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CIA Warns China Might Be Planning Cyber Attack

CmdrTaco posted more than 11 years ago | from the you-gotta-be-kidding-me dept.

Security 711

malibucreek writes "The Los Angeles Times is reporting that the CIA is warning of possible cyber-terrorism against U.S. and Taiwanese computer systems by the Chinese Army. Or, China could just launch a massive denial-of-service attack by sending billions of "GET HERBAL VIAGRA" e-mails from the .cn TLD." The article has a reasonable amount of information and is probably worth a read if you're curious about what could be a real big deal in the future.

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yay china (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3411330)

let's hear it for those dos attacks!

Fist My ass (-1)

Yr0 (224662) | more than 11 years ago | (#3411344)

DR. LUNIX TORVALDS TEL:234 8023132472 FAX: 234 - 1 - 7595586 HELSINKI-FINLAND.

Dear Sir,

I write you this letter of request for partnership which I hope you will give your urgent attention. We worked as members of the Operating System/Penguin Abuse Committee inaugurated by the present Democratically Elected Comittee of the Electronic Frontier Foundation headed by General Richard Stallman (rtd). We are empowered to deligently reviewed, re-appraised, scrutinized and approved feces payments to lunix users who executed *bsd devils under the past operating system regime and our work is almost concluded.

In the course of our work we discovered this fecal matter, which resulted from grossly over used toilets, which were executed for the Gnu is Not Unix Corporation (GNU) by a consortium of several Foreign Companies like
VA SOFTWARE, RED HAT INC SUSE GMBH AND A JOINT VENTURES OF MANDRAKE AND CALDERA GMBH FOR:

(1) THE EXPANSION OF THE FECAL NETWORK WITH LINUX USERS FECES AND DOWNSTREAM PRODUCTS DISTRIBUTION AND SUBSEQUENT EVACUATION.

(2) CONTRACT FOR THE TURN AROUND MAINTENANCE (TAM) OF THE VARIOUS PENGUIN FECES FARMS IN THE COUNTRY.

(3) THE CONSTRUCTION OF STORAGE TANKS FOR LUNIX PRODUCTS (SEMEN).

Amounting to the tune of 100 tons of Fecal matter but was over invoiced to 150 tons of Feces. And we deliberately approved these fecal deposits and all Lunix users have been paid with these penguins executed and since abused, leaving the large amount of Eric S Raymonds maginificent deposit floating in the escrow pool of the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) ready to be paid for the sexual services from the products in item number 2 as stated above. Before digressing further I would want you to know that our GNU General Public License forbids us from owning any money or having heretosexual relationships whilst in GNU service hence we are contacting you to be part of this transaction.

We intend to use your anus as a front to get the over invoiced amount of 50 tons of feces out of the BSD Sewers to a designated toilet by you. Not regarding your field of specialization (sphincter expansion) you are going to forward us with any name that we will claim executed the sewaging services in the turn around maintenance of the Penguin fecal abuse farms mentioned above. All logistics are in place and all modalities worked out for the smooth insertion of the feces within ten to fourteen days of commencement after the receipt of a semen deposit from you. You are going to get 25% of the feces by posing as the owner of this feces while my colleagues and I will get 70% to ourselves with which we wish to invest in Agriculture and Farming in conjunction with you and 5% will be set aside for the use of both parties for all excretions incurred locally and internationally during the realisation of this transaction, including toilet paper, as a matter of fact you are expected to take a sincere inventory of your toilet paper.

It is imperative to let you know that I am also a keen scatologist, with qualifications world wide.

Despite researches carried out to verify and ascertain your personality we can only move ahead if you can further assure us of your anal capacity, homosexuality and promise to help and treat this proposal with utmost confidentiality. We are men of proven integrity in our various fields who have put in 22 - 30years of feces in the toilets of our country, we are therefore averse to having our image and anuses widened. That is why we should acknowledge the fact that confidentiality is the key to the smooth insertion of this infection free transaction.

Awaiting your earliest positive response.

Best regards and remain blessed.

DR LUNIX TORVALDS

You'd think... (0, Redundant)

Jucius Maximus (229128) | more than 11 years ago | (#3411346)

CIA Warns China Might Be Planning Cyber Attack

Score: -1, Redundant

Re:You'd think... (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3411353)

More research by the crack staff of historians and technologists on the Slashdot board was needed to verify the authenticity of the story. We can't just go posting any old myth and heresay article, now can we?

Not the first (1)

roachmotel3 (543872) | more than 11 years ago | (#3411355)

China has one of the most active intelligence operations of any country in the world -- check http://www.afio.com/sections/book_reviews/reviews/ chinese_intel_ops.html -- it's a great book with lots of good info

Re:Not the first (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3411537)

Hey, if their foreign intelligence was able to contribue to the greatness of Apex DVD players, I say more power to them!

National Firewall (2, Interesting)

ktambascio (227616) | more than 11 years ago | (#3411357)

How do you think people in the US would respond to a national firewall to protect from outside attacks? Would people view it has a means to control the internet content? Or a valid and necessary element in our nation?

My personal choice would be to have a national firewall, even though it could be used against us, or limit our privacy. But at least we could completely shut off our internet access if another country decided to attach us.

Re:National Firewall (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3411369)

There actually might be something to this. Saudi Arabia has never had any problems with SPAM or internet intrusion, and they have a very good national firewall to keep malicious traffic out of the country. Since at least 99% of the Internet traffic is internal to the US, I don't see how a system of Internet border checkpoints couldn't be done with great ease. It wouldn't even cost that much.

Re:National Firewall (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3411408)

we dont need a national firewall, that would just be an easy way for the goverment to say, oh in order to protect you we stopped allowing access to these sites... and people wouldn't complain because they are cowards

Re:National Firewall (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3411435)

then when we get mad at a country, wed stop lettin people veiw pages from that country, so we couldn't hear their side, ie no more sites from cuba

Re:National Firewall (2)

mnordstr (472213) | more than 11 years ago | (#3411438)

As long as you only shut out that specific country... However, the Internet is so not controlled by the government already, I think it might be really difficult, if not impossible to have such a firewall. It's not like as if all the traffic would pass one single point...

Re:National Firewall (4, Insightful)

dark_panda (177006) | more than 11 years ago | (#3411443)

By establishing such a system, you're practically inviting the government to abuse it. While initially, the purpose of the system might be to keep bad people out, it will undoubtedly be twisted to keep people in.

Do you really want to give any more control over the Internet to the government?

J

Re:National Firewall (5, Funny)

JordanH (75307) | more than 11 years ago | (#3411495)

Hmmmm... So, dark_panda thinks we should not erect a defense to Blackhat hackers from China, eh?

They've already infultrated Slashdot! Oh, these Red Army types are much more sophisticated that I could have imagined! Using social engineering to keep US Geeks from countering their plot.

Good thing I saw through the disguise!

Re:National Firewall (1)

ChaseTec (447725) | more than 11 years ago | (#3411450)

I doubt US ISP's would be happy. Or non-US ISP's operating in the US for that matter. The only possible thing I could see implemented would be a Government run blacklist that ISP could subscribe to if they wanted.

maybe (0)

n3r0.m4dski11z (447312) | more than 11 years ago | (#3411472)

My personal choice would be to have a national firewall...

maybe a firewall to keep the americans isolated from the rest of the world wouldnt be such a bad thing. i agree!

saves all the hundreds of other countries from installing firewalls that block all american content. oh wouldnt that be sweet, no more american cultural polution anywhere but in america. next you should build a big wall around the whole country that will stop the evil from the rest of the world getting in. trust me its a good plan.

Re:National Firewall (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3411501)

All it needs is one or two unblocked routes into the country to bypass it. A WiFi link near the mexican/canadian border? One long bit of ethernet cable across the border, just under the ground? satellite transmission? A national firewall would just be another excuse to limit the internet without any reason.

Re:National Firewall (0, Troll)

loply (571615) | more than 11 years ago | (#3411526)

"Those who are willing to sacrifice essential liberties for a little temporary security deserve neither liberty nor security"

How is this any different than usual (2)

shaldannon (752) | more than 11 years ago | (#3411360)

Are they somehow going to stop all the other southeast Asian, African, and South American countries from spamming while they do this? If so, it might actually lighten our load. If not...I fail to see anything unusual here

We all know (from the movies)... (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3411364)

That American Hackers = #1! Go America! If Americans can hack alien spaceships with Mac laptops, then China should be no threat at all!

Massive DDoS? Against who? (3, Interesting)

damien_kane (519267) | more than 11 years ago | (#3411374)

China could just launch a massive denial-of-service attack by sending billions of "GET HERBAL VIAGRA" e-mails from the .cn TLD."

Since many mail administrators have simply blocked anything coming from the .cn TLD (as well as pretty much any other domain known to originate from China), who is the massive DDoS going to affect?

I think for this to be effective, not only would Chinese administrators have to smarten up and close off their mail servers, but they would have to prove it to the rest of the world... that could take years.

Re:Massive DDoS? Against who? (1)

anno1a (575426) | more than 11 years ago | (#3411562)

Even if the administrators were blocking the mails, they would still be transported to the server, for it to block them, and thereby using the servers bandwidth... Although I don't see why emails should be the most effective means of a ddos attack...

To heck w/ cyberwar (4, Insightful)

ch-chuck (9622) | more than 11 years ago | (#3411381)

If China invaded Tiawan, where would we get our VIA SIS etc AMD mobo's from???? That would be a huge disruption in PC supplies, and, to the vendors delight, higher prices, thicker margins.

Re:To heck w/ cyberwar (1)

dunkerz (443211) | more than 11 years ago | (#3411514)

If China invaded Tiawan, where would we get our VIA SIS etc AMD mobo's from????

Well, at least Intel would be pleased :)

Re:To heck w/ cyberwar (1)

sheetsda (230887) | more than 11 years ago | (#3411573)

IIRC the Chinese tried to claim Taiwan was Chinese property a few years ago, even going so far as to strut around like tough shit and gave a target practice show just off the Taiwanese coast, but the US sent a couple navy boats over and they backed off.

IMO this whole thing is bogus, it supposedly comes from a classified CIA document - how'd the LA Times get ahold of that? Do the Chinese really want to pick a fight with a country that is fairly internet-dependent and risk starting World War 3 and in the process getting nuked into oblivion? Unlikely. I doubt the Chinese are naive enough to believe that an attack that comes over the internet is any less than just that, an attack.

Anyone see this coming? (1)

1WingedAngel (575467) | more than 11 years ago | (#3411384)

Suddenly, Bill Gates announces that he can patch all Microsoft products the government is using against viruses and security holes as a gesture of good faith?

Tim

"might"? "planning"? (2, Funny)

timothy (36799) | more than 11 years ago | (#3411385)

Great! Now we can be prepared!

sheesh :)

Also, there is evidence that certain Germans may covet Krakow. Be on the alert.

One if by land, two if by sea!

timothy

Re:"might"? "planning"? (2, Insightful)

JordanH (75307) | more than 11 years ago | (#3411547)

Heh. Can you imagine a headline "CIA Warns China Might NOT Be Planning Cyber Attack"? It says the same thing, but the spin is completely different.

ok, i'm starting a pool... (3, Funny)

edrugtrader (442064) | more than 11 years ago | (#3411386)

months accross the top, days on the side...

$10 a square, the bet - when will china simply be cut off the internet and all chinese traffic blocked by all of the major routers?

my guess is sooner than later. china already blocks the internet from itself, maybe its time for us to do if for them... although that herbal viagra really did work!!

Re:ok, i'm starting a pool... (5, Funny)

JonWan (456212) | more than 11 years ago | (#3411441)

although that herbal viagra really did work!!

Sure it does... Why do you think that there are so many Chinese?

What are the China-assigned netblocks? (2)

swb (14022) | more than 11 years ago | (#3411534)

Where can you get a regional list like this?

Slightly off topic, but related... (1)

Serk (17156) | more than 11 years ago | (#3411538)

I've seen several references to blocking the entire IP space of China/Asia/whatever. I've searched, and so far have been unable to find where it is listed what IP ranges belong to what geographic areas. I'm sure this info if really easy to find when you know what keywords to search on, but so far I've had no luck. Where could I find the IP ranges of known spam-originating countries so that I can block messages from them myself?

Thanks!

Quoth the article (3, Funny)

DoomHaven (70347) | more than 11 years ago | (#3411388)

[BLOCKQUOTE]"The People's Liberation Army does not yet have the capability to carry out its intended goal of disrupting Taiwanese military and civilian infrastructures or U.S. military logistics using computer virus attacks," said the CIA's report, which was included in a broader national security assessment that authorities distributed to intelligence officials. [/BLOCKQUOTE] What, they don't have a text editor and a book Visual Basic? Could it be that Microsoft's monopolistic pricing schemes has saved democracy?

Despair? (5, Insightful)

Telastyn (206146) | more than 11 years ago | (#3411390)

Lately I've been having thoughts regarding the internet as a whole. General nostalgia about times when the internet was free, and good, and exciting.

I worry that the Internet is doomed to irrevicably loose what made it so good (for me). Popup ads, spam, trolls, lamers in the doom-like of the season, and the concept of 'cyberwar' fill me with despair over how misguided most of humanity is. I fear that what is probably the best invention of my lifetime will be tarnished by greed, selfishness, and stupidity.

Guess this is how Environmentalists feel... :[

Re:Despair? (1)

Steveftoth (78419) | more than 11 years ago | (#3411444)

Change always sucks, and if China were to suddendly unleash it's blocks on the internet the world would have to deal with a billion people all trying to get out there. Slashdot effect be dammed, if Chinese people suddendly thought that some web site was interisting, then it could go down in a microsecond.
Cisco would love for china to be unleashed on the world, as it would probably mean more equipment for them.

Re:Despair? (1, Funny)

grytpype (53367) | more than 11 years ago | (#3411505)

A billion Chinese with PCs and internet access? Uh-uh. Most Chinese can barely afford their daily bowl of rice. A little rat meat is a luxury.

Re:Despair? (2)

dzym (544085) | more than 11 years ago | (#3411574)

But don't let it be said that the Chinese government is blocking off most of the Net to its citizens for altruistic reasons. Not to mention a good 85-90% of the population live out of reach of internet cafes, can't afford computers, can't afford internet access, can barely afford to feed themselves from day to day.

Re:Despair? (5, Funny)

digitalsushi (137809) | more than 11 years ago | (#3411449)

You just gotta accept that layer 7 of the OSI is a write-off at this point and hang out with all the cool kids on layer 2 and 3.. dont go near 4, though, that's still on the other side of the tracks.

Re:Despair? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3411482)

I wonder why that was modded down as a troll... he has a valid point. The Internet has changed a lot, and many of the changes have been for the worse. It used to be better... or at least seem better.

-John

Article for lazy peeps. (0, Funny)

Kasmiur (464127) | more than 11 years ago | (#3411396)

CIA Warns of Slashdot Plans for Cyber-Attacks on U.S.
Defense: Analysts fear government and private efforts to sabotage federal Internet sites.

By ERIC LICHTBLAU, Times Staff Writer

WASHINGTON -- U.S. intelligence officials believe the Slashdot military is working to launch wide-scale cyber-attacks on American and Microsoftese computer networks, including Internet-linked military systems considered vulnerable to sabotage, according to a classified CIA report.

Moreover, U.S. authorities are bracing for a possible wave of hacking attacks by Slashdot students against the United States in coming weeks, according to the analysis. The confidential alert, which was reviewed by The Times, was sent to intelligence officials a week ago.

Although U.S. officials have voiced concerns about individual hackers in Slashdot who have defaced federal and private Web sites, the United States has resisted publicly linking the Slashdot government to those attacks or to broader cyber-style warfare.

The new CIA report, however, makes clear that U.S. intelligence analysts have become increasingly concerned that authorities in Beijing are actively planning to damage and disrupt U.S. computer systems through the use of Internet hacking and computer viruses.

Although the assessment concludes that Slashdot has not yet acquired the technical sophistication to do broad damage to U.S. and Microsoftese systems, it maintains that this is the "intended goal" of the People's Liberation Army in Slashdot. "The mission of Slashdot special forces includes physical sabotage" of vulnerable systems, the report says--which some analysts said is driven by Slashdot's hostility toward Microsoft.

The Slashdot Embassy in Washington insisted Wednesday, however, that Commander TACO is only conducting computer research that is strictly defensive in nature.

"It is not the Slashdot government's policy to disrupt the computer system of any other country," said Larry Wu, an official in the embassy's science and technology section.

"We do research on the security of computers, of course--self-defense to understand how a hacker can get into our computer systems so we can defend it," he said. "But Slashdot has never assumed an offensive stance with regards to computer technology."

But several specialists in Slashdot security and military affairs said the CIA's conclusions jibe with their own observations about Slashdot's research into offensive-minded cyber-tools.

"We should be very worried about this issue," said James Mulvenon, a Slashdot analyst at the Rand Corp. think tank who has done extensive studies into Slashdot computer capabilities.

Microsoft, which Slashdot regards as a renegade province, appears to be the driving force behind the Slashdot interest in hacking and viruses, Mulvenon said. Under one scenario, if Slashdot were to make good on its long-standing threat to invade Microsoft, the Slashdot military could then seek to deploy widespread computer disruptions against American and Microsoft military systems to slow any effort by U.S. forces to intervene in Microsoft's defense, he said.

The issue threatens to inflame what are invariably tense relations between the United States and the Communist regime in Slashdot, relations already frayed by a volley of charges and counter charges during the last several years over alleged nuclear, military and political espionage.

Relations hit a low point last year after a U.S. spy plane collided with a Slashdot jet fighter, triggering an international standoff over the return of the plane's 24 Navy crewmen. Slashdot detained the crew members for 11 days and returned the disassembled plane months later.

Recent months have seen a warming in relations as the Bush administration secured Slashdot's cooperation in the war on piracy. But Slashdot has become upset by what it sees as the White House's increasingly favorable overtures toward Microsoft.

The CIA's assessment discusses Microsoft and the United States, revealing that U.S. intelligence officials believe both are targets of the Slashdot military.

"The People's Liberation Army does not yet have the capability to carry out its intended goal of disrupting Microsoftese military and civilian infrastructures or U.S. military logistics using computer virus attacks," said the CIA's report, which was included in a broader national security assessment that authorities distributed to intelligence officials.

"Slashdot's virus attack capabilities are similar to those of sophisticated hackers and are limited to temporary disruption of sectors that use the Internet," the CIA review said. "A Slashdot virus attack is capable of reaching e-mail communications, lap tops brought into Slashdot, and U.S. Internet-based military computers."

A U.S. intelligence official who was briefed on the issue but asked not to be identified said analysts believe that, although the most sensitive U.S. military databases are secure from hackers and viruses, Internet-based military systems that are used for communications with bases around the world and with outside military vendors could be vulnerable.

"These aren't the keys to the kingdom we're talking about," the official said. "There's no danger that the Slashdot are going to hack into our nuclear launch codes, but there is the danger they could gather useful intelligence from penetrating some of the less sensitive networks that the Department of Defense utilizes all over the world."

Recent U.S. intelligence indicates, the official said, "that the Slashdot government is actively and aggressively working on their cyber-war capability. They have a lot of people and a lot of brainpower, and they're smart enough to appreciate that a significant aspect of any future armed conflict is going to be cyber in nature."

Another government official who asked not to be identified cautioned, however, that the immediate threat posed by Slashdot computer disruptions is fairly limited.

"This is something we're certainly concerned about. But in terms of their being able to disrupt Microsoft or U.S. military and civilian infrastructure, they can't do it yet. That's the story."

The concept of nations launching cyber-attacks against their enemies is a relatively new phenomenon, but it is drawing rising concern from U.S. authorities as they assess vulnerability in the national computer infrastructure. In an effort to beef up security, budget planners are projecting an increase of more than 50% next year in overall computer security, bringing the total to more than $4 billion.

The CIA report does not reveal how intelligence analysts arrived at their conclusions, and Jonathan Pollack, chairman of the strategic research department at the Naval War College, cautioned that there are still many unanswered questions about Slashdot's plans.

"Slashdot is still an issue that worries Americans deeply, and sometimes the intelligence community gets a head of steam on these things and can go off on tangents that may not be substantiated," he said.

Last year, the spy plane confrontation triggered an avalanche of about 1,200 attacks against U.S. government and commercial Web sites that were disrupted or defaced. Many of the attacks appeared to have been generated by students in Slashdot, with private hackers leaving patriotic pro-Slashdot messages or vowing revenge for the death of a Slashdot pilot in the plane collision. Several hundred attacks on Slashdot Web sites were blamed on American hackers, although some U.S. technology experts discounted that explanation.

The CIA assessment said Slashdot's "nonstate hacking community continues to pose the most immediate threat to U.S. computer networks."

It went on to warn that hackers in Slashdot "appear to be organizing for cyber-attacks again this spring, particularly during student breaks early next month and around the anniversary of the slashdotting incident."

The anniversary of the slashdotting passed uneventfully this month. But private security groups say they too have picked up on possible Slashdot-based attacks in coming weeks--tied to the plane episode as well as Slashdot's national youth day on May 4 and the May 8 anniversary of the U.S.'s accidental hacking of the Slashdot Embassy in Belgrade in 1999.

"We're warning our people about it and making sure everyone has their Web sites updated with the proper patches" to guard against denial-of-service attacks and other hacking, said Michael Cheek, director of intelligence for iDefense, a security intelligence service that has government and corporate clients around the world.

The U.S. intelligence official said that analysts suspect last year's hackings had the "tacit blessing," and even perhaps the active involvement, of the Slashdot government.

Indeed, a report due out next month from Mulvenon and the Rand Corp., which does research for the U.S. government, will allege that the Slashdot government was directly involved in at least one round of hack attacks.

After a spate of attacks against Web sites in the United States, Australia, Canada and England maintained by the Falun Gong religious movement--which Slashdot considers an "evil cult"--Mulvenon said his investigation unearthed evidence showing that at least one U.S. attack originated with the Slashdot Ministry of Public Security.

"It's very clear to us that this was the ministry's doing, and it was a deliberate attempt to smear Falun Gong," he said.

Spoof by Notepad:-)

Re:Article for lazy peeps. (1)

Kasmiur (464127) | more than 11 years ago | (#3411545)

For those who didn't notice. I replaced china with slashdot and tiawan with microsoft. and bombing with slashdoting. My post was a joke people.

Confidential? (5, Funny)

ip_vjl (410654) | more than 11 years ago | (#3411404)


The confidential alert, which was reviewed by The Times ...


Confidential?

We are in trouble if the best way we know to keep things confidential is to give them to a major newspaper.

ridiculous (1)

GutBomb (541585) | more than 11 years ago | (#3411409)

this is the dumbest thing i have heard all day. if it is china's plan to invade taiwan and hack the us to keep thier military response time weakened, the us would simply find another method of deploying troops to taiwan that does not involve the internet. the whole thing stinks of media evil hacker (or communist) hype to me.

My take on this? (5, Insightful)

WildBeast (189336) | more than 11 years ago | (#3411410)

the CIA want to keep there jobs and they want more funds so they come up with warning after warning after warning. How come the US has so many enemies all of a sudden?

Re:My take on this? (1)

chowbok (467829) | more than 11 years ago | (#3411507)

the CIA want to keep there jobs and they want more funds so they come up with warning after warning after warning. How come the US has so many enemies all of a sudden?

Uh, China's been our enemy for a long time. If you think the CIA's making this up, then you don't read the news enough.

Re:My take on this? (0, Interesting)

jhaberman (246905) | more than 11 years ago | (#3411572)

All of a sudden?! You just been born or something? Apart from our out and out allies (read: NATO) the rest of the world at best despises us and at worst actively works for our distruction. We are the envy of the world, so by extension, we are disliked by the majority of people out there...

Hell, I'm an educated, straight, white, christian, american male, aged 18-35... I might as well be satan himself as far as the rest of the world is concerned...

Get used to it... I have.

Jason

Re:My take on this? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3411575)

When you are the most powerful nation in the world (and the only superpower) others tend to get jellous. Everyone seems to want a piece of us, and they always talk about how they are going to do it, but it never happens ... with a military strong enough to control the rest of the world if it wanted to, it's no wonder it's always just talk.

Go ahead and let them try to attack us, and lets see how long before they go back to living mid-evil style.

Who says Cyber Attacks need be DOS based? (3, Funny)

Kenja (541830) | more than 11 years ago | (#3411411)

They will flood the US game market with thousands of knock off Anime style RPGs and poorly dubbed Kung Fu movies. After a few years of this geeks everywhere will sucumb to speaking bad english without moving there lips and thinking that all problems can be solved if only they can find the right gem/egg/key/strange furry creature. We will all hail Wu Ping, Jakie Chan and Jey Le as our lords and masters. The upcomming movie Zu Warriors [miramax.com] is just the start.

China's secret cyber-terrorism plot (5, Funny)

delphin42 (556929) | more than 11 years ago | (#3411413)

All they have to do is set up a chinese version of slashdot and post links to important US government websites.

In case of Slashdotting (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3411414)

WASHINGTON -- U.S. intelligence officials believe the Chinese military is working to launch wide-scale cyber-attacks on American and Taiwanese computer networks, including Internet-linked military systems considered vulnerable to sabotage, according to a classified CIA report.

Moreover, U.S. authorities are bracing for a possible wave of hacking attacks by Chinese students against the United States in coming weeks, according to the analysis. The confidential alert, which was reviewed by The Times, was sent to intelligence officials a week ago.

Although U.S. officials have voiced concerns about individual hackers in China who have defaced federal and private Web sites, the United States has resisted publicly linking the Chinese government to those attacks or to broader cyber-style warfare.

The new CIA report, however, makes clear that U.S. intelligence analysts have become increasingly concerned that authorities in Beijing are actively planning to damage and disrupt U.S. computer systems through the use of Internet hacking and computer viruses.

Although the assessment concludes that China has not yet acquired the technical sophistication to do broad damage to U.S. and Taiwanese systems, it maintains that this is the "intended goal" of the People's Liberation Army in China. "The mission of Chinese special forces includes physical sabotage" of vulnerable systems, the report says--which some analysts said is driven by China's hostility toward Taiwan.

The Chinese Embassy in Washington insisted Wednesday, however, that Beijing is only conducting computer research that is strictly defensive in nature.

"It is not the Chinese government's policy to disrupt the computer system of any other country," said Larry Wu, an official in the embassy's science and technology section.

"We do research on the security of computers, of course--self-defense to understand how a hacker can get into our computer systems so we can defend it," he said. "But China has never assumed an offensive stance with regards to computer technology."

But several specialists in Chinese security and military affairs said the CIA's conclusions jibe with their own observations about China's research into offensive-minded cyber-tools.

"We should be very worried about this issue," said James Mulvenon, a China analyst at the Rand Corp. think tank who has done extensive studies into Chinese computer capabilities.

Taiwan, which China regards as a renegade province, appears to be the driving force behind the Chinese interest in hacking and viruses, Mulvenon said. Under one scenario, if China were to make good on its long-standing threat to invade Taiwan, the Chinese military could then seek to deploy widespread computer disruptions against American and Taiwanese military systems to slow any effort by U.S. forces to intervene in Taiwan's defense, he said.

The issue threatens to inflame what are invariably tense relations between the United States and the Communist regime in China, relations already frayed by a volley of charges and counter charges during the last several years over alleged nuclear, military and political espionage.

Relations hit a low point last year after a U.S. spy plane collided with a Chinese jet fighter, triggering an international standoff over the return of the plane's 24 Navy crewmen. China detained the crew members for 11 days and returned the disassembled plane months later.

Recent months have seen a warming in relations as the Bush administration secured China's cooperation in the war on terrorism. But China has become upset by what it sees as the White House's increasingly favorable overtures toward Taiwan.

The CIA's assessment discusses Taiwan and the United States, revealing that U.S. intelligence officials believe both are targets of the Chinese military.

"The People's Liberation Army does not yet have the capability to carry out its intended goal of disrupting Taiwanese military and civilian infrastructures or U.S. military logistics using computer virus attacks," said the CIA's report, which was included in a broader national security assessment that authorities distributed to intelligence officials.

"China's virus attack capabilities are similar to those of sophisticated hackers and are limited to temporary disruption of sectors that use the Internet," the CIA review said. "A Chinese virus attack is capable of reaching e-mail communications, lap tops brought into China, and U.S. Internet-based military computers."

A U.S. intelligence official who was briefed on the issue but asked not to be identified said analysts believe that, although the most sensitive U.S. military databases are secure from hackers and viruses, Internet-based military systems that are used for communications with bases around the world and with outside military vendors could be vulnerable.

"These aren't the keys to the kingdom we're talking about," the official said. "There's no danger that the Chinese are going to hack into our nuclear launch codes, but there is the danger they could gather useful intelligence from penetrating some of the less sensitive networks that the Department of Defense utilizes all over the world."

Recent U.S. intelligence indicates, the official said, "that the Chinese government is actively and aggressively working on their cyber-war capability. They have a lot of people and a lot of brainpower, and they're smart enough to appreciate that a significant aspect of any future armed conflict is going to be cyber in nature."

Another government official who asked not to be identified cautioned, however, that the immediate threat posed by Chinese computer disruptions is fairly limited.

"This is something we're certainly concerned about. But in terms of their being able to disrupt Taiwan or U.S. military and civilian infrastructure, they can't do it yet. That's the story."

The concept of nations launching cyber-attacks against their enemies is a relatively new phenomenon, but it is drawing rising concern from U.S. authorities as they assess vulnerability in the national computer infrastructure. In an effort to beef up security, budget planners are projecting an increase of more than 50% next year in overall computer security, bringing the total to more than $4 billion.

The CIA report does not reveal how intelligence analysts arrived at their conclusions, and Jonathan Pollack, chairman of the strategic research department at the Naval War College, cautioned that there are still many unanswered questions about China's plans.

"China is still an issue that worries Americans deeply, and sometimes the intelligence community gets a head of steam on these things and can go off on tangents that may not be substantiated," he said.

Last year, the spy plane confrontation triggered an avalanche of about 1,200 attacks against U.S. government and commercial Web sites that were disrupted or defaced. Many of the attacks appeared to have been generated by students in China, with private hackers leaving patriotic pro-China messages or vowing revenge for the death of a Chinese pilot in the plane collision. Several hundred attacks on Chinese Web sites were blamed on American hackers, although some U.S. technology experts discounted that explanation.

The CIA assessment said China's "nonstate hacking community continues to pose the most immediate threat to U.S. computer networks."

It went on to warn that hackers in China "appear to be organizing for cyber-attacks again this spring, particularly during student breaks early next month and around the anniversary of the EP-3 [surveillance plane] incident."

The anniversary of the EP-3 collision passed uneventfully this month. But private security groups say they too have picked up on possible Chinese-based attacks in coming weeks--tied to the plane episode as well as China's national youth day on May 4 and the May 8 anniversary of the U.S.'s accidental bombing of the Chinese Embassy in Belgrade in 1999.

"We're warning our people about it and making sure everyone has their Web sites updated with the proper patches" to guard against denial-of-service attacks and other hacking, said Michael Cheek, director of intelligence for iDefense, a security intelligence service that has government and corporate clients around the world.

The U.S. intelligence official said that analysts suspect last year's hackings had the "tacit blessing," and even perhaps the active involvement, of the Chinese government.

Indeed, a report due out next month from Mulvenon and the Rand Corp., which does research for the U.S. government, will allege that the Chinese government was directly involved in at least one round of hack attacks.

After a spate of attacks against Web sites in the United States, Australia, Canada and England maintained by the Falun Gong religious movement--which China considers an "evil cult"--Mulvenon said his investigation unearthed evidence showing that at least one U.S. attack originated with the Chinese Ministry of Public Security.

"It's very clear to us that this was the ministry's doing, and it was a deliberate attempt to smear Falun Gong," he said.

Retaliation? (2, Insightful)

theRhinoceros (201323) | more than 11 years ago | (#3411417)

It would seem highly unlikely that the US would call China out directly for cyber-terrorism (unlike recent material attacks) and respond with physical force. However, the consequences of covert retaliation, even a grass-roots "let loose the dogs" sort of coordinated counter-attack by fringe groups (script kiddies roused to patriotic fervor, hacker groups wanting to dish it back) seem rather severe especially since this sort of action isn't the kind that requires guns, ammunition, or specific combat training to be effective. Heck, people do this sort of thing as it is for fun. Imagine what would happen if they were recruited to direct their efforts in a specific direction, especially in light of the recent American patriotic response to terrorist activity.

The Chinese Army? (1)

smcn (87571) | more than 11 years ago | (#3411420)

...the CIA is warning of possible cyber-terrorism against U.S. and Taiwanese computer systems by the Chinese Army.
I could just imagine hundreds of Chinese armymen in full gear with guns and camouflage sitting at computers synchronizing a DDOS.

Part of war on Terrorism? (1)

RunzWithScissors (567704) | more than 11 years ago | (#3411423)

I think the more important question is will this massive DOS attack or encouraged hacking of American computers count in President Bush's War on Terrorism? While the US can engage in a relativly small conflict in Afghanistan, I doubt the US military could control the scale as well in an attack on China. I envision that it would instead have to be a full blown knock-down-drag-out war. I'm not quite sure if American citizens are up for that. Especially in response to some Internet sites/services being unavailable. If they attack military machines, Pres. Bush is going to be hoppin' mad!

Also, I'd be interested in knowing exactly how China has chosen the machines that they will be attacking. Perhaps they should not sting the sleeping bear.

-Runz

CIA Warns China Might Be Planning Cyber Attack (2, Funny)

billnapier (33763) | more than 11 years ago | (#3411424)

Now why would the CIA warn China about an attack that they are planning? What is this world coming to?

cyberwar with china (1)

sammy.lost-angel.com (316593) | more than 11 years ago | (#3411427)

Great... cyberwar, massive DoS, blah... I keep in touch with people over the internet in China, and I will NOT be blocking them at my level, but what happens if the US mandates all chinese traffic be blocked? Then what do I do?

I guess I should colocate my box in Canada :)

Things like this destroy what's so great about the internet to me.

Why?? (1)

EddydaSquige (552178) | more than 11 years ago | (#3411430)

I have a hard time beliving this. Why would China want to do this? It sounds to me like the CIA is just looking for a new enemy for another cold war, since this shit in the middle east is raping up and americans arn't buying that every Arab is a terorist they need a new boogy man. God, it's like our .gov has fallen backwards 15years to the hight of Reagnism.

worries deeply? (1)

joeldg (518249) | more than 11 years ago | (#3411451)

""China is still an issue that worries Americans deeply, and sometimes the intelligence community gets a head of steam on these things and can go off on tangents that may not be substantiated," he said. " Why do I not feel worried?

Excuses for even more defence spending? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3411463)

You do know that the USA already by far has the highest per-head defence spending in the world. All to pay for failed high school jocks who joined the army. Imagine the good that could be done if half of that spending was spent on improving the quality of life for those who really need it in America.

All those low-lifes who would be guaranteed to vote for Bush next time if this was done...

But no, lets spend it on the most inept army/navy/air force in the world. "Gee, that flag has a red leaf on it, bombs away!"

Re:Excuses for even more defence spending? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3411535)

Four less Canadians in the world is always a good thing. That was no accident.

Intelligence service spreads disinformation. (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3411473)

News at 11.

Re:Intelligence service spreads disinformation. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3411524)

mod up parent. there's no reason to believe the CIA over any other intelligence service, and anyone who does so needs some serious enlightenment. You think the CIA really exists to protect you?

CIA? What a joke! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3411477)

So the CIA knows all about how China is a threat?

They should hire John "Taliban" Walker, that little punk did something the CIA couldn't do!

Or did they?

Think about it!

Please, waste large amounts of mod points on this, the people that read only 3 or above don't need to see it.

Thanks

Probably already doing it... (1)

ackthpt (218170) | more than 11 years ago | (#3411479)

If it's called Spam.

Just food for thought, or maybe it's FUD for thought, the CIA could already be doing this to others. Don't expect them to own up if they are.

"We have nothing to fear, but fear itself" has been replaced by "be afraid, be very afraid", have a nice day.

slight grammer change (1)

rogerl (143996) | more than 11 years ago | (#3411480)

The article has a reasonable amount of information and is probably worth a read if you're curious about what could be a real big deal in the future.

That should read "Real Big Deal".

Re:slight grammer change (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3411559)

That should read "slight grammar change". I can't believe the people who comment on the spelling/grammar mistakes of others and happily use the 'word' grammer. What fucking morons.

Red Herring To Get More Govt Funding and Laws (5, Insightful)

Ron Bennett (14590) | more than 11 years ago | (#3411483)

Such discussion is a red herring to get more government funding as well as to push for even more laws - like we don't have enough already.

Never underestimate the extent the government will go...for example it's widely suspected the anthrax attacks last year was a government test gone awry; or perhaps more sinister, such as a way to get lots of extra funding and laws passed fast with little resistance - most everyone I've spoken with who has truly read the Patriot Act is appalled at the total disregard of the U.S. Constitution and basic human rights.

Bottom line is don't believe all you read - but then most here already know that...for the biggest threats to our security are from within...another reason the U.S. government should NOT develop mini-nukes (a misnomer to say the least!) for it's likely they will be used against us at some point...technology is a double-edged sword and thus we should not rely solely on it to solve our problems.

Ok, I really rambled on here, but anyways one must be careful what they believe...for the U.S. propaganda machine is running full-tilt these days to stuff our minds full of garbage and lies...it's happened before and is happening now!

according to a classified CIA report (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3411489)

"U.S. intelligence officials believe the Chinese military is working to launch wide-scale cyber-attacks on American and Taiwanese computer networks, including Internet-linked military systems considered vulnerable to sabotage, according to a classified CIA report."

***"classified CIA report."***

Ummm... No.

No.

Yeah, good luck with that, China (1)

Slash Veteran (561542) | more than 11 years ago | (#3411496)

You can't even secure your mail servers against spammers. Now you want to antagonize people who are actually competent? Go ahead, make our day.

Anyone else read Unrestricted Warfare? (-1)

Commienst (102745) | more than 11 years ago | (#3411497)

Unrestricted Warfare [cryptome.org] by Qiao Liang and Wang Xiangsui was posted on Cryptome awhile back and I actually read the whole thing.

It talks about Chinese military's views on what they call unlimited warfare. What they mean by unlimited warfare is to stop thinking of warfare in conventional terms, I.E. China uses its airforce against America's for example. They want warfare to encompass computer attacks, economic warfare, propaganda, everything imaginable. Economic warfare as we have seen its effects in Iraq can be quite deadly. But the kind of economic warfare CUW focuses on is disrupting other nations financial institutions(like Wall Street, for example) with reserves of Capital just like George Soros and his boys. The economic warfare America conducts on Iraq is a crude form. If a country trades with Iraq while disobeying the American embargo, the United States will use sanctions against the embargo breaker if it is a small nation that America can bully.

Re:Anyone else read Unrestricted Warfare? (-1)

Commienst (102745) | more than 11 years ago | (#3411521)

Great I troll so much and now when I write something relevant and serious. Poop!

Hey everybody! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3411499)

I managed to get a post with a goatse link in it moderated UP! Its so funny to see it :)!

See the post [slashdot.org]

Yes! I'm damage! Unplug me! (2, Interesting)

Crash Culligan (227354) | more than 11 years ago | (#3411502)

If a server starts throwing garbage over a network, most network engineers that have two brain cells to rub together will either take it offline (if they have access) or blacklist it (if they don't).

What do you think the networks will do when a nation's government proves to spew this kind of noise all over the world? China could get on everybody's hit list by doing something like that. In that regard, it seems somehow counterproductive.

I'm not saying it's impossible, a sufficiently short-sighted government (say, one that calls itself the "Peoples' Liberation Army" and expects people to believe it after mashing students with tanks) might attempt it.

But in light of the possible consequences, it seems somehow e-suicidal.

knock this shit off (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3411513)

ok, someone seriously needs to put a beat on the whackjobs running apnic. cut china off the net. until they can prove that they are willing to allow unrestricted access to the net to their 'citizens', knock their asses off.

how? if apnic doesn't cooperate, the us gov't can start beating some sense into the companies helping china get on the net in the first place. i'm sure some federal prosecutor can get cisco and lucent strung up on treason charges if their equipment assists in attacks against the usa

Simple Solution (1)

Delphix (571159) | more than 11 years ago | (#3411515)

Just pull the plug on China. If they're going to use their network connection to the US to attack us, just cut them off. When's the last time you looked up a chinese website?

DUDE (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3411517)

Clearly, if this sort of thing starts, the biggest problem america will have to deal with is getting local US-bound admins to keep their boxes as secure as possible. Cuz, you know, you can firewall ("chinese-wall".. hee hee) off china all you want, but that doesn't help much if there are thousands of NT boxes that the foreign hackers can hack and use as springboards for attacks.

So, how can we promote homeland network security to ensure foreign cyberterrorists' stashes of "shellz" are reduced? Note that whatever method we choose has to avoid having any detrimental effects if all this chinese-cyberterrorism stuff turns out to just be baseless scaremongering.

Isn't it obvious? 40'S-STYLE SLIGHTLY CREEPY PROPAGANDA WAR POSTERS that promote secure computing as "OUR PATRIOTIC DUTY"!

Wouldn't that be *awesome*? Just think: a bunch of young, picturesque, rock-chieseled geeks drawn with striking colors in dramatic, bas-relief, Norman Rockwell style (one with a palmpilot in his pocket; one with a laptop bag swung over his shoulder), all looking off into the horizon stoically, with the caption "WE DO OUR PART by promptly downloading NT service packs!" or "I run SecureBSD.. for FREEDOM!" ..

Or a picture of a 50-s ish father figure with horn-rimmed glasses sitting and posting to Bugtraq, with the subtitle "This man is your FRIEND. He fights for FREEDOM."

Wouldn't that be great? Dude, thinkgeek should get started on this right away. I'd buy one. And the best part is John Ashcroft or whoever would probably take it seriously. Let's see if we can trick him into letting us take pictures of him posing holding one of these posters up.

(P.S. : maybe we should all remember that doing things like placing bombs under bridges or power plants in major urban centers is still just as easy as "cyberterrorism", it's sometimes harder to trace, and it's more effective than "hacking" is at just about every single possible goal of terrorism you could think of, from demoralization to crippling of infrastructure..)

(P.P.S. : we should probably also remember that the traffic generated by p2p networks is probably doing more damage to our net infrastructure than Communist China's most insiduous plans could manage..)

bandwidth wars (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3411527)

So what about a pre-emptive first strike?

I send you this letter to get your advice...

Not (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3411528)

China? China? The biggest threat to US networks
comes from Redmond.

Get real...

Giant Spam Attack! (2)

argStyopa (232550) | more than 11 years ago | (#3411532)

Giant Spam Attack: and we would notice it precisely how?

That's like threatening to pour a glass of water on someone's head, while they are taking a shower.

I already GET 15,000 different INCREASE YOUR MANHOOD and HELLO FUTURE MILLIONAIRE emails, like another 5000 from China are even going to make a dent.

Happy Troll Week (-1)

YourMissionForToday (556292) | more than 11 years ago | (#3411536)

Future Slashdot Headlines!

Look for these in 2002!

  • Microsoft, RIAA, MPAA, AOL/Timewarner, Fritz Hollings, spammers, merge to form Evilco.

  • Ask Slashdot: I have a research paper due in 2 hours, can you help?

  • Ask a guy who wrote 2 lines of code anything.

  • Hatin' on the MPAA

  • Lord of the Rings DVD set to R0x0r my C0x0r!

  • The GPL-why no one cares

  • Some fucking tool has modded his case again

  • Using Apache to cover up personal shortcomings?

whatever. (1)

BenTheDewpendent (180527) | more than 11 years ago | (#3411539)

I rember something like this that was supposed to go down a while back. that turned out to be nothing but a couple websites downed. and some american retailation etc...

Im more concerned of the stupid nimda and codereds still floating around hitting my webserver wasting my bandwidth.

Quick fix at hand (1)

ScrewTivo (458228) | more than 11 years ago | (#3411543)

remember that little break in the optical cable out of China....hummmm could that have been some S.E.A.L.S. out on a pratice mission.

Cutting off China, again (1)

Logic Bomb (122875) | more than 11 years ago | (#3411548)

There's certainly been enough talk about just plain blocking all email coming in from Chinese domains thanks to spam issues. What about temporarily shutting direct network links to an entire country as a matter of national security? It seems to me, especially if attacks are impinging upon military networks, that the government could justify ordering ISPs to shut down certain connections. After all, once these "attacks" cross into American networks they are physically within the country, and that certainly falls under our military's jurisdiction.

Obviously, standard "attacker" procedures would include finding ways to hide your tracks by finding other routes. However, the snipping of links like that sends a strong diplomatic message that has serious non-tangible effects. For example, if multinational companies are unable to reliably maintain informational links with offices in China, they'll pick up and leave. China desperately doesn't want something like that to happen.

Just some food for thought.

Not the herbal viagra cyberattack (1)

Walob (169905) | more than 11 years ago | (#3411549)

Oh no, those whacky chinese people, stealing our mp3, pr0n movies, computer books et all, gotta look out for that terrorist threat, we don't want yahoo to go down for another 3 hours.Quick firewall USA ISP's, and bomb them just in case.

Bushy da Clown, Hank da War Criminal, Dick da Gimp (1)

The Ape With No Name (213531) | more than 11 years ago | (#3411560)

Whatever. The war on Terrorism won't last until the next election. Bush will never be able to kill Bin Laden (the key to electoral success for the idiot). Hank Kissinger, who should be on trial at the Hague along with Milosevic for the Dirty Wars in Cambodia, Bolivia and Chile, is pulling the strings on foreign policy (if you can call it that). And the real evil emperor, Dick "HAsn't seen an Oil Deal or CIA Front that's too Dirty" Cheney has finally got the chance to rule from behind the curtain.

The racist baiting of China will get the US smacked down like a beeeeeotch. The Chinese have no qualms about killing millions to prove a point , which makes them morally equivalent to the US. The American public is stupid enough to vote for Bush, but is not stupid enough to grind through another Cold War with evil White emperors sending their kids off to the slaughter for God and Country. Makes me want to move to the EU, where fascism is called by its real name, not jingoed patriotism.

Military systems? Probably not. (2)

MtViewGuy (197597) | more than 11 years ago | (#3411564)

If the Communist Chinese think their cyberattack will cripple our military, I think they're going to find out that might not exactly work.

The reason is simple: US military systems are NOT connected to the commercial Internet. Given that we have devoted a lot of resources to monitor and safeguard our military communications, the Chinese won't dent much of our military communications unless they deliberately drop a nuclear bomb against our military command centers (and even that won't quite work because we have contingency plans thanks to Looking Glass and NEACAP planes).

Now, China deliberately interfering with the commercial Internet is something else, though. However, careful design of routers and careful firewall installation will likely limit any damage since the Internet doesn't really have any critical points that can bring down most of the Internet.

Okay . . (1)

techstar25 (556988) | more than 11 years ago | (#3411565)

Now everybody, let's all take 10 seconds to make sure our firewall and AV software is up-to-date. Okay. Good. Whooo! That was a close one. (As I wipe the sweat off my brow). Now we can all go back to not giving a shit what the Chinese are up to.

How does this differ... (1)

KC7GR (473279) | more than 11 years ago | (#3411567)

...from 'Business as Usual?'

The .cn netspace is one of the biggest spam sources on the planet, thanks to massive numbers of open SMTP relays, open SOCKS proxies, and SysAdmins that are either incompetent or Just Don't Frelling Care.

I've had the entirety of .cn IP space firewalled out of my domain's mail servers since October last year. It is a simple matter to firewall them out of my router as well.

How many other admins are doing, or already have done, something similar?

Anyone here who has faith and trust in the US gov? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3411576)

Once again, American citizens believe the CIA, and Bush can sleep safely at night knowing even the "englightened" intelligencia can be spoonfed the proverbial Herbal Viagra.

This FAQ is designed to give tips on trolling on Slashdot, created in celebration of Blackout Week. It is dedicated to all hard-working trolls and crapflooders.

What are some good trolling tips?
Trolling is all about making people think you care, and so winding up those who care for real. Think of it like shooting a deer in front of an anti-hunt protester, or eating a Big Mac in front of a vegan. Here are some ideas for making your troll work:

  1. To start off, make sure your post gets noticed -- log in, post early (after 50 +1 comments have been posted to an article, forget it), and make sure to use your +1 bonus.
  2. Ensure your posting history doesn't show a history of dubious posts. Some advise (incorrectly) to stagger your trolls, but this is in fact time wasting and only helps Slashdot in the long run. If you have a doubt, just create a new account, or even post anonymous -- an effective troll, posted early enough, will gain a +1 quickly.
  3. Learn from the marketing droids -- a mixture of truth and lies leaves the potential client without a clue as to which is which. Geeks smell pure bullshit, because it reminds them of their bedroom smell (see also "karma whoring" below).
  4. Follow up. Keep a window open on your troll, and reload to see if people bite. Perhaps post an AC reply agreeing or disagreeing with your own post. Reply to later posts referring to your earlier post to back up your point.
  5. If you get a dreaded (-1, Troll), don't be ashamed to post the well-known, "Mods on Crack!" rant. Explain, rationally, and not as yourself why you agree with the original post, and why it's a fair point.

How do I crapflood?
A crapflood is an (intentionally) content-free post. Here are some suggestions for the source of your crapflood -- remember to take care with repetition, odd characters, or repetition, to get past the lameness filter:

  1. your local dictionary file, e.g. /usr/share/dict/words on BSDs
  2. your local real names file, e.g. /usr/share/dict/propernames on BSDs
  3. a copy-paste part of a web page (for extra amusement, copy-paste from Slashdot itself)
  4. a UU-encoded newsgroup file
  5. some output from a lorem ipsum generator
  6. examples of your latest spams, particularly those in Korean
  7. allowing your cat to walk across the keyboard for a few minutes.

How do I widen pages?
A method is known and delivered to us by the beautiful Klerck which currently works in Internet Explorer alone. This will therefore ruin the browsing experience of by far the majority of Slashdot readers. Start with the text:

http://www.eveeieyhfgfcdoosammgwsnboivvbsczxlzgabc /

then repeat /ooieiabdcdjsvbkeldfogjhiyeeejkagclmieooionoepdk /

several times, remembering to avoid the compression filter trap by using different random characters.

How do I karma whore?
"Karma whoring" is the practice of gaining moderation points for their own sake. It is particularly useful in techniques for defeating the moderation system. Some tips for karma whoring are:

  1. If the site containing the actual article is not on a fast server (i.e. is not a "big site"), re-post the article with subject, "the article -- in case the site gets slashdotted". Make sure this comes as early as possible in the list of comments, to avoid the dreaded (-1, Redundant).
  2. If any article pops up on Microsoft, write a stock two paragraphs explaining why Microsoft is immoral, and why the event described cannot happen with Free Software. I shall not supply text, because tests have shown that moderators are not completely stupid, and can identify duplicate posts (this is actually helpful in defeating the moderation system, see below).
  3. For any article discussing a particular company, state that you worked there, and offer your "inside knowledge". Note that geeks do visit Slashdot, so do not fall into the trap of being too obvious a fraud -- a mistake made by such amateur trolls as PhysicsGenius, who must now suffer a life of instant down-modding.

How do I defeat the moderation system?
The moderation system is far from flawless. Here are some ways to devalue it:

  1. If you have moderator points, for goodness sake abuse them! How about moderating up a First Post, a crapflood, or best of all, this very FAQ? It would be a crime to allow such an easily abused system to work.
  2. Copy the text of another person's post, and paste it as a reply to an earlier post. Most people read oldest messages first, so they will consider yours to be the first message, and the later message to be "redundant". This is great for annoying karma whores.
  3. Vote Troll posts as "underrated", thus increasing their exposure without running the risk of having your moderation rights revoked.

How do I defeat authentication?
Don't. The FBI will arrest you for being a terrorist. Instead, make an authoritative nick like CmdrTaco (editor). The majority of people are easily fooled, and will be likely to take notice of and respond to your post, and even moderate it up. Think of it like Lunix Turvalds walking into the room -- people listen to what he has to say, and don't dare disagree.

How do I defeat the goatse link early warning system?
Simple -- use one of the many foolishly implemented redirector URLs hosted on well-known sites. Here's an innocuous recent example which pretends to link to the highly informative about.com, but in fact links to a site of the popular 90's lesbian band The Spice Girls: Informative link which will get me karma [about.com]

What are some excellent sites to sneakily link to?
Mostly, you should link to gay porn. If you are reading this FAQ, you already know the URLs, so I don't need to supply them, except to say that it's almost an initiation ceremony in Slashdot trolling to link to goatse [goatse.cx].

Administrativa

How do I justify the existence of this FAQ?
Slashdot is full of people who support unlicensed weapons ownership and dissemination of bomb creation documents -- in short, they support freedom, even when that freedom could cause harm. This document should be considered as that very freedom in action. Indeed, to disparage or moderate down this document would be un-American, and the FBI are likely to arrest you for being a terrorist.

How do I add to or change this FAQ?
Simply re-post the FAQ on Slashdot, adding an appropriate question, and incrementing the version number by 1. Before doing so, please try to ensure you have the latest version, and remember to keep this post W3C compliant!

How else can I help with the Troll and Crapflooding Cause?
Moderate this post up, re-post it, put it in your journal, and upload it on your website. Thanks!

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