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Sybase Advertises 'PATRIOTcompliance'

michael posted more than 11 years ago | from the boogiemen-of-the-infopocalypse dept.

Privacy 158

xmtrx writes "While everyone is rabidly pouncing, pounding and going pundit on Palladium, little-to-no attention is being paid to enterprise-class spyware such as Sybase's PATRIOTcompliance Solution. Their ad includes such gems as "Non-compliance is not an option" and "...helps you satisfy the many integration requirements of the USA PATRIOT Act by... filtering your customers, employees and suppliers against known suspects, and then... continuously monitoring their future activities." No punchline." The laws passed which affect financial institutions are mostly opaque to Joe Citizen. Sybase's press release sheds a little bit of light on what is going on behind the scenes.

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158 comments

WWJD? (0, Funny)

Breakfast Pants (323698) | more than 11 years ago | (#3921769)

This world is getting scary.. with things like this the only way to really find a solution is to ask "What would jesus do?"

Re:WWJD? (0)

OzPeter (195038) | more than 11 years ago | (#3921840)

Unless of course you subscribe to a religeon or philosophy that does not include Jesus in it's manifesto. In which case the WWJD question is rather moot.

You may consider that Christianity is the be all and end all of explaining the universe, but please remember that many people do not.

And I am not trying to discredit *your* beliefs. Just that I think differently.

Personally I think that some of Christianities beliefs are quite unstable, especially when it comes to trying to match the end of times with current political and world events. (I am actually worried that some people are trying to force a match)

As per what Jesus said - no one will know when it comes.

Re:WWJD? (1)

Demonspawn (187073) | more than 11 years ago | (#3921855)

Actually, he's all wrong. WWJD stands for: Who Wants Jack Daniels?

--Demonspawn

Re:WWJD? (-1)

handybundler (232934) | more than 11 years ago | (#3921865)

and the lyrics are:

"I can prove it to you watch the rotation
It all adds up to a funky situation." -- Public Enenmy

If you can't quote lyrics properly, don't do it at all.

Re:WWJD? (0)

hettb (569863) | more than 11 years ago | (#3921882)

This world is getting scary.. with things like this the only way to really find a solution is to ask "What would jesus do?"

Gun down abortion doctors? Give $300 tax rebates?

Re:WWJD? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3921927)

Duffman...torn...What would...jesus do :)

Re:WWJD? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3921979)

JW-RTFM

Re:WWJD? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3922139)

WWJD? "Give away all your belongings to the poor, then come follow me." After this, you no longer need a bank, or even a Social Security Number. If it makes you feel a little better, drop by the local government office and throw a few tables around. So they get a little rattled. Eh! Just make sure you stay away from guys named Judas, and if you happen to spot any wooden objects that even faintly resemble a Big Plus Sign, turn around and begin walking at a fairly brisk pace in the opposite direction (seriously). The world is getting scary? Fear not.

Re:WWJD? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3922221)

Maybe he would make the evil spirits in our police state leaders leave them and go into the bodies of pigs.

Re:WWJD? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3922295)

Help me, Jeebus!

Re:WWJD? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3922618)

Sometimes I wonder why God would bother stepping in to save our sorry butts. I prefer a political solution myself. I say, turn out all of the current members of congress, the current occupant of the whitehouse, put in people who aren't Demogogues or Republocrats, and get them to fire the megabureaucracy that wants to run our lives. Then get them to retire the current occupants of the Supreme court and replace them with people who plan to make the elected officials govern within the bounds of the constitution as it was written.

Re:WWJD? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3922770)

Go where the money is, next Sybase will release GenocideCompliance the new generation of DB for psychopathic dictators everywhere, Saddam says "It's the best! I got rid of my Kurdish problem in half the time it would have taken otherwise!", currently they are working with the US administration to hunt down Muslims, hackers, and anyone who mentions the lies and corruption of American business and politics! Get your FREE CD complete with video clips of the torture and murder that this new product has been instrumental in! Order now while stocks last!

What would Brian Boitano do? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3922775)

I'm sure he'd kick an ass or two,
That's what Brian Boitano'd do. . .

American Citizen's option (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3921778)

Move back to Europe! We don't a PATRIOT act promoting to spy your neighbours, friends, employees, ...

Re:American Citizen's option (2)

blowdart (31458) | more than 11 years ago | (#3921783)

You know that in Europe banks have to report cash transactions over a certain size, and other "suspicous activities" to law enforcement? Europe already has that sort of "monitoring" in place to stop money laundering.

Re:American Citizen's option (0)

hettb (569863) | more than 11 years ago | (#3921793)

Not all European countries are the same, e.g. Liechtenstein probably doesn't have such legislation.

Re:American Citizen's option (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3921795)

You know that this is really new, and e.g. countries like Austria were forced by the US to do so! Austria was even on an index with countries like Iraq, Libya, Syria, ... just because of that.

Re:American Citizen's option (1)

2g3-598hX (586789) | more than 11 years ago | (#3921818)

You'll find that in all developed countries, including the USA, banks need to report large cash transactions to government agencies. I think the limit in the USA is about $10k?

Re:American Citizen's option (2, Informative)

Moofie (22272) | more than 11 years ago | (#3922001)

Yup. To make it mo' bettah, any time you carry a significant amount of cash, the DEA can sieze it without due process on the assumption that you're dealing drugs. Good luck getting it back.

More:

http://www.libertarianworld.com/Property-Seizure -R ights.html

http://www.geocities.com/rab_cdg1/jones.htm

Re:American Citizen's option (1)

2g3-598hX (586789) | more than 11 years ago | (#3922184)

Cool...and then John Travolta, Halle Berry and Hugh Jackman steal the money made from these assets and use them to kill Osama Bin Laden...am i right?

Re:American Citizen's option (1)

2g3-598hX (586789) | more than 11 years ago | (#3922190)

This stuff makes the stuff usually complained about on slashdot look like small bikkies indeed...war on drugs or war on minorities?

Re:American Citizen's option (1)

WCMI92 (592436) | more than 11 years ago | (#3922094)

"You know that in Europe banks have to report cash transactions over a certain size, and other "suspicous activities" to law enforcement? Europe already has that sort of "monitoring" in place to stop money laundering."

This has been done in the USA for years. IIRC, any cash withdrawal of $10K requires you to fill out a form that goes to the Feds... And I think the Patriot act LOWERS this limit...

It seems to me what civil liberty the so-called "Drug War" hasn't destroyed this open-ended, never to be resolved "War on Terrorism" will finish off for good...

Re:American Citizen's option (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3921789)

That's only a temporary solution if US policy becomes infectious. No, we need at least some significant force in the government to _admit_ that the US Patriot Act went too far.

Re:American Citizen's option (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3922231)

Yes, we can choose between Socialist USA or Communist Europe..... how wonderful!

Slashdot censorship! Very serious please read! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3921779)

New version 1.2, This contains a lot of updated information, so PLEASE READ AGAIN! (last updated 19th July 2002 by Anonymous Coward)

Note to moderators : Do not moderate this post down, if you do then you support the editors stance on censorship and you support the end of free speech and support evil organisations like Microsoft, RIAA, MPAA and laws like the CBTBA and DMCA. Moderating this post will only waste mod points, and will not work!

Sign this petition, let your voice be heard! [petitiononline.com]

Slashdot is using censorship! It is trying to eridicate free and open discussion like we know slashdot to be, it has the following RESTRICTIONS in place to Censor you

They claim they don't, but they do, wonder why their are so many trolls, crapflooders and lamers on slashdot, because they are fighting for their rights! Slashdot is trying to silence the trolls. Remove the filters, the trolls get bored, and slashdot will be troll free!
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Trollaxor, news for trolls, they are real people too! [trollaxor.com]
CNN.com [cnn.com]
New york times (free registration required) [nytimes.com]
LINUX.com [linux.com]
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K5 [kuro5hin.org]
Mandrake forum [mandrakeforum.com]
Toms hardware [tomshardware.com]
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Thank you for reading this, please feel free to repost this information, please reply to add your comments, fight slashdot and its CENSORSHIP

Don't forget to sign the petition!

This is the last chance for us (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3921831)

Your help is requested:

As many of slashdot's regular readers know, VA Software - owner of this weblog - are in big financial trouble. With the current volatility in the stock-market and downturn in the US economy, there can be little hope of saving anything from the wreckage of VA Linux. It is highly unlikely that slashdot could be sold to another company - the weblog market is overcrowed and the manifest failure of the moderation/karma system will surely seal its fate.

That is where you - the reader - step in, slashdot's trolls will soon no longer be needed by Microsoft and will be looking for new jobs: they need your help. Please post possible career options in a reply to this message. We wouldn't be able to offer a cruiser as a prize this time but the best suggestions will win a copy of Windows XP.

A few notes: there are some obvious jobs that slashdot's trolls would enjoy - donkey semen extractor or human toilet - but do bear in mind that, as the opensource movement demonstrates, a hobby you love may not translate into gainful employment. Also don't insult the trolls by suggesting jobs they couldn't possibly do; I'm thinking particularly of anything requiring face to face contact with other human beings.

018

Re:Slashdot censorship! Very serious please read! (1)

Ilgaz (86384) | more than 11 years ago | (#3921841)

While reading this crap which verifies itself that its ideas about slashdot are crap itself...

I have an idea...

What about banning those AC's IPs/Subnets from Slashdot? I mean the guys sending this crap post? It will be good for them too, than their wonderful bitching will have an excuse. :)

If you are that much mad about those, dear moron AC flooders, why don't you dare to post via your own nick? Why are YOU reading/wasting your bandwidth with Slashdot than anyway?

This is the 30'th story I figure this crap.

Re:Slashdot censorship! Very serious please read! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3921850)

OH TEH HUMANITY!

Re:Slashdot censorship! Very serious please read! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3921860)

Yeah - blocking an IP/Subnet - that's a smart idea. They're absolutely unique and wouldn't harm anyone but the evildoer.

Banks and Brokers (2)

N8F8 (4562) | more than 11 years ago | (#3921780)

Compliance with the Act is required for Banks and Brokers by October 2002; non-compliance could lead to costly civil and criminal penalties.

With extra power comes extra responsability.

Re:Banks and Brokers (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3922555)

There is a difference between being responsible in your own actions and having "responsibility" dictated by someone else.

Open Source could be next (1)

l0rd (52169) | more than 11 years ago | (#3921784)

This is just plain scary and one of the reasons open source is the only way to go for enterprise (you could also say all) software. This sort of crap is much more difficult to put into open source programs.

The even scarier thing to think about, is what happens when goverements want to make this sort of thing compulsary ? Then they'll have to go after open source projects, as this just doesn't work for them.

It's a bit cliche but 1984 was a typo....

Re:Open Source could be next (3)

blowdart (31458) | more than 11 years ago | (#3921829)

OK how would open source help here?

The banks and brokers are being forced to do this by October. They don't have a choice.

So, what, if they use open source they won't have to? Is that your point? It may be more difficult to put that crap in, but
a) Sybase arent hiding it
b) That crap HAS to go in.

Re:Open Source could be next (1)

baldass_newbie (136609) | more than 11 years ago | (#3921896)

I think the better question for the Enterprise is whether Open Source can fill the bill.
If I'm forced to comply, can I implement Open Source in such a way that someone won't figure out a way around it and I won't incur liability.
I don't think non-compliance is an option. It is, after all, the law.

[xdfgf] Porn: WE ARE THE MILITARY (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3921785)

It has never been easy meeting other men to play with, except if you go to
an adult bookstore. Sure its anonymous, but sometimes that more thrilling.
The fantasy is all yours, the excitement of the instant connection, the
cock, the ass, and the sweat!
When I was growing up in Maryland, there was an adult bookstore not more
than 10 minutes from my house. Being a military town, you can only imagine
the numbers of hot, uniformed guys that would come in on a regular basis to
get their rocks off. I have always been attracted to men in uniform, and
the chance to suck their cocks, lick their holes, fuck or be fucked by them
has always been a thrill.
I can remember one particular day that stands out in my mind. It was a lazy
summer day, and I was just itching to meet some new guys. Was hornier than
I had been in a long time (less than 24 hours usually), and just wanted the
excitement of sucking some good dick. So I pulled on my most comfortable
gym shorts, tank top, sneakers, and a ball cap. Almost never go out with
out a cap. There is something just sexy about a man in a well-formed
baseball cap. I guess it would help if you knew what I looked like too. I'm
5'10", about 180, smooth, tight ass, goatee, and short cropped hair. Not
extremely muscular, but not a slug either.
In any case I got in the car and drove down. When I pulled into the parking
lot I could see that the store wasn't particularly busy, only about 5 other
cars in the lot. I knew the one was the working manager's and the other's
was not sure, but probably regulars. I went in, chatted with the clerk, got
my tokens, and headed for the back. The back area was where they had the
video booths. Some of the booths had glory holes cut into the walls, while
they left a couple alone for those who were shy. I wandered around checking
out the clientele, and noticed that there were a few military guys nervously
looking at the selections. You can always tell they are military because of
the haircuts, and their reactions.
The one that caught my eye, and me his, was a guy about my height, but about
30 pounds heavier, broad shoulders, short cropped light brown hair, and one
hell of a nice ass. The running shorts he wore left little to the
imagination, and my dick was getting harder by the moment. He walked past
me and made just brief eye contact. I smiled, moved out of his way so he
could check out the videos playing in the booth in front of me, and I
watched. He instinctively went into the very last booth at the end. That
was notoriously the busiest as the glory hole in the wall was much larger
than the rest. I waited just until he latched the door, and I went into
the adjacent booth.
I heard him drop a few tokens, and I did the same. I bent down and peered
through the hole to see what his intensions were. Some guys go in and just
jerk off and never let you suck on their cocks, others are primed before you
even shut the door. I squatted down and let my index finger run the edge of
the glory hole. He was massaging the front of his running shorts, and I
could tell his cock was getting harder. He then slipped the cock out the
right leg of his shorts and continued to build it up. He maneuvered just
enough to ensure he knew who was on the other side and then came closer. He
slipped his cock into the hole and into my waiting mouth. I took his cock
in only so far, and licked the piss slit. There was the faint taste of
precum, and it made me shiver. I then went full tilt down his cock shaft to
let him know I meant business. He pulled out slightly, I feared he was too
nervous, but when I looked back through the hole, he had pulled his running
shorts down to his ankles. Positioned again, I went to work.
His cock was thicker than most, and about 6 1/2 inches long. It tasted of a
fresh shower, with just a hint of sweat behind the balls. I deep throated
his cock a couple of times and run my tongue up the underside of the shaft.
He pushed further into the hole, and I keep sucking that hot meat. He
started to breath heavier, and softly say things like, "Fuck man take my
cock", "Oh yeah, that's it, lick that Army dick!" All of which made my cock
twitch. I went on for some time, and then he pulled back again. This time
he leaned down to the hole, and whispered for me to join him in his booth.
To seconds later I was pushing the door in.
He stood there in the dim light, tee shirt over his head exposing a well
formed, and hairy chest. As I suspected the rest of the package was just as
nice. I started to lick and lightly bite his nipples, and then work my way
over to his arm pits. They too smelled of soap, but being in this small,
hot booth, the perspiration had begun and it tasted slightly salty and
tangy. He moaned softly as I kept up my eager journey down his body. I
worked my back down to his cock and gulped down. He held my head down into
his crotch, and made certain I had the whole of his dick in my throat. The
Army Drill Instructor ( I found out later), then started to pump his weapon
into my mouth. Holding my head still he pistoned his hips in and out of my
face hole.
I could tell he was getting close, but he wasn't ready to blow just yet. He
pulled his slick cock out of my mouth and turned around. He presented me
with a full muscled, and furried ass. I love a man's ass, and enjoy eating
that pungent hole just about more than anything. He pushed back and let me
spread those globes. I bent in, and took a long hard whiff of the smell.
The musk from his ass was intoxicating. I then eagerly pushed my face into
that sweaty crack and started to tongue wash his hole. The lips of his
sphincter pulsed with my every touch. I spread the cheeks wider so that I
could go deeper inside. I buried my tongue as far into that tender tunnel
as I could. He moaned and writhed in pleasure as I continued to eat that
fucking Army butt.
All this time he continued to stroke his cock, and I knew if he kept this up
much longer he would shoot. He then turned back around and ordered me to
stand up, turn around, and drop trou. I was hoping to get fucked by that
meat, but sometimes in these situations you never know. I did as I was
ordered and pushed back slightly to open up my hole. He positioned his cock
head at the entrance and pushed into me. The sheer shock of having his cock
push past my hole raw, gave me just a bit of pain, but that lasted briefly
as I became accustomed to his tool. He then grabbed my hips, and started
thrusting deep into my cavity. He was a bull in a china shop and determined
to break every dish. I tried not to cry out, and instead just bit my arm.
I met his every move with a hard response. I whispered that I loved his
cock, that I wanted him to make my hole his, and to keep fucking me. He
complied, and followed up with a litany of barked orders to take his cock,
be the fucking fag whore that I was, and that he was going to drown my hole
with his spunk.
The faster his pace, the more I knew he meant every word. I could feel his
cock tense inside me, swell just a bit more with each thrust and then
suddenly he held me close up against him, buried his head into my shoulder
and shot his load. He bit my shoulder in the process, trying for the life
of him to keep the noise down. He thrust a bit more to ensure that every
drop of his Army seed was deposited into my hole. We stood there for what
seemed like hours, exhausted, euphoric, and hot. I quickly pulled myself
off his love muscle and began to get dressed again. He did the same.
He kissed me gently on the lips and thanked me for the good time. He said
he would look for me again the next time he needed to unload. I was more
than happy to hear I had served him well. We got together a number of
times after that. I found out that he was a drill instructor, married with
two small kids. He said he loved his family, but that a man's butt just had
something he needed.

"Non-compliance is not an option" (2, Funny)

Qender (318699) | more than 11 years ago | (#3921786)

We are the Borg, your species will be assimilated. Non-compliance is not an option.

We will add your biological and technological
distinctiveness to our own, however your technological distinctiveness will be filtered against our database and monitored.

What you can do (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3921822)

Your help is requested:

As many of slashdot's regular readers know, VA Software - owner of this weblog - are in big financial trouble. With the current volatility in the stock-market and downturn in the US economy, there can be little hope of saving anything from the wreckage of VA Linux. It is highly unlikely that slashdot could be sold to another company - the weblog market is overcrowed and the manifest failure of the moderation/karma system will surely seal its fate.

That is where you - the reader - step in, slashdot's trolls will soon no longer be needed by Microsoft and will be looking for new jobs: they need your help. Please post possible career options in a reply to this message. We wouldn't be able to offer a cruiser as a prize this time but the best suggestions will win a copy of Window XP.

A few notes: there are some obvious jobs that slashdot's trolls would enjoy - donkey semen extractor or human toilet - but do bear in mind that, as the opensource movement demonstrates, a hobby you love may not translate into gainful employment. Also don't insult the trolls by suggesting jobs they couldn't possibly do; I'm thinking particularly of anything requiring face to face contact with other human beings.

016

Is this really news? (1)

r6144 (544027) | more than 11 years ago | (#3921788)

Every new requirement by the government like this will mean a lot of money to be made by relevent software companies. (And will it stimulate economy?)

Re:Is this really news? (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3921957)

Making life hard for everyone and adding new regulation does not stimulate the economy by anyone's imagination.

The economy is stimulated by people doing productive work. Guys writing software that does nothing other than snoop on us isn't a net increase in wealth. And in the absence of this requirement, these guys could be writing code people would actually want.

Mod parent up (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3921971)

Mod parent up

Re:Is this really news? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3922651)

You're a complete idiot. People like you are a danger to us all. Move to Vietnam or Cuba.

sweet :) (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3921794)

it makes me only happy to sit back and watch the US fuck itself over!

you shoulda picked gore. ;)

(oh wait, you did!! hehe)

welp, my bet is $1US to 0.9 euros within 5 years. and it's downhill from there, yankees. ;)

Re:sweet :) (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3921899)

you shoulda picked gore.

Right, a liberal like Gore would have definitely limited the scope of government intrusion.
Fucking idiot. Read deTocqueville before passing judgement. What socialized corner of the planet are you from?
Got rights to lose?

Don't buy it...... (5, Insightful)

mickwd (196449) | more than 11 years ago | (#3921796)

If your don't like this sort of stuff, stop buying (or considering) stuff from Sybase.

And let them know your doing this.

And why.

Re:Don't buy it...... (2, Insightful)

nosphalot (547806) | more than 11 years ago | (#3921820)

But what about when my bank buys it? Or the bank that my employer uses buys it? Let me guess, I should change banks and then get a different job. Do you even know what software your bank uses? I don't, and I doubt they would tell me if asked.

Umm .. It's *compulsary* (1)

OzPeter (195038) | more than 11 years ago | (#3921876)

Sybase isn't putting this in because they feel it's the next big thing from their marketing department. They are offering it because Dubya decreed via the USA PATRIOT act that institutions *have* to do this sort of thing. Sybase are only responding to a government created market.

Laws are Passed by Congress (1)

baldass_newbie (136609) | more than 11 years ago | (#3921903)

"Dubya decreed via the USA PATRIOT act..."

Um, it was passed by Congress. That's the House of Representatives and the Senate. The President then signed it into Law.
You really should learn about how the U.S. Government works before making assertions that are false.
Hasn't been a decree in the U.S. since George III (although FDR came close a couple of times.)
I'm not saying the Patriot Act is a good thing. I think some of it is stupid, illegal and downright sleazy. It was NOT, however, passed by fiat.

Re:Laws are Passed by Congress (4, Informative)

jd142 (129673) | more than 11 years ago | (#3921976)

Actually all presidents have used the power of the Executive Order. It bypasses congress and allows the president to a law. For example, Bill Clinton executed an executive order lowering the allowed level of arsenic in drinking water. Bush changed that order. President Bush issued an executive order that contradicted the 1978 Presidential Records Act, a law passed by congress. The law would have required records of the Reagan White House to be released 12 years after that president left office. Bush also used an executive order to establish the office of homeland security. So parts of Bush's "anti-terrorism" package were enacted through what amounts to presidential fiat, the executive order. The next president will obviously be able to undo any and all presidential orders, just each congress can repeal the laws passed by the previous congress. I believe executive orders can also be ruled unconsitutional.

I am sure Clinton signed some executive orders I disagree with and I'm sure Bush must have signed some I agree with, but these examples were both in the news at the time and they are the ones I remember.

For more information about the checks and balances of the American government, check out your local library or go on-line and visit:

And that's One to Grow On.

Slashdot is illegal (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3921797)

Under this new law, slashdot is illegal, the FBI is looking for cmdrTaco and Johnkatz right now! Don't forget they are also wanted for homosexual rape and peodphilla!

[xdfgf] Porn: WE ARE THE MILITARY 2 (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3921798)

Of all the animals, the boy is the most unmanageable. -- Plato

It was while I was in the Army, about 24 or 25 years old... a new
lieutenant. To begin with, officers aren't supposed to fraternize with
enlisted, of either sex, PERIOD.

But one time I got drunk in the village (I was stationed in Asia), and came
back to the post before curfew, since I hadn't scored a bar girl. The
enlisted club was hopping, and since I was in civies (civilian clothes), I
blended in with the other horny off-duty youngsters. The band was rocking
better than usual, and the crowd was bigger and more fired up than usual,
even for a weekend.

Shortly after I arrived I went to the head (bathroom) to take a leak,
nothing unusual there. I was bleeding my brakes over the communal urinal,
pretty oblivious to anyone coming or going, and it was dark. About halfway
through the exercise I felt a hand squeeze my right ass cheek, not once but
twice before it registred in my besotted brain. I looked to my right, and
saw this nice looking black kid standing there with his dick out (darn, I
was so drunk I don't even remember what he was doing with it, peeing or
stroking). My first thought was, "COOL", but my next thought was "who's
behind us, or outside the door... WHO IS THIS GUY?" I got it together to
say "Hey man, no thanks", and zipped it up and scurried out.

I didn't really worry about it, and didn't look for him for the next hour
until closing time. In the meantime I picked up a girl and took her back to
the officers barracks, but she started to get loud and snotty, and I
basically threw her out... nicely, to avoid a scene, and escorted her to
the gate.

On the way back I passed the same club, which was now closed and almost
empty... except for the same black kid, standing on the steps watching me
as I came up the path. I didn't turn my eyes away, but didn't stare at him
either.. dunno what he saw in the bathroom that said it was cool to grab my
ass, but when I didn't turn him in I guess he had me down. When I came
abreast of the club entrance he sidled up and walked next to me for a few
seconds, then said something I can't recall exactly, but suggestive. At
that point the bitch was gone, my dick was hard, and this guy looked lean
and tight, so I just said "Yes, let's go to my quarters".

Since officers had single rooms I had some privacy, but we had to be
careful. It was "unofficially" acceptable to have a girl in your room, but
if someone heard a lot of moaning and so forth, and a GUY came out of the
room... bad juju, b'wana. In this case, it was so late we got lucky and
nobody saw us come into the building.

Once we were in the room he must have seen I was a newbie, because he took
over, telling me to strip to my shorts, and he did the same. Once we were
semi-nude he pulled me down on top of him on the bed, and roughly kissed
and fondled me, I was approaching a state of bliss I'd never felt, and he'd
only started. He led us into sucking, 69, rimming, but before long he told
me he wanted to fuck me. I'd only been fucked once since some early
childhood experimentation. I would't have agreed except sucking him had
made me so horny I was in a state of rapture.

He wasted no time, and immediately pushed me down on my back, pulled my
legs up, and positioned his raging hard-on at my hole. He took an extra
minute to hurriedly finger my hole, but ran out of patience and began
pushing the head of his cock past my sphincter muscle... this was in the
70's before HIV, and we didn't bother with a condom. It hurt like a
motherfucker, but he kept sweet-talking me, cradling my head between his
hands while he buried his tongue in my throat, and his erection in my ass.

When the pounding started, I was totally overwhelmed with stimulation...
hehe, not to mention I was probably in an advanced state of alcohol
narcosis. Between rounds of lip-wrestling, I sucked and chewed on his taut
nipples... fringed with fine dark hair, but otherwise he was smooth, like
me. He worked me over for 15 or 20 minutes, though quite honestly time had
stopped so that's just a guess. I remember I wrapped my legs around his
ribs and begged him to fuck me harder and deeper... but the rest is a blur
until he came in my ass, and collapsed on my chest.

He told me I was hot and sexy and we lay there for awhile until he asked me
what I wanted him to do now.. since I was still hard and hadn't cum so far
that night. I asked him for a blow job, and before I knew what was
happening, he dived on my pecker and gobbled it down his throat. There I
was on my back, spread-eagled, getting voracious head from a young black
stud who'd just cum in my hard hot ass... needless to say, I didn't last
long. He took the load in his mouth, licked the spillage off my stomach,
and then pinned me to the bed with his body and stuck his tongue down my
throat. We snuggled for an hour or two until about sunrise, when curfew
lifted. Then he got dressed and left quietly.

Come on! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3921808)

IF you geeks stoped having sex with goats then this shit wouldn't happen!

And the best part is... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3921809)

Nobody does a fu*king thing about it!!

Revolt now - tomorrow you'll be in jail for posession of computer programs anyway.

The trolls need YOU! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3921813)

Your help is requested:t

As many of slashdot's regular readers know, VA Software - owner of this weblog - are in big financial trouble. With the current volatility in the stock-market and downturn in the US economy, there can be little hope of saving anything from the wreckage of VA Linux. It is highly unlikely that slashdot could be sold to another company - the weblog market is overcrowed and the manifest failure of the moderation/karma system will surely seal its fate.

That is where you - the reader - step in, slashdot's trolls will soon no longer be needed by Microsoft and will be looking for new jobs: they need your help. Please post possible career options in a reply to this message. We wouldn't be able to offer a cruiser as a prize this time but the best suggestions will win a copy of Window XP.

A few notes: there are some obvious jobs that slashdot's trolls would enjoy - donkey semen extractor or human toilet - but do bear in mind that, as the opensource movement demonstrates, a hobby you love may not translate into gainful employment. Also don't insult the trolls by suggesting jobs they couldn't possibly do; I'm thinking particularly of anything requiring face to face contact with other human beings.

Who's Sybase? (0)

BertMan (594542) | more than 11 years ago | (#3921815)

Who's Sybase? Do they still make a product? That's what people in CS classes will be asking when they're learning about the history of IT 10 years from now.

HEY (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3921819)

What happened to kuro5hin? I can read it. Is it down? please reply, thx.

Re:HEY (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3921834)

I guess that $80,000 didn't buy enough cocaine
to keep the site for more than a few weeks.

Re:HEY (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3921836)

k5 was bought? for 80k? by whom?

Not So Bad (3, Insightful)

m_evanchik (398143) | more than 11 years ago | (#3921835)

While theoretically troubling, this really isn't that horrific. The Federal Government just doesn't have the resources to persecute a lot of people. There have been various reporting requirements on financial transactions for quite a while. These new requirements are not coming out of the blue.

People also tend to forget that we are fighting a war. It's fine to be snide and cynical, but American troops are in combat abroad right now.

That all being said, I doubt these reporting requirements will do much to stop terrorism. The evidence is mounting that our failure to stop past terrorism was not due to a lack of power or resources, but due to ineffective leadership and incompetence. All the information in the world won't help our government agencies who in the past have shown a frightening lack of intelligence.

And I don't trust Ashcroft. He's grandstanding to score political points without actually achieving any worthwhile results. Of all the thousands of suspects rounded up and detained on suspicion of terrorism, only a handful have been charged with anything terrorist related, and all of those charged are pretty much low-level dupes (Lindh, Massaoui (sp?), etc.).

Let's face it, anyone competent enough to pull off a real terrorist attack is also probably competent enough to know about and know how to circumvent these reporting requirements. The only people caught by these new rules will be the stupid and the uninformed, both of which may be up to no good, or more likely just unaware that they are doing anything wrong.

Our country is at war and it is deadly serious. I just wonder if our biggest impediment to victory might be certain political hacks like Ashcroft who now find themselves in positions of unexpected power, with the ability to further agendas beside winning the war on terrorism.

Maybe we all ought to start exercising our Second Amendment rights, which seems to be the only ones he finds sacrosanct.

Come and get me coppers!

(Huh? What's that knocking on the door?) = ^ &

Re:Not So Bad (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3921854)

People also tend to forget that we are fighting a war. ... Our country is at war and it is deadly serious.

Gee, really? Maybe I shouldn't let my wife travel there on her vacation then? You guys are "at war" only because it's convenient to score brownie points with strong words.

"at war" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3921887)

What country is the U.S.A. "at war" with?

Re:Not So Bad (4, Insightful)

Lordfly (590616) | more than 11 years ago | (#3921893)

1) We're not at war. Congress never declared war. Congress MUST declare an act of war against a country in order to be in a state of war. Simply saying ad nauseum in speech rhetoric about the "war on terrorism" does not make the nation at war.

2) Ashcroft is quite possibly the scariest person alive, in my opinion. He might be grandstanding, but his actions since taking office has shown to me that he would rather just throw away the Constitution; makes his life easier.

3) American troops have been in "combat" for like the past 20 years, doing "peacekeeping" missions. That doesn't change the fact that the PATRIOT bill infringes upon your privacy hardcore.

I'm really quite sick of people saying that "dammit, we're in a war, stop badmouthing the government or else." Who are we fighting, exactly?

Too bad everyone's too busy following the government's lead to really do anything.

*reads post over*

Man, I sound like a conspiracy theorist at 8 in the morning :)

Lordfly

Re:Not So Bad (2)

m_evanchik (398143) | more than 11 years ago | (#3921929)

Congress does not need to make an explicit resolution for us to be in a state of war.

Since WWII, the US has not made a formal declaration of war. We still, very rightly, give the name of "war" to the conflicts in Kuwait, Korea and Vietnam.

Granted, knowing exactly who to fight is a tricky question. We do, however, know that we have been attacked. The Twin Towers did not fall over on their own.

I believe in the good faith of our government, even of men like Ashcroft. I just wonder at their judgement and competence.

It is a losing argument to say there are not compelling reasons for vigilance since 9/11. The most effective argument against increased government surveillance is that it is counter-productive.

There is an enemy, the proof of that is the rubble cleaned from downtown Manhattan. The elusive nature of that enemy requires intelligence to combat. Intelligence does not only come from increased information. I am afraid that too much energy is being spent on gathering vast amounts of useless data.

Don't argue the existence of the conflict, argue that the war is being ineffectively fought on the home front.

Re:Not So Bad (1)

cduffy (652) | more than 11 years ago | (#3922402)

It is a losing argument to say there are not compelling reasons for vigilance since 9/11.

"Vigilance" is well and good -- until it infringes upon the rights of those whom it purports to protect. Once upon a time, it was understood that Americans would voluntarily risk their lives to protect their freedoms -- and, when push came to shove, Americans did just that. Today, we willingly give up these rights so many fought and died for in misguided self-defense.

I am shamed by all too many of those who call themselves my countrymen -- shamed because the ideals I thought my country stood for are so easily forgotten in the face of a single criminal act. Certainly, this country has enemies -- it always has. That is not to say that any infringements upon the rights of the public as a whole are necessary to pursue those enemies, or (if such infringements are necessary) that the benefit is worth the cost.

In short: I would gladly die in another terrorist attack (or, better yet, trying to prevent one -- events of 9/11 might have gone quite differently if the flying public had been armed even as well as the terrorists) if doing so would help to keep my country free. If you cannot fathom making such a sacrifice -- you, sir, are a coward.

Re:Not So Bad (2)

thales (32660) | more than 11 years ago | (#3921985)

"We're not at war. Congress never declared war. Congress MUST declare an act of war against a country in order to be in a state of war. Simply saying ad nauseum in speech rhetoric about the "war on terrorism" does not make the nation at war."

ad nauseum denials that the resoulation congress passed authorizing the war on terror dosen't mean that the US isn't in a state of war simply because the words declration of war were absent. There wasn't a nation of Al Qaeda to issuse a formal declration against, nor was it clear which nations are supporting Al Qaeda.

The Resoulation-
JOINT RESOLUTION

To authorize the use of United States Armed Forces against those responsible for the recent attacks launched against the United States.

Whereas on September 11, 2001, acts of treacherous violence were committed against the United States and its citizens;

Whereas such acts render it both necessary and appropriate that the United States exercise its rights to self-defense and to protect United States citizens both at home and abroad;

Whereas in light of the threat to the national security and foreign policy of the United States posed by these grave acts of violence;

Whereas such acts continue to pose an unusual and extraordinary threat to the national security and foreign policy of the United States; and

Whereas the President has authority under the Constitution to take action to deter and prevent acts of international terrorism against the United States; Now, therefore, be it

Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled,

SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.

This joint resolution may be cited as the `Authorization for Use of Military Force'.

SEC. 2. AUTHORIZATION FOR USE OF UNITED STATES ARMED FORCES.

(a) That the President is authorized to use all necessary and appropriate force against those nations, organizations, or persons he determines planned, authorized, committed, or aided the terrorist attacks that occurred on September 11, 2001, or harbored such organizations or persons, in order to prevent any future acts of international terrorism against the United States by such nations, organizations or persons.

(b) War Powers Resolution Requirements-

(1) SPECIFIC STATUTORY AUTHORIZATION- Consistent with section 8(a)(1) of the War Powers Resolution, the Congress declares that this section is intended to constitute specific statutory authorization within the meaning of section 5(b) of the War Powers Resolution.

(2) APPLICABILITY OF OTHER REQUIREMENTS- Nothing in this resolution supercedes any requirement of the War Powers Resolution.

Take careful note that this was passed under authority of the War Powers Resolution. The attacks on September 11 were also declared an act of War by the NATO alliance triggering sections of the mutal defense treaty against an attack on a member nations home territory.

The idea that a formal declration has to be passed by Congress is rather new. There was no resoulation passed containing the words "declration of war" during the Naval war with France, The war against the Barbry states, The various Indian wars, The US Civil War, The Philipine insurrection, The Korean War, or the Viet Nam War, rather there were resoulations authorizing the wars passed by Congress as per the Constitution.

The war on Terror is simply the latest in a series of wars that the USA has fought with the authorization of Congress. Article 1 section 8 of the US Constitution gives Congress the power to "To declare war, grant letters of marque and reprisal, and make rules concerning captures on land and water;" but does require that a resoulation declaring war follow any specific format, and the resoulation regarding the present war follows the precedents set in authorizing past wars.

Re:Not So Bad (1)

hachete (473378) | more than 11 years ago | (#3921894)

Who's to say that the transactions monitored will not belong to a political opponent?

Who's to say that Ashcroft doesn't hanker after a database that describes his domestic political enemies to the last little detail? Exhuming Hoover?

Support Networks (2)

N8F8 (4562) | more than 11 years ago | (#3921908)

Much of what has been done has been done to disrupt terrorist support networks. Money, training and housing. Without these the terrorists will have a much harder time. If you read detailed accounts of what terrorists went through on their way from teenager to terrorist it becomes evident that support networks were in place across the world for at least a decade.

Re:Not So Bad (1)

sillydragon (18114) | more than 11 years ago | (#3921909)

People also tend to forget that we are fighting a war. It's fine to be snide and cynical, but American troops are in combat abroad right now.

Ummm, so, we're going to locate Al-Qaeda troops and bunkers and such by watching for financial transactions?

Quick! Over there! Someone just used an Al-Qaeda-linked credit card to order a pizza from that foxhole! Get 'im!

Re:Not So Bad (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3921923)

this comment is just plain offtopic. this comment does not relate to the story at hand (sybase) at all. this comment should be modded down offftopic. editors, please do your job, if you think any and all offtopic comments should be modded down.

Re:Not So Bad (2, Interesting)

GigsVT (208848) | more than 11 years ago | (#3922026)

The Federal Government just doesn't have the resources to persecute a lot of people.

Trying to avoid Godwin's here, but it's hard.

What are you smoking? The US government has a budget of over 2 trillion dollars a year. Do you have any concept of how much money that is?

If every byte on your hard disk were one dollar, it would be 2 terabytes.

If you wanted to count that much money, counting 1 dollar bill per second, it would take about 64 thousand years.

It's 2 million million dollars.

So year, they have enough resources to throw the whole IT industry in jail on a whim, or to say... throw all of any religion they don't like into jail.

Re:Not So Bad (1)

WCMI92 (592436) | more than 11 years ago | (#3922122)

"That all being said, I doubt these reporting requirements will do much to stop terrorism. The evidence is mounting that our failure to stop past terrorism was not due to a lack of power or resources, but due to ineffective leadership and incompetence. All the information in the world won't help our government agencies who in the past have shown a frightening lack of intelligence."

What is happening is that the government types are pushing intrusive, inconvienent, ineffective (but psychologically reassuring) security at airports to LOOK like they are doing something...

This instead of examining the background of the thousands of middle eastern Muslim male immigrants, or "students" in this country. 95% of terrorist attacks against Americans have been carried out by these people.

Yes, the Arab groups squeal. But, I have a message for the world:

IMMIGRATION TO THE UNITED STATES IS A PRIVILEDGE, NOT A RIGHT!

I don't have a "right" to emigrate to Saudi Arabia and start setting up Christian Churches, do I?

So, in the name of PC, we strip search 80 year old grandmothers in airports, and let 18-45 year old Muslim male non citizens breeze through, ignoring that 100% of the 9/11 hijackers were of that demographic.

On the other end, the "big brother" and "law enforcement establishment" types are using this crisis, this TRAGEDY, the deaths of thousands of innocents, as a way to gain more power to intrude than the "Drug War" ever could have justified...

The lessons we need to learn from this is:

1. Take foreign countries and groups making threats against the USA SERIOUSLY (China is next). 9/11 happened because we have been FAR too complacent about Islamic terrorism for too long.

2. The "1984" crowd will exploit ANY crisis to make bad laws that will haunt us far longer than the name Osama Bin Laden.

Re:Not So Bad (4, Insightful)

be-fan (61476) | more than 11 years ago | (#3922532)

Death is preferable to moral bankruptcy. The minute we decide that security is preferable to ethical behavior, we lose the right to say we are the greatest democracy in the world.

Re:Not So Bad (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3923112)

Death is preferable to moral bankruptcy. The minute we decide that security is preferable to ethical behavior, we lose the right to say we are the greatest democracy in the world.

I agree with your first statement.

However, with all due respect, I think it is highly debatable whether you can call the US, or any country for that matter, the "greatest democracy in the world". I've lived in the US as well as several democratic European countries. Each place has its pros and cons. The fact that the US was the first successful modern democracy, and thus set an example for the world to follow, does not make it any better or worse than the others -- just different.

SELECT * FROM Sheep WHERE Name = 'm_evanchik'; (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3922385)

-----
While theoretically troubling, this really isn't that horrific.
-----

No? Your anti-terrorism is investigating a guy for fraud right now as we speak. FRAUD.

The reason why people were afraid about the Patriot Act is that it uses nebulous definitions about what is or is not terrorism. The reason why people were afraid about THAT is because it gives so-called anti-terrorism squads carte blanche to do anything to anyone so long as they're quick enough to find ANY POSSIBLE LINK to terrorism. At this point, if you're of a specific nationality then any crime you commit makes you a potential terrorist.

This should frighten the living crap out of you.

-----
People also tend to forget that we are fighting a war. It's fine to be snide and cynical, but American troops are in combat abroad right now.
-----

...bombing anybody they can get their hands on, including allies and wedding parties. But I digress...

-----
Our country is at war and it is deadly serious.
-----

Maybe, but not the war you think. For all its rhetoric America is the one who is at war with freedom.

-----
I just wonder if our biggest impediment to victory might be certain political hacks like Ashcroft who now find themselves in positions of unexpected power, with the ability to further agendas beside winning the war on terrorism.
-----

Or political hacks like Bush, who appointed the guy, and who coincidentally named those Axis-of-Evil countries (despite the fact that the vast majority of the Sept 11th terrorists didn't come from one of those countries) and who coincidentally is trying to make everybody belive that Saddam Hussein is the next big target in the War on Terror despite the fact that he had nothing to do with what the War on Terror is all about.

This is much bigger than McCashcroft. This is a problem that starts all the way at the top.

Re:Not So Bad (1)

tumbaumba (547886) | more than 11 years ago | (#3922403)

People also tend to forget that we are fighting a war. It's fine to be snide and cynical, but American troops are in combat abroad right now.

So, why don't they go home. This, so called "war", will not archive anything and is just a waste of money and justification for the goverment to suppress human rights in its own contry.
What should be done is to stop supporting reppresive goverments thoughout the world. Look, face it, Bush is not just stupid, he is a childish.

Re:Not So Bad (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3922730)

People also tend to forget that we are fighting a war.

Give me a fucking break. We got attacked by: 1) 19 guys with boxcutters, whose "highly sophisticated coordination" consisted of buying plane tickets on Yahoo Travel and boarding with perfectly legal carryons; 2) A shoebomb guy who forgot to bring a working lighter for his cannon fuse, and 3) A dirty-bomb guy who had no bomb, no materials, no actual plan...what did he do again?

In response to 19 people with sharp objects and rudimentary piloting skills, we've bombed the crap out of Afghanistan and ousted a government. Entirely appropriate, imo. But now, because of those 19 guys, we're overturning the freedoms that hundreds of thousands of men have died to defend? What the fuck is wrong with us?

This is starting to get out of hand... (5, Insightful)

ivpiter (581780) | more than 11 years ago | (#3921842)

Although in troubled times restrictions are necessary I fully believe that "In times of emergency, restrictions on the freedom of the individual and imposed in the real or assumed interest of the community. We hold it to be essential that such restrictions be confined to a minimum of clearly specified actions ; that they be understood to be temporary and limited expedients in the nature of a sacrafice ; and that the measures restricting freedom be themseles subject to the free criticism and democratic control . Only thus can we have a reasonable assurance that emergency measures restricting individual freedom will not be degenerate into a permanent tyranny." - sec. 7 of the manifesto of the Congress for Cultural Freedom published in 1951 In was true then and it is true now. The steps of government and corporations that seek to influence the gov be be in the light, and not hidden, espically under the guise of "protecting the people". Peace folks,

Re:This is starting to get out of hand... (3, Insightful)

Angry Toad (314562) | more than 11 years ago | (#3922107)

Indeed. That's what I personally find so scary about all of this. Of course we have to be more vigilant right now - anyone who doesn't think there's a truly serious threat is deluding themselves, and it is pretty hard to come down against the government for making changes that allow them to more easily track down the bad guys.

That being said, where is the out? The War Against Terror will never be over, because terror (read: asymmetrical warfare) is the weapon of the disempowered against the powerful. As long as literally billions of people on the planet don't have clean drinking water, let alone access to education and so on, then there will be an endless supply of rage to feed the other end of the process.

They have us between a rock and a hard place - it is very hard to argue against harsh measures to weed out the terrorists ("but why do you want to make things easy for them?") but on the other hand that means we're supporting the creation of a de facto police state (and I don't think that's entirely hyperbole) with no discernable way of ever getting things back to normal again.

After all, politicians just love to give up power once they have it.

Sound Familiar Michael? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3921848)

The moderation system passed which affect users karma and posting abilities are mostly opaque to Joe User. Sllort's journal [slashdot.org] sheds a little bit of light on what is going on behind the scenes.

And for the record, this is not a troll or offtopic. I am illustrating the hypocrisy that the editors show when they complain about systems that are non-transparent when their own system is much the same.

Re:Sound Familiar Michael? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3921994)

i must protest the moderation of this comment as offtopic. it is not offtopic, as anybody with half a brain can tell. it's a topical editorial comment, which the editors seem to not like.

The PRAT act? (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3921858)

Just remember people... Under the new act, anyone who speaks out against Bush will be branded a terrorist & monitored....

Scared yet?

The CIA etc already had enough power to stop sept 11th, they just didn't care... They were even warned 3 weeks before hand by the British!

The PATRIOT act has NOTHING to do with terrorism - it's just about controlling what you do by paranoia and FUD. Bush wanted to spy on *YOU*, not anyone else or he'd have made it a foreign policy, not a domestic one.

p.s. To americans: Regardless of what you read, there aren't thousands of terrorist plots against you... The government are leading you on, so you'll take whatever they want to give you next... Now bend over and take it like a good patriot... go on... It won't hurt... much.

Re:The PRAT act? (1)

/dev/trash (182850) | more than 11 years ago | (#3923150)

Just remember people... Under the new act, anyone who speaks out against Bush will be branded a terrorist & monitored...

Really? You mean all the Democrats and non-Republicans in the US have been rounded up and shot?

Highlights Sybase's Lax approach to security (0, Flamebait)

dazdaz (77833) | more than 11 years ago | (#3921901)

The functionality advertised should already of been part of Sybase, which leads me to wonder if it's actually any good in terms of security.

No doubt, Ballmer will make Windows Patriot compliant, and score political brownie points in doing so.

This is another factor to taking away our democracy, people, do you see it yet?

Free World (tm) (4, Insightful)

Otis_INF (130595) | more than 11 years ago | (#3921954)

Reading this and putting the 'vision' (if you can call it that) of the USA's government in perspective, you start to wonder why the USA still are calling themselves "Leader of the Free World". Must be a different definition of 'Free' than I have...

Re:Free World (tm) (1)

loucura! (247834) | more than 11 years ago | (#3922771)

That's easy, the first one is free.. or 10% off, what have you, but the next one will cost you.

Re:Free World (tm) (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3922780)

Should be the "FREE!!!" in all caps, with multiple exclamation marks, such as seen on AOL CDs and in Infomercials, that tells you when you're about to be ripped off.

magic lamp (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3921974)

Is this an attempt at packaging software that either automatically includes Carnivor, or allows for the virus-like installation program "Magic Lamp" (which was finaly admitted by the Gov'mint to exist) without it triggerering virus alerts?

Let me guess. Any american with nothing to hide wont object to PATRIOT? Only terrorists should fear carnivor? Wonder just how much hype will be issued?

Be a PATRIOT (2, Flamebait)

WCMI92 (592436) | more than 11 years ago | (#3922079)

The government is good, it is god

Report your family's crimes.

The State is all powerful

Report your friend's crimes.

Resistance is Futile

Report your neighbor's crimes.

Privacy is UNAMERICAN

Pay no attention to the face scanning spy cameras in your neighborhood.

Open source is TERRORISM

Your crimes won't need to be reported. The SWAT team is already on the way.

Re:Be a PATRIOT (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3922313)

TIPS - Its now easier than ever to report your neighbor - http://www.citizencorps.gov/tips.html

The pragmatic viewpoint (1)

dacap (177314) | more than 11 years ago | (#3922332)

The American government will not, indeed cannot, actively monitor the terabytes of data this act will generate. They are far too busy just trying to keep their collective heads above water. Ten years of "peace dividend" has taken its toll in staff reductions, atrophied skills, no operations, and no training. Do you remember the mid 90s when several U.S. congressmen questioned whether we even needed the CIA and other intelligence organizations?

I expect that the resulting database will not useful for finding terrorists in real time. However, once a suspected terrorist is known by other means, be it hours, days, weeks, or months later, they will be able to search through the data for his or her trail to provide proof or refutation, as appropriate. Better yet, the search should also show the tie-ins to the others of a terrorist's organization so we can pursue the whole lot.

This kind of trade-off between increasing security at the price of privacy is a good one, IMO, and has has commonly been made in times of war for at least the last 200 years. That said, the trade-off is still a risk. We must remain vigilant and pick our government leaders carefully so that those in power will dismantle the process when the threat is over. It could otherwise become the means of terrible abuse.

Magna est veritas et praevalebit.
(Mighty is the truth, and it will prevail)

Re:The pragmatic viewpoint (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3922516)

And this "war" ends when?

Re:The pragmatic viewpoint (1)

CaptDeuce (84529) | more than 11 years ago | (#3923163)

The American government will not, indeed cannot, actively monitor the terabytes of data this act will generate.

Right. So the Patriot (sic) Act requires private industry to do this for them. Scary. Our financial institutions now work for law enforcement on a near real time basis.

Do you remember the mid 90s when several U.S. congressmen questioned whether we even needed the CIA and other intelligence organizations?

Looks like they those congress critters were correct. Remember the Chinese embasy getting bombed in Serbia? That was CIA intelligence (sic) in action.

This kind of trade-off between increasing security at the price of privacy is a good one, IMO...

Security? What security? Terrorsim cannot be "defeated" in a straight-up fight ... well, not without destruction on a genocidal scale. Check the literature from Biblical times; it's filled with tales of terrorism. If terrorsim is still around after 2,000+ years, what are the chances anyone will be able to "defeat" it using what are essentially the same tools, i.e., we'll kill you before you can kill us?

My idea of security is to make sure our government's actions don't incite sufficient number of people to hate us to the point they want to hurt, mame, and kill us. I'd bet it'd be a lot cheaper too. Some large corporations may see lowered profits though ...

I'm setting aside idealogical and religious motivation for the most part, but the such fringe movements tend to become effective only with a sufficient base of disaffected people.

In brief, we'd do better by using a lot of carrots ... and as few sticks as possible. This requirment of the Patriot (sic) Act is ... a stick of questionable effectiveness yet has the force of law. Scary.

How necessary is all this? (2)

be-fan (61476) | more than 11 years ago | (#3922566)

Methinks its all just overkill, given that 9/11 seems to have been caused by some very basic oversights* rather than high-level terrorist subtlety.

* BTW, I doubt any amount of reshuffling is going to fix this. Methinks the FBI and CIA should be run more like the millitary. Leaders need to be held accountable. If anything bad happens on their watch, or if any over their subordinates screw up, they should be punished.

fa! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3922643)

Your ISP realizes that the Fed has a gun pointed at their head. It's only natural that they hand over their wallet and carkeys. Thanks to wonderful campaign finance reform law that restrict the first amendment so that only the lapdog press can "fight back", ISP's have no other choice but to lie down and take it. That goes for the users as well.

Universities to help with data mining. (1)

seven89 (303868) | more than 11 years ago | (#3922837)

from the sybase announcement:

. . . the Act requires that all depository financial institutions and broker dealers must know the true identity of their customers and the source of their funds . . .

The potential for abuse here is incredible. Meanwhile, our institutions of research and higher education are ready to do their part to help the U.S. government digest all of this lovely information: National Academies: Universities to play key roles in response to terrorism [umich.edu]

Most of the measures mentioned in that article seem reasonable, but I'm worried about the "data mining" initiative. If you can mine data looking for "terrorists," you can mine for just about anything else, such as potential political opposition.

Also consider: given the plethora of intricate financial disclosure requirements, a list of one's political opponents and vast mountains of data available for mining, it would be no trouble at all to neutralize the opposition.

Imagine what the dirty tricksters of the Nixon administration could have done with a system like "PATRIOT".

The Bushtapo sez (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#3922931)

all your sybase are belong to us!

Stop Complaining, Slashbots! (1)

Dunkalis (566394) | more than 11 years ago | (#3922960)

I'm sick and tired of hearing you rant that PATRIOT takes away freedoms, makes us faschists, etc. IT DOESN'T. The US is trying to destroy an evil terrorist group that threatens our livelihood. The PATRIOT act may have some clauses you don't like, but you forgot the part that says you need a COURT ORDER to be able to execute anything under PATRIOT.

Now, to be a bit on topic, this is a waste of time. They don't need extra software to help in the war against terror. Why not extract the data from their current databases with some Perl scripts?

Financial snooping may pay off. (2)

Animats (122034) | more than 11 years ago | (#3922993)

Yesterday: "U.S. Customs agents have arrested a Jordanian-born man [washingtonpost.com] who was allegedly carrying $12 million in false cashier's checks, alarming counterterrorism officials who said the suspect may have been trained in al Qaeda terrorist camps in Afghanistan." This is significant. Apparently what's left of al Qaeda wanted $12 million in the US for something. It does indicate that attempts to cut off al Qaeda's money supply are working; these were false cashier's checks drawn on a non-existent branch bank, which is a desperation move.

So all this financial snooping actually does have some terrorism implications.

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