Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Sony Ericsson Makes a tri-band GPRS modem

Hemos posted more than 11 years ago | from the tri-band-that-modem dept.

Hardware 143

prostoalex writes "Sony Ericsson announced their new PCMCIA GPRS wireless modem, capable of delivering 57.6 Kbps. It is tri-band and works in 900/1800/1900 MHz range, which led Sony Ericsson to imply that the card will work in 160 countries, providing an always-on Internet connection. Currently only Microsoft operating systems (starting at Windows 98) are supported. No exact price information on official site, but the PC Pro article above quotes 200 UK pounds. The manufacturer also runs a contest for those who would rather get one for free."

cancel ×

143 comments

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

one more step (-1, Redundant)

bleader (624416) | more than 11 years ago | (#4642327)

in wireless evolution

Re:one more step (0)

jrs 1 (536357) | more than 11 years ago | (#4642385)

is anyone else seeing the repeats of 20th centry technology being repeated but just on much smaller, portable computers... with interchangable faceplates?

Re:one more step (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4642520)

Hardly. If they aren't going to support Win95c at least, then I flat out can't use their product, and I'm never going to buy another Microsoft OS again. The ball is in their court to support my OS.

Frosty puss? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4642328)

I think not... damn those computers are frigging old!

uhh.. goatse or something like that here..

CSLib (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4642329)

CSLib menace for the lunchtime fp!

BSD is dying is 160 countries!

Portability! (3, Funny)

natron 2.0 (615149) | more than 11 years ago | (#4642330)

Finally I can lug my PC Case around with me to the mall and always have a connection to slashdot!

Re:Portability! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4642720)

Finally I have a reason to put you on my foes list.

Re:Portability! (1)

yatest5 (455123) | more than 11 years ago | (#4642834)

Finally I can lug my PC Case around with me to the mall and always have a connection to slashdot!


Yes, if only someone would invent a portable computer!

Fucking hell, 'Funny' moderation hits new low.

But why.. (-1, Redundant)

QangMartoq (614688) | more than 11 years ago | (#4642334)

Woud you want to access the Net over your cell phone? For one thing, signal in most buildings (my home included) is atrocious. And 57.6 kbps? No thanks. My cable modem beats that hands down. Nice concept though. First post, yeehaw! ;)

Re:But why.. (1)

bleader (624416) | more than 11 years ago | (#4642368)

Maybe to get irc wherever you are ? 8)

Re:But why.. (2, Insightful)

jeremyacole (617071) | more than 11 years ago | (#4642397)

Heh. Either you're trolling, or you completely miss the point. Try taking your cable modem to another country... or even accross town. Try using it from the local coffee shop. Nope. Didn't think so.

This is seriosly cool stuff. I wish (WISH!) that GPRS (or even good GSM coverage) was available in the USA at large. I'm still stuck with my TDMA phone until they get better coverage.

Bahh! (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4642338)

It only supports Winblows? Bahh. Who cares, I definitely will not be using it unless some nice person writes some *bsd compat drivers for it.

so when (5, Interesting)

Multiple Sanchez (16336) | more than 11 years ago | (#4642361)

will they manufacture a wireless modem that is "always on" in 160 countries, but bumps it up to high speeds when I stroll through a Ricochet zone or a community 802.11b hot spot? Never? The Jetsons promised me way much more than this. Come on -- chop, chop -- make it happen.

Re:so when (5, Interesting)

MooseGuy529 (578473) | more than 11 years ago | (#4642426)

That is a good idea but consider this:

Which does a service provider make more money on?

  1. A phone that can use other networks like 802.11b, Bluetooth, etc... which won't earn them money, or...
  2. A phone that *always* uses their network and as such will *always* earn them money for your traffic.

Personally, I agree with your point but I know myself that #2 will probably happen. I would love a PDA, especially, that can roam between Wired Ethernet, Bluetooth, 802.11b, GPRS, CDPD, etc... to get the best connection. But it's just not in the best interest of the service providers. Oh well.

Re:so when (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4642624)

Luckily mobile phone manufactures makes phones to the end users instead of service providers.

Option 1 will happen in the future, it's just takes a while before 802.11b implementation is small and cheap enough for mobile phones.

Re:so when (2)

Ilgaz (86384) | more than 11 years ago | (#4642762)

"Luckily mobile phone manufactures makes phones to the end users instead of service providers."

Are you sure? I have a C35 (siemens) which the first selection on menu is "Internet", in fact WAP. Do you think its because of a chance?

Re:so when (5, Insightful)

Ford Fulkerson (223443) | more than 11 years ago | (#4642648)

Which does a service provider make more money on?

How is this relevant, Sony/Ericsson is a mobile phone manufacturer. They don't provide the network access. All theyr'e interested in is makeing a modem that you'll rather but than whatever Nokia is shipping. Putting this kind of functionality into the modem will definetely make that happen.

Also, I know for a fact that Ericsson have done a lot of reseash into mobile phones that automatically use normal digital DECT wireless phone networks available in many workplaces, when available. So no conspiracy with the service providers here.

Re:so when (4, Insightful)

dago (25724) | more than 11 years ago | (#4642681)

maybe ericsson is also a big mobile network equipment supplier ?

for the DECT+GSM, they were one of the few (with SAGEM) to make a dual standard phone. Unfortunately, both discontinued their product some years ago.

in fact, DECT could be far worse for mobile phone operators than 802.11. It's quite easy to make an ad-hoc network of dect phones ... do you really thing that any supplier or service provider wants that ?

seamless interoperation (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4643206)

as you pointed, the problem with seamless roaming over WiFi and other radio access such as GSM and UMTS is at the network (read billing) side of things.

right now there are countless R&D projects trying to figure how to do it in a way that is both minimal cost to the user and still makes business sense for the operators.

a little bird tells me that it will be available in the near future. you need big muscle operators like Vodafone to jump into the WiFi hotspot business, and the natural order of things is to sell you a complete package: in your office you use your own, in hotspots you are connected to WiFi and in other areas you use UMTS or GPRS.

Lucent has recently demonstrated the feasability of seamless handover between WiFi and UMTS, and Nokia and Ericsson work on it. some US R&D lab has UMTS (TDD version) interoperating with WiFi right now.

most /.ers love to bash UMTS - or they are all on Qualcomm payroll :) - but the truth is that WiFi in a multiuser environment is not better than a nicely behaving UMTS TDD access.

so, there is a spot for WiFi / mobile phone card - that will come as soon as the operators find how to sell them.

Re:so when (3, Informative)

trynis (208765) | more than 11 years ago | (#4642446)

Actually you can do this yourself. I did it a year and a half ago. It's called vertical handover, and I did it between 802.11b and bluetooth. I wanted to do GPRS as well, but I had no access to such hardware at the time. It's quite easy to set up using MobileIP and some clever programming. There should be more advanced solutions available now, I think.

It has happend if you buy Nokia (5, Informative)

chrestomanci (558400) | more than 11 years ago | (#4642485)

Check out the D211
http://www.nokia.com/nokia/0,4879,1449,00.ht ml

It is a wireless PCMCIA conectivity card, which supports both GPRS and 802.11b

There are even linux drivers avalabe to to download. (I don't know if they work)

It has been out for a couple of months.

The main downside is that it only supports dual band opperation, so I guess american readers are out of luck.

The other downside is that switching between GPRS and 802.11 is not automatic, though you could probably put together a script to make it so.

I dare say it is rather expensive as well.

Re:It has happend if you buy Nokia (2)

chrestomanci (558400) | more than 11 years ago | (#4642957)

There is also an American version called the D311.

http://www.nokia.com/nokia/0,5184,2022,00.html

It works on american GPRS frequences, but is otherwise very similar.

Option (GlobeTrotter Universal TriBand) (1)

Erik_ (183203) | more than 11 years ago | (#4643031)

Looking for an alternative ? Option International's GlobeTrotter Universal TriBand [option.com] PCMCIA GSM/GPRS card has been shipping for months now... Driver supports for Windows family, PocketPC 2000/2002, MacOS [novamedia.de] and Linux support [option.com] . And all that for 399 Euros.

Option International has been a leading company in bringing modems to PDA's and Laptops for years. They sold the first GSM Modem for the PalmOS as long ago as in 1996.

Not a big deal.. (2)

MikeFM (12491) | more than 11 years ago | (#4642956)

So get this card and a WiFi card and configure your computer to change over to the WiFi network when possible. Something similar to how dual-band phones work. The project to implement an open (free as in speech and beer) wireless phone network is designed in such a way.

Well... (1)

QangMartoq (614688) | more than 11 years ago | (#4642363)

I'll be darned, lol. When I clicked on the story, it had no comments. Thought I was first, but oh well. And yeah, the phone only supporting Windows blows. Not to mention - Can anyone see a company willing to let you use it as a (nearly) always on connection, without charging you an arm, a leg, and your firstborn child too? I can't.

Re:Well... (3, Informative)

Arker (91948) | more than 11 years ago | (#4642488)

It's not a phone, that wouldn't be news, I've got a tri-band GPRS phone in my pack. Plug it in via firewire... anyway this isn't a phone, it doesn't do voice, data only, it's a PMCIA card dedicated GPRS modem. And you're right, it's expensive, mind you the nice thing with GPRS is that you don't pay for time connected, just bits transferred, so if you filter your mail on the server and browse with lynx you could keep constantly up to date relatively cheaply. GPRS service in Europe runs around 20 cents a megabyte IIRC, depending on where you are of course... anyone know about the US? it would definately get expensive fast if you don't take steps to keep your bandwidth usage limited.

Re:Well... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4643073)

Check out the service plans currently offered by cmopanies like AT&T Wireless (www.attwireless.com). You can have an always-on connection for as little as $3 per month (or thereabouts). The real money starts to flow when you actually *use* the connection to send/receive data. Significant charges are associated with sending and receiving data, but being connected costs almost nothing.

One more thing... (0, Insightful)

natron 2.0 (615149) | more than 11 years ago | (#4642371)

What si the security like with this thing, it works in the 900Mhz range, I know alot of 900Mhz phones that are easily tapped with cheap equiptment. I hope Sony has thought this through.

Re:One more thing... (2)

SealBeater (143912) | more than 11 years ago | (#4642393)


What si the security like with this thing, it works in the 900Mhz range, I know alot of 900Mhz phones that are easily tapped with cheap equiptment. I hope Sony has thought this through.


Personally, I hope they haven't. Maybe that's bad, but it's true.

SealBeater

Re:One more thing... (4, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4642466)

900 MHz is also European GSM range. They cannot be easily tapped with cheap equipment.

Also note, when they are talking about triband, they mean 900/1800/1900 MHz, GSM only.

Re:One more thing... (2)

gl4ss (559668) | more than 11 years ago | (#4642474)

**** 900 MHz is also European GSM range. They cannot be easily tapped with cheap equipment.

Also note, when they are talking about triband, they mean 900/1800/1900 MHz, GSM only.****

i'd mod you up, gsm, not nmt/whatever.

Re:One more thing... (2)

Ilgaz (86384) | more than 11 years ago | (#4642809)

Tapping a GSM? um, its possible, with $100k equipment and a cool supercomputer like Cray or some Sun high end.but I think its easy to tap a ISP,e.g. bribing them.

GSM has encryription, a REAL high level of encyription.

Re:One more thing... (1)

EkiM in De (574327) | more than 11 years ago | (#4642477)

It's a GSM/GPRS phone! GSM comes with encryption as standard, albeit the encryption is not as good as it seems [google.de] . I'm not too sure about the GPRS side but since it just an extension of GSM I'd assume that the existing GSM encryption would apply to the GPRS packets.
Can anybody out there confirm or deny this?

Re:One more thing... (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4642639)

GPRS encryption algorithms GEA1 and GEA2 are similar in principle to (but subtly different from) the A5/1 and A5/2 algorithms used for GSM.

While it is true that GSM encryption is not especially strong, the paraniod can, of course, run SSL to encrypt at the IP packet level. You'd also have to say that GPRS encryption and encryption procedures are some way beyond, say, 802.11 - and the encryption is more than adequate to deter all but the most determined.

Re:One more thing... (4, Informative)

radish (98371) | more than 11 years ago | (#4642669)

This is GSM, it's encrypted. It's crackable in reasonable time, but it's certainly not "easily tapped with cheap equipment". This is nothing new, remember GSM has been around for years. I have never heard of anyone tapping GSM transmissions (publically anyway), whilst it used to be common place with *shudder* analogue cellphones.

Re:One more thing... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4642837)

Its not a 900Mhz phone... its a GPRS device, all usual GPRS/GSM security is included at no extra charge =)

Barrier in Europe: Cost (5, Interesting)

Denito (196701) | more than 11 years ago | (#4642374)

Thoughts from a GPRS user:

I have a Handspring Treo phone here in Denmark, and it works great with GPRS. However, the cost (around 20c US / Mb) adds up quickly..

Coverage is fine and it is very usefull. But untill providers give unlimited use plans, this is very cost-prohibitive.

Re:Barrier in Europe: Cost (2, Interesting)

Cyn (50070) | more than 11 years ago | (#4642600)

1USD/5MB sounds like an amazing rate. Everywhere I've heard is the opposite, you end up paying about
5USD/1MB.

You sure you didn't mean KB or something? then it would be much worse and I'd understand you - but personally I'd be happy to pay $1/5MB (given my options now, though naturally I'd be happier with unlimited).

Re:Barrier in Europe: Cost (2, Informative)

Denito (196701) | more than 11 years ago | (#4643026)



Indeed, I cited the wrong rate above, as I lost a zero on my Kroner -> Dollar conversion..

it is about 3 USD per Mb. That's why it's cost prohibitive.

Re:Barrier in Europe: Cost (3, Interesting)

TheSync (5291) | more than 11 years ago | (#4643242)

In the US, Sprint PCS Vision offers unlimited CDMA 1xRTT data even in their $30/month plan - BUT they only guaranteee unlimited free data only for three months. You can buy on a month-by-month basis for $10 more per month to avoid getting locked in for a year. It seems kind of silly to me for them to only have unlimited for three months.

T-Mobile is selling the Danger Sidekick with unlimited GPRS data for $39.99 with 200 anytime minutes and 1000 weekend minutes. But they only guarantee unlimited data for one year.

Verizon Wireless "Unlimited Express Networks" gives you unlimited CDMA 1xRTT data for $100/month, no hedges.

Re:Barrier in Europe: Cost (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4642802)

In the U.S., Sprint PCS now offers unlimited voice and data plans.

I have the Sprint PCS Connection Card, a.k.a. the Merlin C201 from Novatell Wireless:

http://www.novatelwireless.com/pcproducts/index. ht ml#SprintPCS

I was very skeptical when I bought it, but after 14 days of testing in various locations I decided to keep it. It works well even in places where I have only one bar of signal strength.

Testing using the test for mobile devices at bandwidthplace.com I regularly see connection speeds in excess of the "peak" advertised, and my average speed is definetly higher than the average the 50-70Kbps they advertise -- more like double that.

Re:Barrier in Europe: Cost (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4643095)

i pay 6.99 per mb in the us, !!

Re:Barrier in Europe: Cost (1)

m00_cow (443590) | more than 11 years ago | (#4643201)

living in finland I haven't found the price to be a problem. there is a gprs service for 16 a month, unlimited transfers. works like a charm.

Who wouldn't (5, Funny)

EyesWideOpen (198253) | more than 11 years ago | (#4642381)

The manufacturer also runs a contest for those who would rather get one for free.

Who wouldn't rather get one for free?

Re:Who wouldn't (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4642459)

If it's free, who are you going to blame when it goes wrong? Oops, sorry, wrong argument.

Re:Who wouldn't (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4642497)

Who
wouldn't rather get one for free?
Nope. The correct english is
Who would
rathern't get one for free

Re:Who wouldn't (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4643070)

Either you have a stupid sense of humour (aus spelling), or, youre a fucking retard.

Great Innovation (1)

Hackura (603389) | more than 11 years ago | (#4642387)

Seems like a great product that could be very useful to travelling businessmen, and even just vacationers looking for a good place to eat. Lets just hope the security is there to go along with it. I have my doubts about it though, I would imagine something of this nature wouldnt be hard to intercept, theyve been intercepting cell phone transmissions for years.

Who needs a computer to find food? (2)

T1girl (213375) | more than 11 years ago | (#4642667)

Seems like a great product that could be very useful to travelling businessmen, and even just vacationers looking for a good place to eat.

Finding food while travelling is one of the most basic instincts - even the most primitive hunters and gatherers managed it. I've been on many trips and vacations and never found it necessary to do much more than "follow my nose" to find something decent to eat. Most "travel guides" seem to steer you to over-priced tourist traps, so I would need some other motivation to take another expensive gizmo along on a vacation.

In most of the world there is no such thing as a doggie bag. -- Prof. Kelly Brownell

Price Listed on site. (3, Informative)

A Commentor (459578) | more than 11 years ago | (#4642389)

So on the contest site (sonyericsson.com), in the rules it states that it's a EUR 399 value

The prize consists of one Sony Ericsson GPRS PC Card Modem, GC75, which has a recommended retail price of EUR 399.

Re:Price Listed on site. (2)

Ilgaz (86384) | more than 11 years ago | (#4642869)

Now that is a real rip-off... amazing I say, amazing price. You can have a full feature phone with that,with gprs and bluetooth etc. amazing price.

e.g. the Nokia 7650 with built in camera and mms, of course gprs is=$250!

bandwidth (4, Interesting)

asv108 (141455) | more than 11 years ago | (#4642400)

With At&T, I pay $5 for every 2 megs of bandwidth used. If I buy this card, it would cost me $15 just to download all the porn spam I get every morning. Unless the bandwidth costs get reasonable, I won't buy it. What happens if I accidently click on a goatse link? Can I send someone an invoice?

Re:bandwidth (-1)

neal n bob (531011) | more than 11 years ago | (#4642419)

stop lying - it was no accident you clicked goatse you sick bastard.

If you really need it (2)

Arker (91948) | more than 11 years ago | (#4642770)

With At&T, I pay $5 for every 2 megs of bandwidth used. If I buy this card, it would cost me $15 just to download all the porn spam I get every morning. Unless the bandwidth costs get reasonable, I won't buy it.

Youch, that's a lot more expensive than it is here (Sweden) IIRC. That said, if you really need the portable connection, there are ways to minimise the bandwidth needed. Filter your mail on the server, use an IMAP client (mail.app on mac, mutt on *nix, pmail on windows all work alright for this) and set it to only download headers automatically, wait till you request the message to get the body, wait till you request attachments to get them... and browse with lynx. Or at least turn off image loading. Do all that and you'll cut your bandwidth usage tremendously.

Isn't GPRS roaming still rare? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4642434)

As far as I have understood, GPRS roaming in foreign networks is still a very rare service. GPRS works mostly only in your home network.

So marketing the modem as someting that enbles traveling people to have a constant internet connection is slightly overstated. Sure, the tri-band GPRS modem could work in 160 countries since it's hawdware-compatible, but in practice it doesn't since your SIM chip isn't operator-compatible. You'd have to sign up for a new subscription for each country you travel to.

No. Actually GPRS+roaming is cool and FREE... (1)

kitsook (516402) | more than 11 years ago | (#4642942)

The carrier I use (in Hong Kong) provides FREE GPRS roaming [one2free.com.hk] ...

YES! Your are right, free "broaddband" when you travel!

Why arn't we using Bluetooth (5, Insightful)

The Evil Twin (217345) | more than 11 years ago | (#4642439)

So I've been reading about how in the UK everyone is using bluetooth enabled devices. This device becomes a perfect example of a "why do we need this?" product.

The way things should be:
- Most notebooks come with bluetooth.
- you have a Bluetooth enabled GPRS phone.

Done.. there is your internet connection.
Intead, for us stuck here in North America. We get CDMA, and no bluetooth to speak of (except as an option on some high end notebooks). Sure we can buy an adapter for the notebook. But no phones.

Use Infrared (1)

Hunden (516276) | more than 11 years ago | (#4642552)

My SonyEricsson has both Infrared and bluetooth, but my thinkpad only has infrared.

Turn the phone on infrared, and the thinkpad registers the "modem" T68i.

Voila, and no strings attached:)

Re:Why arn't we using Bluetooth (2)

radish (98371) | more than 11 years ago | (#4642558)

Who needs bluetooth? I've been doing exactly that for years with the power of Irda!

I admit that BT can give faster speeds, and doesn't require line of sight, but for simple "check your email from laptop" it's so easy and works just fine. I use my mobile from my laptop, Palm and sometimes PC (when my landline dies, which it does sometimes).

Re:Why arn't we using Bluetooth? BUT WE ARE. (1)

LucidBeast (601749) | more than 11 years ago | (#4642941)

I have Nokia 6310i triple band phone w bluetooth and a socket bluetooth cf card. GPRS works fine and is supposed to work in US too in most of the urban areas although my operator lists them as untested. Downside is that my operator charges 16 (about equal in $)/ 1MB of data / month and 1 for additional MB's

Re:Why arn't we using Bluetooth (1)

NiteHaqr (29663) | more than 11 years ago | (#4642993)

Lol - but I am AND GPRS.

While in the land of cheap hardware (the US) I picked up a rather nice little USB Bluetooth adapter by those lovely Belkin chaps.

Slipping this into the USB port (yes THE USB port) of my Sony Vaio C1VE (now you see why I said THE USB port :P ) lets me talk to my wonderful little Sony Ericsson T68i cell-phone (Tri-band, GPRS, POP3, IMAP4 and other goodies).

From there I can then use my GPRS to connect to the web.

According to ZDNET's Bandwidth Testing script (UK site only I think) I was getting a better connection via BT/GPRS than I normally get coppered into the PSTN network - go figure.

Actually just re-read the article I am replying to and this is exactly what The Evil Twin was saying to do - so instead of being a "nah nah ne nah nah look what I can do" post its now a "Yeah man - I agree and its all cool"

I do know however that the T68i IS available in the US - I saw it in more than a few of your reasonably prices electronics outlets - Circuit City for example (where it came in a really funky dark blue colour as opposed to the silver/grey of the UK) mind you I was in to buy DVD's - £13 for Blade 2 when it hadn't even been released when I got home and was pre-ordering at its normal UK retail of £19.99 - long live DVD region disabling.

Re:Why arn't we using Bluetooth (2)

Mr_Silver (213637) | more than 11 years ago | (#4643004)

So I've been reading about how in the UK everyone is using bluetooth enabled devices. This device becomes a perfect example of a "why do we need this?" product.

Uhhhh, no. That is, I'm afriad, a bit of a fallacy. Yes, we have bluetooth phones here (and the odd headset - which costs a fortune and makes you look an idiot, hence low take up) but if you think we're all using these devices then I'm afriad you're wrong.

At the moment there are two Nokia phones (7650 and 6310i), one SonyEricsson and probably two others of other makes. This isn't much.

I actually have a theory that Bluetooh won't really start to take off in the UK until Nokia starts supporting it on every single phone.

At the moment they're only putting it into high end mobile phones. Out of the 9 phones they've announced 3 have bluetooth. Whilst this might not sound that bad, one of those is a 3G phone, one of those is a communicator and the other is their top of the range model.

Granted I don't expect the new budget 2110 [nokia.com] to have it, but considering the chips are cheap, available and low power - it would make more sense to stick them into all phones.

After all, text messaging didn't become popular by being put on only the most expensive phones. Yes, there was interoperability issues too, but if you want people to use new technology, you can't price it out of the range of the masses.

I think the Nokia D211 is much cooler (3, Informative)

adrianm (100624) | more than 11 years ago | (#4642447)

GPRS, HSCSD, and 802.11 all in a single PC Card
(http://www.nokia.com/nokia/0,1522,,00.html? orig=/ phones/nokiad211)

Wonder if it's really Windows-only (5, Interesting)

Des Herriott (6508) | more than 11 years ago | (#4642452)

If it's like other PCMCIA GPRS cards I've encountered, it might work under Linux/BSD/etc. - simply appearing as a serial device to which you send AT commands (and thus available to run pppd on).

The Windows-only sticker may just refer to some cutesy control centre applet which will (obviously) only run on Windows. Every modem needs its own control centre on Windows these days, it seems.

Re:Wonder if it's really Windows-only (2, Informative)

Des Herriott (6508) | more than 11 years ago | (#4642531)

I should have done some more research :-) Yes, it looks like it will work just fine on a Unix-type OS. It does indeed appear as a regular serial device.

Check out this link [geocrawler.com] (and the followups to it)

Re:Wonder if it's really Windows-only (2)

chrestomanci (558400) | more than 11 years ago | (#4642814)

Probably not.

Moshe Bar (Of open Mosix fame) recetly wrote a byte column [byte.com] on how he got his GPRS phone talking to his laptop while on his honeymoon in the Italian alps.

What his new wife thought about it was not recorded.

I hope this helps.

Anonymous Surfing? (5, Interesting)

SealBeater (143912) | more than 11 years ago | (#4642465)

This is interesting. According to the article, you can swap out the SIM card on the modem. Two immediate options occured to me. One, cell phone theft is a problem in Europe. This can lead to people swiping a cell phone, grabbing the SIM card and doing whatever needs to be done anonymously via the Internet. I'm sure everyone can use their imagination. Second, and perhaps more interesting, there are various services that will purchase or provide SIM cards that are (more or less) anonymous, so you can make phone calls that are not traceable to you. These pre-paid SIM cards are rechargable. This could be a help if you had one in a climate where you needed to make sure something you posted on the web, for example, would be far more difficult to trace. Very exciting. Brave new world.

SealBeater

Re:Anonymous Surfing? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4642473)


well sort of.. far as i've heard of, there's nobody offering GPRS on prepay.

Re:Anonymous Surfing? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4642529)

Not going to happen! Pre-paid anonymous cards only provide the very basic voice service and nothing else. If you want any kind of "premium" service, like gprs, you're going to have to sign up for a regular account.

Re:Anonymous Surfing? (4, Insightful)

gl4ss (559668) | more than 11 years ago | (#4642533)

you could always do this.. of course you can switch the sim card on the modem, how else were you going to get your sim card in it? and being what it is(basically a gprs phone without phone look options). and this is hardly the first one of these to hit the market even, several solutions exist yet, but they dont do triband afaik like this.

provider/phonenumber locking per phone is medieval, something you hear horrorstories from nmt days.

and gprs doesnt do anything 'new' to this, not in this modem or anything. you could always use the 'data' mode of the gsm phone to post things with these. for hmm, 9 years already?

and as somebody mentioned, very few of these precharged providers provide gprs, but that is non issue anyways as long they provide some way to make data calls.

they could use the wap/gprs-modem portions of the phone itself even if the sim card was epoxied in every phone.

Re:Anonymous Surfing? (0)

rundgren (550942) | more than 11 years ago | (#4643265)

provider locking is still very much in use on gsm phones here in Norway, especially on cheap, subsidised phones that come with pre-paid subsription

Ummm... (4, Informative)

rcs1000 (462363) | more than 11 years ago | (#4642636)

All European cell-phones have removable SIM cards. Many, although most users don't realise it, have built in modems.

The Nokia 7xxx and 8xxx, plus the Ericsson R520, T28 and T68. By using either IR or Bluetooth, you can attach these phones to a laptop, and can then use an anonymous Internet account (like Freeserve in the UK.)

Indeed, I have been using this method (except for the Freeserve bit) for about four years now to access the web when I am travelling. It's not quick, but it's super useful.

Contrary to this posters' opinion, most criminals won't use stolen cell phones for Internet access. It's slow and clunky, and there are still ways to find who posted the hypothetical email message...

(1) Trace email message to ISP.
(2) Dredge ISP log to find phone number and time, duration of call.
(3) Contact cell phone company that carried the call, discover IMEI number of the cell-phone.

Now if anyone uses that cell phone again... you will know. You can track which cell they are in, etc. Complicated, but theoretically possible to catch the person you want.

Thx,

Robert

Re:Anonymous Surfing? (1)

DJPenguin (17736) | more than 11 years ago | (#4642640)

... except that when the phones negociate with the AUTH center on the network, they send the IMEI, which is the serial number of the mobile station.

When people steal phones, they try and re-flash it to change the IMEI, but this is getting more difficult, and probably very difficult on a PCMCIA based dealy.

Plus, they know where you were when you made the call :)

Re:Anonymous Surfing? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4642705)

The problem is, many network providers doesn't use imei blacklisting.

Re:Anonymous Surfing? (1)

DJPenguin (17736) | more than 11 years ago | (#4642984)

Yes, my point being that there is *still* an IMEI to track you against, blocking or no blocking... it's still there in the network and in the logs.

Nokia Cardphone (5, Informative)

Psychic Burrito (611532) | more than 11 years ago | (#4642470)

Also, compare it to the Nokia Cardphone [nokia.com] . Works with Linux, too :-)

Not so new... (4, Interesting)

sheriff_p (138609) | more than 11 years ago | (#4642489)

Turns out with my T68, Bluetooth dongle, and iBook, I already have a tri-band GRPS phone that works with a stable operating system...

So What? (3, Insightful)

kitsook (516402) | more than 11 years ago | (#4642502)

why not just buy a gprs phone? then use infra-red to connect your notebook/ppc to the phone?

Re:So What? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4642733)

Because IR sucks. You call yourself a nerd and you don't even know that?

Re:So What? (1)

kitsook (516402) | more than 11 years ago | (#4642897)

(1) i am not a nerd (2) i don't think ir sucks (3) i don't have the money to buy bluetooth so i still use ir with my t39 phone ps i do know that your tv remote control use ir... though...

It won't fly in europe. (5, Interesting)

alecbrown (66952) | more than 11 years ago | (#4642505)

They keep coming out with this cool technology but price it out of reach. My T39 Ericsson mobile phone has been able to connect via GPRS and my laptop's IrDA port for a year now, never done it though because my network providers (O2) costs is extortionate in my opinion, I stick to GSM dialup at 9600 bps to download my email when I am on the move. These mobile telcos shoot themselves in the foot.

Three years ago they were pushing WAP hard but then made it expensive to use, so no-one used it in Europe and all the techie press (including slashdot) said it was a dead and cr@p because of the small form factor, where are the WAP sites now? Slashdot's WAP site seems to have gone (eh Taco?). In South Korea they made WAP and GPRS affordable, and everyone used it, there are lots of sites and both technologies are considered a success.

The really strange technology success (for the telcos) is txting, they thought no-one would be interested so they bundled it as a cheap feature, and everyone used it. If they make GPRS cheap and put useful things on WAP (such as TV guides) then everyone will use it.

£rd generation mobile technologies will also fail unless these telcos learn this painful lesson.

Missing country option, again?!?! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4642513)

Sony Ericsson to imply that the card will work in 160 countries

Personally I get really offended when such a wide variety of countries are supported but my beloved home country of Ecuador is not.

If we're really small enough to just be casually tossed aside, then you are really the egomaniacs that the rest of the world seems to suggest.

Hmph.

Re:Missing country option, again?!?! (3, Funny)

meringuoid (568297) | more than 11 years ago | (#4642541)

Personally I get really offended when such a wide variety of countries are supported but my beloved home country of Ecuador is not.

Missing options:

I'm from Ecuador, you insensitive clod!

CowboyNealia

Always on? (1)

Bobman1235 (191138) | more than 11 years ago | (#4642526)

which led Sony Ericsson to imply that the card will work in 160 countries, providing an always-on Internet connection.

I would tend to not worry about the actual cost of the card but rather the cost of having an "always on" wireless connection. Is there some kind of pricing plan out there for the actual service? I know if I spoke on my cell phone 24/7 it might cost a little bit of money. I don't see how this is any different.

Re:Always on? (4, Informative)

Ilgaz (86384) | more than 11 years ago | (#4642743)

You pay for bytes on GPRS, not being online. Just like some of those corparate lines.

please remember veterans day (-1)

neal n bob (531011) | more than 11 years ago | (#4642547)

today we celebrate the men who died so you pasty fags could sit in your parent's basement and try to entice little kids to send you naked pictures of themselves.

Re:please remember veterans day (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4642573)

I agree with this post! Down with Veteran's Day, up with Armistice Day!

In praise of smarter markets (3, Insightful)

smitty_one_each (243267) | more than 11 years ago | (#4642599)

We must quietly respect the gentle extension of market share on the part of the Big Guy. No whining, no complaints, no trolls: manufacturers are flooding the market with products that are only going to work with the Master System.
The reasonable thing to do is refuse to purchase these products until a reasonable selection of drivers is available for them.
Also, try not to by new boxes incorporating inflexible hardware.
Smarter markets are the key to a better future.

Sneaky! (1)

DJPenguin (17736) | more than 11 years ago | (#4642602)

If you hover over the word "Contest" in the story blurb, it's a doubleclick.net ad link, for OSDN. That's a bit of a sneaky way of getting us to click-through isn't it?

Re:Sneaky! (1)

DJPenguin (17736) | more than 11 years ago | (#4642613)

well well well.. they changed it now! Guess they got enough click-thru's already.

Already Been Done (2, Informative)

GuyZero (303599) | more than 11 years ago | (#4642608)

Gee, too bad there's already the same thing... in Compact Flash.

http://www.shoppingpda.com/product/rtm8000/rtm80 00 .asp

GSM/GPRS, Tri-band, data, earphone jack for voice calls, supports PDAs & Windows - oh, and it's only $283 USD. Cheaper too.

I can't wait until this tech is invisible. (3, Interesting)

sstory (538486) | more than 11 years ago | (#4642610)

When this tech is invisible, I'll be able to buy a laptop, and it will just be online. No worrying about cards or areas, it'll just be omnipresent connectivity.

cdma 1x cards already available (2, Informative)

gyc (66821) | more than 11 years ago | (#4642679)

In the U.S., at least, you can already purchase a CDMA 1x PC Card for $200 that will get you speeds over 100kbps.

Motorola P280 (3, Informative)

rit (64731) | more than 11 years ago | (#4642721)

I have a Motorola P280 (purchased last year) TriBand GSM Mobile which does the same thing. It's access is via t-mobile here in the states; it came with a serial cable which plugs right into the phone - the phone is a full 56k modem which when plugged into serial port is addressable as a standard modem - no special software required.

It also handles GPRS modem, which does require special "iStream" software ( dunno what voicestream calls it now that they rebanded to t-mobile) and only runs on Windows.

It has all the same features of the above mentioned modem, but it also is a phone.

I paid about $300 for it in January, so it's probably more affordable now.

They have an i280 now also that is same phone PLUS bluetooth.

I love the Motorola bluetooth car kit....

Re:Motorola P280 (2)

Vegeta99 (219501) | more than 11 years ago | (#4642882)

Unfortunatly, it wouldn't work with some providers in the USA - ATTWS doesn't use Circuit Switched Data, thye only use their very expensive GPRS service.

Does if support Ogg Vorbis? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4642729)

Or do I completely not understand what this post is about?

Why if your phone has bluetooth? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4642786)


If your phone has bluetooth (or even IRDA/or a data cable) then it's essentially the same as the pccard
except it has the advantage of being a phone also!

It may be advantagious for certain custom systems,
but for general mobile situations laptop + phone
is the most flexible solution.

only works with Windows? who cares? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4642798)

- if it only works with windows, who cares?

- why would it only work with windows?

- the manufacturer doesn't care about other market segments?

- why buy this POS? for US$28 a month i get 115200 on a no-cost kyocera that works with *any* computer..

Questions.. (1)

znaps (470170) | more than 11 years ago | (#4642806)

Seems to me using a GPRS enabled phone with bluetooth or irda would be the better solution, and here's why:

- Most laptops come with only 2 pcmcia card slots, and frequently you can only get one card in at one time. No big deal, just a little bit of hassle factor if I have a pcmcia hardrive/usb 2.0 adaptor etc in there already.

- If I already have a GPRS/GSM account with a provider, I don't want to have to transfer the sim card from my phone into the card every time I want to use it, since then I won't be able to receive or return calls!

Range (2)

Myuu (529245) | more than 11 years ago | (#4643155)

funny, you can get the service in 160 countries but you cant get it in farking north dakota
Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?