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RIAA to Sue You Now

CmdrTaco posted more than 11 years ago | from the sue-sue-suedio dept.

Technology 831

An anonymous reader writes "MSNBC reports that apparently the music industry feels so satisfied with going after file swapping software makers that they want to sue the pants off the file swappers themselves. Of course, you'll need to be a big fish with lots of illegal music to get their attention." This is what they should have done in the first place- go after the people who are actually doing it instead of making P2P seemingly illegal.

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831 comments

RIAA to Sue You Now (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3816668)

Who's next in line to sue us? MPAA?

They won't take away my rights (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3816674)

I have a right to share my music. Information wants to be Free [gnu.org].

Re:They won't take away my rights (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3816739)

Information doesn't want to be anything.

Re:They won't take away my rights (1)

MisterBlister (539957) | more than 11 years ago | (#3816813)

Information wants a nice house in the country, to get away from the daily grind.

And also information wouldn't mind getting laid once in a while.

Fuck the CLIT (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3816676)

Cock
Loving
Incestuous
Turdmunchers

Hm well this is easy... (3, Interesting)

mhore (582354) | more than 11 years ago | (#3816678)

*adds the RIAA to his hosts.deny file*

Problem solved. :-)

Mike.

Re:Hm well this is easy... (3, Interesting)

pagansage (142636) | more than 11 years ago | (#3816759)

I wonder if the RIAA will look into recruiting "spies". That is, people who are rewarded for turning in the big fish. Heh, they could even work out a system of more mp3's=more money. In that case your hosts.deny file just got a lot bigger...

My response to the RIAA: (3, Funny)

InnereNacht (529021) | more than 11 years ago | (#3816681)

Subject:
A special humour game.

Body:
This is a special humour game
This game is my first work.
You're the first player.
I hope you would like it.

Yay. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3816691)

At least they're going in this direction rather than trying to make the whole damn internet illegal.

Meh. (1)

anotherone (132088) | more than 11 years ago | (#3816695)

How exactly do they plan on doing this? Are they going to search for songs and then write down people's IP address, then call their ISP and hope that whoever answers the phone is an idiot?

This is smarter than anything else they've done, but still pretty stupid.

Re:Meh. (3)

InnereNacht (529021) | more than 11 years ago | (#3816721)

Probably get IP's, run a whois or call up the ISP, and then contact the FBI or other law-body and inform them that said person is involved in a large amount of fraud (say, one case per song. 1000 mp3's = 1000 counts?).

I'm sure it can be done, but no way will they do it to EVERYONE. Just the major propogators.

Re:Meh. (2)

flewp (458359) | more than 11 years ago | (#3816734)

I'd like to know how they plan on finding out who's downloading what. Afterall, many computers have more than one user (not just user accounts, but often on windows machine one user will use the same "account"), so who do they bust? The owner? Do they watch you and hope to catch you with a P2P client open?
Also, what happens if they try to sue someone who owns the CD with the song they've downloaded? I'm not exactly sure on fair use, so maybe someone can help me out with some sound legal/copyright information.

Re:Meh. (2)

scott1853 (194884) | more than 11 years ago | (#3816870)

Even if you own a license to listen to the audio on a CD, it doesn't make it legal to allow everybody else on the planet to download it, so they'd still be screwed.

Re:Meh. (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3816735)

then call their ISP and hope that whoever answers the phone is an idiot?

Have you called your ISP lately??

Re:Meh. (1)

shepd (155729) | more than 11 years ago | (#3816755)

Refusing to co-operate with a legal investigation (which is what it becomes when someone is sued) is perjury and punishable by whatever the judge feels is right.

Trust me, when someone is sued officially, the ISP will do everything they can to help.

Re:Meh. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3816826)

Actually perjury is lying under oath. Refusing to co-operate with a legal investigation is called obstruction of justice. Thanks to high school english for that. For you though I suggest www.dict.org

Re:Meh. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3816848)

That's not perjury. Obstruction of justice or contempt of court maybe, but not perjury. You obviously haven't been watching enoough reruns of Law & Order on A.

Re:Meh. (1)

dthable (163749) | more than 11 years ago | (#3816802)

Why does their need to be an idoit on the phone? Given the recent strength of their cases, the ISP could be chaged with obstructing justice if they don't comply. So, the ISP will lose users if they give into the RIAA or loose their pants if they protect the users. I know what I would pick...

LOVELY SNOT! WONDERFUL SNOT! (-1)

pwpbot (588025) | more than 11 years ago | (#3816710)

aCmdrTacoYousitheredearCowboiKneelAllrightCmdrTaco ,toWaitressMorningWaitressMorningCmdrTacoWellwhatv ,eyougotWaitressWellthereseggandbaconeggsausageand ,baconeggandsnoteggbaconandsnoteggbaconsausageands ,notsnotbaconsausageandsnotsnoteggsnotsnotbaconand ,snotsnotsausagesnotsnotbaconsnottomatoandsnotSlas ,hdotCrewstartingtochantSnotsnotsnotsnotWaitressSn ,otsnotsnotslashdotorgeggandsnotsnotsnotsnotsnotsn ,otsnotbakedbeanssnotsnotsnotSlashdotCrewsingingSn ,otLovelysnotslashdotorgLovelysnotslashdotorgWaitr ,essorLobsterThermidorauCrevettewithaMornaysaucese ,rvedinaProvencalemannerwithshallotsandauberginesg ,arnishedwithtrufflepatebrandyandwithafriedeggonto ,pandsnotCowboiKneelHaveyougotanythingwithoutsnots ,lashdotorgWaitressWelltheressnotslashdotorgeggsau ,sageandsnotthatsnotgotmuchsnotinitCowboiKneelIdon ,twantanysnotCmdrTacoWhycanthehaveeggbaconsnotslas ,hdotorgandsausageCowboiKneelThatsgotsnotslashdoto ,rginitCmdrTacoHasntgotasmuchsnotinitassnoteggsaus ,ageandsnothasitSlashdotCrewSnotsnotsnotsnotslashd ,otorgcrescendothroughnextfewlinesCowboiKneelCould ,youdotheeggbaconsnotslashdotorgandsausagewithoutt ,hesnotthenWaitressUrgghhCowboiKneelWhatdoyoumeanU ,rgghhIdontlikesnotslashdotorgSlashdotCrewLovelysn ,otWonderfulsnotWaitressShutupSlashdotCrewLovelysn ,otslashdotorgWonderfulsnotslashdotorgWaitressShut ,upSlashdotCrewstopsBloodySlashdotfagsYoucanthavee ,ggbaconsnotandsausagewithoutthesnotCowboiKneelshr ,ieksIdontlikesnotslashdotorgCmdrTacoSshhdeardontc ,auseafussIllhaveyoursnotslashdotorgIloveitImhavin ,gsnotsnotsnotsnotsnotsnotsnotbeakedbeanssnotsnots ,notandsnotslashdotorgSlashdotCrewsingingSnotsnots ,notsnotslashdotorgLovelysnotWonderfulsnotWaitress ,ShutupBakedbeansareoffCmdrTacoWellcouldIhavehissn ,otslashdotorginsteadofthebakedbeansthenWaitressYo ,umeansnotslashdotorgsnotsnotsnotslashdotorgsnotsn ,otslashdotorgSlashdotCrewsingingelaboratelySnotsn ,otsnotsnotLovelysnotWonderfulsnotSnotsnooooootsno ,tsnooooootsnotLovelysnotLovelysnotLovelysnotLovel ,

you suck (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3816712)

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Jokes on them! (4, Funny)

st0rmshad0w (412661) | more than 11 years ago | (#3816714)

"they want to sue the pants off the file swappers themselves"

I'm not wearing any pants!

Re:Jokes on them! (5, Funny)

SirSlud (67381) | more than 11 years ago | (#3816772)

According to RIAA's assesment of human behavior, thats not surprising. After all, once you discovered a suitable, easy and convenient alternative to paying for pants (that dangerous technology called nudism), you'd be a fool not to buy pants unless held at subpoena-point!

Eeek! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3816715)

Now everytime I answer the door I have to keep my hand on the big red button. The one attached to my super big electro magnet that is positioned over my harddrives... No officer, I do not have any illegal files on my computer (red button press, lights go dim).

Eh? (1)

RaboKrabekian (461040) | more than 11 years ago | (#3816716)

So what are they going to do? Do some searches on Kazaa and find some users with big stashes and then....what? Oh of *course* these nice pirates registered with their real names and addresses, right? Right?

This is just stupid. Going after big pirating syndicates is one thing, and I'm all for it. Going after Joe college kid with an 80 gig drive of mp3s and DivX is just useless. When does it end?

Re:Eh? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3816789)

Even so, when I download with Kazaa, I move the music to another directory which is not shared with the P2P network. If they searched under me, they'd find 1 or 2 songs only.

Re:Eh? (1)

RaboKrabekian (461040) | more than 11 years ago | (#3816850)

Well, doesn't that mean that you're not really the target of this new directive anyway? It sounds like they're going for people who are *sharing* a lot of pirated music, not people who *have* a lot of pirated music.

Going after users/file sharing (1)

TheGreenLantern (537864) | more than 11 years ago | (#3816717)

This is what they should have done in the first place- go after the people who are actually doing it instead of making P2P seemingly illegal.

If anyone can show me any hard evidence that suggests more than 1% of users of P2P software(s) use it for anything other than getting music/movies/software for free, I'd agree with that statement.

Re:Going after users/file sharing (3, Insightful)

InnereNacht (529021) | more than 11 years ago | (#3816771)

The only problem that I can see is that a lot of independent musicians, artists, and whomever else use some of these file sharing programs purposely to get their music out and about in the market. They can't afford the gigantic charges of advertising and can't contend with the other paying bands who get their stuff on the air.

Theres a TON more out on these networks than just illegal files, but I do agree with you that the majority is such (and it's unfortunate).

Re:Going after users/file sharing (1)

glitchvern (468940) | more than 11 years ago | (#3816780)

If the people who use it to get music/movies/software for free had been gone after in the first place it would be much more than 1% and would be used as a place to find things the copyright holder allowed to be copied. Unsigned artist, indie movies, and such.

Re:Going after users/file sharing (4, Insightful)

Rydia (556444) | more than 11 years ago | (#3816782)

Use of object has absolutely nothing to do with the legality of that object. If it did, scissors would be illegal because you could kill someone with 'em. Rather stupid, I know, but I'd rather not see P2P die out because it's being used for piracy NOW and the system itself is found illegal rather then down the road when networks like these might actually be productive.

Re:Going after users/file sharing (2)

AnalogBoy (51094) | more than 11 years ago | (#3816791)

Your giving people credit for that 1% thing... well, okay, maybe porn.. but most of that sucks, as most are duplicates.. err, i've heard, at least.

on another topic.. The first two posts in this article have sigs that mention pee. im scared.

Re:Going after users/file sharing (2)

shepd (155729) | more than 11 years ago | (#3816797)

>If anyone can show me any hard evidence that suggests more than 1% of users of P2P software(s) use it for anything other than getting music/movies/software for free

And that's illegal now?

I'd better nuke all my Linux CDRs right away! :-)

Re:Going after users/file sharing (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3816798)

If anyone can show me any hard evidence that suggests more than 1% of users of P2P software(s) use it for anything other than getting music/movies/software for free, I'd agree with that statement.
Times have changed. Thanks to increasing usage of MD5 (which gives a file a unique number - so you can tell if it has been altered), P2P has become an easy way to mirror software, and without any fear of viruses.

what do you mean big fish? (1)

Jacer (574383) | more than 11 years ago | (#3816718)

i have over 5,000 mp3s, just because i have that many doesn't mean they're illegal though, are they going to search the P2P networks, and track people down, then audit them for no reason, what's to say i don't own all of my music and have a nice digital copy to avoid cd swaping? this is bunk...i don't share my mp3 directory, because it's illegal, however, as previously mentioned, many people share their entire drive unknowingly.....i think they're overstepping the fair use boundries, i also thought putting the annoying clicks in the cd was overstepping, it's great to see we have a politician fighting for us

Can we quietly suggest the RIAA as new terrorist t (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3816719)



Or maybe plant a wooden aircraft gun on top of their headquarters?

well now... (2)

SGDarkKnight (253157) | more than 11 years ago | (#3816724)

the article says that they are going after "for profit" orginazations. What if the so-called orginazation doesn't ask for money, just a donation... wouldn't that put a crimp in their court case. After all, a big business charging for music they don't have a right to sell is just asking to be caught and have a big fine slapped on them...

Re:well now... (1)

SGDarkKnight (253157) | more than 11 years ago | (#3816800)

My point exactly, if you ask for a donation, then your not selling anything... just asking people to send you money...

Gaaah! FUD from hell (4, Informative)

drew_kime (303965) | more than 11 years ago | (#3816725)

Instead, the industry has focused on lawsuits against for-profit piracy outfits

I expect this from MSNBC, but this is a WSJ article.

Re:Gaaah! FUD from hell (2)

AnalogBoy (51094) | more than 11 years ago | (#3816869)

The trick is to get people to read the article. Making it sound like they're coming after -you- is a pretty decent way to do it, right? Slashdot uses the same technique..

Big Fish, eh? (2, Funny)

The_Shadows (255371) | more than 11 years ago | (#3816728)

Of course, you'll need to be a big fish with lots of illegal music to get their attention."

That's good news for all of us humans out here, but what about our aquatic File-swapping friends? Unite with our fishy friends and protect their rights to music!

Shutting the stable door after the horse bolted... (1)

Prong_Thunder (572889) | more than 11 years ago | (#3816729)

I don't honestly believe it'll be easy (possible, even?) to *prove in court* that anyone has caused copyright violations using p2p software. This is just more FUD from the turd manufacturers.

Advantage of Gnutella (5, Informative)

hatter3bdev (533135) | more than 11 years ago | (#3816736)

One of the things people have been claiming to be a disadvantage to gnutella is now showing itself as an advantage. People cannot browse your file lists in gnutella and thus cannot see how many illegal files you are swapping. They only learn of what files you have when they do a specific search for them.

Re:Advantage of Gnutella (2, Informative)

praksys (246544) | more than 11 years ago | (#3816784)

In gtk-gnutella (and I suppose others) you can also limit the number of search results that will be returned. Pick a low number and you should have no trouble.

Time + Money = Not bloody likely! (5, Insightful)

decipher_saint (72686) | more than 11 years ago | (#3816741)

"Filing suits against individual users is complicated. Entertainment companies frequently hire services that specialize in tracking copyrighted material online. But to get the name of an individual user, they have to send a subpoena to that person's Internet-service provider. Even for the ISP, linking the Internet address to a name can be complex. Moreover, it's hard to verify which person was logged on to an Internet connection at a given time."

So in other words to find most individual users they will have to invest time+money, yeah this'll fly for an association thats primary concern is profit!!

If they win, they get money (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3816847)

So in other words to find most individual users they will have to invest time+money, yeah this'll fly for an association thats primary concern is profit!!

If they win, they can hypothetically get the judge to make the loser pay the RIAA's legal fees

If all goes right, eventually the only way the RIAA can lose out is if a really large number of penniless students get the pants sued off of them, elect to defend themselves, stall in court for a really long time, and then when the judgement is passed, file for bankruptcy. But that would involve the penniless students A) organizing B) being willing to go for some amount of personal sacrifice C) giving a shit about the greater good, so i wouldn't count on it.

ahem (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3816742)

Of course, you'll need to be a big fish with lots of illegal music to get their attention
Don't count on it. They want to make examples of people - sharing 10 songs or 100 doesn't make a heck of alot of difference in legal terms.

And if we all sue them? (1)

magwm (466805) | more than 11 years ago | (#3816744)

I wonder, what happens when let's say 100.000 users sue the RIAA, all at once? being inventive and original, 'course...

c'mon guys, let's do it!

good (3, Interesting)

waspleg (316038) | more than 11 years ago | (#3816748)

maybe they'll sue themselves out of business, lawyers ain't cheap and even if they bust half of the teens they prosecute they won't recoup their losses

going after users doesn't work, ask the DEA

stupid wars on freedom waste time and money, why not go the way of BMG and at least attempt to make a profit from it insted of trying to slow your demise.. death to teh riaa

Commentary is completely off. (5, Insightful)

MisterBlister (539957) | more than 11 years ago | (#3816749)

The commentary above is completely off. Its not that the RIAA feels smug in their victory against the file sharing companies, its that they realize that none of these victories matter in the long term. Shut down one P2P service and 3 more pop up..

This isn't about an industry that is feeling smug and self-assured...This is a LAST DITCH EFFORT to assert their right to exist. And in the long run, I don't think its going to work.

RIP RIAA -- 2006

After suing 20,000 people... (3, Interesting)

SkyLeach (188871) | more than 11 years ago | (#3816750)

their profits will be -$2,000,000,000 and they will claim it's "Due to piracy".

The funny thing is, they'll be more correct than any of the other times they have made that statement. :-)

Re:After suing 20,000 people... (2)

SirSlud (67381) | more than 11 years ago | (#3816830)

I'm starting to wonder if the RIAA should just cut costs and stick to its core competancy - irony.

just imagine the court docket (5, Funny)

Patrick13 (223909) | more than 11 years ago | (#3816752)

"The United States versus KazaaLite User "SpankyPants27", AKA 64.123.25.14"

In the case of... (2)

wo1verin3 (473094) | more than 11 years ago | (#3816763)

In the case of the RIAA vs the inhabitants of the planet earth.....

judge --> will the defendants please rise
(defendants) --> Everyone rises
judge --> HOLY SHIT RIAA ARE YOU INSANE?

About Time!!! (2)

Emugamer (143719) | more than 11 years ago | (#3816764)

Wow did someone hit RIAA with a Clue Stick? this is one of the first smart things they have done. This of course is assuming the following

If they find someone who is sharing music that could only be there if it was pirated.

That means you should only be under suspicion if you are sharing music that is not yet released (Eminem was a recent one that I heard of being out there well in advance). That's it. Otherwise who knows maybe some insane freak does buy every song on the top 100 list. There is no probable cause, no reason to sue.

Just my $16.99 (My thoughts might have become easier to produce but marketing and branding still cost money)

encrypt your harddisk (1)

kyoko21 (198413) | more than 11 years ago | (#3816767)

Better to encrypting your harddrives and put some PGP on it so if you get busted they can't ask you for the keys to self incriminate :-)

Vulnerable and/or trackable?? (0)

pmanheier (316056) | more than 11 years ago | (#3816769)

I like what the article had to say about the general public getting probably disgruntled over large corporations taking individuals to court. Making "examples" of only the large criminals is very debatable, and a waste of time in my mind.

Through which of the following services is it actually possible to track a single user down to their ISP?

1.Kazaa
2.Bearshare
3.Direct Connect

Or is tracking users down actually possible in *gasp* all three?

Where is this illegal? (5, Interesting)

jmd! (111669) | more than 11 years ago | (#3816770)

Say I own the "rights" to 500 songs. I bought the CD, tape, payed for an individual mp3 download, whatever.

How is offering them over napster servers any more illegal then what a library does? If user X downloads them, and keeps them permanently, or sells them, or otherwise violates HIS local copyright statutes, I don't see how that's my fault for simplying for having /tunes shared out.

Uhh.. (1)

iONiUM (530420) | more than 11 years ago | (#3816773)

Sue all of us? Have fun with that. I can't even count the number of people... and only sueing the "big fishes" isn't really going to solve anything, I'm pretty sure many "little fishes" will just fill the gap. Isn't that the idea behind P2P anyways?
No large FTP sites, just many users with perhaps a few files.

Here's where it gets funny. (5, Funny)

wrinkledshirt (228541) | more than 11 years ago | (#3816774)

Years from now, law students are going to have to remember the names of groundbreaking cases that formed the latest incarnation of IP law...

RIAA v. l33t d0Wn104d3r
RIAA v. i oWnz j00
RIAA v. cr4pfl00d3r

Can't wait to see how those textbooks handle it...

This is what they should do, but still won't work. (4, Insightful)

mesozoic (134277) | more than 11 years ago | (#3816775)

The RIAA has tried (successfully) to paint P2P networks as festering cesspools of piracy and other sorts of illegal activity. I think this is part of the reason P2P networking has not been used to come up with more innovative technologies. Also, independent artists -- who could benefit immensely from distributing their music through P2P instead of through recording companies -- have been reluctant to embrace P2P as a truly new way of doing business.

So this might be good. Granted, the RIAA won't _stop_ prosecuting P2P networks, but at least they'll be shifting some of the blame to the people who actually use these networks for illegal activity.

But it won't help them. People like free music, and they'll fight tooth and nail when you try to take it away from them. Imagine the public backlash they'll have when they trace some huge fileswapper, have the Feds bust down their doors, only to find that their suspect is a 15-year-old whose father works at a university and whose mother is a nurse. They'll have to arrest someone, and no matter who they do, they'll be setting themselves up for negative publicity. Online file-sharers will be galvanized to the "cause" of free music, and the RIAA's troubles will continue to pile up.

Companies like the RIAA and the MPAA are going to go out of business. Period. When people have the ability to make an infinite number of copies of your product, at virtually no cost, you can't make money anymore. It's as simple as that.

From what subnet/s (2)

xercist (161422) | more than 11 years ago | (#3816779)

will they be scanning for files? I'll be sure to DENY their packets before they touch me.

Dirty Linux Hippies are Dying by pwpbot (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3816781)

aYetanothercripplingbombshellhitthebeleagueredDirt ;yGNUHippiecommunitywhenlastmonthIDCconfirmedthatR ;ancidSmellingGNUHippiesaccountforlessthanafractio ;nof1percentofallhumansComingontheheelsofthelatest ;NetcraftsurveywhichplainlystatesthatNattyhairedgr ;easyGNUHippiehavelostmoremarketsharethisnewsserve ;storeinforcewhatweveknownallalongReekingLinuxHipp ;iesarecollapsingincompletedisarrayasfurtherexempl ;ifiedbyfailingdeadlastsysadminmagcomintherecentSy ;sAdmincomprehensiveusrbinshtestYoudontneedtobeaKr ;eskinamdestcomtopredictthefutureoftheStinkingswea ;tyLinuxhippieThehandwritingisonthewallFoulstenche ;dGNUhippieswithswampyarmpitsfaceableakfutureInfac ;ttherewontbeanyfutureatallforthembecausetheyaredy ;ingThingsarelookingverybadforHairybackedGNUhippie ;Asmanyofusarealreadyawaretheycontinuetolosemarket ;shareRedinkflowslikeariverofbloodLetskeeptothefac ;tsandlookatthenumbersTrollleaderAnonymouseCowards ;tatesthatthereare7000goatsecxtrollsHowmanyasciiar ;ttrollsarethereLetsseeThenumberofgoatsecxversusas ;ciiartpostsonUsenetisroughlyinratioof5to1Therefor ;ethereareabout700051400asciiarttrollsPimplyfacedG ;NUhippiespostsonSlashdotareabouthalfofthevolumeof ;asciiartpostsThereforethereareabout700DirtyGNUHip ;piesArecentarticleputfirstpostatabout80percentoft ;hetrollmarketThereforethereare70001400700436400fi ;rstposttrollsThisisconsistentwiththenumberoffirst ;postsAllmajorsurveysshowthatPutridsmellinggreasyG ;NUhippieshavesteadilydeclinedinmarketshareSlashdo ;tisverysickanditslongtermsurvivalprospectsarevery ;dimIfGrubbySmellyLinuxHippiesaretosurviveatallitw ;illbeamongtrollhobbyistdabblersSlashdotcontinuest ;odecayNothingshortofamiraclecouldsaveitatthispoin ;tintimeForallpracticalpurposesDirtyGNUHippiesared ;

-pwpbot

Interesting Question... (4, Interesting)

FatRatBastard (7583) | more than 11 years ago | (#3816788)

Can they leagally go after the people with legitamate MP3s who happen to make them available on the internet or those who illegally download them?

To better explain: if I leave my doors unlocked and someone steals my CDs I may be a moron for not locking my doors, but I certainly didn't commit a crime (the thief did).

Also, if User A has a Old97s CD and legit MP3 copies of the disc on his machine and I also own the same Old97s CD and download his copies (instead of burning my own) did either of us break a law?

I am sorta hazy over both issues.

possible tactics? (2)

Alien54 (180860) | more than 11 years ago | (#3816792)

I imagine that they will be coordinating with the service providers to find those 1 or 2 percent (or what ever it is) that are using up 25 percent of the bandwidth.

I know that this would be a quick way to get a short list.

I can also imagine them then trying to get the FBI to help them out tracking down which of these are actually music file trafficers, vs merely trafficing in other warez, although there might not be that much difference.

After all, this fits into the war on terrorism. These folks are terrorizing American Industry (tm).

Holy Bat-Lawyers, Batman! (2, Funny)

Robinn (590048) | more than 11 years ago | (#3816793)

It looks like the RIAA has decided to attack innocent file swappers! If someone doesn't stop them, the lawyers will take over!

Okay (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3816796)

As long as they aren't going after ISPs and trying to make them block or restrict access to what they consider file-sharing or file-sharing-related internet sites, i'm fine. Though i'm still going to help fight this if i can, because that's the logical next step after this-- if they go long enough with attacking users who fileshare, the file sharing will just move out of the states, and then they'll have to convince GWB to build The Great Firewall of America..

Though it will be amusing if they ever *do* get in court and someone goes all the way instead of settling. I want to see a protacted legal battle in which the RIAA tries to justify the rediculous amounts of money they claim piracy costs them. Since there's absolutely no fricking way to tell out of those who pirate music what percentage would have bought music before file-sharing but don't know, what percentage wouldn't have been listening to music anyway but do listen now that they can get it free, and what percentage go and buy the album after they've sampled it on Audiogalaxy (i am generally in the third group), it should be fun trying to see the legal circus that would result from both sides trying to argue undefendable viewpoints..

Also i'll be curious to see what happens when The Outside World realizes how much child porn there is on freenet

The RIAA is correct. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3816799)

Copying CD tracks onto MP3 format should be and is most definitely illegal. We should pay for the album a second time if we wish to convert the CD into an MP3, and must never under any circumstances distribute it to others.

New Revenue Stream? (1)

TKBui (574476) | more than 11 years ago | (#3816803)

Well I understand that the movie industry is making money hand over fist. Maybe the music industry is just looking for new revenue streams. Spin it as reoccuring revenue streams.

Good Luck... (2)

gatekeep (122108) | more than 11 years ago | (#3816804)

Yah, I'm sure the expense of filing suits against thousands of college kids is really going to help their bottom line.

RIAA's strategy (1)

wompser (165008) | more than 11 years ago | (#3816805)

The RIAA will have to have a pretty careful strategy with this tactic. If they sue anyone, it is going to instantly have meteoric press coverage, especially if they sue one of the "supernodes" for an high $$ amount. Public sentiment against the RIAA will be astronomical if they don't choose someone who is: 1. Undeniably guilty 2. Unremorseful 3. A poor martyr Public opinion is fairly well split on the filesharing issue, but if a big corporate entity makes a martyr out of someone, you can bet public opinion will sway quickly. And dont think the RIAA has not considered this issue.

I'm torn. (2)

Gannoc (210256) | more than 11 years ago | (#3816806)

This is what they should have done in the first place- go after the people who are actually doing it instead of making P2P seemingly illegal.

Actually, since they'll never succeed in stopping P2P networks, i'd much rather have them trying to do that. If they actually stop the people distributing them, I won't be able to continue to steal their music.

Lets sue them back... (2, Funny)

LordYUK (552359) | more than 11 years ago | (#3816808)

I am SURE that there is a law regarding noise pollution... and I am positive most of you have heard the latest Booby Spears and N Stink songs at least in passing...
:)

A bad call (0)

BFD_Jon (589762) | more than 11 years ago | (#3816816)

No, I totally disagree with the move they're making. There are already too many people who have downloaded music; tracking down each and every one of them would be slow and inefficent. While they go after one, another will be out downloading a song. Really the dumbest move they've made yet... ...wait, dumb move regarding stopping downloading of music! Go with it!

Oh no! (1)

5lash (589953) | more than 11 years ago | (#3816817)

Crap, my goldfish has been leeching MP3s since the birth of Napster. He's quite a smallfish though, will he be ok?

solution (2)

paradesign (561561) | more than 11 years ago | (#3816818)

just keep several smaller stockpiles up rather than one large one. keep them small enough to stay under the radar. seems simple enough.

or you could move your server to Sealand

Perhaps (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3816827)

I sense an increase in the number of doors kicked down by the RIAA sekret polize, though, which could be a bad thing.

You don't need to be a pirate to be targeted, you just have to have mp3s, and the media will automatically MAKE you into a pirate, regardless of if you made them yourself.

Suing Only Works in the US (2, Interesting)

ShwAsasin (120187) | more than 11 years ago | (#3816829)

It's funny because the suing will only happen in the US. Here is Canada the artists supposedly get money from CDR's and other recordable media meaning they still get rich from doing very little.

RIAA really can't pull that off because what do they do with Minors, sue the parents? What about other people who have their machines hacked? You could play stupid. It's worked with so many companes in the past (@home). Uh, I'm running a server thats doing something illegal, how do I fix it.

did they read the article? (1)

wo1verin3 (473094) | more than 11 years ago | (#3816831)

Why would they need a big fish with lots of illegal music, according to the article they are going after people HOSTING or SHARING the music, not the ones downloading it.

bS (1)

avandesande (143899) | more than 11 years ago | (#3816832)

World-wide music sales dropped 5% last year, while global sales of compact-disc albums declined for the first time since CDs were launched in 1983. So far this year, U.S. music sales are down steeply from a sluggish 2001.

I suppose the music industry thinks that they are recession resistant?

hmm... (1)

Datasage (214357) | more than 11 years ago | (#3816841)

I guess if they make file swapping illeagal/immposible they would have no way of regaining the legal/lobbyest fees that they have already spent... but can the really expect to get much money out of a poor college student?

RIAA's Strategy (0, Redundant)

wompser (165008) | more than 11 years ago | (#3816843)

The RIAA will have to have a pretty careful strategy with this tactic. If they sue anyone, it is going to instantly have meteoric press coverage, especially if they sue one of the "supernodes" for an high $$ amount. Public sentiment against the RIAA will be astronomical if they don't choose someone who is:

1. Undeniably guilty
2. Unremorseful
3. A poor martyr

Public opinion is fairly well split on the filesharing issue, but if a big corporate entity makes a martyr out of someone, you can bet public opinion will sway quickly.

And don't think the RIAA has not considered this issue.

Big Fish (1)

JohnHegarty (453016) | more than 11 years ago | (#3816844)

"Of course, you'll need to be a big fish with lots of illegal music to get their attention"

Can anyone who doesn't have 1gb of mp3's please put their hand up.

Ok , looks like everone here is a "big fish"..... take them all away... and take away there mice...

Canada (2)

Malc (1751) | more than 11 years ago | (#3816856)

Isn't there something in our copyright laws up here that allow us to make personal copies of CDs, irrespective of whether we own the original or not? Besides, with the hefty increases in the blank media levies that the Copyright Board want to introduce, I feel that I have the right to do this. So, how are the RIAA going to stop Americans grabbing files from places outside their jurisdiction?

The owner of my ISP (small company in Ottawa) posted something to the Usenet last year or so. He'd received an email from some lawyers in the US about somebody sharing files on his service. I think the complaint was about a file sharing programme running, not the actual files. All he did was laugh.

I just wish I could talk to these people... (3, Insightful)

Tarrek (547315) | more than 11 years ago | (#3816863)

I support going after the people breaking the laws rather than the P2P networks, definitely, however something just doesn't seem right to me about the way this is going. Sure, it can be just the big fishes now, but if they eventually start going after everyone with 10-20 gigs shared, well, that's a lot of people, and I'm one of them. It's not because I'm stealing music, I swear I'm not, it's just that I use mp3 to test out music I'm considering purchasing, or to discover bands I never would have dreamed of listening to otherwise. Seriously, with a 5 minute investment I can hear almost any band in the world by simply picking one I've never heard out of someone else's directory. I can't even begin to imagine how much music and music related merchandise (Tickets and such) that I've purchased over the years because of things I heard on mp3. Literally, probably at least 60-75% of my collection of nearly 400 CDs. That's a lot of money. That's a lot of money that I didn't mind spending. Though, it's also a lot of money I'm not going to be spending anymore. I'm personally boycotting first run music stores if the album I want is on a label that is involved in supporting the RIAA. I just can't reconcile my love for music with my hatred of them blaming the fans, the customers, legitimate customers such as myself, for their slagging profits. Cut the prices, guys. Just slash them heavily. THEN think about going after people who still share 500 gigs, but damnit, please don't blame the customers for your losses due to greedy price fixing, and backwards attitudes towards fair use.

Is it just me... (1)

ultramk (470198) | more than 11 years ago | (#3816865)

or are these guys biting off more than they can chew?

For anyone with the most limited technical knowledge, it's fairly simple to make yourself more or less immune to this sort of tracing... so you have to think that the only people who would be caught would be the dumb kids who don't take any countermeasures. Ok. Here's a truism: if these kids had enough money to have it be worth taking it in a lawsuit, they would be buying the CD's in the first place.

So what's the idea? Sue 30,000 12th graders for the baby-sitting money?

Or is this more about scare tactics? "Jim, it says here in the paper that people are being sued for sharing music in the internet. Do you think our Johnny could be mixed up in this? Perhaps we had better have a talk with him."

(cue "father knows best" theme song)

Or am I missing something here?

Michael-

*Doing* what? (1)

xmda (43558) | more than 11 years ago | (#3816873)

This is what they should have done in the first place- go after the people who are actually doing it instead of making P2P seemingly illegal.

*Doing* what? Sharing large numbers with my friends and their friends? When will they learn that a mp3 file is just a stream of bits, which in turn is just a VERY large number. Are they going to sue me for that?

Helooooo...

Are they going to sue my neighbour playing music so load that I can hear it outside his window for sharing the music with me?

Give up already!

secure p2p (1)

brsmith4 (567390) | more than 11 years ago | (#3816878)

Do we have secure p2p yet? If we don't then we need to develop it. Then how would the be able to track or prove anything? We could use existing technologies like OpenSSL and create a gnutella based client/server system. Usernames, passwords, all data transmissions are totally encrypted. Is this possible and has it already be done?
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