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The Owner-Builder Book

timothy posted more than 11 years ago | from the step-one-involves-money dept.

News 376

Jeff Lewis writes: My first house was a simple tract home that did not even have phone lines in two of the three bedrooms. A few months after I moved into this first house, a friend of mine invited us over to the house they were building. For $20,000 more than I had paid to purchase this little 1,500 SF tract home, my friend had built a 4,400 SF custom home. And he had not done any of the work himself." If you're considering home ownership, and especially if you want to design in the things which ordinary houses don't take into account (here are two more related stories: one, two), this sounds like a useful resource. Read on for the rest of Jeff's review.

So a few years latter when I decided that I could afford a new home, I asked my friend how he had built such an amazing house for so little. He pointed me to "The Owner-Builder Book." When I saw the subtitle to the book, I was a little suspicious: "How you can save over $100,000 in the building of your custom home." I had seen a few too many infomercials making similar promises, but my friend had done it, so I figured that I could too.

Now, a year later, I have completed building my $550,000 home for $320,000. Much of my 41% savings can be directly attributed to this book:

Chapter 1: You Can Save $100,000
Chapter 2: Learn The Wealth-Building Secret

This is the pep-talk part of the book written to give you incentive to read the next 300 or so pages. This chapter talks about how custom homebuilders know and use the ideas in this book all the time. Ever seen an ad for a "builder's own home"? Why are they always the upper-end homes? Hmm.

Chapter 3: Contractors Aren't What You Think They Are
Chapter 4: You Can Manage Better Than a Contractor
Chapter 5: You Will Profit By Building a True Custom House
These chapters dispel myths about contractors. Hint: A contractor is very simply a project manager, and usually not a very good one at that. Among other things, they rarely shop around for better material prices. They usually use the same lumberyard that they have always gone to. I saved over $20,000 just by telling my framer that I was going to purchase the materials from a different lumberyard, all he had to do was give me the list.

Chapter 6: Conquer Details Room By Room and Save 20%
Chapter 7: How to Get the Subs on Your Side
Chapter 8: How to Build a Budget That is a Powerful Miracle Tool
Chapter 9: Commando Shopping Techniques
Chapter 10: How to Schedule the Work at a Savings
These chapters talk about how to actually save money: The key points are planning, getting down the details of exactly what you want, (i.e. I want two phone outlets in every room with two strands of cat5 and coax.), and make sure to shop around. As an example, I had bids ranging from $5,000 to $15,000 for my electrical. One would assume that with 5G's you would get less than with 15G's, right? Not necessarily: for $5,000 I got everything that I wanted, plus I was able to add a bunch of outlets that I hadn't thought of at the last minute for free cause the subcontractor was a nice guy. Now I love that TV above Jacuzzi tub.

Chapter 11: How to Make Your Lender Swoon
Chapter 12: Paperwork Before You Begin
Chapter 13: Six Months to Victory
These chapters help you get the paperwork ready that you will need throughout the process. Remember contracts with liquidated damages and lien release forms! I only had problems with one subcontractor that my wife had been responsible to get fill out our contract with and had never done it. But, luckily their own contract, which my wife had signed with them, covered most of what we needed. I even got to keep an extra $2,000 dollars because they didn't have time to come back and stain the stairs. Let's see, $50 in stain and supplies, 3 hours time. Yeah, I'll take the $2,000.

Chapter 14: Smooth Execution Saves Money and Improves Quality
Chapter 15: Mistakes You Can Avoid And Successes You Can Achieve
These chapters drill into your head what planning and details mean. I had one major problem over the course of building my home. The truss company built my trusses wrong. It took them three more tries and fourweeks to get me a completed set. Because of my contracts and planning, I cut the cost of the trusses by almost half, but the time hit was the most damaging. My total time to completion was 7.5 months. I had planned for 6.

Chapter 16: If You Decide to Use a Contractor
The final chapter discusses how to choose and work with a general contractor if you decide that being your own general is too much for you.

Conclusion
Don't leave with any illusions: this book will not build a custom home for you. By planning and following through on the information in this book, you too can build your dream home.


The first page of each chapter is available online at: http://ownerbuilderbook.com/book/Ch1.cfm, and a free CD-ROM with software templates for budgets, contracts, the entire book in MP3 format, and a previous edition of the eBook in PDF format is available. You can purchase The Owner-Builder Book from bn.com. Slashdot welcomes readers' book reviews -- to submit yours, read the book review guidelines, then hit the submission page.

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376 comments

♬ First musical post! ♫ (-1)

Mr F J Musical-Troll (582606) | more than 11 years ago | (#3729160)

Yet another first post, and more tuneful sounds [warprecords.com].

Re:♬ First musical post! ♫ (-1)

L0rdkariya (562469) | more than 11 years ago | (#3729185)

An outstanding job from an outstanding troll.

Important Stuff:
Please try to keep posts off-topic.
Try to start new threads.
Fuck other people's messages, try duplicating what has already been said.
Use a clear subject such as F1RST P0ST FAGETS !! that describes what your message is about.
Offtopic, Inflammatory, Inappropriate, Illegal, or Offensive comments might be moderated, unless you're at -1 like we all are anyway.

Re:♬ First musical post! ♫ (-1)

News For Turds (580751) | more than 11 years ago | (#3729303)

good job. As a tribute to your masterful troll ways, I now present to you the following epic tale:

Hewlett-Packard Install Network Printer Wizard
v 02.00

Table of Contents
1. Overview
2. DHCP
3. DNS
4. IP Address Support
5. Suggest IP Address (Autonet)
6. NetWare Support
a. Supported Versions
b. NDS Multiple Tree Support
c. NetWare 5 Support
d. No Novell Print Path
e. No NDS volumes
f. Support for NDS localities
7. Device Discovery
a. Gateway
b. Multi-homed Machines
c. 0.0.0.0 IP Addresses
d. Class A Subnet Masks
8. Driver Support
a. License Acceptance
b. Have Disk Support
c. HP Driver Updates
9. IPX Port Monitor and Data Corruption
10. Printer Names
11. Printer Share Name
12. Error Messages
13. Known Problems Installing HP Printer Drivers Under Windows 95/98
14. Known Problems Installing HP Printer Drivers Under Windows NT 4.0

1. Overview
This Read Me file contains last-minute product information for the Hewlett-Packard
Install Network Printer wizard for Windows 95/ 98 and Windows NT.

2. DHCP
If you try to change just the subnet mask on an HP JetDirect print server that has
been configured via DHCP, you will get an error message while using the Hewlett-Packard
Install Network Printer wizard. Once a JetDirect print server has been manually
configured, it will store the IP address, subnet mask and default gateway statically
instead of trying to obtain them dynamically. Allowing a static change only to the
subnet mask would cause DHCP-configured IP conflicts in the future. For more information
on this subject, see the HP JetDirect documentation.

3. DNS
In a DNS environment, the Hewlett-Packard Install Network Printer wizard will
automatically set up the port with the host name rather than the IP address. If you have
a DNS environment that allows Host lookup by IP, but not the reverse lookup, the printer
will never print a page. We consider this environment to be an invalid DNS environment.
To fix the port without changing the DNS environment, view Properties for the printer.
Select the ports tab. Select the port that is in use for that printer. Click Configure
Port. Change the host name to the correct IP address.

4. IP Address Support
Hewlett-Packard Install Network Printer Wizard do not support class D IP address. Class D IP
addresses are those addresses with the form of 224.xx.yy.zz

All addresses of the form 127.xx.yy.zz are reserved for loopback testing. They are not valid IP
to be used to configure device on the network.

5. Suggest IP Address (Autonet)
The algorithm for obtaining the IP address for the "Suggest Settings..." button is
derived from the Internet Draft DHC-IPV4-AUTOCONFIG by R. Troll entitled "Automatically
Choosing an IP Address in an Ad-Hoc IPv4 Network". The algorithm for generating the IP
address is to randomly generate an address in the 169.254.x.x reserved address range,
then determine if it is in use on the network. If it is in use, generate another address
in the range. Repeat until an address is generated that is not in use. The resulting
address is not intended for use on the Internet. Microsoft uses a similar scheme for
determining an IP address on Windows 98 and Windows 2000 when the system is in an environment
that doesn't have a DHCP or bootp server, and the system is configured to dynamically
determine and IP address.

6. NetWare Support
a. Supported Versions
The supported versions of NetWare are: 3.11, 3.12, 3.2, 4.11, 4.2. For Novell
queue creation, you must be logged into a Novell bindery or NDS server using a Novell
supplied client requester. See www.novell.com for client updates.
b. NDS Multiple Tree Support
The Hewlett-Packard Install Network Printer wizard only provides support for the NDS
tree the user is currently logged into. If a different tree is desired you must quit
the application, change your login to the desired tree and rerun the application.
c. NetWare 5.0 Support
If NetWare 5 is configured for IPX, and an IPX connection is being used on the client,
the Hewlett-Packard Install Network Printer Wizard can be used to create an NDS print
queue. If NetWare 5 is configured for TCP/IP and a TCP/IP connection is being used on
the client, the Hewlett-Packard Install Network Printer wizard can be used to create
an IP print path. If the client on which the application is being run has an IPX
connection to the NetWare 5 server, and the client is logged in, an NDS queue server
print path will be recommended. If IPX is not in use but TCP/IP is, a TCP/IP print
path will be recommended. In order to create NDS queues, an IPX connection with a
login must be present.
d. No Novell Print Path
The Hewlett-Packard Install Network Printer wizard relies upon several DLLs that ship
with the Novell Client for 95 and NT. The application will look for these DLLs and
the associated entry points within them. If any of the necessary DLLs are missing,
or if they do not have the needed entry points (perhaps an old version), a Novell
print path will not be available although other supported print paths will be. If a
Novell print path is not available when you think one should be, try upgrading your
Novell client software to a newer version.

e. No NDS volumes shown in NetWare 4.11
There is a known problem reading the list of available NDS volumes in NetWare 4.11 with
service pack prior to version 7. This problem has been seen in cases were the user
logs into an NDS context that is at a lower level than the available volumes. The solution
is to install the NetWare 4 Support Pack 7 or upgrade to NetWare 4.2.

f. Support for NDS localities
The Hewlett-Packard Install Network Printer Wizard cannot recognize localities in the
NDS context.

7. Device Discovery
a. Gateway
Discovery performance will be very slow if your client PC does not have a gateway
configured. To configure a gateway, choose "Network" in the Control Panel, and then
look at Properties for the TCP/IP protocol. An input should appear for entering a
gateway address. See the online help for a more information on TCP/IP and gateways.
b. Multi-homed Machines
Multi-homed machines are not supported. In a multi-homed machine, it is not possible
to distinguish between multiple devices with the same IP address. A multi-homed
machine is a computer with more than one network connection. It is possible for two
or more devices on different networks to have the same IP address. A multi-homed
machine would see both devices and there would be no guarantee that you are
configuring the correct device. In this case, either disable all but the correct
network card, or configure the HP JetDirect print server from another PC that is on
the correct network and has only one network card. This problem may also occur on
PCs that contains both a network card and a dial-up adapter.
c. 0.0.0.0 IP Addresses
Assuming that an IP address is not assigned, a JetDirect-connected printer will have
an IP address of "0.0.0.0" for approximately 2 minutes after a factory reset. After
2 minutes the IP address will automatically be assigned "192.0.0.192". Attempts to
configure a "0.0.0.0" device through an IP print path will fail. You must wait until
the HP JetDirect device has a non-zero IP address before attempting to configure it.
d. Class A Subnet Masks
If the machine running the Hewlett-Packard Install Network Printer wizard has an IP
subnet mask of "255.0.0.0" (which is known as a "Class A" subnet mask), device
discovery will suffer a significant performance degradation. To improve discovery
performance you must change your subnet mask to a non-Class A subnet mask.

8. Driver Support
a. License Support
Some drivers require the acceptance of a license. When installing a driver, if a
dialog appears that requests acceptance of a license, you must approve the license
before the application will continue. Failure to approve the license will result in
the application hanging.
b. Have Disk Support
To support new printers or drivers, the "Have Disk" button can be utilized during
driver installation. For the "Have Disk" functionality to work, the media must
contain an "inf" file (e.g. filename.inf). Some driver updates available on the
World Wide Web are in the form of self-extracting archives and are not in a format
that "Have Disk" can utilize. In this case, install the driver before running the
Hewlett-Packard Install Network Printer wizard.
c. HP Driver Updates
Hewlett-Packard driver updates can be found on the World Wide Web at:
www.hp.com/go/support
NOTE: This URL is subject to change.

9. IPX Port Monitor and Data Corruption
Some printers may experience data corruption when used with the Hewlett-Packard IPX
Port monitor under Windows NT. These errors may be corrected either by installing an
appropriate hot fix for NT or by installing Service Pack 4 from Microsoft.

10. Printer Names
When naming a printer within the Hewlett-Packard Install Network Printer wizard you
must enter a name in English that conforms to the Microsoft Printer Naming rules
(i.e. what would be accepted in the Microsoft Add Printer wizard). If a localized name
is required, assign the printer name in English and finish the install. Then open the
printer folder from the Control Panel and select the desired printer. Select "Rename"
from the File menu and rename the printer with a localized name.

11. Printer Share Name
Spaces are not allowed for naming printer shared name.

12. Error Messages
Error writing to for : The system cannot write to the specified file.

This error message may appear when attempting to print a test page or during regular
use. It usually means the printer is out of paper or unavailable. Check the printer
and make sure it is plugged in, has paper, etc. If you were running the Hewlett-Packard
Install Network Printer wizard when this occurred, there is no need to rerun the
application. Simply locate the printer in the printer folder and right mouse click on
it. Choose "Properties" and select to print a test page. If you have corrected the
error condition, a test page should now print.

Driver cannot install. Must run printer's setup program.

When installing certain HP printers (see tables below under #11 and #12), the Hewlett-Packard
Install Network Printer wizard may not be able to install the driver. You will receive an
error message stating that you need to run the printer's setup program. The Hewlett-Packard
Install Network Printer wizard may create the printer in the printer's folder despite this error.
The installed printer will not function properly. After the wizard exits, run the setup
program that comes with the printer. You may have to identify the printer as existing on a
local port such as LPT1. Install the printer using this setup program. Now delete both
printers from the printer folder (the printer created by the HP wizard and the printer created
by the printer's setup program). Run the HP wizard a second time. This time choose existing
drivers. You will see two similar printer strings. One will be from the first HP wizard
install and one from the printer's setup install. Choose one. If the wizard exists
successfully you chose the proper driver. If the installation fails, rerun the wizard and
this time choose the other driver. Finally, check to make sure the printer created is the
default printer. This can be accomplished by right mouse clicking on the printer in the
printer's folder and seeing if "Set As Default" is checked.

13. Known Problems Installing HP Printer Drivers Under Windows 95/98
Some HP printer drivers do not install correctly using the printer .INF file and the
"Have Disk..." option. These drivers and the behaviors that they exhibit are listed
below, along with directions to install these drivers properly.

Printer Model: HP LaserJet 8100
Behavior: PCL 6 driver will not install. The user will receive a "Spool 32" error.
Solution:
1. Run the file Setup.exe that came with the printer driver to install the driver.
2. Run the "Install Network Printer Wizard" to install the printer with the PCL 6 driver.

Printer Model: HP LaserJet 8000
Behavior: PCL 6 driver will not install. The user will receive a "Spool 32" error.
Solution:
1. Run the file Setup.exe that came with the printer driver to install the driver.
2. Run the "Install Network Printer Wizard" to install the printer with the PCL 6 driver.

Printer Model: HP Mopier 320
Behavior: PCL 6 driver will not install. The user will receive an error message telling them
to run the setup program that came with this printer, and then to run the printer
installer again.
Solution:
1. Run the file Setup.exe that came with the printer driver to install the driver.
2. Run the "Install Network Printer Wizard" to install the printer with the PCL 6 driver.

Printer Model: HP LaserJet 4050
Behavior: PCL 5e driver will not install. The user will receive an error message telling them
to run the setup program that came with this printer, and then to run the printer
installer again.
Solution:
1. Run the file Setup.exe that came with the printer driver to install the driver.
2. Run the "Install Network Printer Wizard" to install the printer with the PCL 5e driver.

Printer Model: HP Color LaserJet 4500
Behavior: Postscript driver will not install. The user will receive an error message telling
them to run the setup program that came with this printer, and then to run the
printer installer again.
Solution:
1. Run the file Setup.exe that came with the printer driver to install the driver.
2. Run the "Install Network Printer Wizard" to install the printer with the Postscript
driver.

Printer Model: HP DeskJet 2500C
Behavior: The DeskJet 2500C driver will not install. The user will receive an error message
telling them to run the setup program that came with this printer, and then to run
the printer installer again.
Solution:
1. Run the file Setup.exe that came with the printer driver to install the driver.
2. Run the "Install Network Printer Wizard" to install the printer with the driver.

Printer Model: HP LaserJet 5M
Behavior: The following drivers will not install properly: PCL Standard, PCL Enhanced,
Postscript. The user will receive an error message telling them to run the setup
program that came with this printer, and then to run the printer installer again.
Solution:
The drivers for the HP LaserJet 5M can not be installed with the "Install Network
Printer Wizard." Please use JetAdmin or Web JetAdmin to install this printer and drivers.

Printer Model: HP Color LaserJet
Behavior: The following drivers will not install properly: HP Color LaserJet, HP Color LaserJet
5/5M (CLJ5FR), HP Color LaserJet 5/5M (HP). The user will receive an error message
telling them to run the setup program that came with this printer, and then to run
the printer installer again.
Solution:
1. Run the file Setup.exe that came with the printer driver to install the driver.
2. Run the "Install Network Printer Wizard" to install the printer with the driver.

Printer Model: HP Color LaserJet 5
Behavior: The following drivers will not install properly: HP Color LaserJet, HP Color LaserJet
5/5M (CLJ5FR), HP Color LaserJet 5/5M (HP), HP Color LaserJet 5/5M Postscript. The
user will receive an error message telling them to run the setup program that came
with this printer, and then to run the printer installer again.
Solution:
1. Run the file Setup.exe that came with the printer driver to install the driver.
2. Run the "Install Network Printer Wizard" to install the printer with the driver.

Printer Model: HP LaserJet 6P
Behavior: The following drivers will not install properly: PCL Standard, PCL Enhanced,
Postscript. The user will receive an error message telling them to run the setup
program that came with this printer, and then to run the printer installer again.
Solution:
1. Run the file Setup.exe that came with the printer driver to install the driver.
2. Run the "Install Network Printer Wizard" to install the printer with the driver.

Printer Model: HP LaserJet 6L
Behavior: The PCL Standard will not install properly. The user will receive an error message
telling them to run the setup program that came with this printer, and then to run
the printer installer again.
Solution:
1. Run the file Setup.exe that came with the printer driver to install the driver.
2. Run the "Install Network Printer Wizard" to install the printer with the driver.

Printer Model: HP OfficeJet Pro 1170C
Behavior: The OfficeJet Pro 1170C driver will not install properly. The user will receive an
error message telling them to run the setup program that came with this printer, and
then to run the printer installer again.
Solution:
1. Run the file Setup.exe that came with the printer driver to install the driver.
2. Run the "Install Network Printer Wizard" to install the printer with the driver.

Printer Model: HP DeskJet 1120
Behavior: There is a port monitor error right after installing the printer. The printer supplied
driver is not supported
Solution:
1. Run the Setup.exe that came with the printer to install the driver.
2. Run the "Install Network Printer Wizard" to install the printer with the driver.

14. Known Problems Installing HP Printer Drivers Under Windows NT 4.0
Some HP printer drivers do not install correctly using the printer .INF file and the "Have Disk..." option. These drivers and the behaviors that they exhibit are listed below, along with directions to install these drivers properly.

Printer Model: HP LaserJet 8100
Behavior: Windows NT 4.0 shared printers cannot install the Windows 95/98 PCL 6 client driver.
Solution:
1. Windows 95/98 client connecting to the Windows NT shared printer must install driver
manually.

Printer Model: HP LaserJet 5000
Behavior: Windows NT 4.0 shared printers cannot install the Windows 95/98 PCL 5 client driver.
Solution:
1. Windows 95/98 client connecting to the Windows NT shared printer must install driver
manually

Printer Model: HP LaserJet 4050
Behavior: Windows NT 4.0 shared printers cannot install the Windows 95/98 PCL 5 and PCL 6
client drivers.
Solution:
1. Windows 95/98 client connecting to the Windows NT shared printer must install driver
manually

Printer Model: HP LaserJet 2100
Behavior: Windows NT 4.0 shared printers cannot install the Windows 95/98 PCL and Poscript
client drivers.
Solution:
1. Windows 95/98 client connecting to the Windows NT shared printer must install driver
manually

Printer Model: HP Laser Jet 6L
Behavior: Windows NT 4.0 shared printers cannot install the Windows 95/98 Postcript client
driver.
Solution:
1. Windows 95/98 client connecting to the Windows NT shared printer must install driver
manually

Printer Model: HP Laser Jet 5P
Behavior: Windows NT 4.0 shared printers cannot install the Windows 95/98 Postcript client
driver.
Solution:
1. Windows 95/98 client connecting to the Windows NT shared printer must install driver
manually

Printer Model: HP Laser Jet 5L
Behavior: Windows NT 4.0 shared printers cannot install the Windows 95/98 Postcript client
driver.
Solution:
1. Windows 95/98 client connecting to the Windows NT shared printer must install driver
manually

Printer Model: HP Laser Jet 5
Behavior: Driver will not install. The user will receive an error message telling them to run
the setup program that came with this printer, and then to run the printer installer
again.
Solution:
1. Run the Setup.exe that came with the printer to install the driver.

Printer Model: HP LaserJet 5Si Mopier
Behavior: Windows NT 4.0 shared printers cannot install the Windows 95/98 client driver.
Solution:
1. Windows 95/98 client connecting to the Windows NT shared printer must install driver
manually

Printer Model: HP DeskJet 895C
Behavior: Windows NT 4.0 shared printers cannot install the Windows 95/98 client driver.
Solution:
1. Windows 95/98 client connecting to the Windows NT shared printer must install driver
manually

Printer Model: HP DeskJet 890
Behavior: Windows NT 4.0 shared printers cannot install the Windows 95/98 client driver.
Solution:
1. Windows 95/98 client connecting to the Windows NT shared printer must install driver
manually

Printer Model: HP DeskJet 870
Behavior: Windows NT 4.0 shared printers cannot install the Windows 95/98 client driver.
Solution:
1. Windows 95/98 client connecting to the Windows NT shared printer must install driver
manually

Printer Model: HP DeskJet 2000C
Behavior: Driver will not install. The user will receive an error message telling them
to run the setup program that came with this printer, and then to run the printer
installer again.
Solution:
1. Run the Setup.exe that came with the printer to install the driver.

Printer Model: HP DeskJet 2500C
Behavior: Windows NT 4.0 shared printers cannot install the Windows 95/98 client driver.
Solution:
1. Windows 95/98 client connecting to the Windows NT shared printer must install driver
manually

Printer Model: HP OfficeJet Pro 1170C
Behavior: No inf file that describe printer drivers.
Solution:
1. Run the Setup.exe that came with the printer to install the driver.

Printer Model: HP CopyJet
Behavior: No inf file that describe printer drivers.
Solution:
1. Run the Setup.exe that came with the printer to install the driver.

Copyright 1999 Hewlett-Packard Co. All Rights Reserved.

Re:♬ First musical post! ♫ (-1)

GhostseTroll (582659) | more than 11 years ago | (#3729513)

A professor at the University of Mississippi is giving a
lecture on the supernatural. To get a feel for his
audience, he asks: "How many people here believe in
ghostses?" About 90 students raise their hands.

"Well, that's a good start. Out of those of you who
believe in ghostses, do any of you think you've ever seen
a ghostse?" About 40 students raise their hands.

"That's really good. Has anyone here ever talked to a
ghostse?" 15 students raise their hands.

"That's great. Has anyone here ever touched a ghostse?" 3
students raise their hands.

"That's fantastic. But let me ask you one question
further... Have any of you ever made love to a ghostse?"
One student way in the back raises his hand.

The professor is astonished and says, "Son, all the
years I've been giving this lecture, no one has ever
claimed to have slept with a ghostse. You've got to come
up here and tell us about your experience."

The redneck student replies with a nod and a grin, and
begins to make his way up to the podium. The professor
says, "Well, tell us what it's like to have sex with
ghostse."

The student replies, "Ghostse?!? From ah-way back there ah
thought yuh said "goatse." [goatse.cx]

well.. (1, Insightful)

Hatechall (541378) | more than 11 years ago | (#3729168)

This sounds really similar to those spam emails I was talking about earlier!

First kind post (-1, Troll)

Mao Zedong (467890) | more than 11 years ago | (#3729169)

I love you.

Re:First kind post (1)

bill_mcgonigle (4333) | more than 11 years ago | (#3729438)

Look, if you're going to be baked by 11am, home contracting isn't really for you. It's entirely the wrong drug for the job (and people wonder why contracters don't feel like haggling for their customers).

Fall Down (0)

JohnHegarty (453016) | more than 11 years ago | (#3729175)

I have to ask two questions:
1) How often do self built houses fall down
2) How much do you actually save... i persume most of the jobs would still have to be down by the pro's... or you would be refering to question 1.

Re:Fall Down (3, Insightful)

joshsisk (161347) | more than 11 years ago | (#3729221)

1) Why would it fall down? It's not like you built it yourself, you just acted as your own contractor. The contractor doesn't build anything, they just hire the people who do.

Re:Fall Down (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3729328)

And I have to ask this question:

Did you even read the review?

Re:Fall Down (2, Informative)

hexmem (97431) | more than 11 years ago | (#3729421)

My family is about 2 weeks away from finishing our home. We have built 90% of it ourselves. It is not as hard as most people think (but its not a walk in the park either!) We have saved over $100,000 by building it ourselves.

If you build your own home you don't need to worry about it falling over, because that's what a building inspector is for. He makes sure you do everything right.

Re:Fall Down (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3729465)

As others have said, you're an idiot. The book isn't about building the house yourself (despite the title). It is about acting as your own general contractor.

As a second point ... IMHO, a true owner-built house (ie. doing the actual work yourself) is much less likely to fall down becuse the owner is less likely to cut cost corners to preserve profit & save time.

For example, rebar is a classic way for contractors to save a few bucks, cuz, unless it fails catastophically (unlikely), the general contractor will never know. I've even seen rebar pulled out of forms after the building inspector has signed off on it! Wonder why your foundation is cracked?

On the other hand ... I'm building my own addition right now. For an extra $40 I put in 1/3 more rebar then required just for some peace of mind.

Re:Fall Down (1)

BlankTim (241617) | more than 11 years ago | (#3729469)

Well, my first house is still standing, granted, it's only 4 years old, but it's on par with, and probably better than, the professionaly built homes in the neighborhood.
Plus, it's the only one in that development, that I know of, that was wired for CAT 5 ;-)

1800sq ft, total cost was $65,000.00US
Appraisal value when we rolled the building loan into a mortagage was $117,000.00US and that's with an unfinished basement.

Of course I lost the house in the divorce 2 years ago, but that's neither here nor there.

If you've got the time to oversee the project, and get your hands a little dirty, building your own house is the best way to get a new home, espcially for the first time home buyer, like I was.

It's a shame this book wasn't available when I built my house. Matter of fact, I saw very little that was related to this area at the book store.
Hell, the way the blurp for the book talks, I could have built the whole place for $1.25 or so ;-)

Gilbert vs Andrew. (1)

Forge (2456) | more than 11 years ago | (#3729509)

Actualy what matters more than who builds the house or who designs it is what it's made of. I.e. Most of the houses in Florida where built by profesional construction companys and designed by certifide architects. However when Andrew hit whole comunities were converted to wastland.

By contrast most houses in Jamaica were built by the owners. (It's a lot cheaper to do that if you have even rudimentary knowlage of architecture and construction (Enogh to stop yourself from being robed by a cruked mason or moronic plumber.)

Those Jamaican houses stud up quite well to the stronger hurican force of Gilbert. Of course a lot of them lost roofs but you didn't see 2 story dwelings reduced to kindling.

Mainly because Concreat and steal are stronger than wood and papper^M^M^M^M^M^M^Plyboard.

PS: Of course this hapens because somehow we have managed to build an economy where cement is cheaper than wood for construction.

GPL: Intellectual Theft? (-1)

egg troll (515396) | more than 11 years ago | (#3729178)

Hello,

Consulting for several large companies, I'd always done my work on Windows. Recently however, a top online investment firm asked us to do some work using Linux. The concept of having access to source code was very appealing to us, as we'd be able to modify the kernel to meet our exacting standards which we're unable to do with Microsoft's products.

Although we met several technical challenges along the way (specifically, Linux's lack of Token Ring support and the fact that we were unable to defrag its ext2 file system), all in all the process went smoothly. Everyone was very pleased with Linux, and we were considering using it for a great deal of future internal projects.

So you can imagine our suprise when we were informed by a lawyer that we would be required to publish our source code for others to use. It was brought to our attention that Linux is copyrighted under something called the GPL, or the Gnu Protective License. Part of this license states that any changes to the kernel are to be made freely available. Unfortunately for us, this meant that the great deal of time and money we spent "touching up" Linux to work for this investment firm would now be available at no cost to our competitors.

Furthermore, after reviewing this GPL our lawyers advised us that any products compiled with GPL'ed tools - such as gcc - would also have to its source code released. This was simply unacceptable.

Although we had planned for no one outside of this company to ever use, let alone see the source code, we were now put in a difficult position. We could either give away our hard work, or come up with another solution. Although it was tought to do, there really was no option: We had to rewrite the code, from scratch, for Windows 2000.

I think the biggest thing keeping Linux from being truly competitive with Microsoft is this GPL. Its draconian requirements virtually guarentee that no business will ever be able to use it. After my experience with Linux, I won't be recommending it to any of my associates. I may reconsider if Linux switches its license to something a little more fair, such as Microsoft's "Shared Source". Until then its attempts to socialize the software market will insure it remains only a bit player.

Thank you for your time.

Re:GPL: Intellectual Theft? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3729437)

this is very insightful...please moderators, stop sucking on the editors cocks and mod this up. put down the dick! mod this now!!

soft spirt! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3729179)

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It's been 19 seconds since you hit 'reply'!

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Not enough phone lines? (1)

fruey (563914) | more than 11 years ago | (#3729182)

My first house was a simple tract home that did not even have phone lines in two of the three bedrooms.

Woah! I guess he means extensions, rather than different phone numbers for each room, right? Even if he does mean extensions, come one guys, you really need a phone in every bedroom and all that too? Sounds like those people who want RJ45 sockets in their bathrooms.

Get a cordless.

Re:Not enough phone lines? (1, Informative)

Torinaga-Sama (189890) | more than 11 years ago | (#3729398)

who DOESN'T want RJ-45 in the bathroom?

Re:Not enough phone lines? (1)

Gonarat (177568) | more than 11 years ago | (#3729524)

I prefer wireless -- but not paperless ;)


Actually cat-5 is nice to have for speed, but 802.11b or a is nice to have if you have a laptop. It may be a wee bit slower, but then you are not tethered to a cord.


The best advice I have heard is to put plastic PVC pipe in the walls from a phone closet (or at least a central point) when your home is built for your phone and cat-5 runs. That way phone, fiber, cable, more cat-5, etc. can be run with a lot less difficulty.


Doing without professional help (1)

ObviousGuy (578567) | more than 11 years ago | (#3729187)

Who do you sue when things go haywire?

Re:Doing without professional help (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3729263)

Who do you sue when things go haywire?

Hmmm... isn't that the same argument PHBs use to justify choosing Microsoft over Linux?

Re:Doing without professional help (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3729285)

Ah, the first question every american asks...

Re:Doing without professional help (1)

hexmem (97431) | more than 11 years ago | (#3729434)

You sue whoever screwed up. If your only acting as the general contractor and the framers make a mistake, you sue the framers. If your building the whole thing yourself, your SOL.

Re:Doing without professional help (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3729518)

May I sue you for improper usage of "your" and "you're?"

Home Construction ... on Slashdot? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3729203)

What the hell is this, the Bob Vila show?

all well and good....... (4, Insightful)

littlerubberfeet (453565) | more than 11 years ago | (#3729215)

My uncle is a contractor, he builds spec and custom houses in Berkeley. I pity him. People are a**holes about their houses. Sometimes they ask for something, and then insist that it be ripped out, just because they saw something in House and Garden.My uncle gets paid for it, but who wants to waste time?

Now, anyone who builds custom needs to remember that there are 3 people important in your project.
You: the owner
The Builder
The architect

Now, if you cannot work together, then it will be a very painfull process. Remember that anything you ask for has to be feasible and buildable. If you develop a good relationship with an experianced architect, and a builder that is used to custom jobs, not just 'tract houses' then you should be fine. Also, remember that you have to live in the house, so make it comfortable, not trendy.

Re:all well and good....... (2)

Graspee_Leemoor (302316) | more than 11 years ago | (#3729273)

"Sometimes they ask for something, and then insist that it be ripped out, just because they saw something in House and Garden.My uncle gets paid for it, but who wants to waste time?"

Speaking as a contract programmer (IAACP!) I couldn't care less if someone asks for a feature then asks for it to be "ripped out". I get paid by the day, and since I would never write the stuff that people want me to write if I weren't getting paid, I am just happy for the extra money...

graspee

The problem is Berkeley (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3729366)

As seen here [berkeleyboycott.com], they get uptight in the most irritating and unpatriotic ways.

Re:all well and good....... (2)

RedX (71326) | more than 11 years ago | (#3729370)

People are a**holes about their houses

You're right, how dare people be a**holes and demand things to be exactly as they want when they pay to have a house built. Afterall, it's only the single biggest investment they'll likely ever make.

Re:all well and good....... (4, Insightful)

Kintanon (65528) | more than 11 years ago | (#3729450)

My dad did was a contractor or sub-contractor for most of my life, and when a contractor says someone is an asshole, they usually mean something like the following scenario has occured:

Owner: I want a big brick fireplace and chimney on the north facing wall of the living room.

Contractor: Ok! Are you sure about that?

Owner: Of course I'm sure! What am I paying you for? To ask stupid questions or to build my house?!

Contractor: No problem then... *makes the necessary arrangements for the fireplace to be built*

*Fast forward a couple of weeks, finished fireplace*

Owner: Y'know, I changed my mind about that fireplace. We decided fireplaces are dangerous so we don't want it anymore. Can you rip it out and just make it look like the rest of the wall?

Contractor: Ummm... sure, but I'll have to charge you for the additional labor and whatnot.

Owner: WHAT?!?!?! I ALREADY PAID FOR THE FIREPLACE AND I DON'T WANT IT! I WANT YOU TO FIX IT FOR FREE!

Contractor: I can't do that.

Owner: Then you're fired! I'll get a new contractor!

This scenario actually happened to my dad. He spoke with the contractor that was hired after him and that contractor said the owner had tried to get him to rip out the fireplace for free and had really badmouthed my dad. That contractor was also fired when refusing to do the work for free.
These are the kinds of homeowners who are total assholes and have no idea what they want.

Some contractors will actually underbid a job, and then plan for the homeowner to change their mind three or four times so that they can charge them huge amounts of extra money based on no-change clauses in the contract. Those contractors love flighty customers, because they can work the same house for over a year and constantly be getting paid.

Kintanon

I suppose.... (4, Insightful)

Ooblek (544753) | more than 11 years ago | (#3729218)

This probably works if you have enough time to oversee the whole process. I wouldn't trust a contractor as far as I could thrown him to oversee the building of the house. As the book points out, they are generally bad project managers. (I'm sure having Jack Daniels for breakfast doesn't help.) For that matter, I wouldn't trust my wife to manage the job as far as I could throw her either, but thats another problem altogether....

Building you own house doesn't look like a job for a software engineer in my opinion. I'm sure the software deadlines would never be hit if all the engineers here oversaw the building of their house.

Re:I suppose.... (5, Funny)

Peter Trepan (572016) | more than 11 years ago | (#3729477)

It's generally a good idea to meet with as many contractors as possible beforehand, to see who can be thrown the farthest.

Re:I suppose.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3729533)

>>(I'm sure having Jack Daniels for breakfast doesn't help.)

Wow are you a stereotypical idiot.
I guess you will just chunk all software engineers into the same bunch, those who write crappy code for M$, hey look your one of them by those rules. Oh how easy it is to be stereotypical.

How much of a lemming are you?? Did you buy a house because you saw another engineer buy one that was the same, did you buy that car because you wouldnt trust your wife to buy it, like you wouldnt trust her to oversee building the house, hell you better not trust her when you go out of town for the next convention either.

I look at it like this, you got this stereotype from one of two places. You either tried to get off cheaply and had something done by a contractor that you did not research, you were being lazy and you got stuck. Or you were running your mouth, being a stereotypical idiot and got put in your place by a contractor at one time or another. I bet it was the former, which you being lazy is the reason why you got stuck.

Your such a loser, I doubt you could build a birdhouse.

That would be funny ... (-1)

Jon Katz on Tuesday (578508) | more than 11 years ago | (#3729220)

To watch a stupid Slashdot reader try to build his own house. Instead of being taken to the cleaners by a general contractor that knows what they are doing - the typical Slashdot reader would be taken to the cleaners by each and every person working on each and every part of their new home.

Sounds Great! Good Luck!

custome home... (2, Flamebait)

doubtless (267357) | more than 11 years ago | (#3729232)

Now I would be happy to be able to pay my rent on a monthly basis in this economy. Many of us are out of job and actively looking for one, something like "Custome Business Book" review might help a little more.

It'll be nice to run a /. polls on how many of us are really in the position to even buy a small apartment, let alone to be able to shelf out $300,000 for a custome home.. you.. you insensitive nerd!

Re:custome home... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3729272)

I just did :)

Re:custome home... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3729292)

Out of a job? Less /., more job search. Whaa...

Re:custome home... (3, Insightful)

grue23 (158136) | more than 11 years ago | (#3729301)

That's not to mention whether or not they have the money to buy the land that goes under said $300K custom home.

One issue with getting a custom home opposed to one that is already there is that you not only have to start paying morgtage/loans on the custom home and the land it's on, but you also have to continue paying rent for several months in wherever you're living while it's built!

Re:custome home... (2, Insightful)

Torinaga-Sama (189890) | more than 11 years ago | (#3729449)

Unemployment in May 2002 was 5.8%

This is not the great depression.

Commerce goes marching on. Besides this is a potential revenue source for geeks with project management skills. That could very well be your Custom Business book.

I feel that it is very applicable.

Very simple (3, Insightful)

Black Aardvark House (541204) | more than 11 years ago | (#3729244)

You're doing the work the contractor does. Not everyone will have the patience to run through all the steps in the book. Therefore, people hire contractors to do all this for them.

This book will appeal to a rather limited audience who has the time and energy to do all this themselves. Despite the savings, most people would rather "take the easy way out".

DIY (5, Insightful)

Papa Legba (192550) | more than 11 years ago | (#3729254)

Most contractors are idiots, I am glad to see this book agrees. Remember when dealing with most "profesionals" that they usually have side deals going. While they are working for you this time, they alwasy work with their people. Their prime interests are not yours. That is why they will steer you towards certain yards and certain sub contractors. Not becuase they are the best or the cheapest but because they get a kick back.

A peice of advice not mentioned, from personal experience. While the contractor and the sub-contractors may be who you deal with they are not the ones doing the work. The work crews are the ones that are acutally attaching things to other things. A $60 investment in pizza or beer dropped by the site one day will pay of huge in the long run. If the crews personally like you then they will take more care in constructing your house and be friendlier to change requests. I have seen crews who had been taken care off take all the bad material out of the construction piles (warped or knotty studs i.e.) and place them to be moved to another site for use simply because the homeowner thought enough of them to bring them coffee in the morning. They put the good materials in this guys house and the crap went to everyone else.

Re:DIY (1)

jdevons (233314) | more than 11 years ago | (#3729355)

"Bribing" the workers with food, drink, etc is actually mentioned in the book. And from personal experience, it works quite well...

Re:DIY (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3729443)

There's a guy I work with who made the comment that you can tell what kind of a manager the homeowner is by what he does when he drops by to see the work going on. The good managers show up with beer and pizza; the bad ones hang around with a videocamera.

not as easy as it seems (5, Insightful)

f00zbll (526151) | more than 11 years ago | (#3729260)

To do it properly, one has to have the time and energy to supervise the construction closely. If you don't, it's easy to get into trouble. A contractor has the experience to know where mistakes are made and when to check for them. On the otherhand, if you really have the time and energy to do all that, it produces much better results.

Not everyone can do it. Especially if your work and other commitments aren't flexible enough to allow it.

Contractors... (5, Insightful)

MarvinMouse (323641) | more than 11 years ago | (#3729261)

"A contractor is very simply a project manager, and usually not a very good one at that."

Knowing a friend who's father built a quite expensive house. As well as knowing contractors myself. I can attest that this is not always correct. You have to understand that a contractor knows the people to go to, and generally who to trust and who not to trust.

If a contractor can save money he will, but unless he is a bad contractor (in which case he won't be around long), they won't purchase the lowest quality materials just because they are cheap. They try to find a happy medium.

Unfortunately, the biggest problem with hiring a contractor is the fact that you have to pay the contractor on top of everyone else. You have to remember though, that you are paying for the contractors time spent in arranging contracts and getting the right people together at the right time. If you take all of that upon your own shoulders, then you are also taking the stress of finding the right people, controlling them, getting good contracts, etc.

If I had the extra money, and a choice. I would hire a quality contractor (one that had been recommended to me), since I don't have the time or the strength really to handle all of the work necessary for proper contracting.

It is true though, that if you are knowledgable on prices for various products, and services, and are willing to take on the work. It is better for you to do the work then the contractor, since you might be able to find deals that the contractor wouldn't know about due to unforeseen circumstances.

In general though, this sounds like a useful book for people who are willing to put in the effort needed to handle a large project like this. (But for my future $1,000,000+ home that I am planning on buying. :-) I think I will have to go with the professionals to handle the work. )

Re:Contractors... (5, Insightful)

sphealey (2855) | more than 11 years ago | (#3729322)

If a contractor can save money he will, but unless he is a bad contractor (in which case he won't be around long), they won't purchase the lowest quality materials just because they are cheap. They try to find a happy medium.
Would that that were true. Homeowners contracting construction are caught in several classic game theory traps, particularly those involving information costs and public vs. private information.

And the homeowner loses every time, because they do exactly one transaction per decade with the contractor, while the contractor does hunderds of transactions per year with homeowners. Yeah, bad word of mouth can hurt in a smaller community, but when was the last time you heard of a contractor going out of business for that reason?

sPh

Re:Contractors... (3, Interesting)

MarvinMouse (323641) | more than 11 years ago | (#3729339)

when was the last time you heard of a contractor going out of business for that reason?

Actually, I just heard about a contractor in Edmonton that was dismissed by the company he worked for, for just that reason. He apparently was buying really shoddy goods and customers started to complain to the company. He very quickly was removed from the industry (and blacklisted from what I have heard.)

Re:Contractors... (2)

jayhawk88 (160512) | more than 11 years ago | (#3729459)

If a contractor can save money he will, but unless he is a bad contractor (in which case he won't be around long), they won't purchase the lowest quality materials just because they are cheap. They try to find a happy medium.

This is the exact thought I had when he talks about hiring the $5k electrical contractor rather than the $15k one. Those savings won't seem so big in 10 years when you have to pay someone to re-wire your entire house because all the wire and outlets they originally put in was crap and are now a fire hazard.

Cheaper is not always better.

pr0n (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3729268)

Who the hell is paying the advertising for this website? I'm not sure how this fits into slashdot.

!!! IMPORTANT NEWS ALERT !!! (-1)

Jon Katz on Tuesday (578508) | more than 11 years ago | (#3729284)

I just got off the phone with an analyst friend of mine who works on Wall Street. She said that she just got out of a conference call about VA Software (LNUX) and it's current status.

She tells me that it's currently being moved to the pink pages. This is a book of stocks that are barely traded and worth so little they don't even track them realtime. These penny pages, as they are referred to, are thinner than the pages in your yellow & white pages. They use about a 6 point font to tell you information about a company.

So as you already guessed it, LNUX is DEAD.

Sell the rest of your stocks now CmdrTaco! Oh yeah, you're just a corporate drone that got screwed out of a stock deal. Sorry.

Good review (2)

hrieke (126185) | more than 11 years ago | (#3729286)

As someone who is planning my own home (brother is an architect, so that saves me some money right there...), this sounds like a great book to check out.
I would have liked to have a small summery for each chapter, but that's all.
Thank you for your review Jeff.

Re:Good review (1)

SN74S181 (581549) | more than 11 years ago | (#3729500)

(brother is an architect, so that saves me some money right there...),

Oh, I dunno. Being overly involved with an architect can actually drive your costs up. Architects are highly involved with the aesthetics of the project, and practicality is often a secondary consideration for them.

My family lived in an architect-designed/built house for most of my adolescence. There were things like:

the big flat patio roof over the garage, made out of poured concrete, that cracked..

the huge natural stone fireplace in the living room with double faces ('pass through') that we never, ever had a fire in, because it was non-standard dimensions so the fireplace screen would have had to be custom and would have cost many thousands....

the way the moisture condensed out of the deep-well skylights in the second floor bathroom (a rainstorm after every shower!).

the hole in the parquet(sp.?) floor where a dumb waiter from downstairs was supposed to be installed.

Hire an architect to do some sketches and early layout. Then get involved with somebody practical, so you don't spend many thousands in the decades after the house is built dealing with the problems an 'aesthetic' person doesn't consider.

Wusses (2, Funny)

boristdog (133725) | more than 11 years ago | (#3729288)

Contractor, schmontractor. I built my own house with my own two hands. It takes over a couple year's worth of weekends to do, but you get exactly what you want (or what you are willing to do,) and you pay as you go. Once built, it's paid for. Now I just have to finish paying for the 32 acres of land...

Things to do with the money you save on your house (3, Funny)

Zen Mastuh (456254) | more than 11 years ago | (#3729318)

  1. Put together that Beowulf Cluster you've been dreaming about
  2. Build a huge walk-in closet with a robot arm that automagically pours bowlfuls of hot grits down the front of your pants after you get dressed
  3. Dress up your pool area with Natalie Portman, naked and petrified
  4. Make a copy of your favorite piece of music or software package. When the Notice of Final Judgement from your friendly District Court arrives (thanks DMCA, etc...), use your hard-earned money to support the industry leeches
  5. Pay two slashbots to keep a vi/emacs flamewar going--forever!
  6. Buy the fastest AMD/Intel production chip--each time one is released! Tell your friends "I need more Megahertz"
  7. Get pulled over by the man--in Georgia.
  8. See the back of a $100,000 bill--on weed!

u r teh sux (-1)

News For Turds (580751) | more than 11 years ago | (#3729349)

usuck

Hewlett-Packard Install Network Printer Wizard
v 02.00

Table of Contents
1. Overview
2. DHCP
3. DNS
4. IP Address Support
5. Suggest IP Address (Autonet)
6. NetWare Support
a. Supported Versions
b. NDS Multiple Tree Support
c. NetWare 5 Support
d. No Novell Print Path
e. No NDS volumes
f. Support for NDS localities
7. Device Discovery
a. Gateway
b. Multi-homed Machines
c. 0.0.0.0 IP Addresses
d. Class A Subnet Masks
8. Driver Support
a. License Acceptance
b. Have Disk Support
c. HP Driver Updates
9. IPX Port Monitor and Data Corruption
10. Printer Names
11. Printer Share Name
12. Error Messages
13. Known Problems Installing HP Printer Drivers Under Windows 95/98
14. Known Problems Installing HP Printer Drivers Under Windows NT 4.0

1. Overview
This Read Me file contains last-minute product information for the Hewlett-Packard
Install Network Printer wizard for Windows 95/ 98 and Windows NT.

2. DHCP
If you try to change just the subnet mask on an HP JetDirect print server that has
been configured via DHCP, you will get an error message while using the Hewlett-Packard
Install Network Printer wizard. Once a JetDirect print server has been manually
configured, it will store the IP address, subnet mask and default gateway statically
instead of trying to obtain them dynamically. Allowing a static change only to the
subnet mask would cause DHCP-configured IP conflicts in the future. For more information
on this subject, see the HP JetDirect documentation.

3. DNS
In a DNS environment, the Hewlett-Packard Install Network Printer wizard will
automatically set up the port with the host name rather than the IP address. If you have
a DNS environment that allows Host lookup by IP, but not the reverse lookup, the printer
will never print a page. We consider this environment to be an invalid DNS environment.
To fix the port without changing the DNS environment, view Properties for the printer.
Select the ports tab. Select the port that is in use for that printer. Click Configure
Port. Change the host name to the correct IP address.

4. IP Address Support
Hewlett-Packard Install Network Printer Wizard do not support class D IP address. Class D IP
addresses are those addresses with the form of 224.xx.yy.zz

All addresses of the form 127.xx.yy.zz are reserved for loopback testing. They are not valid IP
to be used to configure device on the network.

5. Suggest IP Address (Autonet)
The algorithm for obtaining the IP address for the "Suggest Settings..." button is
derived from the Internet Draft DHC-IPV4-AUTOCONFIG by R. Troll entitled "Automatically
Choosing an IP Address in an Ad-Hoc IPv4 Network". The algorithm for generating the IP
address is to randomly generate an address in the 169.254.x.x reserved address range,
then determine if it is in use on the network. If it is in use, generate another address
in the range. Repeat until an address is generated that is not in use. The resulting
address is not intended for use on the Internet. Microsoft uses a similar scheme for
determining an IP address on Windows 98 and Windows 2000 when the system is in an environment
that doesn't have a DHCP or bootp server, and the system is configured to dynamically
determine and IP address.

6. NetWare Support
a. Supported Versions
The supported versions of NetWare are: 3.11, 3.12, 3.2, 4.11, 4.2. For Novell
queue creation, you must be logged into a Novell bindery or NDS server using a Novell
supplied client requester. See www.novell.com for client updates.
b. NDS Multiple Tree Support
The Hewlett-Packard Install Network Printer wizard only provides support for the NDS
tree the user is currently logged into. If a different tree is desired you must quit
the application, change your login to the desired tree and rerun the application.
c. NetWare 5.0 Support
If NetWare 5 is configured for IPX, and an IPX connection is being used on the client,
the Hewlett-Packard Install Network Printer Wizard can be used to create an NDS print
queue. If NetWare 5 is configured for TCP/IP and a TCP/IP connection is being used on
the client, the Hewlett-Packard Install Network Printer wizard can be used to create
an IP print path. If the client on which the application is being run has an IPX
connection to the NetWare 5 server, and the client is logged in, an NDS queue server
print path will be recommended. If IPX is not in use but TCP/IP is, a TCP/IP print
path will be recommended. In order to create NDS queues, an IPX connection with a
login must be present.
d. No Novell Print Path
The Hewlett-Packard Install Network Printer wizard relies upon several DLLs that ship
with the Novell Client for 95 and NT. The application will look for these DLLs and
the associated entry points within them. If any of the necessary DLLs are missing,
or if they do not have the needed entry points (perhaps an old version), a Novell
print path will not be available although other supported print paths will be. If a
Novell print path is not available when you think one should be, try upgrading your
Novell client software to a newer version.

e. No NDS volumes shown in NetWare 4.11
There is a known problem reading the list of available NDS volumes in NetWare 4.11 with
service pack prior to version 7. This problem has been seen in cases were the user
logs into an NDS context that is at a lower level than the available volumes. The solution
is to install the NetWare 4 Support Pack 7 or upgrade to NetWare 4.2.

f. Support for NDS localities
The Hewlett-Packard Install Network Printer Wizard cannot recognize localities in the
NDS context.

7. Device Discovery
a. Gateway
Discovery performance will be very slow if your client PC does not have a gateway
configured. To configure a gateway, choose "Network" in the Control Panel, and then
look at Properties for the TCP/IP protocol. An input should appear for entering a
gateway address. See the online help for a more information on TCP/IP and gateways.
b. Multi-homed Machines
Multi-homed machines are not supported. In a multi-homed machine, it is not possible
to distinguish between multiple devices with the same IP address. A multi-homed
machine is a computer with more than one network connection. It is possible for two
or more devices on different networks to have the same IP address. A multi-homed
machine would see both devices and there would be no guarantee that you are
configuring the correct device. In this case, either disable all but the correct
network card, or configure the HP JetDirect print server from another PC that is on
the correct network and has only one network card. This problem may also occur on
PCs that contains both a network card and a dial-up adapter.
c. 0.0.0.0 IP Addresses
Assuming that an IP address is not assigned, a JetDirect-connected printer will have
an IP address of "0.0.0.0" for approximately 2 minutes after a factory reset. After
2 minutes the IP address will automatically be assigned "192.0.0.192". Attempts to
configure a "0.0.0.0" device through an IP print path will fail. You must wait until
the HP JetDirect device has a non-zero IP address before attempting to configure it.
d. Class A Subnet Masks
If the machine running the Hewlett-Packard Install Network Printer wizard has an IP
subnet mask of "255.0.0.0" (which is known as a "Class A" subnet mask), device
discovery will suffer a significant performance degradation. To improve discovery
performance you must change your subnet mask to a non-Class A subnet mask.

8. Driver Support
a. License Support
Some drivers require the acceptance of a license. When installing a driver, if a
dialog appears that requests acceptance of a license, you must approve the license
before the application will continue. Failure to approve the license will result in
the application hanging.
b. Have Disk Support
To support new printers or drivers, the "Have Disk" button can be utilized during
driver installation. For the "Have Disk" functionality to work, the media must
contain an "inf" file (e.g. filename.inf). Some driver updates available on the
World Wide Web are in the form of self-extracting archives and are not in a format
that "Have Disk" can utilize. In this case, install the driver before running the
Hewlett-Packard Install Network Printer wizard.
c. HP Driver Updates
Hewlett-Packard driver updates can be found on the World Wide Web at:
www.hp.com/go/support
NOTE: This URL is subject to change.

9. IPX Port Monitor and Data Corruption
Some printers may experience data corruption when used with the Hewlett-Packard IPX
Port monitor under Windows NT. These errors may be corrected either by installing an
appropriate hot fix for NT or by installing Service Pack 4 from Microsoft.

10. Printer Names
When naming a printer within the Hewlett-Packard Install Network Printer wizard you
must enter a name in English that conforms to the Microsoft Printer Naming rules
(i.e. what would be accepted in the Microsoft Add Printer wizard). If a localized name
is required, assign the printer name in English and finish the install. Then open the
printer folder from the Control Panel and select the desired printer. Select "Rename"
from the File menu and rename the printer with a localized name.

11. Printer Share Name
Spaces are not allowed for naming printer shared name.

12. Error Messages
Error writing to for : The system cannot write to the specified file.

This error message may appear when attempting to print a test page or during regular
use. It usually means the printer is out of paper or unavailable. Check the printer
and make sure it is plugged in, has paper, etc. If you were running the Hewlett-Packard
Install Network Printer wizard when this occurred, there is no need to rerun the
application. Simply locate the printer in the printer folder and right mouse click on
it. Choose "Properties" and select to print a test page. If you have corrected the
error condition, a test page should now print.

Driver cannot install. Must run printer's setup program.

When installing certain HP printers (see tables below under #11 and #12), the Hewlett-Packard
Install Network Printer wizard may not be able to install the driver. You will receive an
error message stating that you need to run the printer's setup program. The Hewlett-Packard
Install Network Printer wizard may create the printer in the printer's folder despite this error.
The installed printer will not function properly. After the wizard exits, run the setup
program that comes with the printer. You may have to identify the printer as existing on a
local port such as LPT1. Install the printer using this setup program. Now delete both
printers from the printer folder (the printer created by the HP wizard and the printer created
by the printer's setup program). Run the HP wizard a second time. This time choose existing
drivers. You will see two similar printer strings. One will be from the first HP wizard
install and one from the printer's setup install. Choose one. If the wizard exists
successfully you chose the proper driver. If the installation fails, rerun the wizard and
this time choose the other driver. Finally, check to make sure the printer created is the
default printer. This can be accomplished by right mouse clicking on the printer in the
printer's folder and seeing if "Set As Default" is checked.

13. Known Problems Installing HP Printer Drivers Under Windows 95/98
Some HP printer drivers do not install correctly using the printer .INF file and the
"Have Disk..." option. These drivers and the behaviors that they exhibit are listed
below, along with directions to install these drivers properly.

Printer Model: HP LaserJet 8100
Behavior: PCL 6 driver will not install. The user will receive a "Spool 32" error.
Solution:
1. Run the file Setup.exe that came with the printer driver to install the driver.
2. Run the "Install Network Printer Wizard" to install the printer with the PCL 6 driver.

Printer Model: HP LaserJet 8000
Behavior: PCL 6 driver will not install. The user will receive a "Spool 32" error.
Solution:
1. Run the file Setup.exe that came with the printer driver to install the driver.
2. Run the "Install Network Printer Wizard" to install the printer with the PCL 6 driver.

Printer Model: HP Mopier 320
Behavior: PCL 6 driver will not install. The user will receive an error message telling them
to run the setup program that came with this printer, and then to run the printer
installer again.
Solution:
1. Run the file Setup.exe that came with the printer driver to install the driver.
2. Run the "Install Network Printer Wizard" to install the printer with the PCL 6 driver.

Printer Model: HP LaserJet 4050
Behavior: PCL 5e driver will not install. The user will receive an error message telling them
to run the setup program that came with this printer, and then to run the printer
installer again.
Solution:
1. Run the file Setup.exe that came with the printer driver to install the driver.
2. Run the "Install Network Printer Wizard" to install the printer with the PCL 5e driver.

Printer Model: HP Color LaserJet 4500
Behavior: Postscript driver will not install. The user will receive an error message telling
them to run the setup program that came with this printer, and then to run the
printer installer again.
Solution:
1. Run the file Setup.exe that came with the printer driver to install the driver.
2. Run the "Install Network Printer Wizard" to install the printer with the Postscript
driver.

Printer Model: HP DeskJet 2500C
Behavior: The DeskJet 2500C driver will not install. The user will receive an error message
telling them to run the setup program that came with this printer, and then to run
the printer installer again.
Solution:
1. Run the file Setup.exe that came with the printer driver to install the driver.
2. Run the "Install Network Printer Wizard" to install the printer with the driver.

Printer Model: HP LaserJet 5M
Behavior: The following drivers will not install properly: PCL Standard, PCL Enhanced,
Postscript. The user will receive an error message telling them to run the setup
program that came with this printer, and then to run the printer installer again.
Solution:
The drivers for the HP LaserJet 5M can not be installed with the "Install Network
Printer Wizard." Please use JetAdmin or Web JetAdmin to install this printer and drivers.

Printer Model: HP Color LaserJet
Behavior: The following drivers will not install properly: HP Color LaserJet, HP Color LaserJet
5/5M (CLJ5FR), HP Color LaserJet 5/5M (HP). The user will receive an error message
telling them to run the setup program that came with this printer, and then to run
the printer installer again.
Solution:
1. Run the file Setup.exe that came with the printer driver to install the driver.
2. Run the "Install Network Printer Wizard" to install the printer with the driver.

Printer Model: HP Color LaserJet 5
Behavior: The following drivers will not install properly: HP Color LaserJet, HP Color LaserJet
5/5M (CLJ5FR), HP Color LaserJet 5/5M (HP), HP Color LaserJet 5/5M Postscript. The
user will receive an error message telling them to run the setup program that came
with this printer, and then to run the printer installer again.
Solution:
1. Run the file Setup.exe that came with the printer driver to install the driver.
2. Run the "Install Network Printer Wizard" to install the printer with the driver.

Printer Model: HP LaserJet 6P
Behavior: The following drivers will not install properly: PCL Standard, PCL Enhanced,
Postscript. The user will receive an error message telling them to run the setup
program that came with this printer, and then to run the printer installer again.
Solution:
1. Run the file Setup.exe that came with the printer driver to install the driver.
2. Run the "Install Network Printer Wizard" to install the printer with the driver.

Printer Model: HP LaserJet 6L
Behavior: The PCL Standard will not install properly. The user will receive an error message
telling them to run the setup program that came with this printer, and then to run
the printer installer again.
Solution:
1. Run the file Setup.exe that came with the printer driver to install the driver.
2. Run the "Install Network Printer Wizard" to install the printer with the driver.

Printer Model: HP OfficeJet Pro 1170C
Behavior: The OfficeJet Pro 1170C driver will not install properly. The user will receive an
error message telling them to run the setup program that came with this printer, and
then to run the printer installer again.
Solution:
1. Run the file Setup.exe that came with the printer driver to install the driver.
2. Run the "Install Network Printer Wizard" to install the printer with the driver.

Printer Model: HP DeskJet 1120
Behavior: There is a port monitor error right after installing the printer. The printer supplied
driver is not supported
Solution:
1. Run the Setup.exe that came with the printer to install the driver.
2. Run the "Install Network Printer Wizard" to install the printer with the driver.

14. Known Problems Installing HP Printer Drivers Under Windows NT 4.0
Some HP printer drivers do not install correctly using the printer .INF file and the "Have Disk..." option. These drivers and the behaviors that they exhibit are listed below, along with directions to install these drivers properly.

Printer Model: HP LaserJet 8100
Behavior: Windows NT 4.0 shared printers cannot install the Windows 95/98 PCL 6 client driver.
Solution:
1. Windows 95/98 client connecting to the Windows NT shared printer must install driver
manually.

Printer Model: HP LaserJet 5000
Behavior: Windows NT 4.0 shared printers cannot install the Windows 95/98 PCL 5 client driver.
Solution:
1. Windows 95/98 client connecting to the Windows NT shared printer must install driver
manually

Printer Model: HP LaserJet 4050
Behavior: Windows NT 4.0 shared printers cannot install the Windows 95/98 PCL 5 and PCL 6
client drivers.
Solution:
1. Windows 95/98 client connecting to the Windows NT shared printer must install driver
manually

Printer Model: HP LaserJet 2100
Behavior: Windows NT 4.0 shared printers cannot install the Windows 95/98 PCL and Poscript
client drivers.
Solution:
1. Windows 95/98 client connecting to the Windows NT shared printer must install driver
manually

Printer Model: HP Laser Jet 6L
Behavior: Windows NT 4.0 shared printers cannot install the Windows 95/98 Postcript client
driver.
Solution:
1. Windows 95/98 client connecting to the Windows NT shared printer must install driver
manually

Printer Model: HP Laser Jet 5P
Behavior: Windows NT 4.0 shared printers cannot install the Windows 95/98 Postcript client
driver.
Solution:
1. Windows 95/98 client connecting to the Windows NT shared printer must install driver
manually

Printer Model: HP Laser Jet 5L
Behavior: Windows NT 4.0 shared printers cannot install the Windows 95/98 Postcript client
driver.
Solution:
1. Windows 95/98 client connecting to the Windows NT shared printer must install driver
manually

Printer Model: HP Laser Jet 5
Behavior: Driver will not install. The user will receive an error message telling them to run
the setup program that came with this printer, and then to run the printer installer
again.
Solution:
1. Run the Setup.exe that came with the printer to install the driver.

Printer Model: HP LaserJet 5Si Mopier
Behavior: Windows NT 4.0 shared printers cannot install the Windows 95/98 client driver.
Solution:
1. Windows 95/98 client connecting to the Windows NT shared printer must install driver
manually

Printer Model: HP DeskJet 895C
Behavior: Windows NT 4.0 shared printers cannot install the Windows 95/98 client driver.
Solution:
1. Windows 95/98 client connecting to the Windows NT shared printer must install driver
manually

Printer Model: HP DeskJet 890
Behavior: Windows NT 4.0 shared printers cannot install the Windows 95/98 client driver.
Solution:
1. Windows 95/98 client connecting to the Windows NT shared printer must install driver
manually

Printer Model: HP DeskJet 870
Behavior: Windows NT 4.0 shared printers cannot install the Windows 95/98 client driver.
Solution:
1. Windows 95/98 client connecting to the Windows NT shared printer must install driver
manually

Printer Model: HP DeskJet 2000C
Behavior: Driver will not install. The user will receive an error message telling them
to run the setup program that came with this printer, and then to run the printer
installer again.
Solution:
1. Run the Setup.exe that came with the printer to install the driver.

Printer Model: HP DeskJet 2500C
Behavior: Windows NT 4.0 shared printers cannot install the Windows 95/98 client driver.
Solution:
1. Windows 95/98 client connecting to the Windows NT shared printer must install driver
manually

Printer Model: HP OfficeJet Pro 1170C
Behavior: No inf file that describe printer drivers.
Solution:
1. Run the Setup.exe that came with the printer to install the driver.

Printer Model: HP CopyJet
Behavior: No inf file that describe printer drivers.
Solution:
1. Run the Setup.exe that came with the printer to install the driver.

Copyright 1999 Hewlett-Packard Co. All Rights Reserved.

Re:Things to do with the money you save on your ho (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3729403)

Dress up your pool area with Natalie Portman, naked and petrified.

Somehow, I don't think you're going to get Natalie Portman to pose for a nude statue for less than a cool million. But that would be a hell of a /. coup.

TV above Jacuzzi tub (3, Funny)

wiredog (43288) | more than 11 years ago | (#3729321)

I hope the contractor who installed the TV did a proper job of bolting it to the wall. Otherwise it'll be 'TV in Jacuzzi tub', which could be unfortunate if you happen to be in there at the same time.

Re:TV above Jacuzzi tub (1)

kzinti (9651) | more than 11 years ago | (#3729365)

When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro.

-- Hunter S. Thompson

Score: -1 Offtopic.

Re:TV above Jacuzzi tub (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3729397)

Just be careful that no one kicks the TV into the jacuzzi during the peak of "White Rabbit". Unless of course that's how you want to go...

That's nice, but... (2, Insightful)

An IPv6 obsessed guy (545330) | more than 11 years ago | (#3729330)

This is all well and good, for those living in areas where you can actually get some land. Here in Somerville (just outside Boston, MA), there's literally no developable land left. Meaning to build your own, you'd have to demolish an existing property... Not a cheap proposition, considering the potential for asbestos and other hazards.

Still, sounds like a good book for those in rural/suburban areas.

Re:That's nice, but... (2)

Brento (26177) | more than 11 years ago | (#3729489)

This is all well and good, for those living in areas where you can actually get some land.

Well, yeah, that's kind of the point of the book. Complaining about that is like whining about a review of a Linux book because you're running Windows. The book is about building houses: if you don't need it, move along, nothing to see here.

How to Build Your Own Custom Server (4, Insightful)

giminy (94188) | more than 11 years ago | (#3729342)

It sounds all fine and good to manage the construction of your own home, and even buy the lumber and whatever else you need. But you'd better have some carprentry experience before you do so.

I could save a lot of money by building my own file server too, but then I wouldn't have a support contract to go with it, and getting any warranty work done on it would suck, and would probably result in two companies pointing the finger at each other, saying "It's their fault!"

By the same token, if you go out and buy lumber, and have your framer put it together, and something goes wrong, he may say, "Well, the lumber you bought wasn't so great, there's only so much I can do." Going to the lumber company results in, "The framer must have done something to the wood, that was my best pressure-treated.." If your framer picks out the wood, then you definitely a case and can put it solely on his shoulders.

This is just an example, IANAC (but my brother is).

Don't buy this book! (-1, Flamebait)

rasactive (528598) | more than 11 years ago | (#3729345)

It's common knowledge that building and owning a house is associated with homosexuality. As a devout Christian [godhatesfags.com], I think it's my duty to explain to my fellow Slashdot readers the implications of this article.

You probably think I'm a fundamentalist Christian. But I'm not. I actually consider myself to be a forward-thinking bleeding-heart liberal. [issues2000.org] It's my opinion that, when Darwin invented Linux, it was the best thing that could happen to computers. While many Christians see Darwin as an enemy to the religion, I see him as the future.

You may be wondering what I am here to tell you. I'm here to say that homosexuality is not OK. And you shouldn't buy this book. You're probably saying to yourself, "But this book was written by a man and his wife." It looks like that at first glance, but here's a real picture [forcedintowomanhood.com] of "Elaine".

wireless (2)

Hooya (518216) | more than 11 years ago | (#3729351)

Well, i don't own a home yet. and for a forseeable future i don't plan to. however, the apartments that i've been renting have been pretty good about phone lines. i have a wall mount for phones in each bathrooms! but to a nerd like me, phone lines mean nothing if they don't carry DSL service. i was thinking about drilling some holes to wire the apartment with cat5 to get back to the DSL router but with the (relatively) cheap wireless hardware out there, i'm pretty set without the holes. someone mentioned wiring for cat5 but then later upgrading to fiber once fiber becomes cheap. i would imagine wireless would follow 'moores law'/n curve. i, for one, would consider being a little behind the curve in terms of bandwidth in exchange for not having to wire the house at all! most of my traffic is out to the internet which is limited by the DSL bandwidth anyways. why wire the house now with cat5 and then rip that out and rewire when fiber becomes cheap? use wireless! (and pray that it keeps getting fatter in terms of bandwidth).

Re:wireless (2)

Brento (26177) | more than 11 years ago | (#3729385)

why wire the house now with cat5 and then rip that out and rewire when fiber becomes cheap? use wireless! (and pray that it keeps getting fatter in terms of bandwidth).

Well, there's security, for starters. Sure, you could set up a VPN and use it for every single device in the home, but that's overkill and won't work with most consumer-level gear (think ReplayTV).

Then there's interference - if you've got 2.4ghz phones, you're going to be much happier wiring as much as you can, and then only using wireless gear for things that truly need to move around the house. I still plug into wired jacks when it's time to copy big files, do tape backups, ghost drives, etc.

Don't forget that most consumer gear is just now coming with ethernet jacks (think ReplayTV, Tivo, home MP3 components), and wireless is out of the question.

Re:wireless (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3729415)

You can also use dlink wireless routers. The range is so poor that even with a Cisco Aironet card the signal falls to zero 5 feet outside my door.

DIY Disaster (2, Insightful)

uncoveror (570620) | more than 11 years ago | (#3729362)

If you want to do it yourself, you had better know what the hell you are doing. You can't learn overnight reading a book. My house, which was all I could afford for a first home,is full of some clown who thought he was handy's botch jobs. It's a disaster! Cabinets hung too high to reach, and I'm a tall man! Doors are hung backwards, and nothing is level or plumb. Some things are worth paying for, like competent contractors.

Re:DIY Disaster (1)

stipe42 (305620) | more than 11 years ago | (#3729482)

Contractors don't build houses, the workers do. You're bitching about somebody being a lousy handyman, when the book is dealing with managing the building of the house, not building it bit by bit with your own incompetent hands.

stipe42

So is profit a dirty word for building contractors (2, Funny)

jaunty (56283) | more than 11 years ago | (#3729392)

People can be real idiots. I'm sure the person who wrote this book, and the person who wrote the review, used software supplied by our friends from Microsoft. So I wonder what the markup on MS software is? Prolly a _lot_ more. Why aren't they complaining about that, and providing 15 easy steps to saving $$$$$ with computer software? I'm in the housing construction industry, and I don't see too many "fat-cats" around me. Most people make enough to provide for themselves and their families, but they're definitely not living in half million dollar homes. And I might add, the products they turn out with their daily work, generally aren't the cause of great frustration, without needing an monthly or yearly upgrade, etc, etc... This book is a variation of those "Get Rich While Sitting in Your Lawnchair Surrounded by Beautiful Babes" type books. The only people who benefit from this sort of book is the author and publishing company. Now that I've gotten rid of some steam, I'm going back to work :-)

What? (5, Funny)

Mr_Silver (213637) | more than 11 years ago | (#3729404)

I thought this was news for nerds?

A nerd doesn't need a house, just a big fat T1 into his cardboard box. Pfah, homes are for wusses.

:o)

Amateur vs. Professional (5, Insightful)

sphealey (2855) | more than 11 years ago | (#3729405)

Except for certain specialized tasks (e.g. brain surgery), a dedicated amateur can almost always do a "better" job than a professional - because the amateur can value his own time at zero, and ignore issues of profitability and sustainability.

Basically, this book is saying that if you have the skills of a project manager and the time, patience, and persistence to act as your own general contractor, you can save money and get a higher quality house.

No doubt true - IF you have those skills, if the plumber who used to beat you up in high school can't still intimidate you, and if you have the time.

You also need to consider, however, that most contractors/subcontractors in a given area form their own community, and generally will work together to take advantage of any "lone wolf" outside the system. You will also have a difficult time figuring out, e.g., who the good HVAC contractors are vs. the rip-off artists. This is something the general brings to the game that you can't duplicate.

Anyway, have fun!

sPh

Custom House? what the hell? (1)

ayeco (301053) | more than 11 years ago | (#3729406)

What the hell is a "custom house" Go see an architect. Not a joeblow architect or a "home builder", let alone a contractor. If you want to build, see someone who can maximize the costs - materials don't come cheap but someone with a little insite can make a little go a LONG way. i.e., sam mockbee, rip. [construction.com]

A whole nother story (2, Interesting)

rochlin (248444) | more than 11 years ago | (#3729412)

Along the same lines, Tracy Kidder (of "Soul of the New Machine" fame) wrote a terrific book called House [amazon.com] telling the whole story from dream to carpentry to $$ etc of a couple building their first home... Great book.

Owner-builder (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3729435)

"Learn the wealth building secret"

???

I think I got about 1000 email spams in my inbox with that subject line.

I didn't think it was possible but slashdot has hit a new low with this "news story".

Pathetic!

You want to save money? (4, Insightful)

superid (46543) | more than 11 years ago | (#3729453)

Avoid the "edifice complex". Do you really need 4400 ft^2? Sure, I understand that a smaller house would stand out like a sore thumb in a smaller neighborhood, but thats a lotta house!

Every week in our real estate section we can find featured houses that are less than 5 years old, being sold by the people who built their "dream house" only to find that its now too big. IMHO a house that big is like a St. Bernard puppy, you don't realize how big it really is when it grows up, especially the cleanup!

Another pet peeve. Ever been in a 4400 ft^2 house that echos like a gym because the new owners can't afford nice drapes and furniture and art/mirrors to fill the place up?

If you can afford the neighborhood, the taxes, the furnishings, the maintenance and the upkeep of a house that big, then saving $100k might not be that high on your priority list.

My family of 5 live more than comfortably in a 2300 ft^2 house.

KURO5HIN TO GO BANKRUPT!!! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3729464)

In A.D. 2002

=>

Bankruptcy was beginning


00
00=>00
00

rusty: What happen ?
cp: Somebody set up us the economy
cp: We get financial report
rusty: What !
cp: Main screen turn on
rusty: It's You !!
creditor: How are you gentlemen !!
creditor: All your linux server are belong to us
creditor: You are on the way to chapter 11
rusty: What you say !!
creditor: You have no chance to survive sell your stock
creditor: HA HA HA HA ....
cp: Rusty!
rusty: Sell off every 'thing'
rusty: I know what I doing
rusty: Sell 'thing'

Re:KURO5HIN TO GO BANKRUPT!!! (-1)

GhostseTroll (582659) | more than 11 years ago | (#3729527)

A professor at the University of Mississippi is giving a
lecture on the supernatural. To get a feel for his
audience, he asks: "How many people here believe in
ghostses?" About 90 students raise their hands.

"Well, that's a good start. Out of those of you who
believe in ghostses, do any of you think you've ever seen
a ghostse?" About 40 students raise their hands.

"That's really good. Has anyone here ever talked to a
ghostse?" 15 students raise their hands.

"That's great. Has anyone here ever touched a ghostse?" 3
students raise their hands.

"That's fantastic. But let me ask you one question
further... Have any of you ever made love to a ghostse?"
One student way in the back raises his hand.

The professor is astonished and says, "Son, all the
years I've been giving this lecture, no one has ever
claimed to have slept with a ghostse. You've got to come
up here and tell us about your experience."

The redneck student replies with a nod and a grin, and
begins to make his way up to the podium. The professor
says, "Well, tell us what it's like to have sex with
ghostse."

The student replies, "Ghostse?!? From ah-way back there ah
thought yuh said "goatse." [goatse.cx]

My Question (1)

Yohahn (8680) | more than 11 years ago | (#3729493)

With the Urban Sprawl that has been experienced in the United States, do we really need to be promoting building of homes?

Perhaps building where are previous building was torn down would not be a bad thing.

hrm...

New Home Construction (2, Interesting)

maxconfus (522536) | more than 11 years ago | (#3729505)

Ok, maybe it says it in the book but how much time did this take? 1 year, 2 years? Most homes built by a home builder are completed in a 4 to 9 month span. Try paying rent or an existing mortgage while you are waiting to finish your home.

My big question though after reading this post is if you DIY the home yourself do you still get a warranty? Probably not. Most states require a home builder to guarantee the structure up to 7 years. Second, I imagine it is very tough to get financing for this type of DIY construction. Let alone getting financing for the land. Usually a bank requires collateral and you will not have that much if all you have is a pile of lumber.

I recommend contracting with a home builder for new construction but just don't layout cash to the first who comes along. Look into them and ask around. Most of all make sure you are comfortable laying out that type of cash to someone you do not know.

Living through it right now (5, Informative)

gCGBD (532991) | more than 11 years ago | (#3729530)

I am in the process of building a custom home at this time. Here are some things I've discovered along the way...

The primary job of an architect is to add design features to your home. In other words, they charge you money to make your house more expensive. You almost always DO NOT need one.

Instead, I recommend a good structural engineer. Start out with a pretty good idea of your budget, and a pretty good idea of what you want for a house (look through the $5 house plans magazines and books and free sites on the web until you think you are going to be sick).

The structural engineer will take care of the rest.

We started with an architect. $25,000 later we had house plans that we couldn't afford to build, and didn't even have the structural engineering done yet. Everything that the builder and subcontractors and permit process need are provided by the structural engineer, not the "architect".

After abandoning that approach, we purchased house plans from one of those house plan books. Only to discover that it couldn't be 'stamped' for the state we live in (Ohio) and had to be completely re-engineered anyhow. Another $1,000 wasted.

Once we got this part of the process right - the structural engineer cost us about $4,000 (to do everything).

I read a bunch of books on being your own contractor. Indeed the job description is basically that which we in IT call a project manager. I figured I'd make a go of it myself.

Then I discovered the next issue - every single material supplier and subcontractor had higher prices for me, than they did for a full time general contractor. 'Contractor Pricing' was often 1/2 of what they would charge me as an independent general contractor.

On top of that I had a really hard time finding a bank willing to do a construction loan without a trade contractor involved.

Lastly, I found the government inspectors to be very grumpy and skeptical about dealing with an independent contractor.

Therefore I was able to actually save money, as well as many headaches (there are enough already) by hiring a general contractor.

A *lot* of hard work (5, Interesting)

sclatter (65697) | more than 11 years ago | (#3729532)

My parents built the house they live in now. Friends and family did the framing. A few things, like the plumbing, cabinetry and masonry were contracted out. My granddad did the electrical and Dad and granddad did the finishing.

The only way this was possible in the first place was that my parents have a good friend who is a (very good) building contractor. He sort of tutored them along. Still, there were plenty of problems. My folks paid a premium for the "best" masons, who left mortar stuck all over all the face of the brick. Dad had to spent days with a rented acid washer cleaning up the mess. The guy who laid the marble in the foyer screwed up so most of it has cracked over time. My granddad fell off the porch roof that he was shingling. Luckily his paratrooper training kicked in-- he tucked, rolled, and was fine. But mostly it was the countless little things that just add up.

Was it worth it? Certainly my parents have a much nicer house than they otherwise could have afforded. But I think it put a huge strain on my parents' marriage. My parents were able to do things exactly the way they wanted, but later they discovered that some things they thought would be really cool just weren't. (The bathroom setup though good in concept has proven to be particularly sub-optimal.) We had to live with my grandparents for a while during the construction and that was pretty hard sometimes.

Basically, I don't think my dad would do it again.
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