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Linux Beta Kernel 2.5.16 Out

michael posted more than 11 years ago | from the living-on-the-edge dept.

Linux 146

dipfan writes "The latest beta version of the Linux kernel 2.5.16 is out, with some comments by Linus here, who was kept 'personally somewhat busy' by 'the interesting Intel SMP-P4 TLB corruption bug, which ends up being due to some very funky asynchronous speculative TLB fill logic'. Woo hoo. Mirrors, etc." We haven't been keeping up with the 2.5.x series, but a slow Sunday is a good excuse to catch up.

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146 comments

finally (2, Funny)

Dr Kool, PhD (173800) | more than 11 years ago | (#3546418)

Does Linux support blast processing yet??

Sega Genesis emulators on Linux (3, Interesting)

yerricde (125198) | more than 11 years ago | (#3546704)

Does Linux support blast processing yet??

"Blast Processing" is the name of the sprite engine that Sega used in Sonic 2 and Sonic 3 for Sega Genesis. Here are some Genesis emulators for UNIX and Linux systems [zophar.net] . DGen is pretty good.

Re:Sega Genesis emulators on Linux (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3546891)

or it could be a compute solution for bioinformatics research groups.

Re:finally (2)

glwtta (532858) | more than 11 years ago | (#3547130)

BLAST runs on most UNIX and UNIX-like OSes, I've been using it on linux for years (though currently most of our BLAST jobs are handled by a few Tru64 boxes.

Next slow Sunday.. (0, Offtopic)

Rob Kaper (5960) | more than 11 years ago | (#3546420)

.. I am so going to submit my childhood stories to Slashdot. :)

Re:Next slow Sunday.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3546534)

I don't even know you, and sadly, I'm looking forward to it, just so these horrible stories will stop..

Errmmm... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3546433)

Isn't this what Freshmeat [freshmeat.net] is for?

A mirror (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3546442)

Well, I dunno if the short changelog format is wonderfully readable, but [bldrdoc.gov]
at least it's small enough that I don't feel bad about mailbombing the
kernel list with it.

USB and architecture updates, IDE driver updates etc. The one that kept me
personally somewhat busy was the interesting Intel SMP-P4 TLB corruption
bug, which ends up being due to some very funky asynchronous speculative
TLB fill logic, which made the page table invalidation "exciting".

The TLB invalidate rewrite will likely have broken all other architectures
(at least performance-wise, if not in any other way), so architecture
maintainers look out!

Linus

Summary of changes from v2.5.15 to v2.5.16

o USB-UHCI-HCD

Anton Altaparmakov
o NTFS 2.0.7: minor cleanup, remove NULL struct initializers
o NTFS 2.0.7 release: pure cleanups.

Jens Axboe
o fix scsi oops on failed sg table allocation

o Include linux/slab.h not linux/malloc.h in pc300 wan driver.

Martin Dalecki
o 2.5.15 IDE 60
o 2.5.15 IDE 61
o 2.5.15 IDE 62a
o 2.5.15 IDE 63
o 2.5.15 IDE 64

o Sparc64 fixes:
o Sparc64: Delete AOFF_task_fpregs define.
o tcp_ipv4.c: Do not increment TcpAttemptFails twice.
o Sparc64: Make pcibios_init return an int.
o Ingress packet scheduler: Fix compiler error when CONFIG_NET_CLS_POLICE is disabled.
o Sparc64: Bitops take unsigned long pointer.
o Sparc64: Fix typos in bitops changes.
o Sparc64: Missing parts of previous math-emu fixes.

o -- ehci misc FIXMEs
o -- hub/tt error recovery

o Update orinoco driver to 0.11b

o 1127/1: static PCI memory mapping for ARM Integrator reduced
o 1126/1: Kernel decompression in head.S does not work for ARM 9xx architectures
o 1130/1: Remove support for prefetchable PCI memory on ARM Integrator

o zlib_inflate return code fix. Again.

o 64-bit jiffies, a better solution

o USB storage
o USB storage
o USB storage drivers
o USB storage
o usb_submit_urb fix for broken usb devices
o USB device reference counting api cleanup changes
o USB sddr55 minor to enable a MDSM-B reader
o Change to the USB core to retry failed devices on startup.
o USB Config.in and Makefile fixups
o USB - fix a compiler warning in the core code
o USB - Host controller Config.in changes

Christoph Hellwig
o IPv4 Syncookies: Remove pointless CONFIG_SYN_COOKIES ifdef.

o Change maintainer info of PC300 WAN driver.

o Fixed the handling of file name containing 0x05 on vfat

o Add full duplex support to 3c509 net driver.

Jeff Garzik
o Add new pci id to tulip net driver.
o Merge 2.4.x changes for old OSS ac97_codec driver:
o via-rhine net driver minor fixes and cleanups:
o Update MII generic phy driver to properly report link status.
o Fix phy id masking in 8139too net driver.

o uhci.c FSBR timeout
o USB device reference counting fix for uhci.c and usb core
o 2.4.19-pre8 uhci.c incorrect bit operations
o 2.4.19-pre8 uhci.c incorrect bit operations
o uhci-hcd for 2.5.15

o Fix four similar off-by-one errors in wireless net drvr core.
o IrDA update 1/3:
o IrDA update 2/3, set_bit updates:
o IrDA update 3/3:

o ISDN: maintain outstanding CAPI messages in the drivers
o Use standard AS rule.
o ISDN: AVM CAPI drivers: Common revision parsing
o ISDN: Usage count for CAPI controllers
o ISDN: Init ISA AVM CAPI drivers at module load time
o ISDN: Release AVM CAPI controllers at module unload time

o Fix oops-able situation in 3c509 net driver

Manfred Spraul
o usb-storage locking fixes

Neil Brown
o - kNFSd in 2.5.15 - Require export operations for exporting a filesystem
o - kNFSd in 2.5.15 - export_operations support for isofs
o Micro Memory battery backed RAM card driver

o [ARM 1110/1: fixes to the ARM checksum code

o cs89x0 net driver minor fixes, SH4 support, and cmd line media support

o PPC32: This changeset updates several of the powermac-specific

o tulip net driver 2114x phy init fix

o misc.c:
o Fixed race when devfs lookup()/readdir() triggers partition rescanning.
o Minor cleanup of fs/devfs/base.c:scan_dir_for_removable().

o Cosmetic cleanups, remove unused struct members from via-rhine net driver

Russell King
o [ARM] Localise old param_struct to arch/arm/kernel/compat.c.
o [ARM] Fix signedness of address comparisons, causing boots on some
o Pass a physical address from the boot loader for the location of the
o Always allow CONFIG_CMDLINE to be set or edited by the user.
o Clean up do_undefinstr - it only needs to take the pt_regs pointer
o A pile of missed kernel stack accessing functions were still using
o [ARM] Don't write to read-only registers.
o [ARM] SA1100 cleanups:
o [ARM] Couple of small fixes:
o [ARM] ADFS updates/fixes.
o 2.5.14 updates - for the new memory management pfn() macros. Also,

o clean up maximum priorities

o Hotplug CPU prep

o Prevent deadlock in JFS when flushing data during commit

o Add to list of supported 8139 net boards.

o Sparc64: Export batten_down_hatches
o Sparc: Use proper sys_{read,write} prototypes in SunOS
o drivers/video/aty/mach64_gx.c: Include sched.h

Linus Torvalds
o Fix 'export-objs' usage in Makefiles.
o Make arm default to little-endian jiffies.
o This improves on the page table TLB shootdown. Almost there.
o Fix up some more TLB shootdown issues.
o Update kernel version
o Cleanup munmap a lot. Fix Intel P4 TLB corruptions on SMP.
o Make setresuid/setresgid be more consistent wrt fsuid handling
o First cut at proper TLB shootdown for page directory entries.

o request_region janitor cleanup for rtc char driver

OpenBSD 3.1 released today... (2, Insightful)

karlm (158591) | more than 11 years ago | (#3546447)

<rant> ... and this makes the front page?

I prefer Linux myself, but a major and highly respected new *NIX distro release beats a beta kernel release and day of my 8-day week.
</rant>

MOD THIS DOWN!! (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3546469)

MOD THIS DOWN!!! MOD THIS DOWN!!!

He's not singing the praises of linux. He's not ooh and ahhing at the latest buggy release. Mod this guy down; he's obviously a subversive bsd user who lives in the real world.

Re:MOD THIS DOWN!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3547567)

-1: flaimbait

Re:OpenBSD 3.1 released today... (2, Insightful)

Mathness (145187) | more than 11 years ago | (#3546546)

I agree. Though I mostly use Linux myself, I would really like to see info/news about other OS' as well.

One of them might have exactly what I need, or could be needing in the future.

(Currently missing a galaxy and lightspeed simulator.)

Re:OpenBSD 3.1 released today... (1)

socratic method (15936) | more than 11 years ago | (#3546609)

You may already be familiar with it, but OSNews.com is a good resource for information on a variety of OSes.

Scanning the frontpage headlines now, I see stories on Microsoft, Gnome, FreeBSD, Linux, Sun, and Mac OS X. Better variety than /., anyway.

mlup

Re:OpenBSD 3.1 released today... (1)

Emil Brink (69213) | more than 11 years ago | (#3546781)

(Currently missing a galaxy and lightspeed simulator.)
Simulating lightspeed is easy, since it's a constant (don't believe it when blasphemous Slashdot articles try telling you otherwise). Just think "2,999,792,458 meters per second", and you're there. See? Thinking in c is easy, it's even easier than C.

Re:OpenBSD 3.1 released today... (2)

56ker (566853) | more than 11 years ago | (#3546550)

Depends what flavour of geek you are as to what you prefer.

Re:OpenBSD 3.1 released today... (5, Informative)

the Atomic Rabbit (200041) | more than 11 years ago | (#3546579)

Not to mentioned gcc 3.1 being released a couple of days ago, and being buried in the Developers section...

Re:OpenBSD 3.1 released today... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3546637)

Hey, something to worth knowing!!!

Anyone release any homemade (non-copywrited) CDs yet?

Re:OpenBSD 3.1 released today... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3547093)

See? This is what I hate about OpenBSD and its developers/users.. they always whine about Linux being so much more mediatized than their own OS, it all goes like 'we're such poor babies, no one notices our OS which is oh-so-much-better than mainstream Linux'

*sigh*

Re:OpenBSD 3.1 released today... (1)

karlm (158591) | more than 11 years ago | (#3547268)

See? This is what I hate about OpenBSD and its developers/users.. they always whine about Linux being so much more mediatized than their own OS, it all goes like 'we're such poor babies, no one notices our OS which is oh-so-much-better than mainstream Linux'

I've never had OpenBSD on any of my machines. I'm a Debian guy. I roll my own kernel .debs with encrypted loop and tweak my own USB keyboard driver. Yet, the 2.5 kernel probably isn't important enough to any of you to make the front page. If the kernel matters to you that much, you read kernel.org or at least read teh linux section and don't need it on the front page. Don't get me wrong, production kernel realeases or -ac kernel releases may still be front-page worthy, but unless the submitter mentions some really cool new feature, development kernel releases aren't front-page worthy.

I'm just saying that I'm quite the Debian fanboy. I just realize that unstable kernel release notices without cool feature highlights shouldn't make the front page while the OpenBSD release isn't up there. Now it's pretty much moot since they finally put up an OpenBSD story. (I would have submitted a story, but I would not have done it justice.)

Don't label me "one of those OpenBSD users/developers". I admire elegant design and good clean software. I've heard really good things about OpenBSD, but I am in no way an OpenBSD user. We'll see. Maybe I'll become an OpenBSD user sometime this week or next.

2.5.16 2.4.19 (1, Redundant)

Bobzibub (20561) | more than 11 years ago | (#3546448)

Anyone wanna start betting when the dev kernel will surpass the stable kernel?
3 versions to go....
-b

Re:2.5.16 2.4.19 (3, Informative)

Publicus (415536) | more than 11 years ago | (#3546460)

Anyone wanna start betting when the dev kernel will surpass the stable kernel? 3 versions to go....

It's really not that fantastic. 2.5 will probably go pretty high. The 2.3 kernel went to 2.3.51 before it jumped to 2.3.99 (look here [kernel.org] ).

It will be interesting how much work goes into 2.5 before 2.6.0 is released. Then we'll be able to start comparing what's new to 2.4.x. It is interesting that we're at 2.4.19 when the 2.2. kernel is at 2.2.20, IMHO.

Re:2.5.16 2.4.19 (2)

Error27 (100234) | more than 11 years ago | (#3546715)

It will be interesting how much work goes into 2.5 before 2.6.0 is released. Then we'll be able to start comparing what's new to 2.4.x.

Some people have already started: http://kernelnewbies.org/status/latest.html. [kernelnewbies.org] Some of these will probably get backported into 2.4.

Some of the big changes/additions are: block IO, JFS (IBM file system), alsa, support for 64bit amd, preemption, a new NTFS driver and ide clean ups.

Re:2.5.16 2.4.19 (1)

tymesf (231615) | more than 11 years ago | (#3546939)

2.4 is at 2.4.19 because of the VM screwup mostly. Otherwise the smaller changes probably would have been put into larger batches.

Re:2.5.16 2.4.19 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3547212)

not to mention the fact that 2.0 went as high as 38 (but the last version I ran was 36). Those were the days when everyone was compiling new windowmanagers, kernels and everyone was anxiously awaiting for a good browser to replace Nutscrape 4.72

Kernel 2.6 (4, Interesting)

i_am_nitrogen (524475) | more than 11 years ago | (#3547255)

Actually, some people believe that the 2.0 series is the most recent quality Linux kernel.. While obviously that's open for debate, there are people hard at work backporting 2.2.x and even 2.4.x subsystems to make kernel 2.0.40. which I imagine will be released some time this year.

Personally though, I can't wait until 2.6... I know someone who's working on some of the new graphics stuff in his spare time (the new graphics layer is code named "Ruby"), and there will be some sweet stuff. The DRI, framebuffer, Video4Linux, etc. systems will all be made into one unified kernel interface, which will be user friendly and capable enough to (almost) program graphics applications in bash! Imagine (device names are changed to protect the innocent ;p):
# set video format
echo "640x480x24" > /dev/gfx/camera/cam0.mode
echo "640x480x24" > /dev/gfx/video/vid0.mode

# display snapshot
cat /dev/gfx/camera/cam0.gfx > /dev/gfx/video/vid0.gfx
I mean, that's just too cool for words.

Not to mention we'll finally be able to ditch X on the desktop for the framebuffer without losing OpenGL support, and let X do what it was meant to do: thin clients and network terminals.

Re:2.5.16 2.4.19 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3546465)

I bet it'll surpass it at 2.5.20, but that's just my guess...

The 2.4 series. (0, Redundant)

saintlupus (227599) | more than 11 years ago | (#3546449)

We haven't been keeping up with the 2.5.x series, but a slow Sunday is a good excuse to catch up.

According to kernel.org, the latest version of the 2.4 stable tree is 2.4.18 - which has been out for quite a while.

I don't read the kernel mailing list. Could someone who does tell us what we have to look forward to in the 2.4 line?

--saint

Re:The 2.4 series. (1, Flamebait)

Rob Kaper (5960) | more than 11 years ago | (#3546474)

I don't read the kernel mailing list. Could someone who does tell us what we have to look forward to in the 2.4 line?

As usual with the stable series, bugfixes. No new features, just bugfixes.

Re:The 2.4 series. (1)

elvum (9344) | more than 11 years ago | (#3546501)

Plus a few backports of relatively stable stuff, like NTFS-NG (or whatever it's called...)

(NB: stable in this case does not imply that you can write to NTFS partitions without corrupting them...)

Re:The 2.4 series. (3, Informative)

tempest303 (259600) | more than 11 years ago | (#3546519)

Well, for one thing, there are a lot of IDE updates and fixes going in for 2.4.19, which is why there are so many 19-pre* releases...

And as another poster has said, a backport of the *working* NTFS-NG driver!

Re:The 2.4 series. (3, Interesting)

karlm (158591) | more than 11 years ago | (#3546523)

I would guess it's pretty much bug fixes from here on out in the 2.4 line. Sure, you'll get some more obscure drivers and such, but I don't thnik too much more exciting is going to happen. The new 2.4 kernel maintainer probably won't do anything too controversial, particularly after that VM switch Linus pulled earlier in 2.4.

The 2.5 kernel is a major rework. IIRC, they're making everything possible modules, and you'll need to make an initial ramdisk with your ide/scsi/network/fs drivers in order to boot. Any idea how stable 2.5 is now? It sounds pretty cool. I've dabbled in kernel programming and am willing to put up with 1 week uptimes as long as I'm running ext3 or XFS. I tried L4-linux, but 8-hour uptimes just hurt. Yes, I'm also playing with Debian HURD. There's lots of really cool stuff going on nowadays in the OS world.

Any idea if there are any plans to merge the international patch (crypto stuff) into 2.4 or 2.5? Encrypted loop devices and encrypted swap really should be part of the main kernel. After all, the 2.4 kernel is currently being maintained by a minor in South America, so the 2.4 kernel is pretty safe from the US govt/US courts at the moment. Hmm... DeCSS in kernel-space anyone?

Re:The 2.4 series. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3546598)

That's really fucking smart. Make it illegal for ANY US-based kernel hackers to make any changes to the source.

Hold on, Linus is US-based!

Oh well, we don't care, because HE'S not the kernel maintainer!

Re:The 2.4 series. (2, Interesting)

Error27 (100234) | more than 11 years ago | (#3546569)

You're not the first person to comment on the recent dirth of stable releases. According to the last changelog [linuxtoday.com] , Marcello has been holding off on releasing the next one because it includes some IDE changes that he wants tested. I'm not really sure what the IDE changes are... Andre Hedrick had some changes that let people use the new really large IDE harddrives, that might be the code, but I'm not sure.

Of course, people who like to take risks or who want to help test, are welcome to use the -pre patches. Right now it is up to -pre8. If you want to live on the very cutting edge, then you can download patches from this page. [kernel.org] The patches here are updated every hour for the Marcelo's bk tree.

I believe that besides the IDE changes, there are several VM tweaks.

Re:The 2.4 series. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3546999)

Well, there are a couple of reasons why he might want to pick things up a bit.

One that immediately comes to mind, that I am not sure about (maybe others can comment here), is I belive parallel port networking (plip.o) is broken in the current 2.4.18.

Re:The 2.4 series. (1)

Drache Kubisuro (469932) | more than 11 years ago | (#3546576)

If I recall correctly, in the changelog USB 2.0 support is now in 2.4.19. Not an incredible addition, but there nonetheless. So as far as I can see, nothing to jump on to when it arrives unless you have USB 2.0 and are willing to find / code associated drivers for your usb hardware...

Re:The 2.4 series. (1)

OpCode42 (253084) | more than 11 years ago | (#3546712)

Well I wish they would fix the annoying VIA bugs, or at least look into it.

Since 2.4.9 I have been unable to use certain via chipsets without "lost interrupt" filling up my dmesg, either on bootup or when ripping audio tracks.

The bugs are in 2.5 too...

Re:The 2.4 series. (2)

(H)elix1 (231155) | more than 11 years ago | (#3547241)

I'll give you one thing -- my laptop has the nvidia chipset. I need 2.4.18-4 or higher -- RedHat 7.3 ships with 2.4.18-3 -- to get something better than the generic video drivers working.

BORING (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3546463)

hey slashdot editors, YOU SUCK.

Shouldn't P4 fix have been #ifdef'ed? (2, Insightful)

drok (78225) | more than 11 years ago | (#3546468)

Ok, I may be clueless here, but given this comment from Linus:

The TLB invalidate rewrite will likely have broken all other architectures (at least performance-wise, if not in any other way), so architecture maintainers look out!

Since it sounds like this was a P4 specific issue, and a P4 specific fix, shouldn't it have been #ifdef'ed for the architecture?

-Robert

Re:Shouldn't P4 fix have been #ifdef'ed? (5, Informative)

VAXman (96870) | more than 11 years ago | (#3546495)

No, it's a Linux bug not a P4 bug. The kernel was freeing page table memory before invalidating the TLB entries, so another processor was able to modify the entries which the originating processor then picked up. It affects all architectures, but was discovered only on P4, I would guess because the processor does more aggressive speculative page walks than other architectures.

good thing I'm not... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3546475)

Good thing I'm not using Linux...could be even worst then applying patch to windows.
Huh, new kernel, gotta update my frig, mp3 player, my car on board computer, my computer, my watch, ...

Linux is a cool geeky thing but will not rule the world, sorry guys...but it's a nice atari gotta admit.

Not flamebating here...just a tought.

Re:good thing I'm not... (3, Insightful)

ajakk (29927) | more than 11 years ago | (#3546522)

Actually, you are flamebaiting a bit. One main difference between linux and windows is that the development and testing for linux is done in the open. So you can install a development or a testing kernel if you would like. Linux just gives you more options. If a kernel is working fine for what you are doing, then don't upgrade unless there is a security issue.

Please tell me how it is any worse than using Windows?

Re:good thing I'm not... (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3546566)

Have you ever thought of becoming a slashdot editor?

Re:good thing I'm not... (1)

MADCOWbeserk (515545) | more than 11 years ago | (#3546645)

Very few people upgrade their kernel with each new release. Most security problems are patchable. Custom kernels in embedded applications generally cannot be upgraded. Most often these OS's are burned on a ROM. By nature even if not read-only embedded systems are tough to hack, (they generally lack the common tools that can be exploited) so security much easier than a workstation. Windows has critical security flaws discovered almost daily. The patches and service packs have caused problems in the past.

What you don't like makes Linux. These interim kernels are what maintain Linux's amazing stability, even when massive new feature sets are added in the major kernel releases.

Re:good thing I'm not... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3546837)

Not true. Many embedded Linux devices boot from
flash (which makes the kernel upgradable). THe
fs is mounted read-only, and if you wish you can
remount them rw, or switch to a writable filesystem.
For most devices, your assumptions to your argument are not correct.

Re:good thing I'm not... (1)

CharlezManning (551849) | more than 11 years ago | (#3547390)

You're correct in saying that most embedded devices do not have the kernel burnt into ROM. Indeed I doubt if any are.

However, this does not alter the main point made here (though made in ignorance). The user can generally not upgrade an embedded kernel willy-nilly.

Re:good thing I'm not... (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3546653)

[translation provided by moronsoft(tm)]

k thanks byebye :)

you r suxors n cant spell omg omg omg u suk

wtf lik u culd even figur out how 2 switch directories in linux hahahaha

stop cuz u suk.

[end translation. flamebaiting trolls since 1989.]

aa VM patch (2)

Oxide (92607) | more than 11 years ago | (#3546477)

Anyone know why the development kernel and the stable kernel didnt adopt the VM patches which andrea did to his own VM ?

They remarkably enhance the system performance, what is holding it up ?

Re:aa VM patch (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3546507)

Whoa, Andrea wrote the VM opsystem for IBM ?
I really underestimated these dirty hippy linux hackers !

Re:aa VM patch (3, Informative)

iabervon (1971) | more than 11 years ago | (#3546587)

As far as I can tell, they haven't been applied in the development series because that series is focusing on other things like the various I/O parts. Making any changes to the VM system while the I/O layer is in flux is sure to cause problems, even if the changes are correct, because they'll change the load on it and hide some bugs and uncover different ones. Better to get I/O done first, and then change the VM. Besides, nobody really cares about the overall performance of a development kernel, except for seeing that their changes improve performance.

Re:aa VM patch (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3546590)

Just buy more memory, VM problem solved.
If you are heavily swapping that is a good indication you are low on memory.

Answer alla Microsoft (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3546868)

Ah, thats the answer. Upgrade your hardware! Spoken like a true microsurf.

Re:aa VM patch (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3547350)

The 2.5.x kernels do not have the aa VM patch yet because there are tremendous changes being made to I/O stuff as well as the IDE and SCSI layers, and any additional major VM changes (which are not required to get SCSI or IDE working) would make debugging too difficult at this point.

Parts of the aa patch have already been merged into the 2.4.19 prereleases. Most of the aa patch will have to wait for 2.4.20 however, as 2.4.19 is also receiving major IDE updates and, again, doing the rest of the aa patch at the same time would make debugging too difficult. The 2.4.19 IDE changes are arguably more important, too; not having the aa VM means lower performance, whereas the IDE updates fix data loss problems and even (in the case of newer IBM laptop hard drives) head-parking-related problems with physical damage to hard drives during powerdown.

What's new 2.5? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3546493)

Anyone know what is being added in the 2.5 kernels? I have not been following them too closely...

Re:What's new 2.5? (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3546691)

Bugs. Lot's and lot's of big freaking hairy-assed bugs. You don't want Linux. Don't even go there. Go get BSD, or better yet, WindowsME. It is well worth the money for the stability and standardization it has to offer IMHO. I know this will get modded down by some ass-sucking communist hippie (they are rampant on Slashdot) but trust me on this.

I've been running it for a day (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3546494)

works grrrreeeeat

I'm anxiously awaiting the next release already, thank god slashdot is keepeing me up-to-date and is also posting other interesting stories to make the the long wait more endurable.

Is LINUX a machination of Satan? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3546500)

Hello,

Recently I've been introduced to an operating system known as Linux.
Lured by its low cost, I replaced Windows 98 on my computer with Linux. Unfortunately the more I use it the more I fear that this "Linux" may be an insidious way for the Dark One to gain a stronger foothold here on Earth. I know this may be a shocking claim, but I have evidence to back it up!

To begin with, Linux runs numerous background processes. These processes are usettlingly termed "demons." Furthermore in order to start or stop these "demons" a user must execute a command called "finger". By "fingering" a "demon" one excercises an unholy power, much the same way that the Lord of Flies controls his black minions.

Every file or directory created on LINUX systems has some permissions. The owner of a file can assign various permissions, allowing or prohibiting access to that directory or file.

When you make a new directory in LINUX, it automatically sets '666' as the permission level. Also, if you want to browse CDs in LINUX, you have to change /dev/cdrom to '666'!

'666' in Linux means 'give myself permission, give groups permission, and give everyone permission'! I've HAD it with all this permissiveness!"

Also consider some of these other Linux commands: "sleep", "mount", "unzip", "strip" and "touch". All highly suggestive in a sexual
nature. I know that our Lord cannot approve of these, and I urge them to be renamed to something appropriate to the Christian community.

Fourth, Linux uses a flavor of DOS known as Bash. Bash is an acronym for "Bourne Again Shell". On the surface this would appear to be supportive of the Lord. However, remember that even Satan can quote the bible for his own purposes! While I believe Linux may be born-again, its obvious by the misspelling of "born" that its not born-again in an Christian church. Will the lies ever cease?

Additionally, one of the main people involved with the GNU Free Software Foundation supports contraception and abortion. His web site even advocates government support of contraception. He also wears fake halos, and has quips about his made-up church that relates to his free software. I find such blasphemy to be extremely unsettling.

One must also remember that the creator of Linux, a college student named Linux Torvaldis, comes from Finland. I'm sure all the followers of Christ are aware of the heritical nature of the Finnish: from necrophilia to human sacrifice, Finnish culture is awash in sin. I find little reason to believe anything good and holy could arise from this evil land.

Finally, let us remember that there is an alternative to using the Satan-powered Linux. I think history has shown us that Microsoft is quite holy. I'm told that its founder, William Gates is a strong supporter of our Lord and I encourage my fellow Christians to buy only his products to help keep the Devil at bay.

I wish I had more time to expound upon my findings. Unfortunately a family of Jews has moved in across the street and I must go speak to them of Jesus Christ before they are condemned to eternal hellfire.

Please investigate this as you see fit and I'm sure you'll reach the same conclusions that I have.

Is LINUX a machination of Satan? YES! (-1)

stallo (575157) | more than 11 years ago | (#3546525)

.Please .try .to .keep .posts .on .topic.
.Try .t o .reply .to .other .people .comments .instead .of . starting .new .threads.
.Read .other .people's .m essages .before .posting .your .own .to .avoid .si mply .duplicating .what .has .already .been .said.
. Use .a .clear .subject .that .describes .what .you r .message .is .about.
.Offtopic, .Inflammatory, . Inappropriate, .Illegal, .or .Offensive .comments . might .be .moderated. .(You .can .read .everything , .even .moderated .posts, .by .adjusting .your .t hreshold .on .the .User .Preferences .Page)

.Pro blems .regarding .accounts .or .comment .posting . should .be .sent .to .CowboyNeal.

Re:Is LINUX a machination of Satan? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3546962)

You've just gotta love the smell of trolls in the morning!

Sure, sure... (5, Funny)

ImaLamer (260199) | more than 11 years ago | (#3546514)

kept 'personally somewhat busy' by 'the interesting Intel SMP-P4 TLB corruption bug, which ends up being due to some very funky asynchronous speculative TLB fill logic'.

That is what they all say.

Please don't slashdot the main site! (0, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3546516)

Here's a list of mirrors. [ebay.com]

Re:Please don't slashdot the main site! (-1)

Alan_Thicke (553655) | more than 11 years ago | (#3546632)

Come up with something new!!! This Troll is mine mother Fucker!

Re:Please don't slashdot the main site! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3546695)

Can you immagine a Beowouf Clsuter of those?

Hot-plug CPUs (3, Funny)

doorbot.com (184378) | more than 11 years ago | (#3546541)

<rusty@rustcorp.com.au>
o Hotplug CPU prep


Sweet.

On a slightly different note, is there a place that has (perhaps weekly) status updates on the Sparc64 kernel and related goodies?

The UltraLinux site hasn't been updated for a while. I'm thinking of putting Linux on my Ultra 30 for testing, and I'd like to run one of the newer kernels (2.5.x).

I'm looking at Gentoo as well, and I'm hoping that their Sparc64 ISO will be released soon.

Re:Hot-plug CPUs (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3546655)

I recommend downloading Solaris. Unless you cannot legally use it (if you are using it in a commercial setting), Solaris 8 is MUCH better in every way on the sparc architecture.

If you want apps, everything that will compile on linux will compile on solaris (after you install gcc, automake and autoconf).

Re:Hot-plug CPUs (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3546865)

Hotplug CPU prep

ohmigod, now this is taking it a bit far! Hotplugging cpu's is like making the ability to plug in live cpu's easy as inserting passengers into a train or like brain transplants on infinite monkeys in the time it takes to compile a kernel. Development technology has gone too far. We must stop now before its too late.

I can understand progress, but this is insane. Next thing you know, we will have Linux duplicating quantum physics. We can't have software similating the big bang.

uh ho (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3546549)

as i type this all i have is the default kernel in Slack 2.4.5 and using 4.7 netscape, shame on me, HEY don't hit me with that giant penguin!!!

Asynchronous logic? (2)

brejc8 (223089) | more than 11 years ago | (#3546556)

Does anyone have more details on what asynchronous logic is in the P4 and why it was funky?

"Beta" kernel? (5, Interesting)

Platinum Dragon (34829) | more than 11 years ago | (#3546584)

At best, I would call the development series "alpha". Beta implies that the kernel is ready for general testing prior to release, and there are few known showstopper bugs.

When 2.5 goes -rc, or Linus starts making prereleaserr noises, then go ahead and call it "beta". Until then, it's the type of thing you inflict on a computer you don't mind messing around with.

Mode = Astrotrufing (-1, Flamebait)

zulux (112259) | more than 11 years ago | (#3546640)

Fellow Hackers,
Yesterday I downloaded the new Linux 7.2 into my Personal Computer. And let me tell you, the Experience was terrible. The instalation diden't require a security number like Microsoft's operating-systems, and some of the EULA's were very confusing. I invite you to try out the latest in clustering operating systems - Windows XP. You'll get a easy to use environment for all of your digital needs! Where do you want to go today, indeed. Let's go into the future together!

Signed, your typical atroturfer with a Slashdot ID > 500,000.

Re:Mode = Astrotrufing (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3546815)

Fine, I will try Windows XP. Could you please
direct me to the download site so I can run it
on my m68k-nommu processor? Also, because I don't
want to be tied to one vendor, tell me where I can
download the source code. I have an open mind
I will concider using XP, but until Micrsoft can
GPL their code, I am afraid, there can never be any comparison
between Windows and Linux.

Re:WindowsClustering GordonMicrosoftResearch (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3546912)

Gordon we know its you at Microsoft Research standing next to Linus see all those great Transmeta Processors just kinda got to you like back in the good old VAX days when you VAX guys like Cutler gave us that load of shit called NT. Gordon whats the matter cannot read the code thats right its not coded in your great language Visual Bullshit & Virus Script. Hey must be busy trying to develope some games kinda stuck well heres one you love to play MICROSOFT MONOPOLY. WidowsXP thats right lots of bloat on that goat. WindowsXP looks like an operating system made for Senator Hollings and Eisner at Disney. We do not need extra bloat and security holes created by XP . XP clustering HAHAHAHAHHAHH........XP has enough trouble each day just rebooting as it chews up you data into useless bits. Gordon you can clone it but everyone will know what a cheap imitation it is just like your clone of MAC LISA and VAX EXTENDED.

Re:WindowsClustering GordonMicrosoftResearch (2)

zulux (112259) | more than 11 years ago | (#3546933)

Jesus - can't people around here take a joke. Note the title of my post: Mode = Astroturfing.

The only thing that XP can cluster is a cluster fuck.

slow sunday (0, Interesting)

oyenstikker (536040) | more than 11 years ago | (#3546643)

a slow Sunday is a good excuse to catch up.

No. A slow Sunday is a good excuse to go spend time with your loved ones, take a walk, go to church, and enjoy a home cooked meal with your family.

So why am I reading slashdot on a Sunday?

Re:slow sunday (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3546734)

My loved one is a teen. He'd rather spend time with his buddies. It is raining out. Church is over. And I don't like to cook if I'm the only one who is going to be eating ( habit from too many years as a cook).

When will it be done? (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3546647)

When will Linux finally be done? It seems like all that they do is "fix bugs" and "increase performance" anymore. I am starting to wonder if they will ever finish it. It is a big project - maybe a bit too big for a bunch of hackers to deal with. Quite impressive but still I wish it would get done.

Re:When will it be done? (2, Informative)

mikehoskins (177074) | more than 11 years ago | (#3546671)

Huh? Any OS that is done is Out Of Business (tm), like CP/M, or BeOS.


I'd like to know "When will Windoze be done?"

A very stable kernel (5, Funny)

chrysalis (50680) | more than 11 years ago | (#3546673)

This kernel looks very stable so far. The only trouble I got is with the keyboard. Sometimes, it blo

Re:A very stable kernel (1)

xer.xes (4181) | more than 11 years ago | (#3546954)

Hehe this one's funny :).

Be sure to enable the new input layer (or is it only in the -dj (with other words: compilable) kernel?) you need to do this?

Re:A very stable kernel (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3547100)

In windows XP if you have a mouse you can use the on screen keyboard (Start->All Programs->Accessories->Accessibility->On- Screen Keyboard) .It wkolklss quiote wsell.

OT: Change the damn Slashdot banner (0, Offtopic)

MisterBlister (539957) | more than 11 years ago | (#3546674)

When I click the Slashdot banner in the top left of the page, I want to go back to the Slashdot main page, not the page of whatever 'section' I'm in (developers, apple, whatever.slashdot.com).

Fix it now, motherfuckers!

Re:OT: Change the damn Slashdot banner (0)

Serial Troller (556155) | more than 11 years ago | (#3547108)

Lovely, isn't it? That's been like that ever since they added the section hostnames months ago. Once you're in a section, you cannot navigate out, at all. And CowBoiKneel gets paid for churning out this site?

up2date (3, Funny)

KidSock (150684) | more than 11 years ago | (#3547050)

I have a for host in *.mycompany.com script that will automagically update all our production machines at once. Who needs up2date, Red Carpet, and all that crap? Ha-ha.

Almost there... (1, Redundant)

mikeage (119105) | more than 11 years ago | (#3547353)

We haven't been keeping up with the 2.5.x series, but a slow Sunday is a good excuse to catch up.

And we've been happy! Please, this isn't a spider to check for every time a changelog is updated...
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