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China Develops Their Own CPU: The "Dragon Chip"

michael posted more than 11 years ago | from the dragon-and-phoenix-with-fried-rice dept.

Hardware 908

vaxzilla writes "China's People's Daily Online is reporting in this article that the Computer Institution of the Chinese Academy of Science have developed a new CPU, which they're calling the Dragon Chip. The report isn't clear on the technical details of the chip, though it does state, somewhat confusingly, that it, `is based on the RISC structure, a totally another standard. Therefore, it will not fall into the intellectual property right trap.' They're running Linux on the chip and have built a server around it, Soaring Dragon. It looks like China is starting to tell both Microsoft and Intel to take a hike. Interesting times are ahead."

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Yay China! (0)

badvictor (113234) | more than 11 years ago | (#4352136)

Yay China!

Re:Yay China! (1)

Tablizer (95088) | more than 11 years ago | (#4352144)

What do you mean "Yay"?

It will become Big Brother On A Chip, worse than Palladium probably.

Re:Yay China! (0, Troll)

Ethrian (458135) | more than 11 years ago | (#4352175)

the next set of tanks to run over students will probably be running these, in a beowolf cluster. :P

Re:Yay China! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4352192)

With the Dragon chip, it might as well be called the DragonWelp cluster. *grin*

No, Grendel! (2)

DoctorFrog (556179) | more than 11 years ago | (#4352237)

Since it's a Dragon chip, you'd have to imagine a Grendel cluster, right? Or maybe a Grendel's MotherCluster...

Re:Yay China! (2, Funny)

k_stamour (544142) | more than 11 years ago | (#4352260)

"your CPU cycles are belonging to us!!!"....

Wonder what they think is going on @ People's Daily Online as they get ./'ed ................

The Daily Worker rates this CPU... (1)

Blaede (266638) | more than 11 years ago | (#4352269)

...as Number One, A-OK, chief!

Very cool (2, Interesting)

slifox (605302) | more than 11 years ago | (#4352137)

This could be the birth of a chip that isn't in x86's trap of being an extended, old arch. I hope this works ok, because I would definately buy one of these.

Re:Very cool (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4352147)

Yeah, I'd get one too because of the total lack of information about the processor in the article and the fact that there are no other systems with RISC chips.

Re:Very cool (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4352193)

Count me out. I'm not gonna give any of my money to a country who supports terrorism, and therefore, supports the war against america.

Go spout your communist opinions someplace else, Comrade Child-Killer.

i wonder why (3, Funny)

jon787 (512497) | more than 11 years ago | (#4352138)

maybe because they don't like palladium either?

Re:i wonder why (1)

hampton (209113) | more than 11 years ago | (#4352146)

Yeah, China doesn't want Microsoft or Intel to be able to do any of that stuff. That's the Chinese government's job! Now they can block Google at the CPU level.

Re:i wonder why (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4352163)

No; but they do like vicious censorship of dissenting political opinions. If this appears in People's Daily, it is basically straight from the government's mouth, and is most likely meant as an anti-American sleight-of-hand. Remember, these folks are the same ones who thought The Onion [theonion.com] really was America's Finest New Source [slashdot.org] .

Re:i wonder why (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4352169)

Oops, wrong newspaper. Nevermind.

Re:i wonder why (2)

Gerry Gleason (609985) | more than 11 years ago | (#4352281)

You would think they would want their own version of palladium to help both track users and make sure nobody runs any unauthorized software. Only in this case it would be them, not MS doing the authorizing.

dragon references.. (2)

Suppafly (179830) | more than 11 years ago | (#4352139)

I didn't realize chinese people actually made a lot of references towards dragons.. i thought it was like a western misconception or something.. either way, this sounds like an exciting chip.

Re:dragon references.. (1)

domninus.DDR (582538) | more than 11 years ago | (#4352148)

I hadnt really thought about it before, but I guess they do use dragons alot in those parades.

Re:dragon references.. (1)

Quirk (36086) | more than 11 years ago | (#4352183)

Dragon lore in Chinese mythology is thought to go back to days when sea going Crocodiles swam the shorelines of China. I could be mistaken but I believe the Dragon motif plays out in a big way in the I Ching which goes way back in history to a time when the hexagrams of the I Ching were etched on turtle shells and used as a means of divination. More than you probably wanted to know.
cheers

Re:dragon references.. (1)

ari_j (90255) | more than 11 years ago | (#4352211)

Actually, way less than I wanted to know; but I tend to be over-inquisitive. ;-D

Re:dragon references.. (2)

joto (134244) | more than 11 years ago | (#4352284)

Agreed (first point, the latter, you better know yourself :-)

you people suck (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4352141)

get faster...what up peter falk...

Great... (2, Interesting)

mythr (260723) | more than 11 years ago | (#4352142)

Now they can run their firewall cheaper and more efficiently, without worrying about getting help from outside sources. They should have a really easy time oppressing their people from here on out.

Pot, kettle, black. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4352220)

China to the US: "You can oppress your own people your way. We'll oppress our people our way, thankyou."

Re:Pot, kettle, black. (1)

mythr (260723) | more than 11 years ago | (#4352242)

At least the USA allows its people to search for the truth. They may try to obscure it by posting what they want you to think is the truth over and over again, but they let you look for it. China won't even let its people use Google.

The US has some bad policies, I admit, (/s/some/lots of) but the people here are still allowed more freedoms than the people in China are. That is, of course, until Bush and Co. discover that they can make a bigger profit by taking them away.,,

A serious curiousity question (5, Interesting)

A nonymous Coward (7548) | more than 11 years ago | (#4352150)

Are the Chinese going to release their mods to the GPLd code when they distribute their version of Linux? Is there anything anybody over here can do about it if they don't? In particular, will the US government, usually real quick to condemn IP violations and theft when there's money involved, lean on the Chinese government to obey the GPL?

It would be interesting to figure out the CPU details from the code they release...

Re:A serious curiousity question (2)

reaper20 (23396) | more than 11 years ago | (#4352191)

I doubt it.

They can barely contain all the piracy of commercial software (ie. Microsoft), I highly doubt they're going to care about some "communist" license.

Microsoft has the money to politic the government to pressure China, but Joe Blow GPL developer is probably screwed.

Re:A serious curiousity question (3, Insightful)

sphix42 (144155) | more than 11 years ago | (#4352195)

Of course not. China has 'best country' trade status with us. IP theft from Microsoft etc, human rights issues, communisim are quickly ignored.

Re:A serious curiousity question (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4352251)

China is stealing from a company who never develops anything but generally steals or forces cheap sales of technology. Do the words kettle, pot, or black have any meaning to you????

If that does happen... (1, Flamebait)

cscx (541332) | more than 11 years ago | (#4352196)

...it will be pretty ironic, considering RMS himself is a communist, and the people taking his software license and ripping it to shreds whilst he watches and can't do a damn thing about it -- are communists of the true kind.

Sweet sweet revenge.

Proof Please... :-) (1)

shepd (155729) | more than 11 years ago | (#4352218)

>considering RMS himself is a communist

He is?

I don't remeber him saying that...

Re:Proof Please... :-) (1)

QuaZar666 (164830) | more than 11 years ago | (#4352235)

You're Right he didn't say it. Microsoft said it for him.

China isn't communist (5, Informative)

Trepidity (597) | more than 11 years ago | (#4352241)

China hasn't been communist for quite a long time; there's plenty of private industry (both local and foreign), and significant disparity in wealth between the rich and the poor. It's essentially a capitalist one-party state. It's still socialist in some ways, though mostly unofficially (a lot of the large private companies are indirectly controlled by people in high places in the government).

Re:China isn't communist (1)

cscx (541332) | more than 11 years ago | (#4352283)

According to the CIA World Factbook, [cia.gov] China is a "Communist state." You can argue what you want, but I'll take their word for it.

Re:A serious curiousity question (2, Insightful)

tealover (187148) | more than 11 years ago | (#4352198)

China doesn't respect any intellectual property rights, particularly because all of their "inventions" are based on stolen technology. Clearly some Taiwanese sympathizers in the semi-conductor industry have been engaging in industrial espionage.

I work with a lot of Taiwanese engineers. They don't consider forwarding stolen information to China to be stealing. They all believe that helping the Motherland is their duty.

It's funny that the U.S. is so vociferous about protecting Taiwan when the Taiwanese are already helping China out. Once Taiwan is folded back in to China, all those fancy weapons and huge investments in Taiwanese industry will benefit their biggest enemy.

Gotta love US foreign policy. It's so forward thinking.

Re:A serious curiousity question (2)

Planesdragon (210349) | more than 11 years ago | (#4352245)

It's funny that the U.S. is so vociferous about protecting Taiwan when the Taiwanese are already helping China out. Once Taiwan is folded back in to China, all those fancy weapons and huge investments in Taiwanese industry will benefit their biggest enemy.

Actually, I think we're getting rather good at ranking China with "powerful countries that were but aren't now our enemies."

Besides, there's probably some secret government plan to bomb the shit out of Taiwan if it becomes Chineese and China becomes hostile.

Re:A serious curiousity question (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4352290)

...probably quite similar to China's not so secret plan [ciaonet.org] to bomb Los Angeles.

Re:A serious curiousity question (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4352259)

Damn, I don't know who the hell you've been dealing with. Taiwanese sentiment is to distant itself as far from China as possible. The island has been marching towards independence for the last few years at the cost of potentially an all out war.

Most true Taiwanese (aka 7+ generations not KMT crap) hates China more than you can imagine. The #1 selling book in taiwan right now is about how China STOLE Taiwanese investors' money. Countless investors have lost their savings and fortune. Taiwan will never be 'folded back into China' without an all out war. Most would rather die than to live under China's rule.

Re:A serious curiousity question (2)

autocracy (192714) | more than 11 years ago | (#4352222)

I'm thinking that their coming lack of dependance on Microsoft will take precedence over all, and that Micos^H^H^H^H^Hthe US government will "forgive" the human rights violations if they support our country by purchasing more WinXP licenses...

Re:A serious curiousity question (4, Interesting)

ProfessorPuke (318074) | more than 11 years ago | (#4352247)

It's quite likely that most Chinese-government changes to GPL code will make it out, somehow. Firstly, they might want to appear to obey the WIPO regulations they've agreed to. (Not likely to be a big factor in their behavior, though).

Even if they don't feel bound to the license, they still might desire code release- either to take some worldwide market-share from Microsoft (and hurt a leading symbol of US capitalism), or more likely, to benefit from improvements made by generous hackers in Japan, Europe, and America.

And then, if the government STILL doesn't want to release the code, it might filter out anyhow. Its a big country, and even the most draconian restrictions would have trouble intercepting 2 megabytes of nondescript patches. Sure, they might restrict source code access to a small group of closely monitored developers, but then they'd lose much of benefits of Open Source development. (Like the ability to require each of 1 million native computer science students to create a useful kernel improvement to graduate...)

Re:A serious curiousity question (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4352265)

lol. man, you don't get it, huh? when even the communists don't follow the "ideals" behind open source, you don't blame the ideas, but their followers.

maybe if china had GPL'ed the great leap forward, things would have worked out better ;-)

Re:A serious curiousity question (1)

pimpinmonk (238443) | more than 11 years ago | (#4352275)

Agreed. I think that in terms of ideas, China and Linux represent the two most opposite ways of thinking... so how does this work? Either you're free or you're inprisoned... Either you have Linux or you have a repressing communist government. The GPL should be modified to "any computer using GPL code must have access to Google"

Pseudo-steal it back (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4352287)

If China decides to modify the Linux kernel, but not give back the changes, all it takes is one person to get the source code out to the rest of the world. Since China would be legally obligated to release the code this (involuntary) release couldn't be recalled.

Amazing! (1)

Frere du change (607964) | more than 11 years ago | (#4352151)

We've Slashdotted the servers of a country with more than a billion people.

Re:Amazing! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4352215)

That's because there are only a few ports in through the "great firewall."

Blammo! (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4352153)

China's First Server 'Dragon Chip' Made its Debut
The semi-conductor market in China's mainland will see an annual growth rate of 35 percent and a requirement of 17 billion chips before 2005. By the year of 2010, China is going to be the second large semi-conductor market of the world.

The semi-conductor market in China's mainland will see an annual growth rate of 35 percent and a requirement of 17 billion chips before 2005. By the year of 2010, China is going to be the second large semi-conductor market of the world.

Sept. 26, Shuguang Tianyan Information Technology Ltd. announced that China's first Server "Soaring Dragon" of its own intellectual property rights came into the world. The Sever was brought out by using the universally-applied CPU "Dragon Chip" just developed and turned out by the Computer Institution of the Chinese Academy of Science.

Aside from that, used in the manufacture of the "Soaring Dragon" Sever is a kind of specific mainboard with the "Dragon Chip" CPU jointly developed by Shuguang Co. and the Computer Institution of the CAS and the Shuguang LINUX operational system developed by Shuguang Co. alone. According to the analysis of persons from the business circle, the debut of the "Soaring Dragon" Sever marks that China has set out on the marketization of its "Dragon Chip".

The "Dragon Chip", as a product of China's own intellectual property rights, has attracted the attention of the people in China ever since it came into the world. Undergoing many a strict examination and test by the Computer Institution of the CAS and other authoritative organizations in China, the Dragon Chip is proved to be very sound in performance, steady and reliable in operation and utterly sufficient to meet the working requirement of the server and website.

The Shuguang Co. says, the brought-out of the "Soaring Dragon" Sever has not only turned over a leaf in Chinese history that there was "no chip" in China's server trade but also strengthened greatly the national defence, national security and actual strength in many sectors of crucial importance. It has made China's computer industry to follow its own and independent track of development.

The person also made a further explanation, saying that China used the US chip in the past. Information security constitutes the first and foremost line in national defence. However, the line was built on the foreign technology and completed with materials from a foreign country, and so we cannot but be worried about it.

The birth of "Dragon Chip" is considered a landmark on the road for the development of national sci-tech industry. Nevertheless, people are worried about it, thinking that though the "Dragon Chip" is designed on our own it will fall into the trap of foreign intellectual property rights provided it is compatible with that of the others. Dr Sun of the VIA Tech., the only chip-maker in the world able to match with the Intel was ever worried, since the old-brand manufacturers of the Intel CPU entered early into the market, applied and acquired many patent rights it was very difficult for the newcomers to make a detour away from these patents. Moreover, the Intel's monopoly of the market has made it to turn out an actual standard-maker in the market.

But according to the analyses of the experts present at the meeting, the VIA is different from the "Dragon Chip" of China for the competition between the Intel and the VIA is mainly focused in the PC market while the "Dragon Chip" is basically used on severs in the service of businesses and trades, such as banking business and information industry. What's more important is that the CPU of the PC market is based on the Intel's framework of X86 and so it's quite easy to fall into the intellectual property right trap the Intel laid out, whereas the Shuguang "Soaring Dragon" Sever is based on the RISC structure, a totally another standard. Therefore, it will not fall into the intellectual property right trap.

According to the estimation of the Ministry of Information Industry the semi-conductor market in China's mainland will witness an annual growth rate of 35 percent before 2005 to reach a scale of 40 billion US dollars with the chips needed to amount to 17 billion pieces. By the year of 2010 China is going to turn out the second large semi-conductor market in the world.

In correspondence to this, 2001 saw the semi-conductor market in China's mainland reach 13 billion US dollars but that produced by it fell short of 10 percent. Experts come to conclusion that China has to develop chips of its own intellectual property rights so long as it wants to stand out a giant in the world of semi-conductor industry.

By People's Daily Online

Cheap Chinese chips called "Dragon"... (2)

gnovos (447128) | more than 11 years ago | (#4352154)

Cyberpunk, here we come.

Taklamakan (2)

Perianwyr Stormcrow (157913) | more than 11 years ago | (#4352155)

If they look like big gobs of random, evolved circuits, we'd better go looking for fake spaceships in the Taklamakan desert.

Re:Taklamakan (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4352226)

Hey, I have read that story. I was thinking the same thing LOL.

Jay

Watch out Microsoft/Intel... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4352159)

For the fire breathing Soaring Dragon!!1

Here is the big question.. (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4352161)

What would a beowolf of dragons look like?

dual chip boards (5, Funny)

spineboy (22918) | more than 11 years ago | (#4352174)

Will they be called Double Dragons?

Soaring Dragon... (2, Funny)

Paersona (176868) | more than 11 years ago | (#4352177)

...or their internal codename, Soaring Middle Finger to the West.

Bah (1)

Jerry Hicks (599962) | more than 11 years ago | (#4352178)

Don't get carried away admiring the Chinese government and institutions for these "innovations" quite yet.

Free Tibet, then let's talk about basic human rights for the people of China.

Remember, this is an extremely oppressive government that will use technology to harm people. I hope they fail.

Re:Bah (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4352190)

Remember, this is an extremely oppressive government that will use technology to harm people. I hope they fail.

The real Jerry Hicks knows that ALL governments are described that way, don't single out the Chinese.

Re:Bah (1)

Jerry Hicks (599962) | more than 11 years ago | (#4352208)

hehe, you got me :-)

so the REALLY designed their own chip? (1, Flamebait)

cybermace5 (446439) | more than 11 years ago | (#4352182)

Hmmm....

If the hardware design habits of the Chinese are anything like their software programming efforts, then the Dragon will be reverse-engineered and rebranded Pentium.

They probably didn't even have to reverse engineer it, just give a spy an assignment codenamed "INTEL HACKED BY CHINESE"

Re:so the REALLY designed their own chip? (5, Informative)

leandrod (17766) | more than 11 years ago | (#4352210)

>
If the hardware design habits of the Chinese are anything like their software programming efforts, then the Dragon will be reverse-engineered and rebranded Pentium.

This being not a for-profit fly-by-night sweatshop, but a research institute, rumour has it that they cloned Alpha.

I hope they did, because there is no microprocessor architecture that holds more promise then the Alpha, and it is a shame on the US supposedly pro-competitive, efficient culture that it has been cancelled due to Digital being inefficient in marketing it and then Intel not wanting the competition.

Re:so the REALLY designed their own chip? (3, Informative)

haggar (72771) | more than 11 years ago | (#4352231)

I agree about the Alpha. In fact, nowadays the only decent RISC architectures with some chance for survival are the Power from IBM and SPARC from Sun (with the latter having a bit more chance, because they don't depend on the Wintel world as much as IBM does). HP gave in to Intel as well as Digital.

Too bad because RISC is, in fact, the better technology and it had a formidable start, back in the 80's.

Re:so the REALLY designed their own chip? (1)

ealar dlanvuli (523604) | more than 11 years ago | (#4352285)

I forsee a major shift away from the "Free Market" mantra in the next 20 years, bookmark this post and laugh at me in 20 years if I'm wrong.

What you just described is the greatest symtom of the free market, while free market does have (Alot) of virtues, free market should never be considered an end all. If I wanted a free market I'd abolish the goverment, 'nuf said.

Re:so the REALLY designed their own chip? (2)

discogravy (455376) | more than 11 years ago | (#4352239)

If the hardware design habits of the Chinese are anything like their software programming efforts, then the Dragon will be reverse-engineered and rebranded Pentium.

The article states RISC, so I would guess it's fair to say it's not a pentium clone of any type.

Re:so the REALLY designed their own chip? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4352282)

Intel uses a RISC core and as been for quite a while. Heck every major chip out there uses RISC.

Anyway, the article disclosed no details whatsoever and was more apt to repeatedly point out that it doesn't infringe on Intel, which in my eyes makes it more suspicious.

dude, where's my cpu? (5, Funny)

StandardDeviant (122674) | more than 11 years ago | (#4352184)

The new chip is rumored to use the rarely seen iterative data fetch instruction (ANDTHN) to retrieve data from ram (really annoyed memory). In keeping with the RISC philosophy, this is the only instruction the cpu supports when interacting with other entities in the system.


(if you haven't seen "dude, where's my car" this will make no sense. so go watch the movie ;))

not to be confused (2)

zephc (225327) | more than 11 years ago | (#4352185)

with the Dragonball chip [motorola.com]

No real specs on it though? (0)

hot glue gun (610685) | more than 11 years ago | (#4352186)

I think it's great. Let China create more of a playing field for companies interested in chip manufacturing.

Personally, I'd like to tell MS and Intel a few things my self. More power to them!

Sparc? (2)

idiotnot (302133) | more than 11 years ago | (#4352187)

Built a sparc, maybe? If it's running Linux, you'd have to assume that they've cloned a chip linux runs on.

This Just In! (1)

Nintendork (411169) | more than 11 years ago | (#4352200)


The Pacific link between Peking and Seattle, which America and China use to communicate has experienced a /. effect. In response, China has delared war on Michael.

It is also reported that hacker wars between the two countires are on hold until the posting is phased out some time tomorrow.

I'll bet 1000 yuan (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4352201)

it doesn't contain DRM features.

Intelectual property (2)

autopr0n (534291) | more than 11 years ago | (#4352202)

They say the chip won't conflict with IP because it's RISC. Obviously that makes no sense, as CISC instruction sets can't be copywriten either (obviously)

There are a few open source chip designs though, I think sun may have done that with one of their SPARC designs (or perhaps community sourced it). And there may be some free MIPS cores out there.

Re:Intelectual property (3, Informative)

elmegil (12001) | more than 11 years ago | (#4352294)

The SPARC standard is an open standard, and we allow and encourage clones (Fujitsu has made them in the past, for one example). The license is not anything like open source or community licenses in the linux sense though. It's been around a lot longer than most of those licenses except GPL itself (SPARC was designed to be open from the get go in the late 80's).

1984 (1)

Crazy Ukrainian (581427) | more than 11 years ago | (#4352207)

Is it just me, or does that article sound eerily 1984ish? The People's Daily....massive growth reprorts/expectations....Might be beacuse I just read the book, but still, the resemblance in the writing hit me like a wall...and this IS coming from the country that blocked Google....

Re:1984 (0)

alan_d_post (120619) | more than 11 years ago | (#4352286)

Is it just me, or does that article sound eerily 1984ish?

It's not just China.

Have you been paying attention to the US gov's perpetual war/state of public paranoia? The US gov has actually been pretty explicit lately about how their "war" has no end in sight, and claim this "war" justifies any sort of repression they can dream up. So keep listening to NPR, VOA, nytimes, etc., if you want -- just realize that it is the Ministry of Truth talking. And look out for "terrorists"! They could be anywhere! Orange alert!

A Chinese Chip? (1)

Shuh (13578) | more than 11 years ago | (#4352209)

I'll bet SPECint and SPECfp are through the roof!!!

Important question: who will fab these chips? (2, Interesting)

haggar (72771) | more than 11 years ago | (#4352212)

China, as far as I know, doesn't have suitable factories to fab highly integrated chips of this kind. On the other hand, Taiwan does, and a lot of them at that. So many, in fact, that Taiwan is eager to find companies that want to outsource their production. For the Chinese companies it would make good sense in many aspects, because of the proximity, the culture and language they have in common with the Chinese from Taiwan.
However, this seems to be a project very dear to the Chinese govt., and I don't suppose they would want to outsource it to Taiwan with whom they could be at war any moment.

What other options would China have? Honk Kong? Russia? Perhaps Malaysia (they have some big fabs, too, although not as advanced as the Taiwanese).

Re:Important question: who will fab these chips? (1)

gotr00t (563828) | more than 11 years ago | (#4352263)

The answer is simple: take over Taiwan. The mainland has been wanting to do that ever since Communist China was concieved. It would be really interesting if the two sides started fighting for nothing more than chip manufacturing facilities.

On the other hand, the Chinese government does a lotta stuff under the table, and a lotta stuff is kept clandestine, for example, the plans for the lauch of the Shenzhou-1 rocket were unannounced until it was already done. Who knows what those people have up their sleeves...

Re:Important question: who will fab these chips? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4352271)

This is another reason to annex Taiwans so that they can take over the fabs there. The timing on the upcoming invasion into Taiwan will be approx 4 weeks after US enters Iraq for its extended activities in that area.

Re:Important question: who will fab these chips? (1)

Optical Voodoo Man (611836) | more than 11 years ago | (#4352277)

What other options would China have? Honk Kong? Russia? Perhaps Malaysia (they have some big fabs, too, although not as advanced as the Taiwanese).

How about invading Taiwan and taking over the plants? It's not a pleasant, friendly option, but it is an option.

As far as Honk Kong is concerned, honk once for yes, twice for no.

Best quote ever: (4, Funny)

Timmeh (555676) | more than 11 years ago | (#4352213)

The person also made a further explanation, saying that China used the US chip in the past. Information security constitutes the first and foremost line in national defence. However, the line was built on the foreign technology and completed with materials from a foreign country, and so we cannot but be worried about it.
You can't tell me that I was the only person who did a double-take when I read that. That must be why the P4 requires so much power, IT'S GOT A SECRET GOVERNMENT TRANSMITTER INSIDE OF IT. Good thing I wrap my case in the same thick tin foil I used for my hats. And to think that my neighbors call me crazy! At least my data isn't being uploaded to a secret government satellite!

Re:Best quote ever: (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4352250)

You idiot. Suppose you stock your entire government with chips made from the country of Freedonia, and one day, Freedonia bans all shipments to your nation. What are you going to do with service, replacement, etc? Further, what about licensing terms?

National security is not just about the things limited minds can imagine, like radio transmitters. It also includes the ability of nations to produce goods needed for the conduct of their nations defense, telecommunications, etc.

You're a moron (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4352256)

The quote you cite is saying that, from a national defense standpoint, the PRC must not depend on foreign technology (since if the political situation got bad, China would not be able to get any more computers, which would put them in a weak negotiating position, don't you think?) This is exactly the same rhetoric you get from the US government, and it has nothing to do with "secret transmitters", which you just made up.

Re:You're a moron (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4352278)

I see from the parent post and yours that you slashdotters haven't mastered either humor or sarcasm yet, wake me when the grits are done.

Re:Best quote ever: (3, Funny)

Shuh (13578) | more than 11 years ago | (#4352267)

That must be why the P4 requires so much power, IT'S GOT A SECRET GOVERNMENT TRANSMITTER INSIDE OF IT.
You don't think they're doing 2.8 Ghz of work in a P4, do you? Dude, that's the frequency of the transmitter's carrier wave!!!

from the article (4, Funny)

zephc (225327) | more than 11 years ago | (#4352214)

"the Dragon Chip is proved to be very sound in performance, steady and reliable in operation and utterly sufficient to meet the working requirement of the server and website"

'utterly sufficient'? is that like 'majestically plain'?

That's so rad (1)

tucay (563672) | more than 11 years ago | (#4352217)

Whoops I mean that's so red.

I just reversed enginered.. (0, Offtopic)

Frank of Earth (126705) | more than 11 years ago | (#4352221)

.. their dragon chip and renamed it the dr@g0n. I'm almost done with an emulator which will make the dr@g0n run like the x86.

When I'm done with that, I'm going to get xbox to run on the chip and then hack that to run linux and then add Wine to emulate an xbox.

Hold on.. there are guys with red coats at my doo...

Re:I just reversed enginered.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4352276)

what are the british doing at your house?

CPU codename? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4352223)

I heard the codename was "Chink Commie Motherfucker". Is that true?

Released to the public? (0)

PhlegmMaster (596165) | more than 11 years ago | (#4352224)

What's going to happen to the chip from here though?

It would be interesting to see where it goes from here in the world.
Although it is unlikely that it will pull up the roots of Intel anywhere else in the world it is still going to prove interesting.

Frozen Dragon (1)

Optical Voodoo Man (611836) | more than 11 years ago | (#4352229)

Who's going to be the first to take away the dragon's fire breath and try some overclocking? Dragon ala Mode 13

I hope they take the spirit of Linux and share their source (even if the comments are in chinese).

More details from a magazine article (5, Informative)

AtomicBomb (173897) | more than 11 years ago | (#4352232)

I read an interview with one of the Dragon Chip
project leader (Dr Hu) a few months ago in a magazine. It gives a lot more details if I can
still recall correctly.

The reporter interviewed him after their team booted into Linux successfully with their prototype chip (or I should say FPGA implementation). Follow the common practice, they have written a C simulator for the chip, followed by hardware logic verification with FPGAs. I think the latest news is refering to
the completion of the initial silicon design.

The team focuses on the hardware design. The proposed chip is compatible with the MIPS instruction, IIRC. For the floating point
arithmatic, it follows the IEEE 754 standard. That's why they can boot to Linux to verify their
design quite early on without too much tweaking.

The targeted performance is close to PII. Not too bad for an embedded microprocessor at this moment... But, maybe a bit old when they commerically release it. But, as long as they can find applications into consumer electronics, the chip may get a good life like our good old Z80, HC11... Nevertheless, it is a good achievement consider the fact that the bulk of the team has no previous MCU design experience.

Re:More details from a magazine article (1)

gordyf (23004) | more than 11 years ago | (#4352280)

Dr Hu?

Does he use a sonic screwdriver?

Re:More details from a magazine article (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4352295)

Well the beauty of RISC is the PII target performance can easily be ramped up to a P4 3G by simple manufacturing upgrades.

I applaud thier decision, and I hope this leads to a worldwide shift away from the "one true god", I mean microsoft/intell, because to be quite honest everyone is quite sick of it.

China will be #2 semicondutor producer by 2010 (1, Flamebait)

Frank of Earth (126705) | more than 11 years ago | (#4352236)

According to the estimation of the Ministry of Information Industry the semi-conductor market in China's mainland will witness an annual growth rate of 35 percent before 2005 to reach a scale of 40 billion US dollars with the chips needed to amount to 17 billion pieces. By the year of 2010 China is going to turn out the second large semi-conductor market in the world.


Of course, the Ministry of Information Industr [mii.gov.cn] had a gun to their head when they made this statement.

They are also quoted as saying "Arr your crip berong us", which, when translated, means: "All your chip are belong us"

Re:China will be #2 semicondutor producer by 2010 (1)

rob-fu (564277) | more than 11 years ago | (#4352292)

They are also quoted as saying "Arr your crip berong us", which, when translated, means: "All your chip are belong us"

Sorry, the correct translation of that is "All your clip are belong to us." The letter 'l' is pronounced like the letter 'r', and not 'h'.

Son of a bitch YES! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4352240)

America, call your priest for last rites, your burial is soon!

Don't forget Intel's Pentium III... (1)

rob-fu (564277) | more than 11 years ago | (#4352246)

and the Processor Serial Number (PSN) issue.

I'll bet anything that the Dragon has this same kind of thing implemented, and a person's internet habits (at the bare minimum) will be sent back to some huge database controlled by the Chinese government -- who will monitor every move a person makes, most likely. Of course, this is just my speculation.

A huge invasion of privacy if you ask me, but then again, this is the Chinese government you're dealing with.

The Chinese are SMART! (1)

rice_burners_suck (243660) | more than 11 years ago | (#4352257)

There is another factor to consider in this story. China, like most other far-eastern countries, is known by the U.S. software industry as a "one disc" country due to alleged piracy of commercial software. If this is true, that would mean that, say, 99% of the Chinese got their copy of Windows for free.

If the Chinese get their Windows for free, but prefer to develop their own chip and run a free operating system on it, imagine what that means: That they'd rather undertake enormous expenses to achieve reliable computing than use Microsoft's garbage for free.

Now THAT is an intelligent choice.

The system's BIOS... (1)

Chagatai (524580) | more than 11 years ago | (#4352261)

Displays the following message:

Welcome to Chinese Computer. please try your Nice Chinese Computer With Keyboard the traditional and typical of Chinese glonous history. and cultual.

I wonder what why they had such a weird message [iamapsycho.com] ?

No Chinese Palladium? (5, Insightful)

Dan Crash (22904) | more than 11 years ago | (#4352270)

The article doesn't make any mention of DRM-enabling technologies like Palladium embedded on the Dragon chip. So if you value freedom, support China, I guess.

I dread the day when Chinese citizens talk amongst themselves about the funny things Americans can't do with their computers.

Re:No Chinese Palladium? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4352293)

you mean like stealing software? they're already doing that!

what's the deal with all you /.ers and your desire to make stealing IP a "right"?
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