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Open Source Mac Game Programming Competition

michael posted more than 12 years ago | from the single-button-mouse-not-a-handicap dept.

Apple 187

Geert Poels writes "The uDevGame Mac Game Programming Contest was established by iDevGames in 2001 to energize game development on the Apple Macintosh platform. With the 2002 edition launched only two weeks ago, already 42 games have entered the competition. Most notable about this competition isn't the impressive collection of prizes worth $11,000 but rather the obligation for all participants to submit all source code. This kind of competition is groundbreaking for the Mac community in every way."

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Open Source? For the Mac? (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#4213574)

Mac users actually pay for their software.

Re:Open Source? For the Mac? (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#4213619)

This will work, because Open Source games have been SO successful. So why not try writing them for NON-popular architectures?

frost (-1, Troll)

melios (164381) | more than 12 years ago | (#4213575)

frost pist

fp (-1, Offtopic)

mindgam3r (591946) | more than 12 years ago | (#4213577)

first post!

Re:fp (1)

mindgam3r (591946) | more than 12 years ago | (#4213584)

:/ oh well i tried...woo for anything good for macs!

Games for MAC? (1)

The Real Chrisjc (576622) | more than 12 years ago | (#4213592)

Wow! I'm impressed! I was on a mac at my cousin's house and it had only 1 decent game I could find :/
If its open source on MacOSX wouldn't it be easily re-written for most platforms? Assuming a standard language anyway. Does OSX have something special in the programming language that could stop this?

Re:Games for MAC? (3)

cscx (541332) | more than 12 years ago | (#4213603)

If games like TuxRacer could so easily be ported to DirectX, I don't see why it could'nt be ported to Mac OSX... oh wait, it has!

Re:Games for MAC? (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#4213687)

If the game uses too much ObjectiveC with Apple APIs it will be hard to rewrite. But a good way to make games is to use SDL (http://www.libsdl.org/). It allows games to be compiled on linux, bsd, MacOSX, windows ... and take advantage of OpenGL.

Re:Games for MAC? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#4213691)

Unless it is written using an open windowing toolkit, it would be hard to port it to other platforms.

Re:Games for MAC? (2, Interesting)

lucianx (115093) | more than 12 years ago | (#4213710)

If you write a game to OS X's Native APIs, that means you're either writing for Carbon in C or C++, or Cocoa in Objective-C.

You'd have a tough time making just the Objective-C/NextStep low-level APIs compile from OS X to GNUStep; then you'd have to deal with the proprietary nib format not being portable, and X-Specific windowing calls.

You might get some degree of portability if you really stick to something like pure OpenGL for rendering and just rely on the X-specific windowing to set up your GLContext.

Winning entry (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#4213594)

#include <stdio.h>
/* macsdont.c */
int main(;;)
{
{
printf("Macs don't need games, they are for homosexual fantasies only, please jerk off now\n")
}
end;
}

LMAO (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#4213768)

Shame the mods are too thin skinned to mod the parent up... That's truly funny.

Re:Winning entry (2)

Cryptnotic (154382) | more than 12 years ago | (#4213835)


tmp.c:3: parse error before `;'
tmp.c: In function `main':
tmp.c:7: parse error before `}'
tmp.c:8: `end' undeclared (first use in this function)
tmp.c:8: (Each undeclared identifier is reported only once
tmp.c:8: for each function it appears in.)


Wow. You can't even write a "hello world" program. That's truely pathetic.

Amazed (2, Troll)

Winterblink (575267) | more than 12 years ago | (#4213597)

I'm amazed at the Mac game industry actually. I'm amazed there ISN'T one. Hardly any games end up on the Mac. For something which is touted as being a multimedia platform, it's quite surprising. It can't simply be that there's a smaller userbase, because there are LOTS of people who use Macs (I'm not one of them, but oh well). Anyone have any ideas?

Re:Amazed (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#4213609)

It's not amazing, it's good business.

Apple simply doesnt have the volume of users of the PC. The length of a game development cycle is going to be similar whether you target OS X or Windows XP. It only makes sense to target the larger userbase.

Re:Amazed (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#4213618)

Yeah, I can't imagine why companies don't spend their money porting games to an OS used by less than 5% of the computing population.

Re:Amazed (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#4213629)

I'm amazed at the Mac game industry actually. I'm amazed there ISN'T one. Hardly any games end up on the Mac.

Mac users don't like games that don't adhere to the Mac "look 'n' feel". If the user interface isn't exactly what they're used to, they get confused and quit playing the game. Hence, few games get made for the Mac...

Re:Amazed (1)

MalleusEBHC (597600) | more than 12 years ago | (#4213845)

This has to be one of the dumbest Mac user stereotypes I have heard. The reason why fewer games come to the Mac has NOTHING to do with it not conforming to the Mac "look and feel" as you stated. Look at some of the most popular games for the Mac: WC3, Rogue Spear, AOE2, etc. These are games that take over your entire screen and have GUIs that are in no way "Mac-like." We Mac users are not stupid; we do not get "confused" by these oh so fucking complex GUIs that genius Windows users must have for all their great games. The only reason there aren't as many games for Macs is because it still takes the same amount as effort to make a game for Windows but the market is significantly smaller.

Re:Amazed (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#4213906)

Mac users don't like games that don't adhere to the Mac "look 'n' feel".

Unreal Tournament for Mac has a real look'n'feel of OSX, I now see where you're going with this.

Re:Amazed (2, Insightful)

PZMyers (156088) | more than 12 years ago | (#4213632)

I'm amazed, too. Why did you bother to comment here when you clearly know nothing about Macs?

There is a good, solid gaming industry for Macs. We don't usually get the games quite as promptly, and we don't see the less popular, marginal games from the PC world being ported over at all, but there is no dearth of good games available. Right now, my kids are playing various incarnations of the Sims, Black & White, Unreal, Age of Empires, etc...they have more games available than I can keep track of, at any rate.

Re:Amazed (0, Flamebait)

Winterblink (575267) | more than 12 years ago | (#4213673)

I guess I should have asked for INTELLIGENT comments, not scathing and/or idiotic ones.

If "good, solid" means "a fraction of a fraction of" then your statement holds. At any rate, I never stated there were NO games for the mac, just a very small amount, comparatively.

Uninformed (1)

Bobartig (61456) | more than 12 years ago | (#4213860)

Three years ago when I was in college, mac gaming was pathetic. We had to wait 6-12 months for a game to come out, and the support and gameplay was buggy and crappy as hell. Games like Mechwarrior 2, FutureCop, and the TombRaider series ran like total shit on comparably equipped macs compared to PC's (Note: this is when macs and PC's were of very comparable power, with a 500 Mhz PIII up against a 500 Mhz G3).

Nowadays, the wait is still there, but typically only 2 weeks-1.5 months, and even a concurrent release thrown in there every now and then. [and then some games just take forever, like MaxPayne, and Fallout2, which are recent mac releases *boggle*]

The main game publishers for Mac, Aspyr, Bold by Destineer, MacSoft, MacPlay, Feral Interactive, Graphsim, all release 2-3 games a month. And the major players, like Blizzard and Id have adopted their own inhouse porting teams. So the mac platform sees about 10 releases a month. That may be a small subset of PC releases, but it's the 10 BEST games the PC's seen in the last season or so. Even my hardcore gamer friend go through like half that many a month.

I've had a gaming PC (JUST for games) for the past 3 years that I keep fairly current, and it doesn't see much use anymore. I don't consider mac game releases to be in short order.

A lot of people perceive mac releases to be some fraction of their PC counterpart, but in the last 12 months, there's been exactly ZERO games that I've wanted to play and couldn't get a mac vs. or expect one in the near future.

Specific games over the past few months that I've been wasting my life with: Warcraft III, Wolfenstein, Sim's, Civ III, Aliens vs. Predator, Medal of Honor, Black and White, UT, Giants, Baldur's Gate II, Icewind Dale.

With the exception of Half-Life/Counterstrike, and the MMORPG scene (UO/Neverrest/Asheron's, although this is changing very soon), it's been hard to find a hit PC game that's NOT available on the mac.

Re:Amazed (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#4213836)

The confusing thing about the PC is that you go to the store and there's just so many games, everywhere you look. But on the Mac, there's just six, and you know which ones are good because you played them all on the PC like 5 or 6 years ago.

Re:Amazed (1)

testadicazzo (567430) | more than 12 years ago | (#4213647)

The problem is the userbase: 4% apple, 1% linux, and you can guess where the other 95% is. So you compete for the mac game market, you're already competing for 1/20'th the user base you are competing for on the Windows platform

Some games still get made for the mac. A reason for this is you also have fewer games available for the mac. So the mac gaming public snaps up anything that's any good. But I don't have any good figures what percentage of the mac user base are serious gamers. I suspect it's not so large....

Another problem is the dominanc of the direct X API's which are proprietary microsft. If more developers used OpenGL for example, it would be easier and more cost effective to do ports to the mac. It is a pity though, because I would guess with good graphics cards the G4's could really rock out on a properly compiled/optimized game.

Just needs a bigger user base. It's a bit of a catch 22: because there isn't enough of a gamer user base, not enough games are made. Becaues so few games are available for the Mac, few gamers will fork out the heavy dough to get one.

I had a mac a few years ago just before Jobs came back. I remember I had Doom, Quake, Duke Nukem 3d, and Myth, all of which were awesome. But always much later than the windows guys did. Sigh. It seemed to be getting better there for a while, but now it seems to be stagnating again. Kind of sad that Microsoft bought Bungie. That hurt apple gaming quite a bit. Anyone else remember how Halo was supposed to be a showcase for the G4's powers?

sigh.

Re:Amazed (1)

Winterblink (575267) | more than 12 years ago | (#4213689)

The problem is the userbase: 4% apple, 1% linux, and you can guess where the other 95% is. So you compete for the mac game market, you're already competing for 1/20'th the user base you are competing for on the Windows platform.

The trick here is, what percentage of the other 95% play games? Not all PC users use their PCs for gaming at all, I'm sure a huge fraction of that would be just people using it for productivity purposes (the same holds true for the Mac platform I'm sure).

That's interesting you bring up the Halo point, you're dead on. That would have drawn a lot of people and developers to the platform after seeing what it could do graphically, especially when put to gaming use. Definitely a pity!

Re:Amazed (1)

Thomas A. Anderson (114614) | more than 12 years ago | (#4213742)

You are correct about the problems with games on Mac, however, I have on my jaguar box right now:

the Sims
Warcraft 3
Myth 2 and 3
BZFlag
Unreal Tournament
Quake 3 (I wonder if q3rally will work)
Diablo2
MOH::AA
RTCW

and I just found out (reading this thread) that I can install TuxRacer.

Now, this is a fraction of the games I could run on windows, but it's not a bad list either. It's even better for my linux boxes (I run a gaming center with the one mac and 6 linux boxes):

Half-Life, Counter-Stike, DoD, Firearms, TFC, etc
RTCW
BZFlag
Civ:CtP
Creatures
Descent3
F rozen Bubble
Insane
Quake3 (and Q3Rally)
Myth2
GLTron
ArmegaTron
Railroad Tycoon2
SimCity 3000
Soldier of Fortune
TuxRacer
Unreal Tournament.

Plus The Sims is in the mail from transgaming, and thanks to the 3 free months of subscription that comes with it, I will soon be able to play Warcraft III, Grand Theft Auto 3, Civilization III, and Black and White (the latter of which is supposed to run great on os x) on my Linux boxen.

Plus a *ton* of arcade and card games. Again, a fraction, but not a bad list either.

All of the above games work great except multiplayer in SoF.

PC's will probably always be the main gaming platform, but I think the situatin is getting better for mac's and linux boxes thanks to Game developers who care about moer than just the bottom line.

just my 2 cents

Re:Amazed (2)

GMontag451 (230904) | more than 12 years ago | (#4213987)

Another problem is the dominanc of the direct X API's which are proprietary microsft.

Actually, I just saw a blurb in MacAddict about a company called Coderus that has ported the DirectX APIs to the Mac. They support both OS 9 and OS X, and any computer later than rev B iMacs. Their product isn't for consumers though, its for developers. Perhaps we could see Connectix using this technology to finally make it feasible to play Windows games under emulation.

Re:Amazed (1)

Hawthorne01 (575586) | more than 12 years ago | (#4213649)

It's probably due to perception.For years, Apple ignored the game market, as they wanted the Mac to be a "serious" computer, and games where seen to be secondary/tertiary to business/educational use. For years, Mac gamers had little choices, and most were released first in PC format (except for a smattering of titles), then on the Mac.

Mac users are only now getting Ghost Recon, Jedi Outcast and the latest Sims. And other games, like CounterStrike and Serious Sam, never make it to the Mac.

Hopefully, this will change, as Apple makes the Mac more useful for the average home user and increases it's market share.

With the installation of decent to excellent video cards in every Apple product now, and the recent trend for games to spur sales in the PC market, I see good times ahead for Mac gamers.

Re:Amazed (1)

swb (14022) | more than 12 years ago | (#4213867)

For years, Apple ignored the game market, as they wanted the Mac to be a "serious" computer, and games where seen to be secondary/tertiary to business/educational use.

Which is why they named and colored a whole line of them like fruit?

Re:Amazed (2)

alfredo (18243) | more than 12 years ago | (#4213666)

The Mac was never marketed as a game platform.

If you want to create, get a Mac, if you want to play games, get a PC. That seemed to be the attitude with many Mac users.

Re:Amazed (1)

UnknownQ (84898) | more than 12 years ago | (#4213735)

But, do you really want a different computer for work and entertainment?

Re:Amazed (1)

Clue4All (580842) | more than 12 years ago | (#4213829)

Why yes, I find that situation to be much more convenient than packing up my computer and taking it back and forth to work with me every day.

Re:Amazed (2)

Gizzmonic (412910) | more than 12 years ago | (#4213950)

Mac users like myself tend to play games on consoles, where programmers actually care about "getting down" with the hardware and tightly optimizing for a platform.

PC programmers don't give a shit about you if your PC rig is older than 2 years (sometimes even less-look at all the people creaming over DOOM3, which could easily cause cost over $500).

The console world is full of virtuoso development houses that continually churn out great games (Capcom, Konami, SEGA to name a few).

The PC game market is still reinventing Doom, Warcraft, and flight simulators, over and over again. Is it really worth it to waste money on a platform that holds its audience in such low regard?

Re:Amazed (3, Insightful)

eric peterson (320592) | more than 12 years ago | (#4213674)

Apple did their level best to discourage game development on the Mac, early on. They were worried about it being perceived as a game machine (as the IIc was) rather than a serious business computer (like IBM's entry offering). To that end, they managed development on the platform much like Sony and other console developers do today; access to technical documentation, development systems, and serious tools (C compilers, assemblers, etc.) was tightly controlled. You had to submit a project proposal and have it approved, and proposals for games were decidedly not welcome.

Not surprisingly, it worked.

Tech docs weren't available for the Mac until several years later, when the PC game market was already well established. The Mac was also somewhat hampered by the closed architecture and need for approval from Apple before marketing hardware - you couldn't just develop a zany 3D-accelerator video card because you wanted to - until the PC had practically conquered the market.

Of course, almost none of these reasons apply today - you can easily get the latest GeForce for your Mac - but there is a great deal of inertia in the industry, and the smaller userbase doesn't help. There is also a viscious circle at work here: because of the lack of games, Mac owners didn't buy their systems to play games, and aren't perceived as game buyers.

Re:Amazed (1)

NineNine (235196) | more than 12 years ago | (#4213708)

It can't simply be that there's a smaller userbase, because there are LOTS of people who use Macs

So, which is it... is there a smaller userbase, or do "LOTS of people" use Macs? Last I checked "a smaller user base" != "LOTS of people"

Re:Amazed (1)

Hawthorne01 (575586) | more than 12 years ago | (#4213741)

Yes. :) Depends on the type of user. Macs seem to a have good user base in the home, less so in the coprorate world. And it's the home user that buys games (solitaire does NOT count). So, lots of people use Macs in their homes, and the mac has a smaller user base overall. Which brings up an interesting point. Windows comes with solitaire pre-installed, and OS X has a chess game. Does that mean Mac users prefer more intellectually challenging games? :)

Re:Amazed (1)

NineNine (235196) | more than 12 years ago | (#4213857)

Which brings up an interesting point. Windows comes with solitaire pre-installed, and OS X has a chess game. Does that mean Mac users prefer more intellectually challenging games? :)


Good point. Only thing is, have you ever played Spider Solitaire? I'm not sure which is tougher. That's a staple that comes with all of the home OS's now (Win 98,Me,XP Home)

How small = LOTS . . . (1)

MisterSquid (231834) | more than 12 years ago | (#4213873)

A smaller percentage user base can still equal lots of people. Consider.

The early rev iMacs shipped in the couple millions. The pro models ship somewhere near several hundred thousand per quarter. In terms of total sales of computers, the percentage is in the high single digits. That is, "small" user base.

But several million people, last I checked, is a LOT of people.

Re:Amazed (0, Flamebait)

GoatPigSheep (525460) | more than 12 years ago | (#4213782)

well, macs are pretty slow now compared to PC's, I mean alot of people who have them only have 500-700mhz processors and ati rage or geforce2 mx cards.. Honestly most macs just aren't FAST enough to run games.

Re:Amazed (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#4213828)

Mommie, look! It's a troll! /me points finger.

Re:Amazed (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#4213901)

its not a troll, he makes a good point, mac hardware, especially the g4 cpu, is way behind pc's

Re:Amazed (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#4213931)

oh, that must be why doom 3 was shown first on a mac, and quake 3 and halo....

Mac hardware wasn't up to the job (2, Insightful)

realmolo (574068) | more than 12 years ago | (#4213786)

Not that it was WEAK, but until Direct X started being used for almost every game, most games were written to directly control VGA cards at the register level. This gave good performance that wasn't possible in a GUI environment, because of the overhead of having to use inefficient APIs to draw everything.

Well, Macs never had the option of directly controlling the video card registers. It wasn't allowed. You had to use QuickDraw to do everything.

With 3D accelerated games, and cards to support them, it was finally possible to do a Mac game decently, since OpenGL could be used to control the 3D card directy, mostly avoiding QuickDraw and all that overhead. There was also the short-lived GameSprockets API, that never really caught on, and as far as I know isn't used/supported by Apple anymore. There STILL isn't a good way to do 2D games on a Mac. And by good, I mean efficient and hardware accelerated.

Re:Mac hardware wasn't up to the job (3, Informative)

Tokerat (150341) | more than 12 years ago | (#4213896)

...because of the overhead of having to use inefficient APIs to draw everything.

it was finally possible to do a Mac game decently, since OpenGL could be used to control the 3D card directy, mostly avoiding QuickDraw and all that overhead. There was also the short-lived GameSprockets API, that never really caught on, and as far as I know isn't used/supported by Apple anymore

QuickDraw takes advantage of any QuickDraw accelerated video cards, and many of the Mac-specific cards supported this until 3D acceleration become popular.

QuickDraw is VERY fast (250Mhz machine, 22FPS full screen with CopyBits()).

GameSprockets is still a part of Mac OS X today, although it's mostly used to do screen resolution changes.

Ever seen SpriteWorld [spriteworld.org] ?

Re:Amazed (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#4213818)

In relative terms, Mac hardware is pretty slow. Gamers have always been at the cutting edge of speed and performance. They will spend a whole lot of money to milk out that last bit of performance from their hardware. Mac hardware is at least a generation behind industry standard hardware with respect to speed.

If Mac hardware was competitive in terms of speed, you would see more gamers and more games. And price is not the major consideration for hard core gaming--keep that in mind. Speed is the number one factor. Apple could still charge inflated prices and attract gamers if they could compete on cutting edge speed.

Where are your prirorities people? (1)

EvilSuggestions (582414) | more than 12 years ago | (#4213620)

Gee, how come no one has submitted an open source version of Cosmic Osmo? I mean this is a Mac game competition isn't it?

Also think it's wicked cool that the number of games submitted so far is 42. Speaking of which, why no open source port of the old HHGTG text-based adventure game?

Re:Where are your prirorities people? (1)

oaklybonn (600250) | more than 12 years ago | (#4213655)

Cosmic Osmo was truly an experience (at the time.) I would love to have a copy today.

As for the other, there are many open source z-code interpreters, and if you buy a copy of the HitchHikers Guide (or most other infocom adventures) you can just grab the data fork and plop it into the interpreter and away you go.

As a matter of fact, the Mac version of the infocom game had the interpreter as 68k CODE resources, and the data fork of the game contained the zcode bytecodes.

Early version of Apple's "Apple Applet Runner" application (part of their first java runtime release) had a java zcode interpreter built in; if you created a folder next to the application called "Infocom" and dropped in one of those infocom mac games, you could play the games all from within AAR.

Lame prizes (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#4213630)

Prizes worth of $11,000? Man, that's nickel and dimes. I wouldn't even call that a prize. How much is one hour of your life? That is the question you need to ask yourself. If you develop a game and it takes say, two-three months, that's a lot of hours.

Re:Lame prizes (1)

Monkey Angst (577685) | more than 12 years ago | (#4213807)

I have no idea how long it takes to code a game, but if it takes three months, as you say, then $11,000 is pretty damn good. That would be $44,000 a year. If it takes two months, that's even better. Then you'd be making the equivalent of $66,000 a year.

Re:Lame prizes (3, Funny)

MalleusEBHC (597600) | more than 12 years ago | (#4213827)

Considering that you think 44k-66k is good money for a developer, I'm gonna take a shot in the dark and say you aren't from California.

Limit one entry (1)

yerricde (125198) | more than 12 years ago | (#4213960)

I have no idea how long it takes to code a game, but if it takes three months, as you say, then $11,000 is pretty damn good. That would be $44,000 a year.

In terms of monthly income, yes, but in terms of annual income, no. "Limit one entry per team" per competition. Besides, many will enter; few will win.

Re:Lame prizes (1)

An Onerous Coward (222037) | more than 12 years ago | (#4213989)

That's kind of a simplistic analysis. First, if you divide the potential winnings by the number of serious entrants, you get a better idea of the actual value of the prize being offered. Say that, of the 42 currently being developed, 22 are actually going to send in a finished game. Each of the 22 puts in 2 months of normal working hours on their projects. That's $11,000 being paid out for 44 man/months of effort.

Sure, if you were a truly great coder who had no doubt of your ability to win, then the perceived value would be a lot higher. But if you're that good, the only thing stopping you from making more than $66,000 is you.

The main motivations are likely to be street cred and sheer coding enjoyment.

Re:Lame prizes (4, Informative)

Griggs (606973) | more than 12 years ago | (#4214017)

This is a contest, not an attempt to hire cheap labor!

We have considered running it without prizes, but there is no reason why we can't help good developers along by giving them tools they may need.

It's not necessary to work full-time on a game. Indeed Mac game programming is a hobby rather than a profession for most iDevGames users.

The contest is fun and somewhat challenging for developers, mostly for the fun of it, but we do have some good prizes too.
The Mac community gets some cool new games to play, source code to learn from, and probably more skilled developers.

BTW, for uDevGame 2001 we had only $4200 in prizes, but we still had 24 entries. Now, thanks to the generous support of various companies we have more than doubled our prize pool.

Oooty Oooty! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#4213634)

Shake ya damn booty!

Macs dont have any games so why even bother (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#4213643)

What about SDL? (1)

chtephan (460303) | more than 12 years ago | (#4213670)

What when a game (the best/winning game?) is written in a portable manner. e.g. using standard C/C++ and portable libraries like SDL or OpenGL?

The game would run on Windows, Unix and MacOS(X).

Are the games written for this contest required to be Mac only?

Re:What about SDL? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#4213696)

Games in this contest are not required to be Mac-only -- they just have to run natively on a Mac.

Re:What about SDL? (1)

joto (134244) | more than 12 years ago | (#4213729)

sigh... Did you even bother to read the rules?

The rules said that "Only native Macintosh double-clickable applications will be accepted (ie: without emulation software). "

There is no way you could enforce anything else (and there would certainly be no point in doing so...). What does it mean to create source-code that only run on macs? Source-code only runs after it's been compiled and linked, so by definition it doesn't run on anything (not even macs). And since all modern computers generally have the same capabilities, it is generally impossible to create something that cannot be ported (given enough effort).

SDL can be *natively* compiled on Mac OS X (1)

BigWorm (103915) | more than 12 years ago | (#4213893)

Simply adding a Objective C wrapper around your SDL code would allow you to create cross-platform application that runs natively on Mac OS.

Re:SDL can be *natively* compiled on Mac OS X (3, Insightful)

joto (134244) | more than 12 years ago | (#4213943)

I am starting to come to the conclusion that being incredibly dense is almost like a requirement for being on slashdot.

You don't need Objective C to run "natively" on Max OS. You can also use Java (Mac OS X at least), assembler, C, C++, Pascal, or anything else. If your application only uses SDL and standard C/C++ calls, there is no reason to "wrap" anything in some other language.

Chess (0, Flamebait)

cscx (541332) | more than 12 years ago | (#4213704)

Do you think they'll be porting chess, checkers, or solitaire to the Mac? I can't wait!

Re:Chess (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#4213728)

Chess is already ported to macos x.

Minesweeper (2)

swb (14022) | more than 12 years ago | (#4213746)

I hope its minesweeper or the networked hearts game.

Re:Chess (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#4213823)

But on the Mac, there's just 6.

Re:Chess (1)

Pahroza (24427) | more than 12 years ago | (#4214015)

I know this was a joke, but surprisingly Chess has been included with every release of MacOS X. The first time I saw it there was in 1998 I believe. Apple had been working on MacOS X Server, and had given CNN (where I worked at the time) a pre-release copy to use for our quicktime streaming servers. Fun stuff, it's come such a long way since then.

Re:Chess (1)

Tar-Palantir (590548) | more than 12 years ago | (#4214024)

Mac OS X already has chess. You can find it as /Applications/Chess.app.

For Classic try SigmaChess or MacChess.

This is reported in the sun (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#4213705)

Cool [thesun.co.uk]

Open end ... open rear end (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#4213707)

Dear Apple,

I am a big homosexual. I bought an Apple computer because of its well earned reputation for being "the" gay computer. Since I have become an Apple owner, I have been exposed to a whole new world of gay friends. It is really a pleasure to meet and compute with other homos such as myself. I plan on using my new Apple computer as a way to entice and recruit young schoolboys into the homosexual lifestyle; it would be so helpful if you could produce more software which would appeal to young boys. Thanks in advance.

with much gayness,

Father Randy "Pudge" O'Day, S.J.

"...already 42 games have entered the competition" (0, Flamebait)

Snarfangel (203258) | more than 12 years ago | (#4213712)

So this, what, doubles the number of games available for the Mac?

What a coincidence (3, Funny)

superpeach (110218) | more than 12 years ago | (#4213730)

I just saw this link [drunkgamers.com] from NTK [ntk.net] . Parody of some Apple advert or something aparently.

Re:What a coincidence (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#4213743)

you're a retard.. thats old and there are like 50 other parodies of the apple switch ads (www.apple.com/switch/) get with the program fucktard

Re:What a coincidence (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#4213822)

How ironic that it's in .mov format...bah!

Re:What a coincidence (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#4213872)

Actually, it is both mov and wmv. depends which mirror you use

Re:What a coincidence (1)

Bobartig (61456) | more than 12 years ago | (#4213905)

There are a lot of legitimate complaints regarding the current state of mac gaming. This "parody" hits on absolutely NONE of them. This useless piece of drivel is completely devoid of wit.

Too bad that Macs suck (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#4213744)

Oh lordy, how they suck. They are gay, you know.

Nit picking but... (3, Interesting)

MisterBlister (539957) | more than 12 years ago | (#4213747)

If developers use the "uDevGame License", which is one of the license options for this then their game isn't really Open Source as defined by the OSI (and it certainly isn't Free Software)..

Re:Nit picking but... (5, Informative)

Griggs (606973) | more than 12 years ago | (#4213997)

The uDevGame license was created because truly open-source or free software is a concept some Mac developers haven't learned to embrace yet. In a nutshell the license tries to ensure that code is used for educational purposes (figure out how they did it) rather than just used. This also makes possible commercial development of the game more of a possibility, an issue that was important to some potential entrants. However we also give most of the traditional licenses (GPL, etc) as options, and they are being used. Griggs Webmaster of iDevGames.com

Thats weird... (1)

Ironpoint (463916) | more than 12 years ago | (#4213753)

I just saw 42 postings wanting unpaid game dev teams on usenet. All claimed to have the perfect game idea but needed programmers, artists, etc to make it. Royalties were to be split up after each respective games goes bigtime.

Really someone should write a book about the phenomenon. When people find out it takes longer than a week, they tend to give up.

HOMOSEXUALS fancy Apple (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#4213757)

It is a commonly known fact that HOMOSEXUALS fancy Apple. Homos like design stuff shit like that.

game collection (3, Funny)

lingqi (577227) | more than 12 years ago | (#4213758)

I think somebody should port Solitare and FreeCell to Mac. FreeCell already got the name figure out -- or would that be OpenFreeCell? FreeFreeCell? hmm...

but anyway. I swear Jobs can increase Apple's market share by 300% if he included Solitare with it. I mean, a windows machine usually spend 50% of its useable life on that program.

Re:game collection (3, Interesting)

victim (30647) | more than 12 years ago | (#4213806)

MacOS used to come with Eric's Solitaire way back in the system 8 or 9 days. It only played a few types of games unless you forked over some cash, but the game play was beautiful. You just sort of grabbed the cards and flung them where you wanted them and they zipped into place. Very natural. Always amazing to see other solitaires don't do it that way.

Disclaimer: maybe windows' solitaire does this. I've never played it. I speak of the one's in Debian and freely available for the mac.

Re:game collection (1)

MissMyNewton (521420) | more than 12 years ago | (#4213821)


FreeCell already got the name figure out -- or would that be OpenFreeCell? FreeFreeCell? hmm...

Hmm...how about GNU/FreeCell? ;-)

Quality Quantity (0)

Asterax (522761) | more than 12 years ago | (#4213763)

Boy, you can really tell who all the non-Mac users are when they say: 'MAC' intead of Macintosh. Regardless of the fact th

Re:Quality Quantity (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#4213866)

Oh no! The non-Mac users got to you before you could finish your comment!

Relevant Video Clips.... (0, Redundant)

MortisUmbra (569191) | more than 12 years ago | (#4213772)

Wish I could find that Mac Gamer video clip....so appropriate. "I own a macintosh, I'm a gamer....well, I used to be." Anyone know what im talking about? Linkage would be good.

Help: need Apple butt fuck bad (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#4213781)

Lonely queer boy seeks other Apple fags for a good butt fuck. Post name and number.

TIA,
Scott

Re:Help: need Apple butt fuck bad (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#4213819)

Lonely queer boy seeks other Apple fags for a good butt fuck. Post name and number.

You a top or bottom? Real fags usually state that in their request. Nice try anyway. To help you with your future trolling endeavors, here's it rewritten:

Horny hot hung stud seeks bottom Apple fags for a good butt fuck. Post name and Number.

Or

Lonely queer bottom boy seeks hung Apple tops for a good butt fuck. Post name and number.

cross-platform (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#4213797)

The problem lies in the fact that most game developers use the proprietary DirectX API when they should be using OpenGL. If they stuck with cross platform API's like SDL and the like, it would take probably only a few extra days of development time to write a game that would work on Linux, Mac, and Windows.

Take Quake 2 & 3 for example... good code that works on 3 platforms.

This place always gets slow around Saturday eve... (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#4213798)

Damn fake geeks that actually lives outside of Slashdot. There is no better way to spend your weekend than at home with Slashdot. Sure you *could* go out and be with actual people, but think of all the great troll posts you'd miss.

While your nellie friends are droning on about all the hot girls they'd like to fuck if they ever grew some balls, you could be AT HOME reading an excellent post about why the Macintosh will be the hottest gaming platform since the XBox, in less than 10 decades. This is not an experience to deprive yourself of! Stay home with Slashdot. Only dumb jocks socialize. Brain not braun, knowlege is power!!!

Not only is Slashdot fun, it's just like a free online-quest adventure game. You can play as peon, posting meaningless drivel in an attemt to collect experience points (known as Karma). If you are good at playing as a peon, you'll be promoted to a knight, and given the ability to kill (mod down) other peons and speak louder. Of course, if this all sounds too boring and you'd like a more difficult adventure, you can always play as a troll. If you can't make up your mind about your character, there's an anonymous coward account free for everyone to use. It's a virtual world of fun!

Remember kids...

Social activities with other people = Bad
Stay at home and participate in Slashdot = Good

For the Apple bashing trolls... (1)

Satchel Buddah (534002) | more than 12 years ago | (#4213812)

I am a hardcore computer game player. I have been on the Mac platform at home since forever, and I have always found more quality games that I could use simltaneously.
Usually many of the best PC games make it to the mac, with a few exceptions. Agreed, we do not get all of the sucky PC games.

Quake +mods, UT + mods, Warcrafts, Diablos, Myth series, Warbirds, Giants, and a bunch of others, etc.. Can you play all of this and still have a life ? No ! :-)

Re:For the Apple bashing trolls... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#4213923)

You know, that kind of reminds me of a discussion my brother and I had about console games and the Japanese and US markets. He spent a year in Japan and picked up a few games that are really bad. None of these games were released in the US. Japanese game makers use Japan as a test market and only release the games that do really well abroad. Perhaps the Mac and PC gaming markets function in a similar fashion...

For those who can't code on mac (3, Informative)

jukal (523582) | more than 12 years ago | (#4213841)

Here is [openchallenge.org] a good substitute for the competition :)

So if it's open source... (2, Funny)

schnitzi (243781) | more than 12 years ago | (#4213865)

So if it's open source, can I just take one of the entries already submitted, enhance it a little bit, and resubmit it?

42 games (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#4213879)

Sounds like a number someone just made up. The whole thing is fake.

Ooooo! You Linux geeks just HATE knowing... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#4214002)


there's a new neighbor and she's as smart as she is beautiful!

It's hard being the ugly smart girl, eh?

cool, now I can reach the masses (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#4213885)

all 20 of them!

And I can include stupid bubbly interfaces to make stuff LOOK better. Yay superficial covering!

Games in general these days (2, Insightful)

geek (5680) | more than 12 years ago | (#4213887)

Suck.

I remember years ago, you didn't have to worry much about whether a game would run on your system. Devs are pushing the envelope so far that it's out of reach for 90% of all consumers, Mac and PC alike.

Most people regardless of their platform still use PC's with 500mhz processors or slower. However the specs for games such Doom3 are outrageous.

Devs used to care about a good storyline, exciting game play etc. Now it's all about who gets the best framerates, what game has the prettiest textures. I don't care what the game looks like anymore, thats all window dressing. I want a game that's FUN.

I happen to be a mac user and I can attest that when/if a game is ported to the Mac from the PC, it's usually a great game. You see far less junk on the Mac. The downside is we usually see the games a year or 2 later.

I play WC3 and AvP, other than that I stick with the console where I'm not locked into an "upgrade path" every six months. I don't care what the latest and greatest is. I want value out of what I own NOW.

Re:Games in general these days (1)

drzhivago (310144) | more than 12 years ago | (#4213921)

Devs used to care about a good storyline, exciting game play etc. Now it's all about who gets the best framerates, what game has the prettiest textures.
You do know, it always has been about the best framerates and the prettiest textures! The only difference is now you can do more with the graphics, so that it looks like devs are using it more. Why else would you always have competing systems trying to hammer in to people that their system has better/faster graphics? Good gameplay can be done in spite of good graphics. It was like that then, and it is like that now. You are letting nostalgia cloud your thoughts.

Re:Games in general these days (4, Insightful)

Powercntrl (458442) | more than 12 years ago | (#4213944)

Devs used to care about a good storyline, exciting game play etc. Now it's all about who gets the best framerates, what game has the prettiest textures. I don't care what the game looks like anymore, thats all window dressing.

Should I post this as anon to avoid burning karma? Nah.

The reason developers now make games that are all about framerates and pretty textures? It sells. The gamers that open their wallets and fork over the green decide where game development is heading.

Maybe it was cheaper to develop a game back in the hayday of "adventure games that actually had a plot", maybe all these "give me a good plot not fancy graphics" whiners aren't putting their money where their mouth is, maybe there's just a much better return on FPS/eyecandy games. Whatever the reason, every once in awhile you still see a game comes out that tries to revitalize the adventure game genre and it experiences lackluster sales.

Usually the most common excuse I've seen is that the new adventure game doesn't live up to the legacy of the older games everyone remembers from when the genre was still alive and kicking. The reason is there was a lot more competion to make a good game back then... Now, adventure games are almost a lost art and it will probably take a few tries before some competion builds back up. It means people will have to fork over some money for some lousy games in order to convince more developers that adventure is still a viable genre.

Course, open source changes the rules a bit. Seems though that most open source games are limited to emulators, software versions of board/card games and Tux racer. If the open source community picks up the adventure game genre, it would sure be an interesting thing to see.

riddle me this, batman (0, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#4213981)

Why are so many homosexuals infatuated with Apple?

Is it fair to call Mac "The Gay Machine"?

-- Robin, the [gay] boy wonder

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