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Personal Finance Software for Unix?

Cliff posted more than 12 years ago | from the free-the-quickening dept.

Linux 322

pstreck asks: "I'm trying to find the best personal finance software for Unix. I've been using Quicken for a while, but unfortuantlly it won't run under Wine. I've tried gnucash but it just isn't up to par with what Quicken offers. What do you guys use?" While the free software versions may not quite be up to par with the current commercial offerings, it won't always be the case. The turning point can start now, of course. What finance software are you using now, what features do you like and what features do you think these software packages need?

cancel ×

322 comments

A pencil... (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3545824)

a piece of paper, and my trusty TI-89. Do you really need anything more?

Re:A pencil... (-1)

stallo (575157) | more than 12 years ago | (#3545838)

and a hp30s after my university banned the ti89

The superior linux finance application. (0, Informative)

NoMoreNicksLeft (516230) | more than 12 years ago | (#3545825)

sc.

Re:The superior linux finance application. (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3545836)

sc?

Re:The superior linux finance application. (3, Informative)

ikitat (176075) | more than 12 years ago | (#3545855)

sc is a older curses based spreadsheet program for unix.

Re:The superior linux finance application. (2)

Space cowboy (13680) | more than 12 years ago | (#3545842)

Funny, I was about to moderate you down for just posting a blatant advert as a "response" when I remembered 'sc' was a spreadsheet program...

Simon

Re:The superior linux finance application. (2)

NoMoreNicksLeft (516230) | more than 12 years ago | (#3545931)

Now I'm confused... what else would it be? Quicken, MS Money... I just can't think of any commercial crap that has those initials. Fill me in?

Re:The superior linux finance application. (2)

Space cowboy (13680) | more than 12 years ago | (#3545968)

Your initials?

The point was that it was hard to tell what you were saying - a couple of blank lines before the ad would probably help...

Simon

Re:The superior linux finance application. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3546023)

You stupid shit. It's moderators like you that make slashdot a crappy place, asshole.

Re:The superior linux finance application. (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3545884)

Stop fucking spamming, fuckwit.
This is your final warning, you gonna-be wanna-be pussy-eatin' cock-suckin' pranksta.

Re:The superior linux finance application. (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3545888)

read the posts above... i think you'll see your own stupidity then

Not applicable to /. (4, Funny)

ColGraff (454761) | more than 12 years ago | (#3545837)

"What finance software are you using now?"

Doesn't this question assume that we have money? Considering the huge numbers of high school and college students on slashdot, that seems like an unfounded assumption.

That said, I currently use a free-as-in-beer napkin, which I scrawl down my balance on periodically.

Re:Not applicable to /. (2, Insightful)

brondsem (553348) | more than 12 years ago | (#3545922)

Doesn't this question assume that we have money? Considering the huge numbers of high school and college students on slashdot, that seems like an unfounded assumption.
The amount of money is irrelevant. I'm a college student and I have a part-time job, tuition payments, an investment fund, a bank account, car insurance payments and taxes to keep track of.

Re:Not applicable to /. (5, Insightful)

bwatt (539551) | more than 12 years ago | (#3545928)

Er, I might point out that it is when you don't have buckets of cash, that you should be most concerned with tracking how much you have and what you spend it on...

[Gak! That sounds highly responsible, no?]

Re:Not applicable to /. (1)

hansroy (575558) | more than 12 years ago | (#3546020)

I use it to track my credit card debt. Which every red-blooded American college student should have piles of. Or at least student loans.

online banking (1, Interesting)

gnudutch (235983) | more than 12 years ago | (#3545841)

Would somebody please cleanly reverse engineer Quicken's online banking??? Bank of America's online banking is Quicken based, instead of the more logical choice secure html.

Re:online banking (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3545902)

what are you talking about? I use BofA online all the time. Plain old https. ...

Re:online banking (1)

gnudutch (235983) | more than 12 years ago | (#3545981)

AC: I'm in Oregon.
JDeFontes: real cute

I want (5, Insightful)

finkployd (12902) | more than 12 years ago | (#3545846)

I want the ability to link up to my bank, credit card companies, morgage companies, retirement fund, etc. and download the latest data like I can with Quicken. This is the only reason I keep windows (and quicken) around, and it is hard to live without once you get used to it. Gnucash is quite nice, but until it can do that, it is ultimatly not much more than a spreadsheet all set up for financial data.

Unfortunatly, there isn't a simple programming solution for this, it requires partnerships with all of these financial institutions. That is something I imagine would be difficult for an open source project.

Finkployd

Re:I want (5, Informative)

g4dget (579145) | more than 12 years ago | (#3545867)

The protocol is open and standardized now: OFX [ofx.net] (link down right now). It's based on XML. In theory, it should not require relations between the software vendor and the bank; the end user should be able to get all the necessary information. Reality may be different, however.

Re:I want (2, Interesting)

HawkinsD (267367) | more than 12 years ago | (#3545903)

An open-source version of Quicken or MS Money might address something that I hate about both of them: the constant advertising. It's annoying to be "warned" by MS Money: "Warning! You haven't registered to receive free money-saving offers!" "Click here to save on life insurance!"

I'd feel better if I were running a bootleg copy. But I stupidly paid retail for it.

Re:I want (0)

jmd (14060) | more than 12 years ago | (#3545988)

I agree. I started using gnucash and decided I spent too much time entering data into the computer. I had already done so in my checkbook as I wrote the check the first time. If you need to have charts and such, reenter data quaterly in a spreadsheet program and view from there.

Re:I want (2, Interesting)

gosand (234100) | more than 12 years ago | (#3546001)

I use GnuCash, and it has the ability to import QIF files (Quicken). I don't use it, so I can't comment on how well it works.

But it sounds to me like you are looking for a convenience. If the only reason you aren't using GnuCash is because you can't directly link to all those sources (401k, bank, CC), then it would seem that you are just a little lazy. Can't you just manually enter it? Yeah, I know, computers make things easier, and once you get used to them (lazy) then it is harder to do things for yourself. But I suppose that is why Windows is so popular.

Re:I want (2, Redundant)

finkployd (12902) | more than 12 years ago | (#3546072)

If the only reason you aren't using GnuCash is because you can't directly link to all those sources (401k, bank, CC), then it would seem that you are just a little lazy. Can't you just manually enter it?

Why use GnuCash at all? Why not just manually write down your finances in in your checkbook and do the math in your head? This is exactly the type of thing that Quicken is good for, eliminating worthless "grunt work" like manually entering numbers.

Yeah, I know, computers make things easier, and once you get used to them (lazy) then it is harder to do things for yourself.

I have no fear that I will someday forget how to manually enter numbers into a computer.
You use GnuCash, I use Quicken. Both of us use a computer to do our math and bookeeping for us, the only difference is I don't have to type it in. I completly fail to see the point of your arguement unless you are against both GnuCash and Quicken...

Finkployd

I hate it when I forget to close an html tag (5, Informative)

finkployd (12902) | more than 12 years ago | (#3546083)

If the only reason you aren't using GnuCash is because you can't directly link to all those sources (401k, bank, CC), then it would seem that you are just a little lazy. Can't you just manually enter it?

Why use GnuCash at all? Why not just manually write down your finances in in your checkbook and do the math in your head? This is exactly the type of thing that Quicken is good for, eliminating worthless "grunt work" like manually entering numbers.

Yeah, I know, computers make things easier, and once you get used to them (lazy) then it is harder to do things for yourself.

I have no fear that I will someday forget how to manually enter numbers into a computer.
You use GnuCash, I use Quicken. Both of us use a computer to do our math and bookeeping for us, the only difference is I don't have to type it in. I completly fail to see the point of your arguement unless you are against both GnuCash and Quicken...

Finkployd

Check out MoneyDance (5, Interesting)

jockm (233372) | more than 12 years ago | (#3545847)

I use MoneyDance [moneydance.com] . It's Java based, so it runs on Linux, Win32, MacOS X, etc...

Re:Check out MoneyDance (1)

cwills (200262) | more than 12 years ago | (#3545907)

I'll second Moneydance

I've found it to be fairly easy to use. It does what I want it to do.

write it in Perl you whiny faggot (-1)

Proctal Relapse (467579) | more than 12 years ago | (#3545850)

don't Ask Slashdot unless you're willing to take the stupidest route to your goal. fucking idiot.

GNUCash (-1, Redundant)

peterprior (319967) | more than 12 years ago | (#3545851)

I've heard good things about GNUcash and it seems quite popular.

See GNUCash.org [gnucash.org] for more info.

read it (1)

dollargonzo (519030) | more than 12 years ago | (#3545863)

perhaps you didn't read what the user was asking...he said that "gnucash just wasn't up to par."

QED

Re:read it (1)

peterprior (319967) | more than 12 years ago | (#3545872)

Bugger - brain skipped that bit :|

*sigh*.. revision is killing me....

Re:GNUCash (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3545871)

Didn't even read the summary, did you? Pretty sad.

generally... (2, Interesting)

dollargonzo (519030) | more than 12 years ago | (#3545856)

most people and businesses are using finance applications where a simple paper record or a digital one would MORE than suffice. you have a number of records, they are stored, once every year / quarter or whenever u do your finances you tally them up, and sit down for a day or so and calculate everything. the thing about finance applications is that in general, it takes more time for people to USE them then to just do it by hand. people have forgotten how to do simple maths :-(

now not only do they not know how to use a pencil and paper, they cant even use a CALCULATOR! they need special software to do EVERYTHING for them

QED

Re:generally... (3, Interesting)

danheskett (178529) | more than 12 years ago | (#3545972)

Yeah, thats great until you want to do analysis of how the best way to spend your money is, for example.

I know many people who do some very sophisticated tracking of how well their (limited) amounts of mone yare working for them, going as far to anaylze which debt should be accelerated, decelerated, consolidated, etc. It may seem basic on the surface, but in fact, alot of it you and I (non-trained accountants) would miss at first glance. One friend is specific showed me specifically how he save like $1200 in like six months just by adjusting the way he pays his bills.

Sure, if you have one checking account or something you can probably just take an excel spreadsheet and make some enteries (thats what the first version of Quicken really were anyways).

Throw in a few bank accounts, a few credit accounts, an IRA or 401k, some investments maybe, automated banking, etc and that $30 piece of software doesn't seem like such a waste.

Re:generally... (1)

drinkypoo (153816) | more than 12 years ago | (#3546122)

One friend is specific showed me specifically how he save like $1200 in like six months just by adjusting the way he pays his bills.

Let me guess, he puts all the bills on a lazy susan and spins it, and whichever bills stay on get paid?

Personal Finance Tools == Tools of Terror (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3545860)

It's no wonder the submitter posits the question, "Are there any personal finance tools for Linux" -- he's obviously involved in fundraising efforts for terrorist organizations like Al Qaeda. He mungs his e-mail address (got something to hide ``pstreck''), uses Linux (free downloadable from the 'net, no audit trail or software license with personal contact information).

I urge the Right Honourable President George Washington Bush to pass a bill outlawing the use of Linux as tools of terror.

Thank you for your support.

Re:Personal Finance Tools == Tools of Terror (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3545960)

Are you saying that all people who use linux are affiliated with al qaeda? And Pres. Bush's middle name is not washington, it is walker.

Personally I have to disagree with the majority of you. I like GNUcash. Its good enough to keep track of my simple finances.

GnuCash (1)

peripatetic_bum (211859) | more than 12 years ago | (#3545862)

Once I moved over to linux I missed Quicken but then I found GnuCash which is very easy to use but also has a very different view on how to track money. GnuCash tracks money the way businesses track money. It is always a matter of where money came from and goes to. It makes you think about where your money is going.

I cant recommened it enought, check it out at
www.gnucash.org

In short, you can use it from home checking to runing your office, which is what I do!

Re:GnuCash (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3545889)

>but also has a very different view on how to
>track money. GnuCash tracks money the way
>businesses track money. It is always a matter of
>where money came from and goes to. It makes you
>think about where your money is going.

Golly, I wonder if that's because Quicken isn't business software.

If you want to use a Quick[something] product for a business, use Quickbooks. That's what it's there for.

Re:GnuCash (2)

Locutus (9039) | more than 12 years ago | (#3546103)

If you want to use a Quick[something] product for a business, use Quickbooks. That's what it's there for.


But they won't port to Linux and it supposedly doesn't run under Wine....

LoB

Try Kapital (4, Informative)

motorsabbath (243336) | more than 12 years ago | (#3545865)

Try kapital:

http://www.thekompany.com/products/kapital

My girfriend loves it, I prefer a good spreadsheet (Applix)...

JB

Microsoft Money (1, Funny)

dashjosh (134999) | more than 12 years ago | (#3545869)

\\:^)

Seriously though, Quicken is one of the oldest and most mature consumer software products available. It will be a long time before anything comparable is available on Linux.

*Grumble* (5, Informative)

jsse (254124) | more than 12 years ago | (#3545877)

Do you really care to do a little research, before Ask:Slashdot?!

The main page of Christopher Browne's "Finances, Linux, and Stuff" is here! [hex.net]

Click to that little "2. Linux-based Financial Software" you can find what you need.

*grumble*

Re:*Grumble* (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3545921)

This is a recurring theme on Ask Slashdot - people who don't take the .01 second to do a simple google search! [google.com] begging for answers to their questions. Can we have a pulldown menu that has a stock "RTFM" response?!

Sql-Ledger (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3545878)

Not everyone wants a double-entry system, but as I do I'm using SQL-Ledger [sql-ledger.com] . Perl + PostgreSQL + Apache.

Dirty commies! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3545879)

Use Quicken you hippies!

Well now (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3545881)

While the free software versions may not quite be up to par with the current commercial offerings, it won't always be the case.

I've heard this for years. Is there a projected date by which Open Source will beat commercial software?

Re:Well now (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3545935)

You know, I couldn't agree with you more. The fact of the matter is that no matter how much people wish it weren't true, a person will always try harder for a goal if they know they'll be rewarded in some way for it. I say, "Hurray for the Free Market and Capitalism!" It's what keeps this country running people. Take an econ class or move to China.

Well, personally... (4, Funny)

vkg (158234) | more than 12 years ago | (#3545883)

I recon you can't beat MySQL and Perl for all of your financial needs :-)

Re:Well, personally... (2)

joib (70841) | more than 12 years ago | (#3545971)

In fact I can. With PostgreSQL and python.

*Dons asbestos kit*

;-)

In an unrelated note, I think gnucash 1.6.x has support for MySQL and PostgreSQL, in case flat files don't cut it.

Re:Well, personally... (2)

vkg (158234) | more than 12 years ago | (#3546004)



Ha!!! Postgres is TOO SLOW to compute my AWESOME WEALTH!

Python? The CONSTANT INSERTION OF "L" BEHIND MY DOLLARS OFFENDS!

Fie!

Re:Well, personally... (2)

rtaylor (70602) | more than 12 years ago | (#3546022)

Slow maybe (then again -- maybe not), but it'll guarentee that you don't lose track of your funds when making transfers from one account to another asumming you use it right ;)

Re:Well, personally... (2)

liquidsin (398151) | more than 12 years ago | (#3546031)

If he can't figure out his finances without software, what makes you think he could figure out perl?

Re:Well, personally... (1)

Snarf (109692) | more than 12 years ago | (#3546075)

If you've got a set of tools that might help here, my not make them available?

Re:Well, personally... (1)

WWWWolf (2428) | more than 12 years ago | (#3546105)

Yes, I suppose, but I guess a "build your own damn money-handling application" isn't an option for most end-users.

(Besides, Perl is all good and well, but I wouldn't trust my money on MySQL. PostgreSQL, maybe, but not MySQL... =)

It would really help... (2, Interesting)

xonker (29382) | more than 12 years ago | (#3545885)

if you would have specified what it is that Gnucash won't do that Quicken does. "Isn't up to par..." doesn't really cut it. I've used Gnucash a little bit, and it seems to have everything that I would want - but my personal finances aren't so complicated that I can't manage them in my check register and savings book. I'm not really disciplined enough to enter every little thing into Gnucash often enough to make it worthwhile. My personal theory of finance is to earn way more money than I spend and always have enough in the bank to cover purchases, and not to have to rely on credit cards.

If there are specific features you're looking for, you should have mentioned them. Right now this is just another in a series of useless "Ask Slashdot" questions that indicate the poster didn't do any footwork on their own or even think very hard about the question.

Do you really need it? (2)

Trekologer (86619) | more than 12 years ago | (#3545886)

I tried Quicken and thought that it was a little overkill for what I wanted to use it for. I only need to keep a register of what my account ballances are and want to be able to quickly and easily look up how much money I have and enter new transactions with the same ease. So, I ditched the personal finance software and fired up my favorite spreadsheet application. All I needed to do was to set up the worksheet so that the first collumn was the check number, the second was the date, the third the payee, the fourth the amount of the transaction, and the fifth my ending balance. The balance is taken from adding (or subtracting) the amount of the transaction from the ending balance of the line from above. Very simple and I don't need to wade through the excess features that I don't want or need.

Personal finance software brings several tool together into one package. But most of those you can easily recreate with other software.

I use moneyplex for quite a while now. (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3545894)

http://www.matrica.de/

I don't do big things with it. :)
Just online banking, but I think it is quite nice.
But it costs a bit of money and is not open source... :-(

Re:I use moneyplex for quite a while now. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3546085)

Is this in English anywhere?

Ask Quicken (-1, Troll)

WildBeast (189336) | more than 12 years ago | (#3545896)

Just ask Quicken to produce an Open Source version of there products or a Linux compatible version. Yes, it is that easy, all you have to do is ask.

Re:Ask Quicken (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3545923)

I did ask Quicken. Their response, "Not in the near future will we be creating a Linux version."

Reverse engineer? why? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3545904)

We already have the capability to import Quicken data in BeOS. Go look it up and you might just find the specs you need to grab thast data to import it.

Online tax filing.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3545906)

I'm sure there is one available.. so I'll go looking again.. anyone have a linux program that will file your taxes electronically like Turbotax or whatever? a lil late this year for it.. but plenty of time for next year.

Checkfree for dos? (2)

thogard (43403) | more than 12 years ago | (#3545910)

I've been using ChecFree's old DOS program under dosemu for a number of years. Its even is happy calling the old compuserve data network to transfer payments.

I've been using the program since about '92 or so and its quite happy except for a few stupid questions about thinking the date is set very far ahead and a few y2k sorting bugs.

I looked into the data format of the file and it looks very easy so if someone is looking at writing a program that talks to chcekfree, I might be able to dig up the code that decodes their packets. They build a small file and then xmodem it off to some connecion on the old CIS network so its not big on security but at least it works unlike my banks payment system (which uses some new shiny interface to the same backend and might just use the same CIS interface)

Kapital (5, Informative)

Michael Wardle (50363) | more than 12 years ago | (#3545912)

I asked myself the same question only a few weeks ago. I came to the conclusion that Kapital [thekompany.com] from theKompany [thekompany.com] was the best option. You'll probably need KDE and Linux or FreeBSD to run it.

Somewhat ironically, I'm using GnuCash [gnucash.org] until I can afford to buy it. :-/

Both Kapital and GnuCash claim to be able to import Quicken data files, which is a very handy feature.

Kapital is reviewed here [linuxplanet.com] .

Freshmeat also has a brief review [freshmeat.net] that compares many Linux/Unix financial products.

If none of these seems sufficient, maybe Quicken runs under WINE. Has anybody tried doing so?

Re:Kapital (4, Informative)

Dr. Cam (20341) | more than 12 years ago | (#3545967)

Quicken is reported to run _very well_ under Wine. I cannot verify this myself, as I switched to Gnucash. It lacks a little bit of the functionality of Quicken, but it offers a good deal more.

Because my wife and I have some real estate investments, and she runs a sole proprietorship, we need to make use of a "real" financial package. Quicken's use of single-entry bookkeeping used to drive me nuts at times, because some things were very complicated to set up. Gnucash is a true double-entry system.

As for getting your bank statements, unless the bank is using the newer Quicken format, downloading is trivially easy. Quicken developed the QIF format, and this is used still by a large number of financial institutions. Gnucash will sort out the duplications for you, and allow you to classify entries it cannot identify.

I won't go back.

Mod this up (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3546047)

somebody would mod this up.

Re:Kapital (1, Informative)

Damek (515688) | more than 12 years ago | (#3546005)

This is really the only weak link in the chain of software for Linux. Personal Finance is one of the main reasons for your average home user to own a computer. Without a good, comprehensive personal finance software package, no one who has no other interest in computers (i.e., most average home users) will care to use Linux.

Kapital seems like the best bet to me. It's Linux-native, open source, though it's not free as in beer, and it looks nice. GnuCash is ugly. These things matter.

Moneydance is also a good bet, though it's not open source. But most people don't really care about that, even if they should.

Still, they both need to beef up on the features, especially Kapital. Sometimes I wonder if Linux developers ever use competing products. The people who write Kapital need to study Quicken and see what they do right.

The best features of Quicken, for me and my acquaintances, are the budgeting and scheduling features. Quicken used to schedule payments in an archaic, counter-intuitive "calendar," but now, at least in Quicken 2002, you can have on the front screen a simple summary of your scheduled payments. It shows you what bills you have upcoming, and really helps in planning.

All I really need is a register interface for entering my transactions, just like Quicken, a budgeting system like the latest Quicken, and an easy way to schedule payments and list my upcoming payments on the startup screen. The first and last are most important; the budgeting features are secondary.

Re:Kapital (1)

wisemat (561791) | more than 12 years ago | (#3546080)

Apparantly, Quicken runs well under wine, but does anyone know if they are thinking about making a *nix native version of Quicken anytime soon?

Re:Kapital (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3546111)

"I've been using Quicken for a while, but unfortuantlly it won't run under Wine."

Applications? (2)

saintlupus (227599) | more than 12 years ago | (#3545926)

What do you guys use?

A Pilot fine point pen and my checkbook.

Hah! Finally being poor is advantageous and saves me hassle!

--saint

Quicken (5, Informative)

JDeFontes (134194) | more than 12 years ago | (#3545932)

Quicken 2002 on OS X. *wink*

But seriously...

I used to work for Intuit, and at one time there was an initiative to do an online version of Quicken. Some of that work seems to have shown up in their My Finances [quicken.com] offering:

"Track checking, savings and cash accounts here. You can download balances from your financial institution..."

GnuCash with Yahoo Billpay (1)

bushda (460996) | more than 12 years ago | (#3545945)

I was holding onto Windows because I used CheckFree's client. Well Yahoo offers the same service for half the price through a web interface, and here's the kicker - it's in cooperation with CheckFree!

No, I can't make direct payments using GnuCash but all I'm looking for is an electronic check register. I have no need for all the bells & whistles of Quicken.

If I wasn't too lazy to keep it up, I'd probably just use Gnumeric.:)

CBB (1)

foobrain (411652) | more than 12 years ago | (#3545948)

I've been using CBB for a while now. It's small, run on Linux and MacOS, and mature enough to suit my little needs. Check cbb.sf.net [sf.net] .

I just guess. (2)

desierto (568467) | more than 12 years ago | (#3545952)

And when the debt collectors call I say I'm not in but I will take a message. My suggestion for the pman is that he make a healthy contribution to the GNUCASH project, this will both simplify his financial situation and encourage improvements to the source code.

Quicken runs on UNIX (1)

Alexander (8916) | more than 12 years ago | (#3545956)

Are you more interested in the platform or the applications? You've mentioned UNIX (not Linux), but also WINE. This would suggest an uncommon desktop environment, one with less than the small fraction of a % that even Linux owns. It would be difficult to imagine that you could find financial apps for your working environment.

However, there are now several fine commercial financial applications that run on BSD UNIX via OS X. Quicken and MYOB accounting are two that I've used.

I'm sure that switching platforms now just for the application mentioned is not a particularly viable option, but if you aren't opposed to using commercial apps and want UNIX, you may consider looking into OS X at some point in the future.

Re:Quicken runs on UNIX (1)

Trevin (570491) | more than 12 years ago | (#3546029)

I'm sure that switching platforms now just for the application mentioned is not a particularly viable option, but if you aren't opposed to using commercial apps and want UNIX, you may consider looking into OS X at some point in the future.

OK, so when will OS X get ported to the x86? (That includes Cocoa and Aqua, not just Darwin.) That's something I'd like to try myself, but I can't afford (nor do I have extra space for) new hardware at this time.

not surprising (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3545957)

most linux software is not up to par with what Windows offers.. Answer: use windows

Re:not surprising (1)

Glanz (306204) | more than 12 years ago | (#3545989)

....great idea!!!!!!!! I would have never thought of that. BTW, what's Windows?

Linux PF (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3545959)

Here is a link to some great Linux packages, among them a great personal finance tool: Software Packages for Linux [goatse.cx]

Use Crossover Office (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3545962)

Though not officially supported, Quicken 2001/02 will run on Crossover Office. At least, I'm able to run it. YMMV.

An open source alternative would be better. But this at leasts saves you the reboot...

MS Money (1, Interesting)

Ahotasu (206241) | more than 12 years ago | (#3545980)

Personally, and I know I'll probably get flamed to hell and back, I use Microsoft Money and find it workes quite well for managing my many investments, mortgage, 401K, and my checking account. I've never used Quicken, but I bet the two are comparable in features if not in performance or asthetics. I also have never tried wine (sounds like a lot of hassle, plus I dual-boot with Win2K), and thus have never tried Money under wine.

When I first tried GnuCash, I found it was able to do the majority of the things I do in Money, though not necessarially quite as user-friendly. Two major things that I found I was unable to do in GnuCash, however, were internet updates for my various investments (Mutual Funds, 401K, etc). I also tend to use a lot of the reports and graphing features in Money. GnuCash's capabilities in this respect were limited.

One thing that Money doesn't do, though, which I find to be a pain and would like GnuCash to be able to do is updating the prices (value) of US Savings Bonds using interest rate info from the 'Net.

And, just because I'm just in a flame-fishing mood today, I have to say that I tend to be very resistant to moving to a new program in general. Moving to a new program and losing any functionality (that I use at all) is not going to happen. Moving to a new program whose asthetics are (IMHO) much less pleasing and whose functionality is less is definitely not going to happen. UNLESS, that is, the new program has some additional functionality which weighs in more heavily, of course.

Just my $0.02...

Quicken under Linux (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3545982)

I've been using quicken 4 via wine for quite some time without any problems.

The real problem is that I can't get programs such a turbotax running under wine. My solution was to run quicken under vmware. This allows me the flexibility to keep my linux box running 24/7 and still run the latest version of quicken/turbotax, etc without the need to dual boot.

It's not an open source solution but it is a fully workable one.

Quicken on Unix (2)

smack.addict (116174) | more than 12 years ago | (#3545992)

I run Quicken on Unix. I use Mac OS X.

Re:Quicken on Unix (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3546037)

Is it native? If it's running under Classic, it doesn't count :).

OOPS!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3545995)

Uh oh. I shit my diapers...

Can I get someone here to change them for me?

What a lamer. Can't do a simple search.

my 'must have' feature (4, Interesting)

slide-rule (153968) | more than 12 years ago | (#3546000)

I have actually poked at each release of GnuCash, but consistently it lacks one feature that I am rather addicted to: scheduling income and expenses, and combining this into a budget forecast for the next N months. With something like this, correctly setup, I not only know how much money I have an any account *right now*, but I will have a reasonable ball-park figure for how much money I will have in three months, six months, etc. A nifty line-plot is handy to see where, when, and how bad the next "low point" is going to be, and as necessary I can adjust funds to deal with it gracefully before it has a chance to bite my sorry a$$. Very useful planning tool that, now, I cannot do without. This is the one single feature keeping a '98 partition hanging around my house.

Now, I'm not too bad writing bits of code and what-not (it's a tangential part of my day job), and I appreciate that, to some extent, linux money applications can be scripted and stuff; maybe I could roll my own forecaster this way, but I really don't want to feel like I need to kludge together such a relatively 'big' feature when I don't have the time and interest after getting home. (Maybe it's just me, and, yes, I'm a bit lazy once I'm off the clock. ;)

I probably haven't looked into all possible alternatives for a linux-based financial program, but so far I haven't noticed one that really handles this.

Re:my 'must have' feature (1)

mtgstuber (457457) | more than 12 years ago | (#3546094)

This feature is under active development right now. There are several GNUCash developers using it in the 1.7 (development) release. Look for it in GNUCash 1.8.

Moneydance (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3546002)

Written in Java - the data files are the same on any platform - Use JDK 1.4 for your Java - http://www.moneydance.com The cost is minimal ($25 or so).

- David

GnuCash (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3546014)

I would love to switch from Quicken, but when I tried to move to GnuCash last year I had two problems. First, exporting from Quicken and importing to GnuCash resulted in the need to do a bunch of manual edits, and I wasn't confident that I had found all of them. Second, after a week or two of use, GnuCash crashed and corrupted my data file. That's twice that I ran the risk of losing data, and I can't really afford that.


Now GnuCash may have since improved, but it is expensive for me to try it again (effort and chance of losing data) so I will wait another while.

Quicken runs fine on my Unix system... (1)

shawnce (146129) | more than 12 years ago | (#3546017)

I have Quicken running just fine on my Mac OS X system. I guess the title should be "Personal Finance Software for Unix*? (*not including Mac OS X)". ;-)

Anyway, google found these...

Good summary page...
http://vip.hex.net/~cbbrowne/finances.html [hex.net]

Various packages...
http://www.moneydance.com/ [moneydance.com]
http://cbb.sourceforge.net/ [sourceforge.net]
http://www.thekompany.com/products/kapital/ [thekompany.com]

Best personal finance software... (2)

rtaylor (70602) | more than 12 years ago | (#3546030)

is what the bank typically gives you at the end of each month. Thats right. I use my credit card for almost everything.

When tax time, submissions for refunds from my employer, etc. come around I simply photocopy my statement, black out the lines they shouldn't see. For the truely paranoid photocopy it again (so you can read through the page).

The only item that doesn't appear on that statement is rent. But if I could, I'd do that too.

Oracle Small Business Suite Works Well (2, Informative)

thrice (253465) | more than 12 years ago | (#3546049)

Oracle Small Business Suite, powered by NetLedger, works well from Linux based browsers.

They provide a complete small business package which includes accounting, sfa, cms, employee expenses, time and billing, scheduling and clandars, online file cabinets, payroll, online bill payment, web store/site, and customer care features in their product.

See them @ Oracle Small Business Suite [oraclesmallbusiness.com]

Re:Oracle Small Business Suite Works Well (1)

thrice (253465) | more than 12 years ago | (#3546065)

Forgot to include this, you can try it free for 14 days [oraclesmallbusiness.com] .

Give KMyMoney2 a try (2, Informative)

EconomyGuy (179008) | more than 12 years ago | (#3546078)

I found this a couple of weeks ago in the Debian package archives. If your not running Debian, it can be downloaded from sourceforge [sourceforge.net] . Overall the program is looking to be real solid. Its still in development in a lot of ways, but from my brief experiements, it looks like it has lots of nifty features and a very good ledger system.

Why I don't like Quicken (5, Insightful)

vegetablespork (575101) | more than 12 years ago | (#3546082)

Even if Intuit released a version of Quicken for Linux today, I wouldn't use it.

Strike 1: Intuit charges me for the software--then has the audacity to attempt to force me to give up personal information to use it (astalavista.box.sk to the rescue again).

Strike 2: Intuit spams me with sales pitches based on information entered into the program. I already paid once, thank you.

Strike 3: Using the online services requires me to go through Intuit as an intermediary, rather than keeping the relationship only between me and my financial institution. Given their proven propensity to bother me with ads, I don't exactly trust them with my financial details.

Yer out!

My advice - avoid these programs in general (3, Insightful)

Ars-Fartsica (166957) | more than 12 years ago | (#3546099)

On a somewhat related note, I have found that most people who purchase these programs want to decrease expenditures, feeling that if they organize their expenses, they will reduce them.

In general I have found this not to be the case. If you simply want a category breakdown, your credit card should already provide it - mine does. Otherwise, a simple check of your accounts once a week should give you a simple idea of how your spending is going.

Simply put, the only way to reduce expenditures is to not buy things. Also, watch for monthly fees you start incurring for this service or that - these monthly fees constitute a huge drain on most people's cash, and our economy is moving more and more to a rental model where it will be hugely important to control recurring service fees.

Added to which, most banks charge for the pleasure of automagically syncing Quicken with your account (although you can still manually update Quicken with a download file for free with most banks). So you could be losing money while trying to save it.

/usr/bin/bc (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#3546101)

For decades now I have used /usr/bin/bc as my personal finance software. Give it just one try and you'll never go back to GUIs again. (I'm currently using v1.06 from GNU [gnu.org] .)
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