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OSNews on the LinuxWorld Exhibition Floor

CmdrTaco posted more than 11 years ago | from the places-to-be dept.

Linux Business 166

Expo writes "OSNews reports on the second day of the LinuxWorld Expo. Highlights of the article is CodeWeaver's CrossOver Photoshop effort and the fact that OpenOffice.org is collaborating with _all_ the other major Linux office suites and word processors towards the creation of a new, open XML-based, file format. NewsForge also has a report."

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166 comments

Slashdot Beatitudes (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4078342)

And seeing the multitudes, He went up unto the mountain: and when He was set, his disciples came unto him: And He opened his mouth, and taught them, saying,

"Blessed are the poor in threshold: for theirs is the Kingdom of the Page-Lengthening and Page-Widening Posts.

"Blessed are they that mourn the death of *BSD: for they shall be comforted with an ultradense Linux server from VA Linux, now sold by California Digital Corporation.

"Blessed are the posters of smug one-liners: for they shall inherit an Account Capped at 50.

"Blessed are they which do hunger and thirst after The First Post: for they shall have the Third or Fourth Post.

"Blessed are the karma whores: for they shall obtain "Score: 5, Insightful".

"Blessed are those who dismiss out-of-hand: for they shall fail to see the Point of the Original Post.

"Blessed are those who seek to associate themselves with the latest techno-fad: for they shall be called 3L33T for at least Another Half Hour.

"Blessed are they which are persecuted for their own self-righteousness' sake: for theirs is the Kingdom of "Ask Slashdot".

"Blessed are the over-eager, who believe that Open Source is a social movement heralding the rise of a new generation: for they shall not realize that There Are No Sacred Cows.

"Blessed are ye, when men shall revile you, and persecute you, and shall say all manner of evil against you falsely, for the sake of your Favorite Operating System.

"Rejoice, and be exceeding glad: for great is your reward in Heaven: for so persecuted they the prophets which were before you.

THIS IS THE WORD OF THE LORD

did i get it? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4078345)

the first post that is?

First (-1)

CmdrTaco (troll) (578383) | more than 11 years ago | (#4078350)

Post?

OS News Here (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4078353)

Read it and weep!!!

Same old, same old... (4, Funny)

Quasar1999 (520073) | more than 11 years ago | (#4078356)

But what about GAMES??? When are they going to have GAMES at one of these linux expos???

Re:Same old, same old... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4078369)

Read the article. They are reporting that no desktop apps were presented there. Only embedded and server stuff. :(

Re:Same old, same old... (2)

Quasar1999 (520073) | more than 11 years ago | (#4078400)

I did read the article.

There are games for WINCE, why the hell aren't there embedded games being developed for Linux? Take a look at http://infosync.no, they have news on the latest apps for the embedded world, including games... NOTHING for Linux... what gives?

We already have them. (1)

bhsx (458600) | more than 11 years ago | (#4078577)

You just recompile the games we have. I've got a Sharp Zaurus. I've got pacman(i think the origianl rom:) an asteroids game, doom and quake(have to switch between those) on a 256MB compact flash.

Re: games games games! (2)

cruise (111380) | more than 11 years ago | (#4078764)

Everyone knows that parents new computer so their kids can play the latest games.

Thats why new computers come with Windows installed.

Re:Same old, same old... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4078853)

Probably around the same time that people start writing games for Linux. (:

First post (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4078363)

Yeah, maybe

What is Linux? (-1, Troll)

SpanishInquisition (127269) | more than 11 years ago | (#4078365)

I keep hearing about it but I don't know what it does, does it run on AOL?

Re:What is Linux? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4078450)

oh dear. please tell me your joking? if not get out of slashdot and never come back. ever.
its an operating system, like windows (but less evil) for running webservers.

Re:What is Linux? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4078871)

I think he's a troll and was doing what trolls do best. For more information on trolls, please check out this web site [goatse.cx] .

Re:What is Linux? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4078479)

Linux is the study of the universe after the big bang. Some people believe in creationism, but many believe the source should be free.

Question.... (0, Redundant)

JoeLinux (20366) | more than 11 years ago | (#4078366)

Is this the convention that MS got a booth in? If so, how is THAT going? Any bomb threats or anything?

Joe

Re:Question.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4078392)

You should read the article. Everything is there about it.

Re:Question.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4078394)

did you bother to read?

MS had three technologies for display

Re:Question.... (2)

JoeLinux (20366) | more than 11 years ago | (#4078476)

I did read the article. They had the technologies listed, but they didn't tell whether or not people were openly mocking the poor saps who were supposed to man the booths.

Why would you sign up for something like this?

"Ok..we need two people to go to a linux convention"

"You're kidding, right?"

"Nope"

"We better get combat pay"

"Damn straight"

"Ok, let's go"

Just another peak into my perverse mind.

JoeLinux

How do you make a cat go "woof" ? Soak it in gasoline and throw a match at it.

Re:Question.... (2)

ArsonSmith (13997) | more than 11 years ago | (#4078484)

read the freaking article:

Just a few meters away, Microsoft's booth was packed. Lots of people, were looking at the three products Microsoft was presenting there: WebMatrix, a 1.3 MB free ASP.NET IDE, WindowsCE with its shared source code and Windows Services for Unix 3.0. Everything was normal and smooth at their booth, lots of people interested or simply curious.


Re:Question.... (1)

armyofone (594988) | more than 11 years ago | (#4078486)

Since you're too lazy to click on a link, here y'are...

Just a few meters away, Microsoft's booth was packed. Lots of people, were looking at the three products Microsoft was presenting there: WebMatrix, a 1.3 MB free ASP.NET IDE, WindowsCE with its shared source code and Windows Services for Unix 3.0. Everything was normal and smooth at their booth, lots of people interested or simply curious.

That took me about four seconds...

Heh... (0, Offtopic)

armyofone (594988) | more than 11 years ago | (#4078567)

Whoops - should have skipped the preview button and done it in three seconds. That way I might not have been redundant.

I really don't get the big deal. (1)

Valar (167606) | more than 11 years ago | (#4078391)

I really don't understand what the big deal with XML is. The word processor people could just decide on one standard format, XML or no XML. The real inovation is that they would use the same format. XML is really more of way of thinking about things than a specific set of instructions, so I think it is a bit overrated.

Re:I really don't get the big deal. (1)

Wolfier (94144) | more than 11 years ago | (#4078463)

Yeah, it's a bit overrated...but one of the big deal is, you no longer have to write parsers if you don't want to. Generic XML parsers will do the job for you...

You're damn skippy! (2)

jonfromspace (179394) | more than 11 years ago | (#4078481)

We are currently doing a doc filter for data mining at my company, and being able to use a generic XML parser would be fantastic. Currently, we are dealing with .doc, .pdf, .html, etc. etc. what a pain in the arse!

Re:I really don't get the big deal. (2)

tim_maroney (239442) | more than 11 years ago | (#4078694)

ou no longer have to write parsers if you don't want to.

That's not true for all applications. XML in itself is only useful for data that is suitable for sequential scanning and complete storage in RAM. To access the data in a random form, you need to build and maintain a binary index. To access data too large to conveniently fit in RAM, you need to have an external index and to be able to deal with partial XML data. XML can be bridged to a database but it is not a database.

--
Tim Maroney tim@maroney.org

Re:I really don't get the big deal. (2)

Wolfier (94144) | more than 11 years ago | (#4078831)

come to think about it...why XML for word processors? It'd be a perfect world if they can just agree on a set of shared TeX scripts and macros, and use TeX as the default format!!

Re:I really don't get the big deal. (5, Interesting)

Havokmon (89874) | more than 11 years ago | (#4078467)

I really don't understand what the big deal with XML is. The word processor people could just decide on one standard format, XML or no XML. The real inovation is that they would use the same format. XML is really more of way of thinking about things than a specific set of instructions, so I think it is a bit overrated.

You hit it on the head. XML is a way of thinking.

Would you rather go to your boss and say, "Let's take a look at replacing MS Office with Open Office. They've started using a standard file format, so multiple vendors applications can read and interact with those files without any issues. This standard is available for Microsoft to implement also."
OR
"Let's take a look at replacing MS Office with Open Office. They've started using an XML-compliant file format, so multiple vendors applications can read and interact with those files without any issues. This standard is available for Microsoft to implement also, who is not yet using XML."

The Boss's brain stops at 'XML', and says "I know that word, everybody is moving in that direction*".

*all the guys on the golf course are talking about it - so they must already be using it.

Re:I really don't get the big deal. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4078712)

XML is already a file format in Office. You're playing catchup, and you didn't even know it.

Re:I really don't get the big deal. (3, Informative)

Kunta Kinte (323399) | more than 11 years ago | (#4078786)

XML is more than hype. It's a god send for many of us.

Try writing a parser for any widely used file format. Go ahead I dare you, DOC, RTF, anyone. Just the parser, so the end result is a syntax tree in memory. See how long it takes to get anything useful. Don't stop there think of revisions of the format. Languages, are we going to have one solid C library and thats it? Aren't we going to support Ruby and Phython? Think of the API to get other programs to use your in-memory parse tree. How are you going to do that? Another API?

XML makes this trivial. with libxml or any of the other popular XML libraries, no *real* coding is involved, just supply the DTD. And plus XML libraries are everywhere. DOM is documented and understood by programmers who may not have encountered your format before, shortening the learning curve for use of your product

With an XML file format *any* of those libraries can be used to edit the format. No more sending mouse clicks to Microsoft word to do simple doc conversions or other hacks. Just write a *very* short PERL script that would parse this file. Also because XML is becoming the parser language of choice, there is a good chance that suitable XML libraries are available for your platform/langauge or installed already.

The idea to use XML is most likely from coders who have had to deal with these parser issues for years. I doubt it was handed down my OpenOffice "management".

Re:I really don't get the big deal. (2, Informative)

AwenAnam (550971) | more than 11 years ago | (#4078943)

It's more than just parsing, when you work with XML you work both with a totally flexible data storage system and at the same time you work with a data storage system with a common well defined basic structure. The advantage of this? Portability, with a common base structure you can exchange data between applications based on XML data storage with veyr much ease as long as theyr use is similar, and some dissimillar applications would be able to share data too whereas before it was a tedious and long task to archieve so.

That is the real beauty of XML, portability from one source to another. Wich is also helped and aided by it being both an Open standard and a Human readable way of storing data.

Re:I really don't get the big deal. (2)

garcia (6573) | more than 11 years ago | (#4078857)

we already have standards. MS already doesn't follow them. What's the point of pushing for something either a) MS won't adopt b/c they don't have to, or more likely b) will adopt but will change to suit their needs?

Re:I really don't get the big deal. (2)

Sabalon (1684) | more than 11 years ago | (#4078940)

They've started using an XML-compliant file format, so multiple vendors applications can read and interact with those files without any issues.

Yup...just like HTML - until things like Flash, Shockwave, Quicktime and all these other plugins get embedded into it.

Hopefully XML can remain pure and more useful than HTML has become.

And I don't even blame MS for this one - they may have added some things here and there, but even if you just follow the standards for HTML and CSS, half the crap only works on IE.

Re:I really don't get the big deal. (1)

vadim_t (324782) | more than 11 years ago | (#4078723)

Why? XML is really cool. MS Word always has a format incompatible with the previous version. Why? Because designing a binary format that is extensible and flexible is not something you can do on a weekend. With XML this becomes easier.

Suppose you want to define the font. In version 1.0 you have <font name="Arial" bold="true">. Now, in version 2.0 you come up with a cool formatting effect. It's a bit stupid but let's say you want font with a gradient. Now your new tag looks like <font name="Arial" bold="true" gradient="BlueGradient">. The old version of your app can simply ignore the new information and still load the document correctly.

Using a binary format, all that goes to hell when you realize that you need to store more data in a field and change it from a char to an int type, making the format unreadable by the previous version. And of course no company will be happy having to accept a format like what Word uses. What if they want to add a new feature that can't be expressed in .doc? When done well, XML should allow having a base everybody can read and still add features unique to your program.

Re:I really don't get the big deal. (3, Insightful)

tim_maroney (239442) | more than 11 years ago | (#4078901)

XML does not solve the format change problem. Adding new features to an XML-based word processor would necessarily involve changing the schema. Old applications could well be confused by the new data. They might be able to create a parse tree in memory, but on a semantic level they would not be able to understand what the parse tree meant.

It's definitely not as easy as just ignoring new data, as you suggest. Suppose the new feature is footnotes within footnotes. Throwing away all the nested footnotes when the data are processed by an old application is not the right way to go. And you can't just blindly preserve the unknown information either, since transforms done to the rest of the data (e.g., changing the font universally to Garamond) also may need to be applied to the unknown data. Or they may not. If you don't understand the data you don't know whether they need to be done or not, and you may not understand the right way to do the transform.

Some of these problems can be addressed in part, but they require significant extra infrastructure to do so, and complicate everyday data processing tasks. That is, a format flexible enough to solve most of these problems would be quite hard to deal with on an ongoing basis, due to the need to constantly make decisions based on variant data types and informational attributes. There is no magic bullet for the format change problem.

--
Tim Maroney tim@maroney.org

Re:I really don't get the big deal. (4, Informative)

CynicTheHedgehog (261139) | more than 11 years ago | (#4078751)

1) DTDs

XML allows you to define your own document format standards and embed those standards into your documents, for on-the-fly validation during parsing. DTDs can be distributed to your vendors, and they can draft documents according to that DTD, and be assured some level of compatibility with your software.

2) Heirarchal Storage of Data

This may not be that important to a lot of people, but it offers the ability to categorize data in common groupings with duplication of meta data. It's great for, say, directory structures and whatnot. Sure, there's LDAP, but that's an interface standard. This is a storage standard.

3) Readability

There's a whole debate over how readable XML is, given the prevalance of markup, but I would argue that the heirarchal outlines are much more intuitive than a flat file format. Well-designed DTDs and well-named tags help reduce the interference of markup.

4) Conciseness

XML wouldn't be good for, say, a network layer protocol, but as an interface between applications and users it is fairly small for what it does. Sure there's "overhead" and "bloat", but who wants to visually parse run-together character strings or hexadecimal encoded bytes?

5) Standardization

XML has to make a lot of concessions because it is designed to be universal. It's a standard. Yes, not all applications make use of all the features it offers. They don't have to. But those features are available so more applications can make use of it. It's widely used, it's open, and it works.

XML is good at what it's designed for. The standardized office document formats are a great place for it, as it offers the user *some* readability outside of an application framework while preserving special markup. Ever try reading a .DOC file in WordPad? Yech.

Re:I really don't get the big deal. (1)

ejaw5 (570071) | more than 11 years ago | (#4078794)

it is nice they're collaborating on a common format. I can't say whether XML is good or not for a format, but it is nice to be able to take document files created from any office program and open and edit in a differnt program WITHOUT saving in a txt or rtf that loses a lot of formatting features.

Not to bash M$, but different companies working together is much better for the computer user. Ever try opening a Works document in M$ Word? It doesn't work, yet both packages are made from the same company, now what chance do other competing programs have with working with M$ files? The example of a common format will give more reason to use Linux, if this trend continues (or starts)

suggestion for file extension for new XML document (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4078406)

how about ".dox"?

India plans moonshot-a Question (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4078412)

If Americans are called Astronauts; Russians called Cosmonauts; Chinese call Chinkonauts--then what will Indian spacemen be call Dotanauts? Stinkanauts? CurrySmellinganauts???

This is why linux is doomed to FAIL (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4078429)

This is pathetic. A whole article about a linux trade show, and not ONE worthwhile piece of information. I've got some news for you linux types: without industry-standard applications like Microsoft Word or games like Quake 3, your little toy OS is going exactly NOWHERE.

I know a bunch of you are going to reply to this to whine about how all kinds of "exciting" (to a sunlight-starved gnome with CRT-bleached skin) server technologies were presented, but guess what? Boring server shit doesn't sell computers. Compliance with industry standards and good games do.

Re:This is why linux is doomed to FAIL (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4078525)

This article appears to be written for those who have attended shows like this, but were unable to attend. It appears to be a pretty good summary of what went on, but leaving out all the geeky details of information that may be hard to convey in just one article.

Industry standard Microsoft Word? Tell that to my mom who has problems opening up her Word documents from other people who use word. Its not even compatible with itself. This toy OS you speak of is about as industry standard as your are going to get. It is molded for compatibility around a 30 year old operating system. Try that with Windows, that kept breaking programs through each release, from Windows 286, 3.0, 3.11, 95, 98, NT, 2000, XP. Old unix programs never die, they just run on newer hardware.

WHAT THE FUCK IS WINDOWS 286? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4078589)

Typical insane linux zealot delusions (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4078672)

It appears to be a pretty good summary of what went on, but leaving out all the geeky details of information that may be hard to convey in just one article.

Here's a clue for you, buddy: if an article goes on for two straight paragraphs about "32-bit applications" and "64-bit processors," it's got the "geeky details." In spades.

I don't want the geeky details, and I certainly don't need them to see that there was nothing that a REAL computer user would be REMOTELY interested in presented at this convention.

Industry standard Microsoft Word? Tell that to my mom who has problems opening up her Word documents from other people who use word.

And who are these other people? Oh, right, EVERYBODY. That sounds like a standard to me.

Its not even compatible with itself.

Right, and I suppose you think they should have left Office at version 1.0 and forgotten about it, since a newer version might have (horrors!) an incompatible file format.

Whatever.

News flash: if you want to read current documents, you have to stay current. I understand that your freeloading linux mindset may give you some problems with actually PAYING for software (whoa! weird idea, man!), but if you don't pay REAL MONEY for upgrades, how are the people who write your software supposed to make money, to say, feed their families?

Eazel sure did well.... (cough)

This toy OS you speak of is about as industry standard as your are going to get. It is molded for compatibility around a 30 year old operating system.

Yeah, I agree: linux would have been pretty standard in about 1972. Now it's just a joke.

Try that with Windows, that kept breaking programs through each release, from Windows 286, 3.0, 3.11, 95, 98, NT, 2000, XP.

I can still run all my old DOS programs in Windows XP. But, hey, if I ever find one that I can't run, that's the price of progress. I'd much rather lose the occasional 20 year old program (why would I want to run software from 1982?) than be stuck with some ridiculous OS that requires me to "recompile my kernel" every hour.

Old unix programs never die, they just run on newer hardware.

And that's exactly why unix has been left behind -- along with the rest of the 70's.

Re:Typical insane linux zealot delusions (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4078814)

News flash: if you want to read current documents, you have to stay current.

You live on the bleeding edge of excitment and apparently don't have to worry about compatibility.

A bit offtopic, but still in concept (2)

justsomebody (525308) | more than 11 years ago | (#4079001)



"Here's a clue for you, buddy: if an article goes on for two straight
paragraphs about "32-bit applications" and "64-bit processors," it's got
the "geeky details." In spades.

I don't want the geeky details, and I certainly don't need them to see that
there was nothing that a REAL computer user would be REMOTELY interested
in presented at this convention."


I guess you're one of the happy readers of "Runs better, faster" type of
logos, maybe you should read some children web site, there is that kind of
readings you'd wish. Hope you're not expecting that mostly linux geek site
will go on your level.

Or on the other hand, it would be useful some kid, user, geek preference
in your info.

"And who are these other people? Oh, right, EVERYBODY. That sounds like
a standard to me"



But, doesn't it bother you that less and less people confirms to that EVERYBODY?

"Eazel sure did well.... (cough)"



WHat has Eazel to do with documents compatibility

"I can still run all my old DOS programs in Windows XP. But, hey, if I
ever find one that I can't run, that's the price of progress. I'd much rather
lose the occasional 20 year old program (why would I want to run software
from 1982?) than be stuck with some ridiculous OS that requires me to "recompile
my kernel" every hour."



????

Ok, I've bought my self notebook with XP PRO. There's only two windows apps
I'm using.

One goes way back into startings of my company. All my comapny papers are
inside. Guess what. It doesn't work under XP.

Second one is not so old it's a one year old program that I use to connect
to the bank (Same program that half of the country uses). Guess what, Doesn't
work under XP.

So, to hell with your progress. Here's why somebody would use a program like
that.

"And that's exactly why unix has been left behind -- along with the rest
of the 70's."



Considering maturity of your answers, 20 years before you were born :-)

Re:This is why linux is doomed to FAIL (1)

Colin Walsh (1032) | more than 11 years ago | (#4078548)

This is pathetic. A whole article about a linux trade show, and not ONE worthwhile piece of information. I've got some news for you linux types: without industry-standard applications like Microsoft Word or games like Quake 3, your little toy OS is going exactly NOWHERE.

What bridge have you been living under? I wasn't aware that there was *another* video game, exclusive to Windows, called Quake 3 [tuxgames.com] ? Fancy that!

If you're going to attempt to insult us Linux using folk, you might as well do us all a favour and do it right.

-Colin

Article enclosed (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4078437)

San Francisco, Wed. 14th Aug 2002. This was my first Linux-related exhibition, so I did not exactly know what to expect. Jill from DesktopLinux came by the house and picked me up this morning (thanks Jill :) and we arrived there around 10:40 AM, with lots of enthusiasm and some expectations for a nice geek show. However, it seems that this year's LinuxWorld is much more corporate than expected. Which is both a good and a bad thing for the Linux universe.

Part I

First booth I visited was AMD's. Their booth is right at the entrance of the South Hall, and it is nicely designed, with lots of space to move around. Main highlight was Opteron. While they had a couple of Athlons running, most of the machines, shows, speeches and specials were all about Opteron, Hammer and the x86-64. I think it is obvious that AMD does not try to race against Intel and Pentium4 (which will be running at 3 GHz in two months) as much anymore. They are already behind in the 32bit x86 speed race, running at 1800 MHz (2200+) with the AthlonXP CPUs already maxed out in both speed and heat. Opteron/Hammer is the future of AMD, and this LinuxWorld really made it a lot more clear where the company is heading to. The whole show at AMD was about it. They also had some benchmarks going on running IBM DB2 on a 800 MHz Opteron, which performed well. The SuSE Linux used for their tests, was able to run both 64-bit and 32-bit compiled applications at the same time. For example, SuSE itself and DB2 was compiled as native 64-bit, while the Opera app I launched was a 32bit app running side by side with the 64-bit ones. Very good integration between the two architectures. Two in one, smooth switch.
Next booth I visited was Trolltech's. They had on display the ED.1, which has a folded, full keyboard! The device is kind of stuffy though, pretty thick. I asked them what their current relationship is with KDE and what if the KDE project requires some changes to the API, and they replied that they mostly do modifications for embedded or cross platform aware customers, so if a feature is not cross-platfom "enough", or many customers haven't asked for it, the feature probably won't get implemented if it is only needed by KDE. (Hey Waldo, masquerade as a Trolltech customer and ask for that QSplitter... ;)

The .ORG pavilion was cool -- full of real geeks. A lot of open source projects found a roof in the LinuxWorld, even if their exhibition space floor was minimal. The Debian guys were there, I bought their t-shirt for a tenner (they were joking that "KDE 3 for the next Debian will be released in 2008 or 2009), Gnome were just next to them, and it was ran by various people at different times of the day. I would have bought a Gnome t-shirt too, with the new logo on it, but the printed logo was really small, so it was really not justifying the $15. I talked to a couple of people on both the Gnome and KDE booths, asking for interoperability, perfect collaboration between Qt and GTK+ applications, and they told me that more and more developers are getting sensitive into the issue and they seek ways to do so. Today, the MIME types format is now understandable from both KDE and Gnome and they see this as the first step of the collaboration.

The NetBSD booth was just next to KDE's, but no one and nothing was there. It seems that the guys didn't make it to the expo.

The OpenOffice.org booth was full at all times. In fact, it had more people around it than the StarOffice booth. Lots of people were asking questions, like what is the difference between OOO and SO6. I talked to a gentleman at the booth and he told me that some Gobe people were there, and they were all discussing the idea of creating a new, XML-based, common format, that will be accessible from all major Linux offices and word processors, including SO, OOO, gobeProductive, KOffice, AbiWord etc. He said that the current OOO format is not that great and it is a bit heavy, so they would like to work together towards a new common format.

The MotifZone was there too, and except the fact that they wouldn't like using QT or GTK+ "because not all features or widgets are there", they were clear that they only target the corporate market, or other heavy Unix developers, and not as much Linux or *BSD. Recently, they added the ability to compile a Motif application with a new look that looks better, in their surprise, the corporate devs still use the traditional Motif look.

Some of the Gentoo Linux PPC guys were there, they were... compiling... hmm... compiling... :)
I was eager to meet Daniel Robbins, but he had to fly that day, he was present only the first day of the expo.

I stopped by the Aurora SPARC Linux project, who have basically back ported the Red Hat Linux 7.3 to SPARC after Red Hat stopped supporting the platform. Interesting project. Their version of Red Hat (which of course does not have any logos or mentions to the company to avoid legal issues) runs on all 64bit SPARCs, and they now port the new Installer to the 32bit SPARCs, so their port would be truly complete.

CodeWeavers were there, they were presenting Office under Linux, and they are creating two new products, one of which is the ability to run Photoshop properly under Linux! In fact, they had a beta ready to ship, but they found some last minute bugs, that put the release on hold. Just on the other side of CodeWeavers you would find the PogoLinux guys, but I had no idea that Jason Spisac from Lycoris was using it as shared booth. There was no Lycoris logos or big posters anywhere, so I missed him. If I regret one thing from the whole show, is that I didn't meet and talk to Jason. :(

Just a few meters away, Microsoft's booth was packed. Lots of people, were looking at the three products Microsoft was presenting there: WebMatrix, a 1.3 MB free ASP.NET IDE, WindowsCE with its shared source code and Windows Services for Unix 3.0. Everything was normal and smooth at their booth, lots of people interested or simply curious.

The Sharp's booth was also packed at all times. They were selling the Zaurus for $300 (which is the price they sell it to some of their resellers). The PDA can be found in retail as low as $325+tax+shipping.

Part II

Walking a bit further, someone with a familiar face passed me by. I immediately recognized Linus Torvalds. He was walking alone, with a... smile in his face. I could see he was feeling pretty happy (and that is not just women's instict ;). I decided to talk to him, he was very kind and cool, but also seemed a bit... lost, as he was there for an appointment and he couldn't find the appropriate booth. ;-)
The biggest booth of all, was HP's. I did not like it and to be honest, I don't quite understand their business with Linux. Instead, I asked for information about... HP-UX. They did not have anyone from the HP-UX team on board, while Sun did have a lot of Solaris stuff to show off just a few meters away from the HP booth. In fact, the Sun's booth was shared to many projects, like Solaris, StarOffice, Sun Linux, other third party Solaris-related companies and Gnome 2.0 (btw, their default configuration of Gnome 2 is even worse than the default Gnome 2). Also, all the CDE applications instead of evenly show in the Applications menu, they have their own folder on the root of the menu, called "CDE". Great integration Sun. NOT.

The booth that had by far the most people of all, and it was packed all the time, was Red Hat's. These guys are big. They ran the whole show at LinuxWorld. You go to Sun, they use Red Hat. You go to Google, they use Red Hat. You go to some other booths and products, and they still use Red Hat. Robert Young was there, very obviously happy, discussing business with some other people in their booth's mini-lounge. Ximian was using a bit of Red Hat's space floor too.

And if Red Hat was the strong player there, SuSE was the weakest one. SuSE gets the award for the worst "professional" booth at LinuxWorld. I was very disappointed by the people who were running it. The booth was very plain, they had nothing to give to visitors, and the guys were so no-enthusiastic, that really depressed me and made me wanna go away from their booth. Half of their booth was about SuSE Linux 8 and their email server product, and the other half was about UnitedLinux. Very few people around them. And the exhibitors did not help with their attitude. I heard from other media people (I went there with a "media pass") the exact same complaints for their performance.

And talking about Red Hat and SuSE, the biggest absent from the show was Mandrake! Where did these guys go anyway? A lot of Linux-friendly companies and lots of OSS projects were missing, but Mandrake's was the most obvious and un-excused one. [Update: I now hear they were there, under the AMD booth. Well, they were completely... undetectable.]

Intel's, IBM's and Borland's booths were pretty big, Intel was showing lots of embedded stuff. Netraverse was there showing their three products, Covalent, Google, and also lots of embedded-related companies.

This LinuxWorld was a bit corporate, not many geeks around, but still always a few, mostly around the .org pavilion. The kinds of products mostly presented there were either for the embedded world, or for servers. In fact, because of this very professional/corporate embedded-feel of the Expo, even Microsoft's presence was kinda making sense... However, in general, nothing ground breaking was shown in this Expo...

The highlight of the Expo would be AMD's multiple Opteron presentations really. And I am not even a lot into hardware (still happy with my dual 533Mhz)... It was kinda of a let down to not see ANY new desktop-oriented application presented at the Expo. There was no company exhibiting, that its commercial products would be truly for the desktop. No professional DTP applications, no video editors, no Illustrator-killers, no high end audio apps or 3D. Nothing. Just embedded and server stuff. A lot of Linux users try to convince us or establish the idea that Linux is or can be big on the desktop, but the absence desktop-oriented exhibitors, tell the opposite story so far - and this is indeed kinda of a let down.

Just 15 minutes before I leave the building, Michael Bego, the Xandros VP, spotted me (because of my back pack, a woolly sheep-bag :) and we talked for a while. Mr Bego is an exceptional, kind young man. He really does not deserve your harsh criticism to their (unreleased yet) product guys. He told me that because of the feedback from the OSNews forums, the colors and some of the icons and other elements of the UI will be changed and will be ready for the last beta, before the final release of the product. He also told me that the large majority of the Xandros Desktop 1.0 will be open sourced completely, and only some of their enhancements to the file manager, installer and some wizard pref panels that they were engineered from scratch won't be opened immediately. In fact, the company is studying the possibility of opening their source code at some point, to a (stricter) license scheme similar to SuSE's Yast2. But it is not certain yet, it is still under discussion. They are about 25 people working today for Xandros. I asked Mr Bego which kind of desktop users Xandros targets: The Linux-aware desktop users, or the completely unexperienced ones. Xandros apparently tries to play nice with all. He also said that Lindows bases some of their under-the-hood code on the Xandros one, however none of the pref panels, installer, and other enhancements found on Xandros can be found on Lindows. Yes, Xandros respects the users and root Unix accounts (while on Lindows you are only logged in as root).

I got some pictures from the expo, but my camera is not digital (neither I am sure it works, haven't used it for 2 years :), so I will have to find some time and go and print them. It might take a couple of days to do so.

My... LinuxWorld Awards:

1. Best Booth: AMD
2. Worst booth (ever): SuSE/UnitedLinux
3. Most crowded booth: Red Hat
4. Less crowded booth: X.org and 2-3 others.
5. Most interesting project: Aurora Linux.
6. Most interesting product: Borland Kylix.
7. Most interesting person: The main Microsoft guy. Wasn't that guy sharp or what?
8. Sweetest person I talked to: Sharp Zaurus marketing manager (spoke to her at the Intel booth too) and Michael Bego.
9. Sleepiest person I talked to: All these guys at SuSE/UnitedLinux... What were they thinking?
10. Best Free Gift: Sun's Gnome2 light pen! Kewl... :)

Until next year!


You may think I'm posting this in case of a slashdotting, but, really, I'm doing it cause it pisses off ELoli, and I love seeing her mad.

Down with your copywrite 'claims'.

Re:Article enclosed (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4078474)

I recommend you do not copy/paste whole articles from publications that explicity include at the bottom of their page:

"Reproduction of OSNews stories is granted only by explicitly receiving authorization from OSNews and if credit is given to OSNews."

Re:Article enclosed (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4078522)

I knew you'd come by to get pissy Eugenia!! Is it that time of the month?

Re:Article enclosed (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4079019)

Fuck off, jewboy. You should be gassed along with all your kike brothers.

Set the standards babe! (3, Interesting)

miffo.swe (547642) | more than 11 years ago | (#4078448)

Thats more like it! Hopefully they give the olive branch to all Mac and Windows developers too. Not to Microsoft, remember kerberos anyone?


If GNU/linux/Open Source can be a part in setting the standards instead of just following them it would be awesome. Then linux could be the developers platform that set the industry instead of just playing tag along with windows.


To get backing for this it needs support from all other than Microsoft to be able to pressure them into supporting it. A web standard for documents would be nice instead of plain txt or vendor locked Microsoft and Adobe format. Adobe has its place too but its not a real standard, and its not free.

Re:Set the standards babe! (2)

BitGeek (19506) | more than 11 years ago | (#4078734)


Adobe has its place too but its not a real standard, and its not free.

Sure it is. Its an open standard.

Apple created the OS X compositing engine to be compatible with PDF, making PDF generation a trivial thing for Mac Apps, and they did this without paying Adobe any money.

AFAIK there are Open source implementations of PDF as well, if not then its only because nobody wanted it enough to write one.

Or did you mean Free as in GNUtalitarian? "Sure, you're free to use our icon, you just have to open the source for your whole program. No, just releasing the changes you make to our work isn't enough, sorry."

Open Source PDF (1)

obotics (592176) | more than 11 years ago | (#4078803)

PDF is openly available to be implemented in various systems.
Check out Xpdf [foolabs.com] . Xpdf is licensed under the GNU General Public License (GPL), version 2, so that should make many /. readers happy :)

Re:Set the standards babe! (2)

GypC (7592) | more than 11 years ago | (#4078865)

PDF isn't really a word processing format though... it's a display format.

Early post! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4078453)

Not first post, of course, but still close to the beginning.

http://goatse.cx [microsoft.com]

NetBSD booth (1)

bsDaemon (87307) | more than 11 years ago | (#4078487)

I'm sad to hear they didn't make it. I don't know why, but i'm just getting into Net after 6ish years w/ Free. Daemonnews was supposed to have a booth, too. I think the FreeBSD people where going to but, i know not.

It is nice to know that people wheren't setting fire to Microsoft or anything. anything that makes either linux or bsd look bad is going to end up being bad for the other, becuase we're all on the fringe compared to say, sun or ms.

Fringe? Wait for Sun's reverse stock split. (1)

BoomerSooner (308737) | more than 11 years ago | (#4078802)

Then you'll see fringe. 4.27/share, ouch.

Greate company (4, Interesting)

wilburdg (178573) | more than 11 years ago | (#4078488)

I really think CodeWeaver has a great place in the open source community. They are creating proprietary code, but in doing so, they are giving many windows users the option to switch to linux, by making available their favorite apps. Just because they offer a proprietary solutions, doesn't mean they aren't supporting the open source community.

Re:Greate company (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4078598)

Niggles!

Re:Greate company (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4078626)

I still don't get it. Is CodeWeaver open source or not? Is it WINE? I know it uses WINE code somehow, but do CW contributions make it into the WINE tree? Is it open source but commercial (like Netscape is to Mozilla?)

I looked on the site but could not find a clear explanation of CW vs. WINE & Open Source Vs. Proprietary..

Could someone shed some light on this?

Re:Greate company (1)

Centove (29943) | more than 11 years ago | (#4078832)

You didn't look hard enough:

http://www.codeweavers.com/products/office/suppo rt _wine.php

And more mention of it here:
http://www.codeweavers.com/products/crossov er/the_ real_dirt.php

damn it! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4078495)

...the fact that OpenOffice.org is collaborating with _all_ the other major Linux office suites and word processors towards the creation of a new, open XML-based, file format.

That's not what the article said, the article merely states that there is an interest in doing that.

He said that the current OOO format is not that great and it is a bit heavy, so they would like to work together towards a new common format.

photoshop on linux?? (3, Funny)

Dr. Awktagon (233360) | more than 11 years ago | (#4078499)

I think I just wet my pants...

Re:photoshop on linux?? (1)

armyofone (594988) | more than 11 years ago | (#4078542)

You mean you can't tell for sure? :-)

Serioiusly though. Do you really need Photoshop when you have the GIMP?

Re:photoshop on linux?? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4078582)

Um, yes. Photoshop is only about a million times easier to use than the GIMP.

Photoshop on Linux will get people to use Linux (2)

gatesh8r (182908) | more than 11 years ago | (#4078584)

It's not a matter of what's available, it's a matter of what people like. I think the GIMP is great, and sure whomps Photoshop. But... people like Photoshop, and people don't want anything else but Photoshop. It's nolstagia, and that's what keeps people going back to the well of Adobe -- the same goes for M$ with their Office suite (though OO and SO are available and do great) and Intuit with Quicken and Quickbooks.

Re:Photoshop on Linux will get people to use Linux (2)

Afrosheen (42464) | more than 11 years ago | (#4078692)

Alot of people depend on Photoshop for their livelihood, and have been using it since version 3 or lower. It's pretty hard to make the transition from Photoshop to Gimp...seems like everything is missing/works wrong. Trust me, I've wrestled with Gimp from time to time, but at the end of the day, I end up using Fireworks. I'll be sending Codeweavers a big wad of cash the day they have Codeweaver's Flash/Dreamweaver/Fireworks.

Re:Photoshop on Linux will get people to use Linux (2)

teamhasnoi (554944) | more than 11 years ago | (#4078788)

Gimp is great if only because it's free. Photoshop is able to do much more. Like get me jobs, allow me to finish them, and send them to people who can print them out.

It's got nothing to do w/ nostalgia, Photoshop gets the job done. If Gimp did more than RGB, and was easier to use, then we'd see more people use it.

I think the nostalgia is yours, for Gimp.

Re:photoshop on linux?? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4078725)

>Serioiusly though. Do you really need Photoshop when you have the GIMP?

YES. Does GIMP do CMYK? What about ColorSync? Until then, it is NOT a Photoshop competitor for serious use.

Next, I hope they get Illustrator and InDesign working, to complement Photoshop.

Re:photoshop on linux?? (0)

Rude Turnip (49495) | more than 11 years ago | (#4078736)

Now I can "borrow" my fiance's G3 Mac, switch in a PC w/Linux & KDE w/an OS X theme, install Photoshop with Codeweavers and she'll never notice! muhahhahahahahah!!!!

Re:photoshop on linux?? (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4078776)

Never notice? The difference between Aqua and an Aqua theme is pretty damn obvious when you've been using OS X for a while.

Re:photoshop on linux?? (1)

kappax (588731) | more than 11 years ago | (#4078784)

lol!! i had photoshop on linix 1.5 years ago with wine, what is the big deal ? this is old news to me. I dont think you ppl have tryed as many apps as you should. I when down the list and treyd just about every exe i could find my Ms partition.

Without a partition is the key. (1)

BoomerSooner (308737) | more than 11 years ago | (#4078879)

Installing PS5, 6, or 7 on Wine does not work, and if you can get it working it's extremely unstable (one of the major benefits of using linux).

A Zaurus for 300 bucks? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4078553)

Damn. Now I wish I was there.

New format? (2, Informative)

raptwithal (134137) | more than 11 years ago | (#4078557)

From the post: the fact that OpenOffice.org is collaborating with _all_ the other major Linux office suites and word processors towards the creation of a new, open XML-based, file format.

From the article: some Gobe people were there, and they were all discussing the idea of creating a new, XML-based, common format

Isn't there a difference between 'discussing the idea' of creating a new format and actually doing it?

Re:New format? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4078632)

Yes,
First you discuss,
Then you form a standards group,
then you make the standard.

Re:New format? (3, Interesting)

Soko (17987) | more than 11 years ago | (#4078955)

Said the AC:
Yes,
First you discuss,
Then you form a standards group,
then you make the standard.


Other than being "Captain Obvious", the AC is correct. You need to get all of the cats into the same corral before you can herd them along.

At least they're attacking the root problem - a useable, patent free, open standard document format, rather than a de facto standard format that's closed, proprietary and difficult to reverse engineer.

Soko

Microsoft Presence... (1)

dubious9 (580994) | more than 11 years ago | (#4078558)

It's nice to know that the MS booth was not targeted for any pranks (AFAIK). This really gives a lot of credibility to Linux and the open source (and especially Slashdot) communities, by showing that we can play nicely even if we do refer to MS as the evil empire.

Evidently they got spent a lot of time thinking about who should represent them because the OSNews lady was quite impressed:

"Most interesting person: The main Microsoft guy. Wasn't that guy sharp or what?"

This is the best example I've seen to date about Microsoft taking *nix seriously

Re:Microsoft Presence... (2, Interesting)

paladin_tom (533027) | more than 11 years ago | (#4078621)

You don't consider them running their free online mail service [hotmail.com] on FreeBSD for years "taking *nix seriously"? ;-)

We didn't have to (1)

Invictus2.0 (570276) | more than 11 years ago | (#4078796)

Scott McNealy and Larry Ellison slammed them (and others) quite nicely for us during their keynotes (I still don't think very highly of Ellison, but I digress). Remember, if geeks trash tlak corporations, we're immature, if corporations trash talk other corporations, they're competetive.

Just came to think about a thingie. (1, Offtopic)

miffo.swe (547642) | more than 11 years ago | (#4078566)

Is it possible to create a similar approach as with networks on documents. Creating an "OSI" model for documents would allow easy changes along the way and extensions on both high and low levels without the need to rewrite all code at once.

It has obviously been proven very succesful on networks so do any of you think it would be workable?

Re:Just came to think about a thingie. (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4078965)

How is that offtopic?

Clueless moderators...

RedHat? (2)

garcia (6573) | more than 11 years ago | (#4078573)

the booth that "was packed all the time, was Red Hat's. These guys are big. They ran the whole show at LinuxWorld. You go to Sun, they use Red Hat. You go to Google, they use Red Hat. You go to some other booths and products, and they still use Red Hat."

I ran RedHat for many years, it is still running on my Alpha UDB because I am just too damn lazy to wait for Debian to install on that lowly machine. Why is there such a buzz around RedHat as far as their distribution goes?

I know that they do A LOT for the community but I just don't see their distribution as being the cleanest and safest of all.

Any ideas on why they would be such a popular choice? Is it just their physical popularity or is there something else I am missing?

Re:RedHat? (3, Insightful)

Jonny Ringo (444580) | more than 11 years ago | (#4078748)

I often think its becuase of the "first to market" deal. Like Amazon for ecomerce or Ebay for auctions or Yahoo for portals. Redhat has been around for a while (one of the firsts) and they do a pretty decent job of marketing themselves.

BTW, I am aware that Redhat does not eq linux and Linux was around before Redhat

Re:RedHat? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4078846)

Ok, I remember when I first went looking to install linux some 4+ years ago, I stumbled on RedHat in a book. That sealed it for me. I ran it until Mandrake 6 appeared some time later on. Mandrake at the time was still RedHat will enhancements.

RedHat has a corporate presence that is missing with the other linux distros. They have meaningful corporate relationships and agreements with some of the big boys out there. And, they have worked hard on things that users wanted improved- such as the install. So, while they aren't the best, they might just be the best- for corporate America.

And besides, if you go somewhere and they are running RedHat, are you really going to bitch that thye should have installed debian instead? No, you are impressed that another company is using linux.

Wow it is fun out here. (2, Informative)

Metex (302736) | more than 11 years ago | (#4078574)

Right now I am sitting in the press room typeing this and all I can say is LinuxWorld has evolved in many ways. At first glance most of my friends were somewhat dissapointed and the considerable drop of booths and people attending. But big buissness that have in the last past few years showed up in full force even the 3v1l Micro$haft. This signifys the continueing trend of how Linux and LinuxWorld Expo has turned from a kinda Comic Book convention atmosphere where you know everyone into a serious suit affair.

The highlights from linux world for me? Getting a pic of 17 Microsoft Employes all holding up a bumpersticker that said "You shouldnt Buy software from ex convicts". Besides that the allways insperational Linux Bowl/ or by its proper name the Golden Penguin Bowl when my Friend Arthur Ulfelt(? last name allways screws me up) got picked to be on the sides. And unfortunatly again one of my friends were on the looseing team since last year I got my friend Jesse Crocker to go up on one of the sides he lost forgetting that Trinity was in room 303 and he missed the 20 people makeing signs that said it with there fingers. Oh well. Arthurs shigning moment was when he said as the answer "Food" to the questoin is C6H1206 food or poisen =)

Re:Wow it is fun out here. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4078913)

Please tell me English is not your first language...

LINUX RUINS THE LIVES OF ITS USERS! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4078616)

XML DocBook? (1)

jgilbert (29889) | more than 11 years ago | (#4078627)

OpenOffice.org is collaborating with _all_ the other major Linux office suites and word processors towards the creation of a new, open XML-based, file format.

I'd be content if one of them would come out w/ a straight up DocBook editor that despensed w/ all the WYSIWYG non-sense and provided a convenient way to apply stylesheets and generate different output. What's the advantage of yet another XML DTD?

Of course, it would also be nice if everyone would standardize on kerberos for single sign-on instead of all the bitching about liberty and passport.

jason

Bugs (1)

IWantMoreSpamPlease (571972) | more than 11 years ago | (#4078638)

>>CodeWeavers were there, they were presenting Office under Linux, and they are creating two new products, one of which is the ability to run Photoshop properly under Linux! In fact, they had a beta ready to ship, but they found some last minute bugs, that put the release on hold

Bugs, yeah...they're called Microsoft lawyers

Photoshop on Linux is a good thing (4, Informative)

Plasmic (26063) | more than 11 years ago | (#4078639)

Unlike GIMP, Photoshop actually supports CMYK, Pantone, and 16-bit/channel images. The entire pre-press industry depends on these features.

The only app for Linux that's competitive in this space is GIMP. According to GIMP's web site, supporting CMYK will "require a complete rewrite" of the painting engine and will not be available until GIMP 2.0 which some speculate will never come to fruition.

There are entire industries blocking on Linux having the capabilities that Photoshop provides. This is a great step in the right direction, even if it's just a stop-gap until GIMP 2.0 is available.

CMYK is a color model in which all colors are described as a mixture of these four process colors. CMYK is the standard color model used in offset printing for full-color documents. Because such printing uses inks of these four basic colors, it is often called four-color printing.

In contrast, display devices generally use a different color model called RGB, which stands for Red-Green-Blue. One of the most difficult aspects of desktop publishing in color is color matching -- properly converting the RGB colors into CMYK colors so that what gets printed looks the same as what appears on the monitor.

Photoshop does this rather well.

Re:Photoshop on Linux is a good thing (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4078779)

How are CMYK colors displayed properly on a RGB monitor that they use to work with? What percentage of quality are we losing from the RGB -> CMYK conversion? Considering that print rags are becoming outdated, is this really that important?

Raster (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4078653)

I notice that Raster was absent this year...he was deming the evas tool or library last year....Maybe he decided to pack it in? Does anyone know?

Re:Raster (1)

bsDaemon (87307) | more than 11 years ago | (#4078695)

he's kind of in Australia with an actual job that is much les likely to let him go than VA or RH, which probably shoved him there.

linuxworldexpo is running windows (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4078680)

WTF? the event of the summer for Linux and it cannot be run by its own system. If you do not believe me click http://uptime.netcraft.com/up/graph/?host=www.linu xworldexpo.com

Oy, it's bad (4, Informative)

actappan (144541) | more than 11 years ago | (#4078708)

I stubled over to the show a couple times in the last few days - only a couple blocks from the office here. All the geeks in the office agreed that it was deeply deeply lame. 'Bout the best thing to come of the show was the elastic badge holder thingy.

The floor seems empty, the booths seems thin, and the coolest thing I think I saw was this handheld voice rec translator - and it was running Windows.

And - RedHat seems like a bunch of revolutionaries compared to the other exhibitors. They actualy use the words Open Source.

Way downhill from last year (where's Ximian and the cool jungle booth?)

Low quality article (4, Informative)

bryanbrunton (262081) | more than 11 years ago | (#4078746)


Commenting on the Athlon, the article starts out with:

"running at 1800 MHz (2200+) with the AthlonXP CPUs already maxed out in both speed and heat"

The 2400+ and 2600+ Athlon will very likely be released on the 21st of THIS month. And they are supposed to be running much cooler. AMD found a glitch in the Athlons that was responsible for a good deal of the chips heat.

I hate CNBC! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4078787)

They showed this crap last night and i thoguht what the fucking fuck? Not only that, LNUX shares actually went UP!

TechTV (0, Offtopic)

brandonsr (550431) | more than 11 years ago | (#4078845)

And for this of you who get TechTV you can watch CmdrTaco on an interview tonight, or so the email in my box is telling me.

Funny quote... (1, Offtopic)

thrillbert (146343) | more than 11 years ago | (#4078873)

"Next booth I visited was Trolltech's"

Wow.. didn't know the /. trolls were so well organized to have their own company...

---
It is very difficult to prophesy, especially when it pertains to the future.
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