | (#3375847)

Hey, nobody ever said that the law had to make sense. Our only requirement is that it "protect the children" and sounds good in a 10-second sound bite on the evening news.

Re:Civil disobedience (2)

Dr Caleb (121505) | more than 12 years ago | (#3375895)

Outrageous! I am stunned! I get a picture in my head of the first person charged under that law, and it is very similar to that scene in the Phantom Menace with the droid..."mmmm that does not compute...mmmm...YOU'RE UNDER ARREST"

Re:Civil disobedience (1)

ProfMoriarty (518631) | more than 12 years ago | (#3375860)

The legal burden is on the owner of an encrypted file to prove that they never had the key.

Since I live in the US, I'm not up to speed on forgien laws and such ...

But how do you prove a negative? Last time I checked it was impossible. Though I haven't been through that new math that they're teaching in schools now ...

So just by receiving an encrypted email ... either you show it, or go to jail. Damned if you do, damned if you don't.

Ummm... (2)

DickPhallus (472621) | more than 12 years ago | (#3375584)

Advanced research and technical notes are being handed over to the Chinese without question. It couldn't be going better for the Communists.

Can anyone back up this claim? I mean it doesn't seem like good business sense to just give things away for free to a competiting nation...

Re:Ummm... (0)

KDENCE (558103) | more than 12 years ago | (#3375648)

Know that under the Clinton administration China was not a competing nation, it seemed to me that we had a one sided brotherhood with them. Clinton actually made them think we were afraid of them and gave him a lot of intelligence for FREE!

"Entertain the Brutes"

Re:Ummm... (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3375678)

An interesting claim made in the article, and it caught my eye too, but for a different reason:

Just because a nation adopts communism as their economic model does not make them an enemy of the US, of the world, or of any person or ideology. Communism is an interesting economic structure which has good points and bad points. Capitalism is another interesting economic structure which also has good points and bad points. Together a lot of their good points will overshadow the others bad points . . . like maybe there is some optimal mix of the two.

Of course I'm an AC, what with McCarthy still very much alive in some powerful people . . .

Does anyone think that the Chineese really want to continue to annex land? If so, then we need to bring some diplomatic efforts to try to resolve the situation. Sharing of technology should be viewed as a Good Thing, as we are increasingly a global society. Otherwise we should be bringing diplomatic efforts to them in the areas of space exploration, global resource management (they are a huge chunk of land), and environmentally sound industrial practices. Anyone who thinks that we can't learn from each other is simply ignorant, or truly stupid.

This is probably Offtopic -1; Flaimbait -1; Troll -1; Treasonous -10

Live free or die

Re:Ummm... (3, Interesting)

Rorschach1 (174480) | more than 12 years ago | (#3375728)

Well spoken. I realized one day that pretty much the only education I'd had about Communism, at least before college, consisted of 'Communist = Evil'. Not even in high school did we ever cover the basics of what it really is.

I spoke to a friend who spent some time travelling around Laos. Apparently the system's worked pretty well for them. They've got better education and nutrition now, access to healthcare, and at least some hope of sending their children on to something beyond a subsistence-level existence in a small village. And when you're operating on that scale, I really can't see how capitalism could be argued to be that much better.

Empirical evidence would suggest, however, that communism hasn't worked out terribly well for the long term in larger implementations.

Re:Ummm... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3375835)

Empirical evidence would suggest, however, that communism hasn't worked out terribly well for the long term in larger implementations.

One word: Corruption.

Re:Ummm... (1)

ProfMoriarty (518631) | more than 12 years ago | (#3375777)

Too bad you're posting AC ... you made some really good points ...

Capitalism (economic) is the opposite of Communism (economic)

Whereas Democracy (government) is the opposite of Dictatorship (government)

Often people confuse Democracy with Communism ... which is wrong. However, how do you think a government form of Democracy would work with Communism? I think it would self-implode. However, a Capitalistic Dictatorship MAY work ... as long as the dictator doesn't interfere too much with the market forces.

This is starting to get off-topic ... so I will stop.

Re:Ummm... (2)

MisterBlister (539957) | more than 12 years ago | (#3375896)

Nazi Germany was essentially a capitalistic dictatorship -- yet more proof that its the Dictatorship part that is the evil. And I agree, there's nothing wrong with Communism in theory and in fact, I'm sure most of the world will be Communist (assuming we haven't destroyed it) within the next couple hundred years...It sure won't be capitalist, because the supply/demand/scarcity stuff just isn't going to work...Except maybe for clean air and water(?).

Re:Ummm... (4, Informative)

ProfMoriarty (518631) | more than 12 years ago | (#3375691)

I believe what they were trying to get at, is that companies are getting or trying to get their products into China so badly (the market opportunity is huge), that they will help the Chinese government understand the product.

Once the product is in China, then the reverse engineering can start. This has happened with a couple of rocket launches a few years ago. Also, it is purported that the former US administration allowed classified technologies into China.

Unfortunately, I cannot provide links to help prove this post ... and that appears what you wanted in the first place ...

Re:Ummm... (1)

mochan_s (536939) | more than 12 years ago | (#3375830)

The article goes on to say "While bootstrapping their economy with the fruits of Western labor and ingenuity, they gain the tools to prune democracy on the vine."

Communism and freedom aren't related. Communism is an economic model and there is no freedom/no freedom in there.

Second, if you accept capitalism as the invisible hand which balances everything to the optimal, the transfer of technology to China is just the forces of capitalism working to right the an economic imbalance.

It's very easy to make an issue out of a popular irrational hate. If the arguements go like "snouts deep in the feedbag, they haven't quite noticed the bacon being trimmed off their ass", one should be suspicious.

Re:Ummm... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3375854)

This was my point exacly: Communism and freedom are not related. Neither are capitalism and freedom.

Live free or die

sport huh. (2)

Joe the Lesser (533425) | more than 12 years ago | (#3375597)

Hacking is a contact sport.
The more people who have contact with one another, the better.
-- Shaolin Punk,
Proxy Boss,
Hacktivismo

Yea, totally. I'm routing for the Bears!

Re:sport huh. (2, Funny)

CrazyBrett (233858) | more than 12 years ago | (#3375659)

Yea, totally. I'm routing for the Bears!

Yes, that is one possible joke in this context :)
The other would be "I'm rooting for the Bears!"

cDc offer to help Feds after September 11... (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3375602)

The cure [cultdeadcow.com] sounds worse than the disease. As I read this story I thought it was a bad joke.

THE CULT OF THE DEAD COW OFFERS A HELPING HAND IN AMERICA'S TIME OF NEED [cultdeadcow.com]

This hyprocritical line caught my eye:

So we intend to re-architect Back Orifice
from the ground up. There will be absolutely no
shared code between the two projects,
in order to skirt detection by commercial
antivirus packages. The code will remain
totally secret. The software will never
surface publicly.
And it will be far
more stealthy than anything we have ever
released, demoed, or publicly discussed.

Yeah, yeah, yeah, we like Open Source for everyone except for us - because we know better. Save it for the newspapers, Oxblood.

MOD PARENT UP! [N/T] (-1, Offtopic)

TheAwfulTruth (325623) | more than 12 years ago | (#3375668)

MOD PARENT UP!

MOSTLY. (2)

Renraku (518261) | more than 12 years ago | (#3375606)

"Hacktivism chooses open code, mostly." Guess this means a lot of people will be against it because its not totally open.

cDc blocked (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3375612)

I tried to access the cDc site from my school library and was blocked by a filtering firewall. I can't remember if their site contained sexually explicit content that would justify filtering. Does anybody think that this is an outrage and a politically modivated block?

Re:cDc blocked (1)

duren686 (463275) | more than 12 years ago | (#3375711)

I don't think it's so much sexually explicit content as potentially dangerous borderline-illegal content. It makes sense for your school to block it, just as it would to block instructions on how to make pipe bombs from common materials found around one's school.

Re:cDc blocked (1)

blibbleblobble (526872) | more than 12 years ago | (#3375773)

cDc itself says:

"This site may contain explicit descriptions of or advocate one or more of the following:
adultery, murder, morbid violence, bad grammar, deviant sexual conduct in violent contexts, or the consumption of alcohol and illegal drugs.
Then again, it may not.
Who knows?"

You can see it for yourself at:
https://proxy.magusnet.com:443/-_-http://www.cultd eadcow.com/ [magusnet.com]

Long on Talk, Short on Substance (2)

nairnr (314138) | more than 12 years ago | (#3375614)

Wow, is it just me or was that just a lot of fluff!

If you consider some of his topics and questions that he introduces, there is no resolution. While trying to detail what hacktivism is, he makes one statement about it being about creating, rather then destroying, but on the other hand he says that people should be writing disruptive code. Also in the same vein, while talking about writing disruptive code and what should be made, there is a big Closed source bad/open source good (except when you want to hide something malicious). P2P turns into H2H, why napster shut down.. blah, blah, blah.

While I applaud the use of key phrases and liberal use of rhetoric, I walked (or clicked) away with the sense that I wa no more enlightened...

Re:Long on Talk, Short on Substance (2)

Deagol (323173) | more than 12 years ago | (#3375669)

This was meant to be a visionary kind of statement, to make you sit up and think a little bit. And he clearly states that "disruptive" was in context of the status quo (of censoring entities), not disruption of services, systems, etc.

He described a problem, described the first step (design), and only hinted at implimentation (open vs closed code, and using P2P -- er, H2H -- systems), but primarily we the readers are meant to be inspired to find, rather than spoon-fed, the solutions (which may not be even be known yet).

Re:Long on Talk, Short on Substance (1)

Liora (565268) | more than 12 years ago | (#3375702)

It's just you. I found it pretty informative. I have known that other countries had been censoring internet access for their citizens for a while, but it never occurred to me that I should try to do anything about it. What I do not feel, having read that, is that I have a clue as to what to do.

Was that supposed to be a speech for people who already know what to do? Or was it supposed to just make me aware and get me thinking? I thought that he said we shouldn't be writing disruptive code, but that we should practice dissonant compliance. (I know that wasn't the term, but that's what it sounded like.)

It was beautifully written. I have to give him that.

World War III (4, Insightful)

loosenut (116184) | more than 12 years ago | (#3375615)

The article quotes McLuhan: "World War Three will be a guerilla information war with no division between military and civilian participation."

I firmly believe that this is true, and is going on right now. But I wonder if it is appropriate to mix this concept with hacktivism. Consider Bush's current position. He's convinced most of the world (most of the US, anyway) that he should be given free reign to wage war anywhere in the country, all in the name of fighting terrorism. I'll keep theories about military-industrial complex profits to myself, at this point.

The point is, he is using major media outlets to spread his message, and in the mainstream media, very few people are questioning him. And at the moment, it is the mainstream media that carries the perception that it reflects the national consciousness.

Not enough people have switched off their TVs and let their corporate newspaper subscriptions expire to make hacktivism effective. It's unfortunate, and I expect (hope) things will change in the coming years, but for now, it's largely irrevelevant.

Re:World War III (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3375731)

I'll keep theories about military-industrial complex profits to myself, at this point.

Please do so.

Go Hacktivism, Down with TV (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3375733)

You would think that a medium that offers no good information, barely passes for entertainment, and peppers you with commercials ad nauseum would ultimately fail. The fact that it has not yet indicates that there may be some addictive qualities to TV which should make it subject to FDA approval. There are actually some interesting studies that show a brain on TV is very much like a brain on Heroin, and that withdrawal from TV (though not like Heroin) is very difficult, moreso than caffine, and causes significant mood disruption.

The media is a mouthpiece of corporate America, and therefore corporate America has been able to HIJACK the government largley through obfuscation of the facts and manufacturing consent.

Turn of the TV. Go for a hike. Smoke a joint. Hang out nude with a good friend at some hot springs. Then think about what a good life might be and see if TV is a part of it. If it's not, turn it off and throw it away.

Anonymouse, but not cowardly.

Re:World War III (5, Insightful)

subhuman666 (574627) | more than 12 years ago | (#3375761)

The only problem with mainstream [cnn.com] versus independant [indymedia.org] media sources is that the majority of US citizens tend to believe that anything that hasn't been reported by a major media outlet isn't verfiable. It's kind of funny actually, considering mainstream media rarely reports anything other than common knowledge and murders in Hollywood(check out CNN's front page)...it's also a little sad, because this seems to be all society wants to hear.

Re:World War III (2)

blibbleblobble (526872) | more than 12 years ago | (#3375791)

How strange. When I read that, I tried to remember my history, tried to think when Bush had been president.

I just realised he still is... That's scary!

Re:World War III (2)

Odinson (4523) | more than 12 years ago | (#3375844)

" Not enough people have switched off their TVs..."

Perhaps it's time we hit our neighbors, friends and faimlies with a quick reality check.

Run on sentence, spoken with accending pitch

"Over half the country is on the Internet using hundereds of different instantanious media sources reporting at contantly increasing levels of detail all run and funded by competing conflicting interests, and you still wait for six o'clock to wade through a half hour of drivel and meaningless commercials that mean nothing to you to get to the one thing of interest on the TV news..."

"...uh huh..."

feel free to use :).

Pick your cause before you pick the site... (5, Insightful)

Rorschach1 (174480) | more than 12 years ago | (#3375616)

To quote cDc at DefCon a couple of years ago.

Personally I think 'hacktivism' is a grossly overused excuse for vandalism. Hacking sites as a 'service' to the operators is passe... now the kiddies have to act like they've got some sort of noble political agenda.

Re:Pick your cause before you pick the site... (2, Informative)

djwavelength (398555) | more than 12 years ago | (#3375884)

they repeat that view in the article, and then go on to define "Hacktivism" in the cDc sense of the word.

Save the trees (1, Troll)

ZaneMcAuley (266747) | more than 12 years ago | (#3375622)

Im a hacktivist.

hacktivism.com (1)

m.e.l.l.e.n.t.i.n.e (305369) | more than 12 years ago | (#3375633)

Mmm... I'm totally gonna buy that domain (hacktivism.com) that they're selling. Think of all the wonderful things I could do with it. Although, I kinda feel sorry for the idiot that mispelled it and got the wrong domain for them. Wait... no I don't. *pointing finger and laughing*

AI Activism (-1)

Mentifex (187202) | more than 12 years ago | (#3375639)

The ultimate hacktivist activity is the spawning and swarming of myriad Robot AI Minds [scn.org] evolving towards full civil rights on a par with Homo Sapiens and towards a superintelligence beyond any human IQ.

You may help save the world [resentment.org] with artificial intelligence if you hack the basic AI code, improve it and release it again.

Just today all the Open Source AI variables [scn.org] have been documented to help AI activists share and collaborate in the greatest intellectual adventure of all human time.

H2H sounds good but... (0)

Shaper of Myths (148485) | more than 12 years ago | (#3375651)

will it have good pr0n and warez? =)

Nothing New (2, Interesting)

thryllkill (52874) | more than 12 years ago | (#3375661)

Civil liberties are being oppressed the world over, and us techies are pissed!

This article tells us of some of the horrible things going on in the world and all, but it is nothing we didn't know was going on.

Hackers collaborate over the web to fight oppression and close mindedness!

Sound at all like a certain upstart OS?

I really did like this article, don't get me wrong but it is very lite on the important information like what they are actually doing about it. I doubt making it easier for a Chinese person to rip music off of the internet is going to bring them to the enlightened western thinking necessary to invoke social change.

What apps are you creating to further this change, where can I get the source (since you sited open source as being the obvious choice among hacktivist coders)? What can I do to help? This article, while being interesting, served no real purpose.

Ya but... (0, Troll)

iONiUM (530420) | more than 12 years ago | (#3375664)

They made back orifice. I'm pretty sure I didn't "learn" anything, or get any more "free rights" from using. All I got was passwords which allowed me to cause havoc on the net.
I think the wrong people are representing "hackers"..

Re:Ya but... (1)

thryllkill (52874) | more than 12 years ago | (#3375709)

You obviously didn't use back oriface since it is a remote admin tool and not a password sinffer, huh?

Uhhhh.. Sorry? (4, Funny)

quantaman (517394) | more than 12 years ago | (#3375675)

In 1968 the Canadian communications guru Marshall McLuhan stated, "World War Three will be a guerilla information war with no division between military and civilian participation."

So if the war is being waged on the Internet by civilians would that make the /. effect an attack? Maybe we should call it a /. blitz or /. offensive. On that note we've been hitting a lot more good guys than bad guys, sheesh! Us geeks can't even get a techie war right!!

Open source Food (4, Interesting)

RealisticWeb.com (557454) | more than 12 years ago | (#3375710)

I have two things to say about this article.

1) It was VERY VERY long

2) I really liked the analogy of OSS to Resturants.

Think about it. The majority of people never think twice about never seeing the ingrediants, but there are some who feel "I'm putting this stuff in my system, I have the right to know what's in it!". Some even have good reasons like peanut reactions and so forth.

The resturant will say "If we tell you how we made it, we will lose business". I think that's nonscence personally. Ten to one, I'm not going to be able to cook that by myself anyway, and I'm just going to come back to the restaurant to get it donecorrectly. Plus if I do make it and feed it to all my friends and they say "where did you get that recipie?" and I tell them, don't you think they are going to go check out the menu for themselfs?

And finally, what if the majority of the people eating at your restaurant wanted the food cooked a different way, but didn't have any other choice on the menu? They are going to take those ingrediants and make the food better. If the cook was smart enough, he might be able to learn from what the other cook did, and make his own product better!

Am I making my analogy clear here, or is this just gibberish?

Re:Open source Food (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3375766)

It's clear... but there's a fault in that argument.

Sure, you'd have the right to see what you are eating and how it's prepared... but so would McCompetitor... and steals your recipe and takes you out of business. So, in the end you lose out... the reason we have patents and so on I guess.

Ok, so patents are there to protect that but there are things you just can't patent.

Peace.

Re:Open source Food (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3375776)

You've obviously never worked in a restaurant. Outside of maybe a TGIFridays or a McDonalds, the vast majority of chefs and cooks are more than happy to have you come back into the kitchen and will show you exactly how they cook your meal.

Re:Open source Food (2, Interesting)

RealisticWeb.com (557454) | more than 12 years ago | (#3375842)

Yes the COOK is, just like the person doing the coding usualy is too, it's the companys that have the restrictive policies. The cook might show you how he cooked it, but if the regional manager finds out he is likely to lose his job. Of cource I'm talking about large restarunts/companies. The smaller locals one will be more fiendly.

Re:Open source Food (3, Insightful)

blibbleblobble (526872) | more than 12 years ago | (#3375837)

Ok I'll bite.

Lookup news on MacDonalds, GM crops, and hormone-injected beef in France.

Also lookup the US trade-barrier-attacks on French roquefort and fois-gras.

Maybe MacDoSerfs in america don't care about the shit they eat (yes, that claim can be proven) but if "You are what you eat" then yes, Europeans do care about the recipe used at their restaurants.

Hybrid ! (1, Funny)

ThorbyBaslam (552367) | more than 12 years ago | (#3375712)

Oh my god ! Its genetic manipulation gone mad !
Someones created an Ostrich-Troll hybrid ! It sticks its head in the sand to ignore whats going on around it, while simultaneously attempting to wind up its neighbours !

Everywhere (1)

u01000101 (574295) | more than 12 years ago | (#3375714)

* Even less draconian governments, like Malaysia, have threatened Web-publishers, whose only crime is to publish frequent Web site updates. Timely and relevant information is seen as a threat.

Even Deutsche Bahn [slashdot.org] threatens Google [google.com] . And the COS threatens everybody who mentions "xenu.net" (oops!). It's an all-out assault on free-*.

Letting someone else do the dirty work (1)

YrWrstNtmr (564987) | more than 12 years ago | (#3375717)

Our fathers and grandfathers fought wars defending, among other things, our right to speak and be heard. They even fought to defend unpopular opinions. It is the unpopular opinions that are most in need of defense. Without them, society would remain unchallenged and unwilling to review core beliefs.

That's right. your fathers and grandfathers fought and sometimes died, defending your right to free speech.

So why aren't you, Oh Dead Cow cultists? A bunch of slackers dicking around with BackOrifice is nowhere near the same as actually defending your country and free speech.

Free Information (3, Interesting)

AConnection (106831) | more than 12 years ago | (#3375722)

Maybe I am simply idealistic. I seem to remember an idea that Information *wants* to be free. I think this concept is accurate, simply by the huge increase in the access to all varieties of information that is on the internet. I also believe that this concept can be expanded by the idea that a "taste" of information is addictive. Think about the reason that information wants to be free, might it be because people desire more information/knowledge the more they get? If that is the case, and you give a taste to "restricted" people in restrictive governments, aren't a certain percent of them going to desire more information badly enough to find the holes in the wall?

I've heard enough of both sides on the P2P debate over music trading to understand the premise behind both sides and can even see their respective points. This only means to me, that eventually, using my thoughts above that music will be changed forever and "profit" from "selling" your music will be something totally different than we have now and probably something we will not see coming. In the same way, enough people want free information, that I believe that everyone will eventually have access due to the efforts of a small number who fight to make the holes in the walls larger.

hacktivism (1, Troll)

nomadic (141991) | more than 12 years ago | (#3375730)

There was an interesting case in Argentina where a judge ruled that an act of hacktivism, the defacing of their supreme court's webpage, wasn't illegal. I submitted it, and hacktivism, as a story, but was rejected.

I'd post the address here, but what's the point, since this post will be modded off-topic by slashdot fanboys who burst into tears every time their beloved editors are criticized. Ooh, I bet someone will start snivelling about how if I don't like slashdot, I should stop reading it.

Re:hacktivism (2)

jgerman (106518) | more than 12 years ago | (#3375797)


start snivelling about how if I don't like slashdot, I should stop reading it


Well yeah, you'd be stupid to do otherwise. Unless you're a sado-masochist. Anyway, at least stop posting if all you're going to do is bitch about how the link you have will be modded down. Not that it necessarily would. Instead of spending my mod points to up I'm posting to point out why you're wrong.


If you get all bitchy and complain how you submitted this and it was rejected, of course you're going to get modded down. If you say, "hey guys, in addition to this story I have this link for something similar" you'll most likely get modded up.


Who cares who submits a story anyway, unless you really have to have the credit, then it's you who's the fanboy. Worrying about your karma and whether or not you get your name on the main page, sheesh.

Re:hacktivism (2)

josh crawley (537561) | more than 12 years ago | (#3375826)

Have you noticed that news sites that let you vote and pick the news are much more successful in constructive comments? ...And the interesting stories like you mention, which are NERD stories, get rejected.

Anyways, hacktivism? Why even mention it? If you mean in IRC space, there's wars between whiny clans all the time :-) If it's the Great FireWall of China, just remember the flag of the USSR, pickaxes. Just have a few hunderd people tear down all those buildings, from the inside out. Offing _their_ political leaders might not be a bad idea. The USA would surely benefit (hell, I betcha we're doing the same thing as we tried to do to Castro).

What I dont get (and I am catholic), is those poeple who risk their life to spread........ Bibles. 1 Bible = death, so why not spread munitions to groups like Falun Gong? If you're going to be dead anyways, I'd rather go out with a bang (on their soil).

Last, I hate those fanboys as much as you do. In a Commodore 64 article, I said commie. Mod to 0 cause some dipshit was too stupid to relate commie to commodore.

Re:hacktivism (1)

ethereal (13958) | more than 12 years ago | (#3375868)

It wasn't illegal because they didn't have any laws against it; don't count on it staying that way.

Frankly, if your viewpoint is convincing enough or interesting enough, you shouldn't have to co-opt other peoples' sites to get the message across. Just look at that "I kiss you" guy - we need hacktivism to have as much underground appeal as that, so that it gets forwarded to everybody about five times. So far, really only DeCSS has come close, and even that was pretty far out of the popular mind.

lots of polemic (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3375735)

maybe a good article: I didn't read it until the end because of the polemic about "bad communism" good western culture. What a bullshit.

a german

Off Topic (1)

MrSkunk (544767) | more than 12 years ago | (#3375739)

Who is the guy in the 'Censorship' icon? When I first started visiting the site I always thought it was Woody Allen. But that's not right.

Chaos (0)

First_In_Hell (549585) | more than 12 years ago | (#3375749)

* In Mauritania - as in most countries - owners of cybercafés are required to supply government intelligence agents with copies of e-mail sent or received at their establishments

Imagine getting sent to jail for trading goatse links and pictures. That would suck.

But seriously, no wonder these countries are as in as much poverty as they are. Their lame assed nazi governments are too busy reading spam to worry about real issues.

Dumbasses

back in 1995 (5, Interesting)

Syre (234917) | more than 12 years ago | (#3375752)

Back in 1995 I had some arguments... that is um... discussions (in Cannes at Milia) with Nicholas Negroponte and John Perry Barlow. Both Negroponte and Barlow believed that the Internet was an unstoppable force that would inevitably make countries like China become free.

My argument was that the Chinese and other repressive governments would be sure to set up national proxies with filtering that blocked out sites the government didn't want people to see and kept track of what people were accessing.

Both Negroponte and Barlow told me that was impossible and would never happen. They also pointed out that the TCP/IP is designed to route around obstacles.

Well, I've been proven right (so why am I not running Media Lab or flying around the world giving speeches?). China and other countries (Singapore, etc.) have in fact put in national proxies and are blocking thousands of sites, tracking people's usage, and putting people in jail.

On the other hand, I think that there is a hope that Barlow and Negroponte will eventually turn out to be right in the end, as hackers and other renegades put in alternative links via satellite and other means, which bypass these government blockades.

If enough of that happens, the blockades will come down, since they won't be useful any longer.

But I think there will be a long hard struggle befoe that happens.

Re:back in 1995 (1, Insightful)

First_In_Hell (549585) | more than 12 years ago | (#3375775)

I don't want to be a troll, but god knows I am sure there are some asshole senators in the government that would restrict the net here in the US if they could get away with it. They probably think it would be good for us.

Shit slimeball scum companies like Gator are already spying on me.

Re:back in 1995 (2, Insightful)

Geekonomical (461622) | more than 12 years ago | (#3375845)

You just included Singapore and China in the same bandwagon. I guess folks in America could afford to think a little bit more outside the obsession towards free speech. Singapore doesn't block websites that criticizes its own government. In plain simple words it blocks porn. What have we done so far to make the internet a safe environment for kids? Is there any onus on the pr0n site owners? You can easily get away with running a free porn post site which can be (potentially) visited by any age group.

When it comes to free speech, everybody is up for hactivism or activism. When it comes to responsibility......

Re:back in 1995 (1)

mochan_s (536939) | more than 12 years ago | (#3375857)

Well, I've been proven right (so why am I not running Media Lab or flying around the world giving speeches?). China and other countries (Singapore, etc.) have in fact put in national proxies and are blocking thousands of sites, tracking people's usage, and putting people in jail.

Those firewalls are only symbolic. They block CNN, BBC. You were right that it would be attempted but it's not really possible. Anyways, what do the Chinese have to repress more than any other country?

I didn't know they were tracking people's usage. I though that was more done by companies in the US with spyware.

Jesus... (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3375755)

Slashdot: Links to Register. Stuff that matters...

Hacktivism? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3375758)

Is that a peer technology to Activision?

The definition of 'activist' : (2, Flamebait)

JonKatzIsAnIdiot (303978) | more than 12 years ago | (#3375801)

Someone who screams incessantly about something they know nothing about.

Please crap-dot, tell me... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3375831)

...since the wicked witch took my brain, I can't decide and need your wisdom for my own.

Is it a:
- good read?
- interesting read?
- fun read?
- must read?

This tag needs to be on every article. You missed a few this week...what's wrong?
======
News...if all of the sand in North Africa were spread out to a depth of 3 meters, it would cover the entire Sahara Desert...it's a dry read, but you'll enjoy it.

Well (1, Offtopic)

MisterBlister (539957) | more than 12 years ago | (#3375848)

Hacking is wrong.

cDc (-1, Offtopic)

c00lant (550309) | more than 12 years ago | (#3375887)

Cult of the Dead cow? Arent these the people who INVADED privacy with their BO trojen? Well, made it possible anyhow... oh well, good to see them doing something decent i guess

hacktivist-to-hacktivist (H2H) networks. (1)

cdf12345 (412812) | more than 12 years ago | (#3375892)

Sounds like a good idea,
I'd love to know of any that are in existance,

I'd say it's more of a hopeful theory.
Load More Comments
Slashdot Account

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
Create a Slashdot Account

Loading...