×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Galileo's Flyby of Almathea

michael posted more than 11 years ago | from the diana-gallagher-songs dept.

Space 169

An anonymous reader writes "The spectacular Galileo flybys of Jupiter, Europa and Io are largely credited with the discovery of frozen water ice and some of the earliest examples of non-solar (tidal) heating anywhere in our solar system. For the next 10 days, Galileo scientists are preparing for their next target: probing one of Jupiter's moons, Almathea, at the close-up range of 100 miles. Almathea is one of the most unusual moons in the solar system, because it gives off more heat than it receives from the Sun."

cancel ×
This is a preview of your comment

No Comment Title Entered

Anonymous Coward 1 minute ago

No Comment Entered

169 comments

frozen water ice? (4, Funny)

deaton (616663) | more than 11 years ago | (#4528743)

is that anything like unfrozen ice water?

Re:frozen water ice? (4, Informative)

Alain Williams (2972) | more than 11 years ago | (#4528773)

The point is that 'ice' can be made from all sorts of liquids - water is just one of them.

Re:frozen water ice? (1, Informative)

Blackneto (516458) | more than 11 years ago | (#4528793)

But all ice is in a frozen state no matter what it's made out of. I just thing he was pointing out the redundancy of saying "Frozen Ice"

Hey.. (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4528979)

Can I borrow your ink-pen? My electronic computer isn't working, so I have to use this writing paper.

For communicating with people from another galaxy, the extra redundancy(ha!) may be useful to get meaning across but lots of the local folks forget the joys of context as the nivisible helper to communication.

Re:frozen water ice? (0, Offtopic)

DustMagnet (453493) | more than 11 years ago | (#4529456)

Maybe they wanted to point out that the water had been frozen to form ice at some point. There are people who believe it was just created as ice, so it was never frozen.

No wait. Nevermind.

Re:frozen water ice? (4, Informative)

comic-not (316313) | more than 11 years ago | (#4529539)

Well, ices can exist in the crystalline or amorphous phase. E.g. the water ice inside cometary nuclei is in amorphous form, and one can argue that it is technically not frozen, because it has originally been built from such tiny particles that there hasn't been a meaningful macrostate (BTW, did you ever create amorphous sulphur in the chemistry class?) to call it such. When amorphous ice is heated, it turns to the 'normal', crystalline phase, which more closely resembles our concept of 'frozen'. I don't know, however, whether the original poster tried to express this distinction.

Re:frozen water ice? (0, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4528795)

The point of the joke was that the submitted wrote frozen water ice.
The water part wasn't part of the joke.
One more time, so you get it:
frozen ice
Its an unnecessary repetition, get it?
If you don't get a joke, don't say anything, cause when someone points it out, it ruins the joke for everyone else.

Just imagine, you ruined something for thousands of people. Maybe you should turn off your computer for the rest of the day. You've done enough damage.

Re:frozen water ice? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4528805)

It's funny, number one.

Number two frozen water would be sufficient, the word ice is redundant.

Go grade some papers Professor Williams

Re:frozen water ice? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4528861)

Thats classic. Someone that has been with slashdot almost 5 full years (assumed by the very low UID), and has only made 30 comments over that time makes one of the dumbest of all time.

How about Vanilla Ice? (-1, Troll)

macdaddy357 (582412) | more than 11 years ago | (#4529023)

"Ice Ice Baby"Yo, VIP, Let's kick it! Ice Ice Baby, Ice Ice Baby
All right stop, Collaborate and listen Ice is back with my brand new invention Something grabs a hold of me tightly Then I flow like a harpoon daily and nightly Will it ever stop? Yo -- I don't know Turn off the lights and I'll glow To the extreme I rock a mic like a vandal Light up a stage and wax a chump like a candle.

Dance, Bum rush the speaker that booms I'm killing your brain like a poisonous mushroom Deadly, when I play a dope melody Anything less than the best is a felony Love it or leave it, You better gain way You better hit bull's eye, The kid don't play If there was a problem, Yo, I'll solve it. Check out the hook while my DJ revolves it

Ice Ice Baby Vanilla, Ice Ice Baby Vanilla
Ice Ice Baby Vanilla, Ice Ice Baby Vanilla

Now that the party is jumping With the bass kicked in, the Vegas are pumpin' Quick to the point, to the point no faking I'm cooking MCs like a pound of bacon Burning them if they're not quick and nimble I go crazy when I hear a cymbal And a hi hat with a souped up tempo I'm on a roll and it's time to go solo Rollin' in my 5.0
With my ragtop down so my hair can blow
The girlies on standby, Waving just to say Hi
Did you stop? No -- I just drove by
Kept on pursuing to the next stop
I busted a left and I'm heading to the next block
That block was dead

Yo -- so I continued to A1A Beachfront Ave.
Girls were hot wearing less than bikinis
Rockman lovers driving Lamborghinis
Jealous 'cause I'm out geting mine
Shay with a gauge and Vanilla with a nine
Reading for the chumps on the wall
The chumps acting ill because they're so full of "Eight Ball"
Gunshots ranged out like a bell
I grabbed my nine -- All I heard were shells
Falling on the concrete real fast
Jumped in my car, slammed on the gas
Bumper to bumper the avenue's packed
I'm trying to get away before the jackers jack
Police on the scene, You know what I mean
They passed me up, confronted all the dope fiends
If there was a problem, You, I'll solve it
Check out the hook while my DJ revolves it

Ice Ice Baby Vanilla, Ice Ice Baby Vanilla
Ice Ice Baby Vanilla, Ice Ice Baby Vanilla

Take heed, 'cause I'm a lyrical poet
Miami's on the scene just in case you didn't know it
My town, that created all the bass sound
Enough to shake and kick holes in the ground
'Cause my style's like a chemical spill
Feasible rhymes that you can vision and feel
Conducted and formed, This is a hell of a concept
We make it hype and you want to step with this
Shay plays on the fade, slice like a ninja
Cut like a razor blade so fast, Other DJs say, "damn"
If my rhyme was a drug, I'd sell it by the gram
Keep my composure when it's time to get loose
Magnetized by the mic while I kick my juice
If there was a problem, Yo -- I'll solve it!
Check out the hook while Deshay revolves it.

Ice Ice Baby Vanilla, Ice Ice Baby Vanilla
Ice Ice Baby Vanilla, Ice Ice Baby Vanilla

Yo man -- Let's get out of here! Word to your mother!

Ice Ice Baby Too cold, Ice Ice Baby Too cold Too cold
Ice Ice Baby Too cold Too cold, Ice Ice Baby Too cold Too cold

Re:frozen water ice? (0, Offtopic)

hatchet (528688) | more than 11 years ago | (#4529252)

That is not true!
Ice is water in solid state.
Solid mercury is not ice, nor is any other solid compound else than water.

Re:frozen water ice? (2, Informative)

comic-not (316313) | more than 11 years ago | (#4529568)

Ever tasted dry ice cream? I thought not. Dry ice is carbon dioxide ice. In planetary physics, all volatile compounds in solid form are known as ices.

Re:frozen water ice? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4529505)

Definte "liquid".

Hello losers (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4528746)

Welcome to my world.

Gives out more heat that it recieves. (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4528750)

Lisa, In this house we obey the laws of thermodynamics.

Yes i know there are other explainations

Re:Gives out more heat that it recieves. (3, Interesting)

TooCynical (323240) | more than 11 years ago | (#4528790)

Yet another law to disobey... http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/2135779.stm

Re:Io and Europa give out more heat also.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4528831)

They give out more heat "infrared energy" than they recieve from the sun " all wavelengths" because they have tidal heating.

Heck, even the earth does also due to a radioactively heated core.

Perhaps, the missing word is noticebly or measureably more heat.

Re:Gives out more heat that it recieves. (5, Informative)

verag (617874) | more than 11 years ago | (#4528860)

The planet itself does this as well... "...Jupiter radiates nearly twice as much heat as it receives from the Sun." Found here [thinkquest.org]

Jupiter is by far the most interesting planet (with it's moons) to me, other than the Earth. More information as well as pictures can be found on NASA's site [nasa.gov] for the planet itself.

Re:Gives out more heat that it recieves. (4, Interesting)

Jugalator (259273) | more than 11 years ago | (#4528998)

I think at least Io was so volcanic and active because of the extreme "tidal waves" from Jupiter. The "waves" are, due to the huge gravitation of Jupiter, so strong they pull solid matter and this of course cause quite a bit of friction. And friction cause heat. Not really surprising, since such a small object as our Moon does funny things to our seas. :-)

Anyway, to my point, perhaps the same applies to Amalthea?

Almathea... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4528757)

Wasn't that the name of the female unicorn in The Last Unicorn?

I'm a little Confused (3, Funny)

ksplatter (573000) | more than 11 years ago | (#4528760)

I thought this Galileo guy died a long time ago. And with him being so busy with Astronomy how did he ever find the time to learn how to Fly?

Boy you sure learn something new everyday reading Slashdot!

Re:I'm a little Confused (5, Funny)

apt142 (574425) | more than 11 years ago | (#4528796)

Haven't you read the Hitchhiker's Guide? Flying is easy. All you have to do is throw yourself at the ground and miss.

heat generator (5, Funny)

scrod98 (609124) | more than 11 years ago | (#4528761)

because it gives off more heat than it receives from the Sun

And NASA releases a picture of the Intel Inside logo on the surface...

Re:heat generator (2)

JimPooley (150814) | more than 11 years ago | (#4528993)

NASA releases a picture of the Intel Inside logo on the surface...

AMD, surely...

Re:heat generator (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4529157)

You don't see the AMD mascots jumping around in asbestos suits.

Guide? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4528766)

Is there a Lonely Planet guide for this destination?

Re:Guide? (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4528823)

No, but Moon Handbooks has one out.

what are they hoping to find? (4, Funny)

Transient0 (175617) | more than 11 years ago | (#4528767)

a civilization of alien potheads who have hotboxed an entire atmosphere?

or maybe the worlds biggest overclocked processor.

I can't think of any other reasonable theory to account for this moon radiating so much heat.

Re:what are they hoping to find? (3, Funny)

isorox (205688) | more than 11 years ago | (#4528858)

I can't think of any other reasonable theory to account for this moon radiating so much heat.

Perhaps the 65,000 processors in IBM's new computer [slashdot.org]?

Re:what are they hoping to find? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4528925)

Suppose there was large quantities of radioactive materials, these would give off quite some energy as heat.

Re:what are they hoping to find? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4528962)

I can't think of any other reasonable theory to account for this moon radiating so much heat.

Gravitational stresses from that big planet nearby.

Re:what are they hoping to find? (3, Funny)

DjMd (541962) | more than 11 years ago | (#4529350)

Geothermal/volcanic comes to mind?
Doesn't Io's volcanic activity come from jupiter's pull?

That would be my first guess...



That or the monolith [imdb.com] left the hot plate pluged in...

Earth has Moon Envy (5, Funny)

Zech Harvey (604609) | more than 11 years ago | (#4528769)


I mean, that's the only explanation I can come up with. Ours just...you know, sits there. We go there once, get bored and come back. So we spend our time looking at other planets' moons instead of making it back to ours. I mean really. Give our moon some lubbin'!

Re:Earth has Moon Envy (4, Interesting)

edremy (36408) | more than 11 years ago | (#4529408)

Nah. Ours is the biggest, at least in relation to our size. (Forget Pluto+Charon; they're just comets that took a wrong turn.)

It's not the number, it's the size, baby.

(And in seriousness, there's a fair number of theories that think life would not have come about without the large tides raised by the moon.)

Nice rendered pictures (5, Informative)

Dark Lord Seth (584963) | more than 11 years ago | (#4528771)

For those of us who aren't very much at home in astronomy and it's terms and who just want to see (relatively) pretty pictures; Celestia [sourceforge.net] also has Almathea available for your viewing pleasure, along with allot of different stuff in our solar system and even beyond there. Besides, it's a pretty proggy... :)

Almathea? (4, Funny)

CommandNotFound (571326) | more than 11 years ago | (#4528774)

...isn't that the planet where they used to build luxury planets for the super-rich?

It's Amalthea, stupid (1, Flamebait)

21mhz (443080) | more than 11 years ago | (#4528997)

I mean, I realise you Americans can't memorize all those wicked ancient names (can you spell the name of your neighbour, if anything?).
But come on, all the poster had to do right is to cut-n-paste it from the article: Amalthea.

Re:It's Amalthea, stupid (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4529210)

Learn how to spell neighbor like a civilized person and then get back to us.

Shift the focus already (3, Insightful)

Drunken Coward (574991) | more than 11 years ago | (#4528776)

Spending all these resources investigation such distant objects in outer space when there is so much [slashdot.org] so close [slashdot.org] to us that we have yet to get a good view of. Walk before we run people!

Re:Shift the focus already (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4528819)

Umm, most objects we find that close to us is junk. Perhaps we should focus on learning something new than studying decades old garbage?

Re:Shift the focus already (1)

Cujo (19106) | more than 11 years ago | (#4528826)

It's not distant at all - in the same solar system, roughly a light-hour away. How close do you need it?

Re:Shift the focus already (3, Insightful)

Blackneto (516458) | more than 11 years ago | (#4528836)

Um, Galileo has been orbiting Jupiter for 7 years. It's not like it's costing them a lot more to do this.
Think and read before we post people!

Re:Shift the focus already (5, Insightful)

ChuckDivine (221595) | more than 11 years ago | (#4528994)

While I strongly support looking for close in objects, it's not like it's an either/or situation. The world has lots of astronomers (and other kinds of scientists as well). We also have resources sufficient to do research into a wide variety of astronomical phenomena.

Those of us who have actually done some political work in support of looking for earth approaching asteroids only ask for a few millions of dollars to finance such work. Focusing all of our attention on nearby objects would be foolish and wasteful in the extreme.

Re:Shift the focus already (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4529367)

The objects you describe would require escaping from earth's gravity well. And as you should know, once you've broken from earth you've made it most of the way to the rest of the solar system. So it boils down to

spending a couple hundred million sending a probe to examine a nearby rock in great detail

--or--

spending a couple hundred million sending a probe to study numerous planets and their satellites in great detail.

For those looking for Earth like planets... (5, Insightful)

MrFenty (579353) | more than 11 years ago | (#4528778)

This sort of place is exactly the sort of reason I think, if we find life elsewhere in the universe (intelligent or otherwise) then it won't have to be on a planet that looks exactly like Earth and at roughly 1 AU from its local star. Here we have a moon that gives off heat, at a very large distance from its sun. There is no reason for us to be arrogant enough to assume that life can only exist on a place that looks identical to our place. This really bugs me, when I see people say "life can't exist there, that planet is twice Earth's distance from its star..." and rubbish like that. Aarrgghh !

Sorry, I needed that rant.

Re:For those looking for Earth like planets... (4, Informative)

FortKnox (169099) | more than 11 years ago | (#4528848)

To continue your rant philosophically...

We are ignorant when it comes to life. What exactly is life? We only know what life is within our world.
Astronomers get excited at the fact that we can find water on Mars and Europa, meaning they could have life, because our knowledge of life involves water. But, as far as we know, there could be life on the moon, we just aren't looking for it correctly.
If (or when, depending on your philosophy) we find extraterrestrial life, it will be when we aren't looking for it, IMHO.

Re:For those looking for Earth like planets... (3, Interesting)

mustangdavis (583344) | more than 11 years ago | (#4529123)

We are ignorant when it comes to life. What exactly is life?


Isn't this why there are plans to retrieve some of the upper atmosphere of Venus? There have been several articles on /. recently describing how there could be life in Venus's upper atmosphere ... just floating around, using carbon monoxide and the energy from the sun as a means of sustaining life.

BTW: I doubt you're going to find water on a planet as hot as Venus :)

This is why I REALLY hope there is life on Venus ... it will make everyone take a hard look at where we should be looking for life. These "aliens" won't have arms and legs as we think of them, which would also be excellent!

But it would definately be cooler if we found something a bit more advanced than floating bacteria on Almathea, Europa or IO.

If there was life that was slightly more advanced, it is only a matter of time before someone from N*Sync will want to take a field trip out there ...

Re:For those looking for Earth like planets... (2, Insightful)

aurelian (551052) | more than 11 years ago | (#4529437)

Planet hunters don't assume that life can only exist on earth-like planets. However they do assume that life might be more likely to be found on earth-like planets. hence it's worth looking for them.

Imagine! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4528779)

A Beowulf cluster of those!

Looking at Jupiter and its moons (5, Insightful)

igotmybfg (525391) | more than 11 years ago | (#4528787)

Two summers ago, one of my friends in University here asked me to come outside with her and look at something which she described as 'cool'. Thinking I might get some :) I went with her, and we set up a tripod and telescope and ended up watching the stars all night long. For a time we focused on Jupiter, and though I couldn't see Almathea, I did see Jupiter, Callisto, Io, Europa, and Ganymede. The thought that there was nothing (well, almost nothing) in between me and those huge, huge objects that were so very far away still sends tingling down my spine whenever I think about it. It reminds me, when I think that there is pretty much nothing left to do or discover, that there is indeed a whole universe out there, waiting for (or perhaps indifferent to) us.

Cheers!

Re:Looking at Jupiter and its moons (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4528803)

tinglign in ur spine?
i think that was ur boyfriend in ur arse
you have teh ghey my freind

Re:Looking at Jupiter and its moons (5, Funny)

allanj (151784) | more than 11 years ago | (#4528820)

Well, I think I speak (type?) for all of us here - did you, in fact, get some?

Re:Looking at Jupiter and its moons (4, Funny)

archen (447353) | more than 11 years ago | (#4529065)

in between me and those huge, huge objects that were so very far away still sends tingling down my spine whenever I think about it.

I think so.

Re:Looking at Jupiter and its moons (1)

Da Fokka (94074) | more than 11 years ago | (#4529518)

Huge objects that are so very far away? Sounds like a technical university campus for sure, dude :)

Re:Looking at Jupiter and its moons (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4528877)

and did you get some?

Re:Looking at Jupiter and its moons (0)

Comen (321331) | more than 11 years ago | (#4528950)

Or what happened when you tried to get some?
If a girl takes you out to watch the stars, I hope you at least tried and didnt get so into watching the stars you forgot!

Re:Looking at Jupiter and its moons (5, Funny)

vinlud (230623) | more than 11 years ago | (#4529485)

The thought that there was nothing (well, almost nothing) in between me and those huge, huge objects that were so very far away still sends tingling down my spine whenever I think about it. It reminds me, when I think that there is pretty much nothing left to do or discover, that there is indeed a whole universe out there, waiting for (or perhaps indifferent to) us.

You're talking 'bout the girl now right?

Good heavens (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4528798)

not once, not twice, but three times did you say "Almathea". It's Amalthea!

heat (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4528824)

Is it in any way possible that Amalthea recieves additional energy from the radiation and gravity in the Jupiter system?

Monolith? (5, Funny)

alexc (37361) | more than 11 years ago | (#4528837)

Did Galileo find a Black Monolith yet?

Re:Monolith? (3, Informative)

khendron (225184) | more than 11 years ago | (#4529122)

No no no. Clarke envisioned Amalthea (a.k.a Jupiter V) as great big a spaceship, used by an extinct alien race to move to our solar system. See here. [sfsite.com]

Almathea? (3, Funny)

Kierthos (225954) | more than 11 years ago | (#4528838)

"All these are yours, save Io. Attempt no landing there."

No problem, guv. These other moons look much more interesting.

Kierthos

Re:Almathea? (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4528953)

s/Io/Europa/

Stupid moderators (1)

Des Herriott (6508) | more than 11 years ago | (#4529369)

The original comment gets a +3 funny even though it's wrong, and a reply which gets it right gets a -1? Sigh.

Re:Almathea? (3, Informative)

JimPooley (150814) | more than 11 years ago | (#4529001)

I thought the quote was "All these worlds are yours, except Europa. Attempt no landings there" after Jupiter ignited to melt the ice...

Re:Almathea? (2)

shd99004 (317968) | more than 11 years ago | (#4529407)

If I remember correctly:


All these worlds are yours
Except Europa
Attempt no landing there
Use them together
Use them in peace

Re:Almathea? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4529087)

Wasn't that europa?

Slashdot requires you to wait 20 seconds between hitting 'reply' and submitting a comment.

It's been 15 seconds since you hit 'reply'!

Note: chances are, you're behind a firewall, or proxy, or clicked the Back button to accidentally reuse a form. We know about those kinds of errors. But if you think you shouldn't be getting this error, feel free to file a bug report, telling us:

Your browser type
Your userid "666"
What steps caused this error
Whether you used the Back button on your browser
Whether or not you know your ISP to be using a proxy, or any sort of service that gives you an IP that others are using simultaneously
How many posts to this form you successfully submitted during the day

Please set the Category to "Formkeys."

Thank you.



No problem. I'll try to type slower than twelve words a minute next time.

Weird Slashdot phenomenon (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4529145)

I've noticed this a few times now: comments seem to naturally group themselves into subject order. Look at the parent of this comment, and then the one above: both posted at 0857, both 2001-related.

It's as if one person is writing all the comments, and this whole "community" thing is a fake.

Hold, on, there's a couple of men in dark suits at the door...

[Session timeout]

AmaLthea, not ALmathea (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4528857)

Hell, has nobody noticed that the real name is Amalthea [arizona.edu]?
Where are your classics!?
She was the goat that nurtured baby Zeus = Jupiter!

Earth Mark 2 (2)

KlomDark (6370) | more than 11 years ago | (#4528868)

Isn't the extra heat because of all the other planets being built there?

Oh wait, that's Magrathea...

Amalthea (5, Informative)

Blackneto (516458) | more than 11 years ago | (#4528870)

The Correct spelling is Amalthea.
It says so on the JPL's website.
Also Amalthea was a nymph that nursed Jupiter in mythology. This fits in with the naming of the other moons.
It looks like it was only misspelled once on the astrobio site which may be the cause of the confusion.

More than just little green men. (3, Interesting)

Njoyda Sauce (211180) | more than 11 years ago | (#4528901)

Seriously, as interesting as it would be to find alien life on one of these moons, the more probable scientific interest here would be unlocking a new method of heat creation.

In the future as we attempt to colonize anything other than earth, we might find it's a bit chilly out there. Generating long-term, sustaining heat on a planetary scale without a nearby sun would be a feat indeed! Through closer study we may learn how to artificially introduce these systems to climates that are less hospitable.

Re:More than just little green men. (2, Informative)

Da Fokka (94074) | more than 11 years ago | (#4529481)

The fact that it radiates more heat than it receives implies that there's some kind of heat source within the planet, something like a metal core not unlike earth's.

When we're capable of artificially introducing something like that into a planet most likely, we're capable of building our own (planets, that is ;).

Reminds me of... (3, Funny)

El Jynx (548908) | more than 11 years ago | (#4528936)

"Almathea is one of the most unusual moons in the solar system, because it gives off more heat than it ceives from the Sun."

Funny. My girl does the same thing during the more active cycles.

Had to be said (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4528956)

That's no moon

Just for a minute now... (3, Interesting)

Qbertino (265505) | more than 11 years ago | (#4528958)

..I just imagined they find an abandoned settlement/station or reactor or something on/in that moon. I mean really. Just imagine.
That would render all that debating about economy, sadam, snipers and all that stuff irrelevant, wouldn't it?
Funny to imagine. Things shure would change. For a while that is.

*sigh* Gotta get that code done... :-)

Re:Just for a minute now... (1)

krinsh (94283) | more than 11 years ago | (#4529430)

I thought of the same thing. On the other hand; I wondered if one of the last pictures Gal sent was of it being picked up by whatever was out there. One can still hope; especially with some of the long-range viewing activities noticing stars and objects in deep space that seem to have water or life-supporting environments on them. Again, one can only hope.

Leaves me feeling depressed... (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4529027)

Every time I read stories on Galileo I get an incredable feeling of depression, not because the mission has been a failure, it has not. Rather that the craft never reached its full potentual. Early in the mission, the main arial to earth never opened meaning that the amount of pictures we get now are much lower then what we should have gotten, Sometimes I think that Galileo could have been the mission which found life on another planet besides earth. This would have changed everything, instead of planning wars today we would be planing probes to discover what the hell was out there.(a real long shot). Things like the pluto express would not have been cancelled, and millions would not be wasted on the ISS - a project which gets all its money just from the cool factor, and like the shuttle a complete waste of resources.

Probes are the way to go, its just a pity that for every one sent few manage to survive the trip, the payoff is so great.

Re:Leaves me feeling depressed... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4529325)

Yeah, but still no cure for cancer...

OK (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4529035)

Galileo is expected to fly by CowboyNeal's ass in 2008. NASA is expecting to get some glorious shots of pimple #JW2930 on the right cheek.

Jupiter's mass is the cause of the heating (5, Informative)

Big Mark (575945) | more than 11 years ago | (#4529051)

Jupiter is so heavy that it's inner reigions are incredibly hot - some think it's actually a star that just wasn't big enough to have it's own mass crush it's innards to the point where nuclear fusion occurs and the star is born. It's big enough, though, that the innards are squished to to superheat. It's this heat from the inside that makes Jupiter warm up.

The moon's heating is accounted for by tidal forces - Jupiter is just so flippin' MASSIVE that it's gravity stretches and squeezes the moon, and these tidal forces make it heat up.

The surface of Amalthea (sp.?) will be interesting to look at. I think it will have pronounced cracks on the surface where aeons of tidal forces have had their way.

Re:Jupiter's mass is the cause of the heating (2)

Linux_ho (205887) | more than 11 years ago | (#4529219)

And possibly a big ol' breeder reactor might be sitting at the core, if there's enough uranium floating around in there.

More info... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4529170)

Be gentle on them...

Amalthea [arizona.edu]

It's Amalthea, you nitwits! (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4529201)

Slashdot, where illiteracy is valued above everything else.

What Preparation... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4529266)

is required? I mean, I probed Amalthea once. She's quite a hottie, don't need any little blue pills for that...

when does Galileo retire? (3, Interesting)

peter303 (12292) | more than 11 years ago | (#4529330)

Rescued from disaster- NASA figured out how squeeze data throught the 50 times slower backup attenna when the main one failed- the Galileo mission has extended five years beyond its planned lifetime. Exhaustion of nagivation fuel and other priorities for the Deep Space Network will eventually finish this mission.

It's *Amalthea* (4, Informative)

notfancy (113542) | more than 11 years ago | (#4529442)

Sorry to pick nits, but the name is Amalthea (ah-mal-THEH-ah), it means "the Goddess Amal" (IIRC a Babylonian name for Astarte, the Moon goddess). She was the goat that nursed Jupiter (Zeus, actually) in Mount Ida, and whose horn the baby god pulled with his mighty force while playing with her. That horn is called the Cornucopia, or the Horn of Plenty, after Jupiter, ashamed at his own clumsiness, bestowed that gift on the goat as an apology.

Spacecraft dimensions (4, Informative)

teridon (139550) | more than 11 years ago | (#4529529)

From the article:

Dimensions: The length of the spacecraft is 9 m and, with the high-gain antenna (HGA) deployed, is 4.6 m in diameter.

Ha! That's great! Except that the high-gain antenna failed to deploy [google.com]. Fortunately, with some spacecraft reprogramming, Galileo will still acheive about 70% of its original science goals using the low-gain antenna.

Re:Spacecraft dimensions (1)

Misfire (136548) | more than 11 years ago | (#4529586)

I guess we'll never know, but I have this perverse feeling that the HGA will finally deploy as Galileo plummets into the denser layers of the Jovian atmosphere. (The spacecraft is being dropped into Jupiter at the end of its mission in order to eliminate the possibility that it might eventually crash into one of the Galilean satellites and contaminate it with terrestrial microorganisms.)
Load More Comments
Slashdot Account

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
Sign up for Slashdot Newsletters
Create a Slashdot Account

Loading...