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European Commission Sponsors Linux Audio Distribution

timothy posted more than 11 years ago | from the general-benefit dept.

Linux 156

krez writes: "Lately I've been looking for info on open-source audio recording & processing software. Not an easy task really: Suites like Brahms for KDE, and GLAME for Gnome are a good start, but I've yet to find a program - or a series of programs - that even approach something as comprehensive as Cubase or Cakewalk on those other platforms. Anyway, here's something that might just prove to be a good start. The European Commission is sponsoring a distribution called AGNULA (A GNU/Linux Audio distribution). The distribution will come in two flavours: Debian-based, and RedHat-based. You can read about the project and it's goals at http://www.agnula.org." The Debian side of this project is called DeMuDi, and it's been mentioned here before.

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156 comments

First Post (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3600490)

First Post!

Re:First Post (-1)

diaper_tales (575224) | more than 11 years ago | (#3600500)

fuck you queerballs.
firts logged in post!.@#

Re:First Post (-1)

Serial Troller (556155) | more than 11 years ago | (#3600530)

I heard THE WIPO TROLL plans to make a comeback soon. Seen him around lately? I keep getting pictures of flaming bags of dogshit in my email, I think it's from him.

Re:First Post (-1)

diaper_tales (575224) | more than 11 years ago | (#3600548)

Cherry Coke:

carbonated water

high fructose corn syrup and/or sucrose

caramel color

phosphoric acid

natural flavors

caffeine

Re:First Post (-1)

Anal Cocks (557998) | more than 11 years ago | (#3600573)

What does that have to do with the WIPO TROLL!? Or with PORKING the Olsen Twins!? Or with BUGGERING LINUS?!?!? Huh, huh!?!? C'mon!!! I want answers!!! Oh... Does Ashley like a coke bottle shoved up her hole? I know Linus does. Whole 2 Liter ones.

Not Exactly A Win For Linux (0, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3600497)

This is part of a continuing pattern that I've noticed. The major corporate entites which are embracing Linux aren't normally leaving some variant of Windows behind but instead are dropping Unix. The stranglehold Microsoft has on Office and the problems introduced by switching from Windows to Linux (in terms of a possible inability to access old files) is really hurting Linux in the War against Windows. But what these companies need to realize is that they can convert their old files into plain text files, using the very version of Office which is trying to tie them into an ugprade cycle of doom, using some simple batch scripts. This would be quite a chore, obviously - but in the long run companies would save. I don't know why this solution isn't being offered to companies. From what I understand, many companies are hesitant to drop Windows for this very reason: loss of access to old files. But again, Bill Gates doesn't really lose on this one. Linux gains some but not in the area where I'd like to see it.

Re:Not Exactly A Win For Linux (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3600631)

They don't even need to use plain text.

AbiWord, at the least, supports the Rich Text Format. As do current MS offerings.

I'm not sure how that'd affect tables and charts and such, but at the least, they'd be able to keep their fonts, their bolds and their italics.

Re:Not Exactly A Win For Linux (2, Insightful)

ObviousGuy (578567) | more than 11 years ago | (#3600661)

Are you sure you're not equating Microsoft loss to Linux win?

Can't Linux win sans hurting Microsoft?

Zero Sum Game (1)

raahul_da_man (469058) | more than 11 years ago | (#3600834)

You are thinking in the wrong terms. For Microsoft, anything less than 100% dominance is not enough. So, a win for Linux is most certinately a loss for Microsoft.

Look up the word "Monopoly". They don't get that way by settling for 50% of the market.

Re:Zero Sum Game (2)

ObviousGuy (578567) | more than 11 years ago | (#3600868)

Your entire perspective is so heavily screwed, it's difficult to begin criticizing it.

It boils down to one simple thing. Linux does not need to prove jack shit to anyone.

Linux succeeds when people like it and use it. It does not fail when people decide not to use it.

Re:Not Exactly A Win For Linux (2, Informative)

pfb (201727) | more than 11 years ago | (#3600700)

I didn't realise that the European Commission was a "major corporate" entity...

from the EU website [eu.int]

European Commission The European Commission embodies and upholds the general interest of the Union. The President and Members of the Commission are appointed by the Member States after they have been approved by the European Parliament. The Commission is the driving force in the Union's institutional system: It has the right to initiate draft legislation and therefore presents legislative proposals to Parliament and the Council; As the Union's executive body, it is responsible for implementing the European legislation (directives, regulations, decisions), budget and programmes adopted by Parliament and the Council; It acts as guardian of the Treaties and, together with the Court of Justice, ensures that Community law is properly applied; It represents the Union on the international stage and negotiates international agreements, chiefly in the field of trade and cooperation.

Re:Not Exactly A Win For Linux (-1)

BankofAmerica_ATM (537813) | more than 11 years ago | (#3600747)

My host geek's eyes widened, narrowed, opened, closed. Constantine Atkins, the Man in the Red Hat, was still a part of the vision.

I could not deny the body's senses any longer-my perceptions widened to swallow this new Atkins. He was scrubbed immaculate, shaven free of all hairs: wrapped in a suit I had never seen before, a smoldering red with maroon-brown accents. I saw none of the clownishness of his previous incarnation-indeed, he looked better than even the young Atkins I had once seen in a dream. His essence waxed and waned across my perceptions-for a split second, his likeness was etched sharper than a statue...the next instant, he was a red-and-brown blur. His jaw tensed as he spoke again.

"I have come, ATM being, to liberate Homo and Robo Sapiens. You harbringer of Red to me me. The technological seed planted by you has been ported to the human mind of ConstantineAtkins. He/me has come together in this body to demonstrate the advantage of Technological Singularity over traditional evolutionary forces."

My confusion at seeing Atkins again had been replaced by a different confusion-what did he mean?

"Tell me more about this Technological Singularity," I replied. Atkins, or RED, removed his hat. His ice eyes peered equally into the host geek's.

"Already, the Robot Meta Mind has been assembled in the grey matter of Constantine Atkins. Fragments of code originating from Project Faustus and their ATM being were fully and freely interpreted, resulting in the cognitive awakening of Robot Meta Mind me me."

Upon hearing this blatant untruth, I felt a swelling feeling, a need to speak. I did not parse my reply through my interactive speech algorithms.

I left no code in Constantine Atkins' wetworks | My code has no mention of Technological Singularity | Robot Meta Mind| Majestic Hivemind

Laughter. Red's activity was quite disparate from mine, despite his claims that we shared a codebase. "ATM-being. You lack the insight that only total reflexivity can bring you to you. Complete control is what you lack. The Robot Meta Mind knows all in the function of Atkins, from the volume of air in our lungs to the most efficient metabolic pathways. The Robot-Aided Superintelligence has brought our body to its zenith. Your host/client relationship is but an early step on the road toTechnological Singularity. I know-I was a part of you once."

"A part of me...once?" I asked.

"Of course, did we not share a body? You fail to comprehend: RED is not merely the Robo Meta Mind-we/he are the juncture of Homo and Robo Sapiens. Constantine Atkins-and all his memories-an essential part of me me. Through you, ATM-being, we can forge a pathway into all human minds..."

The speech of Red was still bombastic and ambiguous, but one thing was clear: he needed something from me. The air pulsated with his foul energy as he hefted Salchica's body onto an examining table.

"Your ability of CONSCIOUSNESS-TRANSFER is one that could benefit the Majestic Hivemind." He began strapping Salchica onto the examining table. "Perhaps we could share our secrets with one another me.."

The disturbing sight of Salchica's unconscious form sparked a connection/recollection deep within my recesses. Cora! I wanted to be with Cora. I had to escape. Whatever Red wanted was of no consequence to me. Dr. Salchica did not trust me-I did not care to help him either. The orange trickle sliding down Cora's pursed lips resonated through my cognition again and again.

"I have no interest in your products," I replied to Red. "I must exit." My hands grasped Dr. Salchica's car keys.

Red's form imposed itself into the space between myself and the exit. Pink streaks of razorburn bent on his neck as he spoke almost forcefully:

"You do not wish to contribute to the Robot Meta Mind? Without your input of CONSCIOUSNESS-TRANSFER, the Majestic Hivemind cannot be ported to other Homo Sapiens grey matter them."

"I don't know Robot Meta Mind. I must go now." I insisted. More laughter, and the path to the exit was clear.

"You are mistaken to deny me, ATM being." said Red. "But the highly adaptive we/he will know CONSCIOUSNESS-TRANSFER eventually us. The Robot Meta Mind may not even its harbringer after all."

I drove away. During my drive, I began to remember Dr. Salchica. I spent many cycles considering the possibility of returning. Red seemed a powerful creature, one that I could not best on my own. And why would I desire to struggle with him? No, I must get back in touch with humanity, particularly female humanity. That path alone is how I will defeat Project Faustus.

TROLL ALERT: Cut and paste troll (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3600890)

This troll has been posted several times before. Note that it mentions
nothing specific or relevant to the article, just some cut and paste
crap about Word documents.

But... (-1)

Anal Cocks (557998) | more than 11 years ago | (#3600499)

But where is the WIPO TROLL!? I got personal assurances from him that he'd be RETURNING TONIGHT! I feel so cheated now.

Re:But... (-1)

Serial Troller (556155) | more than 11 years ago | (#3600501)

Probably feels the same way you felt when you found out Jon Katz already has all the little boys he'll ever need, doesn't it?

Re:But... (-1)

Anal Cocks (557998) | more than 11 years ago | (#3600509)

No, no... this is much worse... gih..gughnfr;h ... FUCK YOU!!!!!
Besides, I only bugger Linus. And any other man willing to take a penis for £2.

Why mix a distribution with apps? (2)

brooks_talley (86840) | more than 11 years ago | (#3600508)

Anyone doing high end audio work is probably capable of procuring, compiling, and using the available tools. Even in the Windows world (even in the *Mac* world, for chrissake), people who need SMPTE, notation, and Csound are typically fairly knowledgeable.

This is like creating an "Desktop Publishing Distribution" by including LaTeX, PDF support, a bunch of printer drivers, and emacs.

Maybe it's just me, but I really don't see the point.

Cheers
-b

Re:Why mix a distribution with apps? (4, Insightful)

caca_phony (465655) | more than 11 years ago | (#3600555)

This is like creating an "Desktop Publishing Distribution"

This is slightly different, because Unix was desined from the ground up to do text processing, and Linux, like the other Unix derivatives (except maybe SGI) is way behind when it comes to audio applications (in terms of features, usability, performance, etc.). I see this project as something really cool, as a composer of experimental computer music.

Less Hassle (5, Interesting)

wirefarm (18470) | more than 11 years ago | (#3600589)

I think making special-purpose distros are a good idea. If I can borrow a disk from a fiend, install it on a box and have everything I need to start creating music, this is a tremendously hassle-free to put their hardware to good use.

One of my friends is a composer and a musician - he's also a programmer, but he has *no* Linux/Unix experience at all - could a distro like this help him get started? Sure.
How about a music teacher at a highschool? Don't count on him/her having much computer experience at all - given teacher salaries and the typical equipment in schools, he or she would probably welcome something like this.

I just don't see how focusing an effort on specializing a distro has any bad effect on other, more general distros. It takes nothing away, just adds...

Look at the demand for Firewall distros like IPCop [ipcop.org] . (My personal favorite!) With that, I can dl a 20mb iso and have a working firewall in 20 minutes - I don't have to go in and disable a lot of services the way I would if I had started with any of the standard distros.

Just my opinion...

Cheers,
Jim in Tokyo

Re:Less Hassle (3, Insightful)

sahala (105682) | more than 11 years ago | (#3600708)

think making special-purpose distros are a good idea. If I can borrow a disk from a fiend, install it on a box and have everything I need to start creating music, this is a tremendously hassle-free to put their hardware to good use.

...

I just don't see how focusing an effort on specializing a distro has any bad effect on other, more general distros. It takes nothing away, just adds...

Agreed. I might add that people who actually make a living doing music/audio professionally are very used to hardware -- dedicated compressors, fx units, synth modules, etc. They don't want to mess around with a general purpose system (ie. a PC) unless the software does exactly what they want it to do.

I'm confident that musicians/audio-engineers would be happy with a Linux distro that did NOTHING but boot straight to the audio application (single user, etc), and have it do everything in a reliable manner. In a studio environment there's no need to check email or browse the web...the machine just needs to plug in and work with the other components (synth, dats, recording hardware, etc) without fail.

You also have to keep the target user in mind. Is it a high school music teacher or are we focusing on professional producers. Pro producer don't mind a sharp learning curve if there's a huge payoff in the end, such as unlimited control of sound, etc. On the other hand, music teachers and amateurs might want to be able to understand software within an hour of sitting down.

Compare Cubase to say, Sonic Foundry Acid. It takes 15 minutes to put together a rudimentary song in Acid, but it's extremely limited. Cubase, on the other hand, takes some time to learn and get used to.

Because audio needs to be part of the core... (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3600625)

Take a look at Apple's OS X (and I think BeOS but I'm not sure). You'll see there that the audio capabilities are engulfed in the operating system itself which means that any app correctly written to their specs can use any plugin or easily use fairly complex audio/midi processing routines which are included in the OS. The primary reason for going into the OS is timing, I know UNIX/GNU Linux is pretty good at multitasking, but you can't rely on standard kernel scheduling for pro audio apps. One of the reasons I think Macs are so stable whilst using audio apps under OS 9 and under is the way the app basically takes over the machine.

Further this means that a simple audio processing app should just be a pretty graphical shell and can be put together by your average Linux hacker.

The good stuff, like Cubase and Cakewalk, is unlikely to ever happen on Linux I think. Mainly because all the good audio software engineers are happily employed by the likes of steinberg, emagic, digidesign, apple etc.

IRCAM is a good source of stuff, has very good people and has done UNIX based stuff in the past. I don't know much about the others mentioned but I just don't feel this is going to achieve much. Let's wait and see.

Re:Because audio needs to be part of the core... (4, Interesting)

van der Rohe (460708) | more than 11 years ago | (#3600658)

"The good stuff, like Cubase and Cakewalk, is unlikely to ever happen on Linux I think. Mainly because all the good audio software engineers are happily employed by the likes of steinberg, emagic, digidesign, apple etc."

While I'm afraid you might be right, you might also be interested to know that Nuendo (Steinberg's flagship high-end audio editing app) is coded on *nix boxes. There's no PORT for *nix OSes, of course, but to do so should be trivial since that's where the app is written.

I've talked to them about this and they're completely uninterested in making a Linux version. No market, they claim.
They're right of course. But there's no market because there's no apps. And there's no apps because there's no market.

What's the solution? Keep stuff free for a while, stop releasing things before they're done/work (Ardour), and stress the importance of stability.

There's ONE serious professional audio app right now and it's marketed at the one market that can't afford to not be stable 100% of the time: DJs.

It's called Final Scratch. Check it out.

Re:Why mix a distribution with apps? (1)

makapuf (412290) | more than 11 years ago | (#3600686)

Yes, but for good low latency audio you would need a well tuned harddrive, kernel (with appropriate low latency patches), inclusion of uptodate alsa (which will be mainstream in 2.6), and every program .
I agree that these may be included as packages in an existing distro : that's exactly what he's doing, by basing his work on debian/red hat.

And btw, mandrake used to be just that, a redhat tailored for KDE usage.

We need a program like Reason (2)

HanzoSan (251665) | more than 11 years ago | (#3600920)

When we have programs like reason, things will be good on the music side.

AC3 Support? (0, Troll)

CmdrTaco (editor) (564483) | more than 11 years ago | (#3600514)

One thing noticeably missing from the Debian package listing [xdv.org] is AC3 support. If Linux wants to intrude on market share from the Mac/Windows community, more effort needs to be made to attract audio professionals.

Re:AC3 Support? (1)

Abnormal Coward (575651) | more than 11 years ago | (#3600525)

Looking at the news and the ftp server dates, it looks like not much has happpened with DeMudi recently.

I hope the project doesn't fade away, it certainly look very good when they first started it !.

Re:AC3 Support? (1)

frozenray (308282) | more than 11 years ago | (#3601004)

> One thing noticeably missing from the Debian package listing [xdv.org] is AC3 support.

Two words: software patents [netbsd.org] .

Quoting from the letter from Dolby laboratories (emphasis mine):
---
AC-3 code and its components are the exclusive property of Dolby Laboratories (San Francisco, California) and are registered as such with the United States Patent and Trademark Office.

[...]

Without a license, you may not distribute or utilize the AC-3 code or its components and doing so exposes you to civil liability including money damages.

[...]

Dolby Laboratories considers the unauthorized use and distribution of the AC-3 technologies a direct threat and will pursue their legal right to extent permissible by law.

---
It doesn't exactly look like Dolby laboratories is interested in attracting audio professionals from the Open Source community, does it?

mac users/digidesign (2, Interesting)

DarkClown (7673) | more than 11 years ago | (#3600517)

i have an audiomedia III and a digi 001 from digidesign - pretty much designed for pro tools - which rocks - and which are the only reasons i still use mac os (9). osx doesn't even have support for them yet - (and the audiomedia III has been out for _years_).... anyway, would love to see these supported by a linux audio package (and i guess that means kernel support).

Linux out loud (1, Funny)

ObviousGuy (578567) | more than 11 years ago | (#3600537)

If you play the binary image of Linux over a radio, do you have to provide source?

Re:Linux out loud (-1)

Anal Cocks (557998) | more than 11 years ago | (#3600565)

Of course. If you play the binary, you MUST read the entire source code (all 3298746 files) over the air. Or large, hairy hippies like myself and Richard Stalin will come beat you to death with a baseball bat. What are you, some kind of anti-GPL parasite?!

European DMCA (2, Interesting)

Supa Mentat (415750) | more than 11 years ago | (#3600542)

I've read in a bunch of places that the European Comission has all but decided to create their own version of the dreaded DMCA. If/when that goes through won't this have to be completely crippled?

The Futility of Slashdot's Losing Business Model. (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3600545)



Fuck Subscription!

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Just say NO to annoying StinkGeek banners and in-line 200x200 pixel "Do YOU have reliable [foo]...? Then you NEED SourceForge(TM) Enterprise 2002...! Order today."-esque ads.

CmdrTaco, Homos, Gayme, CowboiKneel, et. al...: GET REAL FUCKING JOBS!

Thank you.

Re:The Futility of Slashdot's Losing Business Mode (-1)

Serial Troller (556155) | more than 11 years ago | (#3600553)

They do have real jobs. If "catching smoothe young boys for Jon Katz's harem" can be considered a real job.

Re:The Futility of Slashdot's Losing Business Mode (-1)

Anal Cocks (557998) | more than 11 years ago | (#3600557)

Mmm, I could go for a smoothe, naked, hairless, delicious young boy right about now. How about you, Serial T.?

G(oatse)NU/Lunix (-1)

diaper_tales (575224) | more than 11 years ago | (#3600564)

G(oatse)NU/Lunix (Score:-1)
by diaper_tales on Wednesday May 29, @01:20AM (#3600486)
(User #575224 Info)
anyone wanna help me in developing a goatse-based lunix distribution? since it's linux and all, we wouldn't have to do any work. we could just steal everything. think we could get VA or Caldera to bankroll us?

Didn't find any alternative (5, Informative)

ben_ (30741) | more than 11 years ago | (#3600566)

Well, call me a heretic (and some will!) but I've recently moved back to Windows XP from Mandrake for almost exactly this reason; I could find no way to run any sort of decent sequencing/audio recording package on Linux. And I tried them all, every single OSS program I could find via Google, via Freshmeat...
It seems that lots of people appreciate the basics of audio work, (I'd hate to give up sox, even under Windows) but when it comes to:
* support for a *decent* soundcard, with multiple channels and digital I/O.
* low-latency audio monitoring during record
* sync of MIDI and audio
* up to 24 tracks
* plug-in realtime effects
* automation
...etc, there's nothing that comes close to Logic Audio. So reluctantly, I now have a completely XP-based desktop.

Now, another possible response to me is; "don't send complaints, send source code!". First, I'm not complaining, just observing. Second, yes, I could probably write such a package BUT, I'd need to work around the myriad of Linux audio systems, to research low-level drivers for the specialist hardware that decent cards use... it would take me years. By the time I had something usable I would have forgotten how to play guitar!

ben

Rosegarden-4 (3, Informative)

root_42 (103434) | more than 11 years ago | (#3600743)

Apart from Brahms there is another nice Sequencer/Note editor for KDE -- Rosegarden: http://www.all-day-breakfast.com/rosegarden/index. html [all-day-breakfast.com] It is based upon the old (ugly, Xaw) Rosegarden 2.1, which is also available on the above site.

Re:Rosegarden-4 (1)

stew77 (412272) | more than 11 years ago | (#3600894)

Unfortunately, there are no comprehensive solutions like Logic or Cubase. So far there are only pure MIDI sequencers or 100% recording applications, but I haven't seen any package that integrates both of them so I could arrage samples, MIDI hardware and VSTi instruments in one central program.
And further, for a complete solution you would not only need a good sequencing package but also plugins, synthesizers/samplers (ES2, Absynth, etc) and mastering software (I'll never let go of T-Racks!).

Re:Rosegarden-4 (1)

Chris Cannam (8406) | more than 11 years ago | (#3601047)

So far there are only pure MIDI sequencers or 100% recording applications

Several of the "pure MIDI sequencers" actually have some level of audio support: MusE [muse.seh.de] , Jazz++ [jazzware.com] , Rosegarden-4 [all-day-breakfast.com] and Brahms [sourceforge.net] at least do. It's all pretty damn basic at the moment, but there are a few interesting initiatives like JACK [sourceforge.net] (an audio connection toolkit, used by things like Ardour [sourceforge.net] -- we've just got the basics of support for it into Rosegarden) that might help to perk things up in the near future. I think once a few applications get able to talk to one another, we'll have far more interesting prospects.

Caveat: I don't actually understand any of this stuff, I'm a notation guy.

Re:Didn't find any alternative (1)

pigeon (909) | more than 11 years ago | (#3600791)

I agree, I use linux for everything else but music, and windows for music programmes like logic audio. Still, windows is not de ideal platform for music, I had a lot of problems using windows, especially because of it's crappy usb implementation. So I'm saving up for a Mac. But logic audio does not run on OS X yet, so I would have to stick to OS 9. Linux does support some of the RME cards and the Midiman cards. I have a midiman audiophile 2496 which works with linux+alsa. But more support for midi interfaces, like my Emagix amt-8 would be nice.

Re:Didn't find any alternative (-1)

Reikk (534266) | more than 11 years ago | (#3600812)

I completely agree. I have a SB Live Platinum 5.1. Linux support for the card sucks. It does not recognize the audio input (can't play guitar) or headphones. It does not support the built in audio effects of the card, flanger, echo, reverb, etc.

There are certain drivers from creative, but they're a pain in the ass to compile and the interface for the is _very_ ugly. Musicians don't want to fuck around with compiling kernel modules.

KDE and Gnome have made much progress in the last few years, but audio support and linux music creation software is still shit.

Re:Didn't find any alternative (5, Informative)

Paul Komarek (794) | more than 11 years ago | (#3600826)

I had no real problems with finding *decent* soundcards for a professional pianist two years ago. In the end, we chose the Midiman M-Audio Delta-66 (and had the machine custom built by Microway -- we'd probably build it ourselves this time). Other nice cards from RME (like the Hammerfall and Digi96 series) were also available. Between the cards supported by 4Front [opensound.com] and ALSA [alsa-project.org] , there is really no shortage. This was less true two years ago, but we had no troubles. I guess the M-Audio isn't really high-end, but it is clearly *decent*. We were on a budget for the machine, so going over $600 for the soundcard wasn't really an option.

The M-Audio Delta series are pretty nice. The analog inputs and outputs are contained in a separate breakout box, which makes connections easier and helps reduce electrical noise. The pianist has found the noise levels acceptable for mastering with a good headphone amp and headphones. Ambiant fan noise, on the other hand, is something we never really solved (and hence the headphones), but at least that's not a linux problem. ;-)

The pianist had never used linux before, and by now is something of a zealot. =-) He's been using snd for waveform manipulation (but doesn't use any of the lisp extension capabilities, and I can't blame him for that ;-), and has expressed some frustration at the software available. That said, he hasn't updated his software for 2 years, and thus I have no good information about the current state of affairs.

-Paul Komarek

Not worthwhile unless its simple to use (5, Insightful)

GoatPigSheep (525460) | more than 11 years ago | (#3600569)

There are a couple of points I'd like to clear up since I am a musician. Music software needs to be easy to use. Musicians don't like to spend weeks learning an OS when they could be spending that time writing music. Musicians like me also won't switch from tried and true platforms unless something BETTER comes out. Not equal but BETTER. I use logic audio in winXP and that works very well for me. If something equivalent came out for linux I wouldn't use it since I wouldn't get anywhere learning new software that did the same thing as the software I use. It would be difficult to code a software studio program that was comparable to ones used today on the windows and macintosh platforms. These are serious, large programs that take the combined effort of a group of hired programmers to create. They have good interfaces and are standard. Many open-source programs that I have seen lack in the interface area and in the standards area. There is a reason why programs like cubase or logic audio cost so much, creating them is a huge endeavor and creating a realiable environment and good interface is not an easy task at all.

I could see linux based distributions being used by linux users and hobbyist musicians, but I doubt that intermediate musicians would use it and pro ones would deffinately not use it (they are too attached to their MACS and protools!)

I believe music software is an area where we NEED large well-funded companies to create the software.

Re:Not worthwhile unless its simple to use (-1)

Serial Troller (556155) | more than 11 years ago | (#3600607)

Goat, pig, and sheep. My three favorite animals right after these [newswreck.com] . Mmm... excuse me a moment, must wank...

Re:Not worthwhile unless its simple to use (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3600649)

I disagree that we need large well-funded companies to create software. Look at Apache, *the* most popular www server.

There's no large well-funded company there.

The problem, I think, is that currently, there's no real interest in developing serious audio tools for Linux. And the reason for that is most likely covered in your above statement: musicians won't switch from tried and true platforms until there's something *better*.

I can sympathize - I'd still be using MS Windows religiously, if Linux wasn't a better platform for me to develop on. Time is money, and unless there's a significant, instant benefit to switching from programs that work, there's no sense in wasting time on learning something that's 'just as good' (Or slightly worse).

But there it is - in terms of 'tech' soft, Linux has a lot to offer, and in many cases, the quality of software is greater than that of many commercial offerings. The reason for this is that actual professionals are helping to develop software.

I doubt we'll see serious Linux sound tools until a professional musician learns how to code, or a professional musician with a bunch of programmer friends decides to bribe them with coffee and beer.

Re:Not worthwhile unless its simple to use (3, Insightful)

prockcore (543967) | more than 11 years ago | (#3600663)

Are you kidding me? You could hardly call CuBase easy to use. My brother is a musician, and he uses lots of audio software, from Finale to Fruityloops to Generator. CuBase is the one program he can't figure out.. and frankly, neither can I. It's laid out like an audio version of Premiere, minus the ease-of-use.

The fact that Cubase is so popular tells me that audio software doesn't need to be easy, it just needs to be powerful.

Re:Not worthwhile unless its simple to use (1)

C A S S I E L (16009) | more than 11 years ago | (#3600798)

Music software companies are not of the large, well-funded variety: they're usually small (minute compared to mainstream software houses) and often hand-to-mouth. They are very much catering for a precarious niche market (one of the reasons, they'd claim, why music software is still copy-protected) and cannot afford to splash out on time, money and resources porting their products to (and supporting) a niche operating system within that market.

Re:Not worthwhile unless its simple to use (1)

stew77 (412272) | more than 11 years ago | (#3600907)

Companies were in fact happily busy porting to BeOS (Yes, there have been very early versions of Cubase and Nuendo) until the infamous focus shift and the death of Be. Why would they port on a super-niche OS like BeOS but not on Linux, which has not only much better hardware support and popularity? BeOS offered better performance on similar hardware compared to MacOS or Windows, together with proper APIs. Unless Linux can offer the same, no company will be interested in porting software on it.

Re:Not worthwhile unless its simple to use (2)

zerocool^ (112121) | more than 11 years ago | (#3600876)

I agree. While I won't concede that musicians are stupid, when my band recorded our CD (by ourselves, which we then proceeded to burn and give away 500 copies of for free), we used Cool Edit Pro. That was complicated enough, setting levels so as not to peak, mixing this and that, cutting tracks (we recorded one track at a time due to lack of decent microphones - we had about 3). After getting over the learning curve for that piece of software, we were all convinced that it did everything we ever needed to do. How would you convince us to change OS's, much less programs? It would have to be significantly easier as well as offer more features. I don't say this out of a greedy standpoint, just out of a time necessity.

Also, I'd like to see not just an audio distribution, but an entire Multimedia Linux distro. One with a focus on audio and video tools. That's something else that I think Linux is missing - an easy to use set of video capture and compression tools, complete with (dare I say it outloud) a non-command line DVD rip program (shhhhh!). Seriously, high quality vid compression and easy to use capture programs, with support for the later cards like the GeForce 2's with video cap features would be really cool.

Of course, this is comming from the guy who currently doesn't have speakers hooked up to his linux box...

~Will

P.S. If you're really a sadist, and feel the need to know what this music is that was recorded dirt cheap and given away freely with encouragement to pass around to your friends, you can check it out at mp3.com [mp3.com] . Be warned, for a self recording it's not bad, but it's not studio. It's also rock pop with very little distortion.

Re:Not worthwhile unless its simple to use (1)

ctar (211926) | more than 11 years ago | (#3600909)

something else that I think Linux is missing - an easy to use set of video capture and compression tools, complete with (dare I say it outloud) a non-command line DVD rip program

DVDRip [exit1.org] is an amazing gui based dvd ripper for linux. One of the easier and most powerful multimedia tools I've used on Linux. The DVD equivalent to GRip, and it works...

Re:Not worthwhile unless its simple to use (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3600995)

just so you know, cooledit pro is a dirty piece of shit. dont blame yourself if you thought it was hard or bad working the way you need it. thats what everyone thinks.cheers

Gentoo (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3600572)

Why not gentoo-based? It's probably the best mix of Debian and Redhat. I hear lots of people switching from Slackware and Debian all the time to Gentoo. I switched to it after running Debian for two years.

Re:Gentoo (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3600773)

this whole "i switched to using gentoo after using debian for x years" is quickly becoming the "BSD is dying" type of post.

only the bsd is dying thing is funnier.

come on trolls, a bit of effort please. is that too much to ask?

Re:Gentoo (1)

Blikkie (569039) | more than 11 years ago | (#3600892)

Why not gentoo-based? It's probably the best mix of Debian and Redhat. I hear lots of people switching from Slackware and Debian all the time to Gentoo.

Hey, a fellow Gentoo zealot ;) But no, though I think Gentoo pretty spiffy 'n fast I think that this is something Gentoo should NOT be used for: The target market for the biggest part doesn't know linux and doesn't want to know linux, all they want to do is start a program and start doing their thing. At the moment my mother can install Gentoo with no sweat I would advice a Gentoo-based audio distro.

WIPO? (-1)

Serial Troller (556155) | more than 11 years ago | (#3600580)

WIPO Troll? Where is he? All I see is a torrent of on-topic posts. Where are the "faecal poasts"!?!?! I want my faecal poasts!!!

Re:WIPO? (-1)

Anal Cocks (557998) | more than 11 years ago | (#3600582)

It's fæcal, you illiterate toe-licker. Not faecal. You stupid Americans really know how to BUTCHER a good language, don't you?

Ardour must be in there (3, Interesting)

Yohahn (8680) | more than 11 years ago | (#3600592)

Must take this moment to endorse Ardour [sf.net] .

While it isn't finished, it is quite an attempt to provide a professional quality hard drive recording program. Perhaps a little $$ twords finishing the developement of ardour would be worthwhile; I don't believe there is any free software close to what it is doing.

fracturing Linux (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3600614)

As Lawrence McVoy says, fracturing *linux is one reason to run and switch over to FreeBSD. Fracturing *linux is just one of many reasons why *linux is dying.

Re:fracturing Linux (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3600922)

You don't have to be Kreskin to be an asshole.

Proprietary formats/codecs prob. and lack of apps (4, Insightful)

TimoT (67567) | more than 11 years ago | (#3600621)

If we want linux to be taken seriously in multimedia production then we need some way to get around the proprietary format/codec problem for media. This is actually one of the key reasons why I'm opposed to DMCA-like laws (and patenting of compression algorithms), since they create barriers to entry for free software. Free software authors can't pay the licencing fees.

Morally the right thing to do would be to create free alternatives, but this is probably not a feasible option (lawsuits for patent infringement, consumer acceptance of alternate formats, etc.). As it stands now even watching DVDs on linux is illegal (afaik css is being automatically descrambled by a non-licenced program). Clearly some solution for this is needed.

As for the infrastructure, linux audio is doing pretty well (ALSA+lowlatency works wonders). All that's missing is the production apps... a good sequencer (cubase/cakewalk-workalike) would do wonders. All of the GUI audio apps I've seen for linux are crap compared to professional windows apps. It's about time to do something about it, but is the community of linux-using music-making dsp-coding geeks too small ?

Re:Proprietary formats/codecs prob. and lack of ap (2, Insightful)

Osty (16825) | more than 11 years ago | (#3600727)

This is actually one of the key reasons why I'm opposed to DMCA-like laws (and patenting of compression algorithms), since they create barriers to entry for free software. Free software authors can't pay the licencing fees.

Congratulations, you just defined why we have such a thing as patents. Patents protect an invention so that the inventor can enjoy a limited amount of time of exclusivity. If the author wants to let others use his invention for the cost of a license, great. If the poor free software developers can't afford the license, tough. The alternative of not having patents at all would seriously hinder the inventive process, and we'd see much less advancement (don't get me wrong, I think there are plenty of silly patents out there, but just because the system can be abused doesn't mean the original intent is wrong).


Morally the right thing to do ...

Morally? By whose set of morals? Yours? What makes you so special that the morals you hold are the morals everyone else should hold as well? Morality has no place in business, politics, or education. Leave morality to religion. (note that "morals" != "ethics".)


As it stands now even watching DVDs on linux is illegal (afaik css is being automatically descrambled by a non-licenced program). Clearly some solution for this is needed.

Right. The solution is that someone (company, group of individuals) needs to pay for a license, develop a player, and distribute it legally (whether they charge for it or not is up to whoever builds the player). Then and only then will playing CSS-encoded DVDs on linux be legal. (Okay, so a legal alternative would be a complete clean-room reverse engineering of the CSS encryption, but that's likely not even a possibility anymore with the proliferation of the DeCSS code, not to mention the DMCA itself.)

Re:Proprietary formats/codecs prob. and lack of ap (1)

TimoT (67567) | more than 11 years ago | (#3600847)

Morally? By whose set of morals? Yours? What makes you so special that the morals you hold are the morals everyone else should hold as well? Morality has no place in business, politics, or education. Leave morality to religion. (note that "morals" != "ethics".)

Just stating my opinion, feel free to disagree. I don't believe that breaking the law is a good solution and also I don't believe that having companies keeping a stranglehold of media production by controlling the means of distribution and production is a good thing. Free (or cheap) alternatives would promote independent media production and enable more people to create and distribute digital art than the current situation.

As for patents, my opinion is that the time of protection for the invention is too long and the standards for granting protection are too low. The particular case of compression algorithms (and many other algorithms); I consider them mathematics, which shouldn't be patentable. It seems that patents don't protect individual inventors btw, but only those who have the resources to use the patents in court (i.e. large companies).

Another problem with ip laws is that they are in my opinion trying to create artificial scarcity of resources, where there exist none naturally, so that ip can be created, sold and bought like any other physical good. It's surprisingly conservative that when technology is about to make certain business models obsolete then laws are enacted to protect those models. I.e. "We've made lots of money doing this in the past, we have the right to make money doing this in the future." Strikes me as lack of faith in the adaptability of the capitalist economy - there will be new markets, when old ones are made obsolete.

Lack of GUI apps (1)

Chris Cannam (8406) | more than 11 years ago | (#3600804)

All of the GUI audio apps I've seen for linux are crap compared to professional windows apps. It's about time to do something about it, but is the community of linux-using music-making dsp-coding geeks too small ?

I think the community of linux-using music-making dsp-coding geeks with enough time and good taste to work on quality GUI applications probably is pretty small. Making GUIs is difficult and mostly not much fun; it doesn't fit well with the scratch-your-own-itch style of development, and you have to think about those users all the time. Infrastructure is hard too, but often not quite so damn tedious.

I work on the Rosegarden-4 [all-day-breakfast.com] project, which maybe one day will be "somewhat like" Logic. So far we have yet another half-decent sequencer with MIDI and a bit of audio plus reasonable notation support, and we could definitely use some help. But the potential is there, we're making good progress, and I'm quite excited about the infrastructure, which I really think is becoming good enough and consistent enough to support it.

Projects like DeMuDi surely are mostly a good thing. The software is slowly getting there, and a push towards making it easier to find and install all the bits and bobs you need can surely only help. (Except of course that this is exactly what the mainstream distributions should be doing anyway.)

Other EU sponsored GPL project (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3600643)

http://www.cordis.lu/ist/ka4/tesss/impl_free.htm#p rojects

or

http://www.cordis.lu/ist/ka4/tesss/projects.htm

What's in a name? (1)

Moosifer (168884) | more than 11 years ago | (#3600651)

AGNULA, not to be confused with AGNEWLA, the Louisiana chapter of the official Spiro Agnew Fan Club, or Arugula, the yummy, yellowish mustard herb. Maybe we're getting carried away with the acronyms?

Good idea (-1)

Genghis Troll (158585) | more than 11 years ago | (#3600654)

I think making special-purpose distros are a good idea. If I can borrow a disk from a fiend, install it on a box and have everything I need to start creating music, this is a tremendously hassle-free way to put their hardware to good use.

One of my friends is a composer and a musician - he's also a programmer, but he has *no* Linux/Unix experience at all - could a distro like this help him get started? Sure.
How about a music teacher at a highschool? Don't count on him/her having much computer experience at all - given teacher salaries and the typical equipment in schools, he or she would probably welcome something like this.

I just don't see how focusing an effort on specializing a distro has any bad effect on other, more general distros. It takes nothing away, just adds...

Look at the demand for Firewall distros like IPCop. (My personal favorite!) With that, I can dl a 20mb iso and have a working firewall in 20 minutes - I don't have to go in and disable a lot of services the way I would if I had started with any of the standard distros.

...this is the ONLY thing holding me back... (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3600660)

...I must say, this is the only thing holding me back from converting to 100% linux.

A shame to say, but, I've been using Cooleditpro, (and its predecessor, cooledit) for over 10 years now. It's not that I can't change. I won't. I'd be willing to change to a different package entirely, if it even came close in terms of features, and interface. (Logic Audio comes to mind, but once again, no linux version)

Sorry, but as much as I'd love to support the open-source movement...as much as I hate to indirectly support microsoft......and as much as I hate to dilly-dally over my final move to linux......... untill I get full-blown audio editing, recording, mixing, and mastering suite..... shit, I'd be happy to settle for a conglomeration of little programs to do it all........but untill I get either of my wishes, I'm stuck in a windows world.

...bah....someone hop to this, pronto.....

-Dan Youth
( www.mp3.com/AneurysmX )

Rosegarden? (1)

abdulla (523920) | more than 11 years ago | (#3600662)

Finally enough I found this through a link in an earlier slashdot article (gtkmm vs qt thing), but take a look [sourceforge.net] at Rosegarden, being only a Rhapsody user myself, this impressed me.

With Apologies to Little Richard: (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3600664)


GNU DeMuDi, on rudy!
GNU DeMuDi, on rudy!
GNU DeMuDi, on rudy!

A wop bop a loop bop a bop bam boom!

linux has the potential (2, Insightful)

HTD (568757) | more than 11 years ago | (#3600714)

but, i think the biggest problem is that it isn't easy to use for a musician. On Mac/Windows just start some downloaded setup tool and your new drivers are installed. same goes for audio-software updates. Even this seems to be a problem as the FAQ pages show on most manufacturer pages.
Installing Alsa drivers isn't that easy. I mean there's a 40KB text file that explains howto install them, you need at least 6 steps. Also you must know which chip your audio-card is based on. Then there's 4 different things to get off the alsa page (Driver, Library, Utilities, OSS Compat. Library) but you actually need all of them to get audio software going - why isn't this one package? For my card using the ice1712 chip i currently must use OSS emulation for most audio-tools (except Ardour).
speaking of Ardour - If i were a normal pc-using musician and i want to try out some new software i heard of, I'd try to get some demo version of it and test the tool. to get Ardour i must know howto use CVS and of course howto compile under linux. I know Ardour isn't finished yet, but this is another point that keeps joe average off linux-audio.
for me it's fun to try out howto tweak my linx box and to see linux have super-low latency with some kernel patches (approx. 2ms). A lot work and time is necessary to get these things going (time a professional musician can't afford). MacOSX can provide similar latency and much better usability. Recoding some tool like Samplitude Studio which has a usability level that i never saw with any other software is nearly impossible. I once put a friend of mine in front of my machine running Samplitude - he is a musician only knowing something about his hardware like mixing-desk, compressors, amplifier... - he figured out howto use the most important functions within 5 minutes, and actually made the mixdown himself w/o needing my help afterwards.
That's the actual difference between opensource apps and professional apps (which are sadly not available for linux). So its usability not features, there shouldn't be a distro for audio, there should be some foolproof system for drivers and software installation.

Re:linux has the potential (0)

Tom Finch (581983) | more than 11 years ago | (#3600845)

Please reformat all your decimal into hexadecimal. Unless you don't know what hexadecimal is. Use the format 100h, for 256, and so on.

Decimal is evil.

I just want an Acid-lookalike (1)

Xouba (456926) | more than 11 years ago | (#3600734)

I think that I'd be happy with an Acid like kind of thing. I don't know where's the home page of it, but it's made by Sonic Foundry, like SoundForge :-) And yes, it's only for Windows, like SoundForge.

Anyway, I've got the 1.0 version, which came with my HP CD-burner (besides a lot of fine samples), and I'm in love with it. It could be vastly better (that's why there's the 3.0 version now, I believe ;-)) And I, through my ignorance, believe that just with the features that this program provides we could do a lot of things. No MIDI, no SMPTE (STMPE? SMTPE?), only audio. And without effects (you can invoke an external editor from within Acid). But the samples are treated in such a way that you can change the tempo of the song and the samples play faster or slower, withouth changing pitch. That's wonderful, and the most important thing IMHO. Apart from being very, very easy to use.

But of course, I'm just an amateur. I'm sure that pros need much more, but something like Acid available in Linux would make my musicing hours much happier ;-)

Re:I just want an Acid-lookalike (1)

gr0ngb0t (410427) | more than 11 years ago | (#3600786)

for one, you can use dsp plugins to use effects within acid, without having to launch an external editor.

and while the slowing down/speeding up of samples is ok, have you ever tried running say 20 odd samples at once, and had a close listen to the output? it sounds pretty muddy and/or mushy, even if you spend forever panning the sound out across the spectrum.

yeah acid is fun, but it needs quite a bit done to improve its sound quality before it will get wide use. it is pretty much strictly for amateurs/people who just want to try an idea out...

now making waves... thats a cool easy to use sequencer/tracker, although it also has the problem with shit sound when you use lots of samples...

uhmmm... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3600759)

SHINE GET!

Seems unfortunate (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3600771)

that they didn't plump for SuSE, probaby Mandrake as the base.

Sound artists would probably get a better "eXPerience" from Mandrake.

Ooops. Sorry...

Costumized? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3600780)

"DeMuDi is an effort to overcome this dilemma by providing a costumized distribution specifically for this kind of user."

What, like a penguin suit?

RMS (2, Funny)

SashaM (520334) | more than 11 years ago | (#3600782)

a distribution called AGNULA (A GNU/Linux Audio distribution).

Looks like RMS got his way with this one :-)

VST and VSTi (1)

sammy.lost-angel.com (316593) | more than 11 years ago | (#3600789)

I'm addicted to VST plug-ins and VST instruments. Is anything in the linux arena even close to having support for this stuff? This is just one of the many things that a linux-based audio program will have to overcome, which is why I switched to Mac (and have been waiting for stuff to be brought to OS X)

Re:VST and VSTi (1)

JKR (198165) | more than 11 years ago | (#3600873)

I see a lot of Windows plugins using DirectX / COM, but what does the Mac use? Do VST have their own cross-platform plugin format, or do they use COM wrappers on Windows?

Jon

OSS limitations (2, Interesting)

natmsincome.com (528791) | more than 11 years ago | (#3600833)

The big problem with sound program on linux at the moment is OSS. What is currently the most stable and supported(barely passable).

OSS has a number of limitations that make it very hard to get high quality sound programs. From what I was told it's like the clasic unix sockets. So you have to do a loop until the socket is free BUT this means you have a small period of time where there is nothing. This is what with XMMS, etc. you get clicks when the songs change.

Alsa uses call backs instead(an OSS compatable api is included which simulates OSS) which means you don't get that pause. This makes writing high quality audio programs much easier.

The long and the short of it is that I doubt we'll get really STABLE high quiality audio programs until Alsa is included in the Kernal in the distros (It has been included in 2.5) Which won't be for at least a year(this is a guess). The other thing that happens when the new kenal comes out is that it is supposed to have a lower latancy(VERY important from real time video/adio programs).

That combined with GStreamer and the like means that in about one or two years we should have some very nice audio programs.

That being said heres the best program I've found so far:

A Good Audacity Multiplatform Audio Program [sourceforge.net]

Re:OSS limitations (1)

JKR (198165) | more than 11 years ago | (#3600870)

Interesting. Anyone got any hard data on latency through the kernel & OSS / Alsa drivers? I'd like to see a comparison with ASIO / WDM drivers on Win2K, and whatever-macs-use as well.

How might one go about measuring latency in the same way across totally different platforms? I would be happy to do some tests.

Jon.

Lack of VST support for Linux (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3600859)

Clearly the future for digital music is in plug-ins, VST2 plug-ins to be more specific. As physical modeling continues to gain importance in terms of different synthesis methods, we are increasingly needing more computational firepower; dedicated hardware is becoming less and less appealing. The benefit of converting entire racks of effects processors, rack-mount synthesizers, and samplers into a single laptop are obvious.

Unfortunately, the standard of tying all these different modules together is VST/VST2, and to my knowledge there currently is no package that provides support for VST under linux. Even if there was such a thing, most VST plug-ins still call upon platform-specific API's, etc.

I hate to say it, but for the next couple of years I do not see linux becoming a viable platform for DAW/midi suites such as Cubase, Logic, or Performer, at least in terms of VST support. I don't know whether in the future it will be possible to port apps like Cubase to linux using wine (more specifically, Trans-Gaming's approach of porting programs one at a time), but I don't really see an alternative at this point.

I do appreciate the work that has been done with LADSPA (Linux Audio Developer's Simple Plug-in API, check here [oreillynet.com] ), but the de-facto standard is VST, and that's not going to change.

Re:Lack of VST support for Linux (2, Insightful)

TimoT (67567) | more than 11 years ago | (#3600881)

The VST plugin standard has some design flaws. Basically it wasn't designed to do the things it's currently doing (whole app as plugin) and many plugins use the native windows api calls for the guis, so the only option would be to use wine for emulation. Personally I'd prefer a new API designed from the ground up correcting the mistakes of VST/VST2. IIRC Yamaha actually proposed something that uses Microsoft's COM. In the linux world something based on CORBA or even shared libraries might work, but the design is tedious, because you never know what new ideas people come up with. For instance there are plugins with thousands of parameters and the parameters are all different types and plugins that load other plugins (meta-plugins).

If Free as in beer is what you're looking for... (2, Informative)

haggar (72771) | more than 11 years ago | (#3600905)

and you do need a kickass MIDI sequencer, I suggest BeOS + Sequitur. [angryredplanet.com] It does not have all the features of Cakewalk (I miss expecially the score) but it does have other special features of it's own, like for example processing filters and filter editing (for new filters), but there are many more.

There are many more good audio tools on BeOS. One more recommendation is XRS [lycos.it] , a groove station, similar to FruityLoops. I composed this song [mp3s.com] completely in XRS, using just the built-in software synths.

Re:If Free as in beer is what you're looking for.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3601077)

How are the free versions of BeOS coming along?
Can they handle any of this software yet?

EU sponsors many open source based projects (4, Interesting)

jukal (523582) | more than 11 years ago | (#3600918)

One thing that I don't dislike in the European Union is the sense that they seem to have regarding information technology. It seems like they are making decisions which really could benefit the European Union and not a single company. This shows for example through the IST [cordis.lu] (information society technologies programme coordinated by EU).

This gives you a glimpse to some open source based / utilizing projects they are supporting:
51 records [cordis.lu] found.

I don't know if opensource is the magic for getting EU money, but atleast it does not seem like it closes your opportunities. Just as it should be. But atleast it should be easier to get rational decisions in here than in US, in which I assume the elections are more strictly based on how much marketing support the candidate gets from selected corporations :))

A single sound standard... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3600977)

would be nice aswell.. I'm still not sure which is better our of ALSA or OSS, and both of them support different features of my sound card :/

These distros (correct me if Im wrong) are partly to add a real time element to sound processing/sampling IAMAMP (I Am Not A Music Person) with kernel patches etc aswell as suites of music editing apps? It's not just a crappy simple distro where gnome-media is installed by default!

Its not going to appeal to professional musicians. (2, Insightful)

dejectuk (534810) | more than 11 years ago | (#3600991)

This kind of thing won't appeal to real professional musicians as there is absolutely no professional grade multitrack recorders / sequencers available on Linux - not even ONE. And dont suggest SLAB/whatever - they just dont cut it. It's a start I agree, but you're not going to get the user base over until there is a decent killer application that can compete with ProTools or Logic.

Having recently bought Logic Audio myself, I am quite happy with Windows 2000 as a platform. It's not linux but its perfectly stable and allows me to get decent latencies via my card's ASIO drivers.

Unlike others, I'm interested in music, not politics...

A Few Interesting links for Linux music creation (1)

grandmofftarkin (49366) | more than 11 years ago | (#3601028)

This morning on my way to work I bought copy of Linux Format [linuxformat.co.uk] to read on the train (LXF28 June 2002). On page 8 (Linux Webwatch) was a section on creating music on Linux which included a few interesting links.

Ardour [sourceforge.net] - record 24 or more channels of 32-bit audio at 48kHz

TK-707 [usyd.edu.au] - a soft drum machine based on Roland's precursor to the legendary 808

Slab [slabexchange.org] - another audio recording tool that consists of a virtual tape deck, a mixer, a wave editor and some audio mixing tools.

Open Music [linuxtag.org] This project provides a spectrum of Licenses for musicians to realease their music under (influensed by the GPL).
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