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Linux Kernel Bugzilla Launched

CowboyNeal posted more than 11 years ago | from the bug-zapper-kernel-trapper dept.

Linux 187

paskie writes "Martin J. Bligh of IBM announced launch of a Bugzilla bug tracking database for 2.5 linux kernel series - it's at bugme.osdl.org. Finally there will be some possibility to easily keep track of known bugs without being subscribed to thousand of mailing lists or googling to death. According to the relevant lkml thread, kernel developers will still prefer discussions to happen on the mailing lists, though. The Bugzilla server and connection is donated by OSDL and IBM folks administer the database."

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In Soviet Russia (0, Offtopic)

ekrout (139379) | more than 11 years ago | (#4673768)

In Soviet Russia, Bugzilla launches Linux!

Re:In Soviet Russia (3, Interesting)

tps12 (105590) | more than 11 years ago | (#4673802)

Funny you should say that. In a way, it is sort of backwards. I mean, Mozilla's a great browser, but it's not exactly stable, compared to the Linux kernel. Maybe the Moz team should be taking bug tracking tips from Linus.

Bugzilla is good because Mozilla is buggy (1)

P-Nuts (592605) | more than 11 years ago | (#4673860)

In a way, it is sort of backwards. I mean, Mozilla's a great browser, but it's not exactly stable, compared to the Linux kernel.

If Mozilla has lots of bugs, its developers need a powerful bug-tracking tool. Bugzilla is what they came up with.

I wonder how long it will be before we get to win a major prize for Linux bug two million. What would the prize be?

Re:Bugzilla is good because Mozilla is buggy (1)

larry bagina (561269) | more than 11 years ago | (#4673891)

If Mozilla has lots of bugs, its developers need a powerful bug-tracking tool. Bugzilla is what they came up with

... and people that write buggy browsers will somehow write a non-buggy bug tracking system?

Re:Bugzilla is good because Mozilla is buggy (2)

SirSlud (67381) | more than 11 years ago | (#4673928)

If my mission is to pick the easier project, Bugzilla would be it.

You can't seriously compare writing a web app with writing the whole client the web app runs through?

Re:Bugzilla is good because Mozilla is buggy (2, Informative)

zapfie (560589) | more than 11 years ago | (#4673910)

It should be noted that Bugzilla 'bugs' are used for everything from bug reports to feature enhancement requests.. so only a certain percentage of those 'bugs' are really bugs at all.

Re:In Soviet Russia (2)

zapfie (560589) | more than 11 years ago | (#4673876)

Bug Fixing != Bug Tracking.

Are you kidding? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4673901)

Linus has a terrible track record at tracking bugs. Look at 2.4 for crying out loud! It's up to what, 119? And each release fixes around 20 bugs!

EARTH TO LINUS: Track the bugs, then fix them in one big patch. Saves time, effort and bandwidth.

Re:In Soviet Russia (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4673835)

In Soviet Russia, First Posts post you! And you bitchslap the editors! And you troll trolls! Hm.. actually.. Soviet Russia is starting to sound good.

Re:In Soviet Russia (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4673843)

Yakov Smirnov said that. Mod parent up.

Eff Pee (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4673769)

Ahight holmes.

Re:Eff Pee (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4673907)

"offtopic"? Someone is going to get nailed in m2! haha fucker!

fp (-1, Offtopic)

bucephalis (165674) | more than 11 years ago | (#4673771)

off-topic, blatant attempt at a fp

fp QWZX (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4673773)

fp

FP suckas (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4673774)

FP suckas!

www.route66sj.com

Cool (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4673779)

Cool

Anime == Obscene Porn (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4673780)

http://www.icv2.com/articles/home/1973.html

Did we listen? No (5, Funny)

DetrimentalFiend (233753) | more than 11 years ago | (#4673782)

"Please let me or the supplied mailto URLs know of any problems you encounter, but please be patient with any inital teething problems
and don't tell slashdot just yet ;-)"

Another server bites the dust.

Re:Did we listen? No (3, Insightful)

po_boy (69692) | more than 11 years ago | (#4673917)

That's blatently inconsiderate, and intolerably so. It's almost as though paskie and CowboyNeal were intentionally being inconsiderate.

Re:Did we listen? No (1)

UU7 (103653) | more than 11 years ago | (#4674391)

And the moon men are comming to take you awayyyyyy.

Re:Did we listen? No (5, Interesting)

WPIDalamar (122110) | more than 11 years ago | (#4674052)

So someone says "please don't slashdot us" and we slashdot them on the same day. That's just low. Come on editors, we need a little responsibility!

Re:Did we listen? No (2, Offtopic)

SubtleNuance (184325) | more than 11 years ago | (#4674119)

hey, slashdot is no better than anyplace else... they are trying to sell ads by driving generating traffic.

I dont know about you people, but I dont harbour any fantasy about Slashdot being my living room, full of 500,000 of my closest friends... dont slip into that fantasy.

Here's a question: how much $ did ?which? editors make on the VA Sale? Do you think their priorities/opinions are the same? Do you *really* think the goals of slashdot are the same since VA bought them...?

Slashdot as an entitiy (such as it is) is amoral.

Re:Did we listen? No (5, Funny)

em_tasol (166929) | more than 11 years ago | (#4674053)

Awwww, come on, it's been a DAY already! That's like, MONTHS in the real world!

Re:back to /. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4674285)

The bugzilla link redirects back to Slashdot now.. any guesses why ?

what? open source bug-tracking? (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4673783)

Doesn't Larry McVoy have some sort of proprietary product we can use? He needs to feed his family and pay his mortgage!

Why? (3, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4673788)

If the developers are still going to prefer the mailing lists, why set up a bugzilla for it? Now there's just one more place to check for bugs. This would only be good if it were going to be used as the only place for reporting bugs. As it is, it'll probably just be an annoyance.

Re:Why? (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4673810)

Yeah... easily searchable, centralised sources of information suck.

Re:Why? (2, Informative)

Monkey-Man2000 (603495) | more than 11 years ago | (#4673991)

I think they were referring to discussions regarding the bugs. Not the list itself.

First Bug! (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4673790)


Linux's implementation of TCP/IP successfully connects to goatse.cx:80

Expected result : connection attempt should be rejected.

Re:First Bug! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4674281)

Goatse man didn't spend hours and hours spreading his hole wide to not have that appreciated and loved by the world community. Give the guy and break and pay some respects - it's not easy getting your ring hole that wide!

What's the point ... (-1, Flamebait)

JoeBuck (7947) | more than 11 years ago | (#4673805)

... of using IBM's db? Other, very large Bugzilla archives are running fine with free databases; the advantages of the proprietary db's don't start showing up until the problems get much larger.

Organizations that gratuitously use proprietary software when free software is completely adequate should consider dropping the "OS" from their names.

Are you serious? (5, Insightful)

Flabby Boohoo (606425) | more than 11 years ago | (#4673892)

Time and materials are being donated. What possible problem could you have with that?

Does it honestly matter how the bugs are being tracked, just as long as they are tracked?

Re:What's the point ... (3, Insightful)

RollingThunder (88952) | more than 11 years ago | (#4673906)

Perhaps I missed it, but I don't see anything in the announcement or on the site that this is using DB2 (what I presume you mean by "IBM's db"). Are you just assuming that's the case because IBM's hosting it?

Re:What's the point ... (1)

oxfletch (108699) | more than 11 years ago | (#4674210)

IBM is not even hosting it, they're just donating some time to help administer it. Sigh ... people's level of paranoia is just amazing. I'm not sure how you think this is going to mind-control the community somehow.

Re:What's the point ... (5, Insightful)

John Whitley (6067) | more than 11 years ago | (#4673925)

None of the links on the /. page or OSDL seem to indicate that the database is IBM's software, just that they're providing the bug database admin labor. Where did you read that IBM's proprietary DB software is being used?

Even if your statement is true, perhaps part of IBM's return on investment is a real-world application study with this bug-tracker as a test case?

IBM is killing open source (2)

axxackall (579006) | more than 11 years ago | (#4674242)

At least this anonounce [kuro5hin.org] speaks for itself: IBM "supports" open source by changing it to its proprietary software and thus IBM is killing open source software by destroying open source community.

Sounds familiar? For me to: it reminds me Bill Gates' "gifts" in India.

Technically, no way IBM can prove that DB/2 is better than PostgreSQL. But IBM even doesn't try to do it. No need. A sponsor can dictate its own choice of technology.

Re:What's the point ... (3, Insightful)

BJH (11355) | more than 11 years ago | (#4673945)

I don't see YOU offering to run a Bugzilla for the kernel. Put up or shut up.

A public database of errors? (-1, Flamebait)

PhysicsGenius (565228) | more than 11 years ago | (#4673812)

So now all MS has to do to compile page of Reasons To Switch is do a quick query against Bugzilla.Linux and there you go. I predict making these bugs public is going to give Linux a big ol' black eye.

Re:A public database of errors? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4673851)


Nice subtle troll. Yeah, let's hide our bugs like Microsoft do!

Yeah, I know what you mean (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4673865)

Hopefully the buglist won't be as long as Mozilla's is. Maybe we can come out looking OK if we just have a few hundred "issues" in there.

Yes and no (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4673882)

I agree that hanging out laundry out to dry isn't the best plan ever, but I think M$ tends to focus on the virality of the GPL rather than any specific technology issues. So I don't think the IT directors are going to get a bad image of Linux from this.

Any unconverted geeks, though...

Re:A public database of errors? (1)

Vann_v2 (213760) | more than 11 years ago | (#4674042)

I guess it's just that some people are optimistic enough that they believe if linux wins on the technical front by huge margins, it can lose on the PR front. If what you say happens, anyhow.

The BEST time to do it. (5, Insightful)

dpilot (134227) | more than 11 years ago | (#4674048)

After all, these are the days of corporate accounting fiascos. In the current clime, transparency is a thing to be admired, and this is about as transparent as you can get.

Feature it, it's the timely thing to do, as well as the right thing to do.

For that matter, Microsoft doesn't have much room to cast stones, and if transparency becomes an issue, one can always bring up their stock dilution through options, non-payment of dividends that stockholders are requesting while sitting on $40e9 of cash, and sometimes-questionable donations to charity that look like they generate more revenue than the donation.

Re:A public database of errors? (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4674079)

Absolute nonsense! Making bugs public is a virtue of Open Source and Free Software, not a reason to worry. MS, on the other hand, would never go about making all of its warts public.

Re:A public database of errors? (4, Funny)

entrylevel (559061) | more than 11 years ago | (#4674288)

Besides, if Microsoft did administer a public bug database, they would have to run it on some form of *NIX. Windows doesn't support enough processors!

Re:A public database of errors? (2, Insightful)

mpost4 (115369) | more than 11 years ago | (#4674100)

Or not, linux developers can then point back and show that they have a way to tracking bugs, fixing them and being open.

Re:A public database of errors? (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4674123)

Yeah, but hink about it this way...
Bug open: 11:54 EST 15/11/2002
Status: Serious

Bug Closed: 17:16 EST 15/11/2002
By: Linus T

How's Microsoft gonna FUD that?!

Re:A public database of errors? (5, Funny)

JordoCrouse (178999) | more than 11 years ago | (#4674137)

So now all MS has to do to compile page of Reasons To Switch is do a quick query against Bugzilla.Linux

Hey, right now all MS has to do to compile a page of reasons to switch is type "linux bugs" into Google:
Searched the web for linux bugs. Results 1 - 10 of about 1,450,000.


(Yeah, I know this is a troll - but hey, I'm bored).

Re:A public database of errors? (1, Redundant)

mcrbids (148650) | more than 11 years ago | (#4674318)

Searched the web for linux bugs. Results 1 - 10 of about 1,450,000.

Sadly, this is NOT an exaggeration [google.com] !

Re:A public database of errors? (3, Funny)

1lus10n (586635) | more than 11 years ago | (#4674364)

query 'microsoft bug'
return: Results 1 - 10 of about 1,280,000. Search took 0.21 seconds.
yeah. they have a whopping 170,000 less PUBLIC bugs than we do. damn. now think about the fact that all of our bugs can be SEEN and actually FIXED by people not being paid by a cartel/conglamorate/*instert bad word thingy here* (whos best interests it is in to hide such things.)
wow they must really have us beat.
anybody wanna do a search on security flaws ? ? ?

windows is worse (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4674375)

windows bugs [google.com]

Re:A public database of errors? (1)

oxfletch (108699) | more than 11 years ago | (#4674272)

So people should switch to MS because Linux has bugs in it's 2.5 *DEVELOPMENT* kernel that we're
actively working on fixing. Yeah. Right.

Why is this being modded down? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4674340)

He has an excellent point. Why are we allowing Linus to expose our flank to Microsoft?

http://www.allgonedead.com/ (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4673817)

i will give somebody 5 dollas to hack this
http://www.allgonedead.com/

The way we do it... (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4673831)

We keep all our developers on campus, and managers handle bug databases. That's why Windows is on version 6, not 2.5.

Re:The way we do it... (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4674082)

And that's why it's so full of bugs.

Re:The way we do it... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4674103)

Less bugs than typical Linux install.

Sorry, but that's a fact. Take off those linux goggles and try looking at the world objectively at least once in your life before you die. It's a kick!

Re:The way we do it... (1)

DetrimentalFiend (233753) | more than 11 years ago | (#4674136)

I'd have to say that the reason you're on version 6 is that each 'major' version has about as many changes as one or two 'minor' changes of linux. Anyway, some of the distributions of linux (which is what you would have to compare windows to) are on version 8 or 9. Versions are all marketing, so why would you even bring it up, even if it was just to troll?

Still responsive? (5, Interesting)

RollingThunder (88952) | more than 11 years ago | (#4673833)

I'm impressed. The Mozilla bugzilla normally falls over the moment /. looks it's way, which is why it denies a slashdot referral now (if I remember correctly).

Either it's just the fact this one's basically empty at the moment, or he may have some advice for the mozilla folks on properly setting up bugzilla. :)

IBM Hosting (5, Interesting)

bstadil (7110) | more than 11 years ago | (#4674039)

The other day Slashdot had a story about the Lightest of the Linux [slashdot.org] that were hosted and managed by IBM. There were not even a slight delay in getting the story at any time. Same here. IBM knows how to do these things.

Re:Still responsive? (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4674312)

The site www.osdl.org is running Apache/1.3.22 (Unix) (Red-Hat/Linux) mod_perl/1.24_01 mod_ssl/2.8.5 OpenSSL/0.9.6 DAV/1.0.2 PHP/4.0.6 on Linux.

Haha... (0, Offtopic)

OrangeHairMan (560161) | more than 11 years ago | (#4673844)

bugme.osdl.org

Yeah, and slashdot me also. :D

Laugh, it's funny.
Orange

Bugs (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4673911)

Many coders are disinclined to use bugs, because they don't necessarily improve code speed.

Whether or not bugs will accelerate any particular program has to be determined
case-by-case. And for most software, the deciding factor should be whether bugs
will simplify development and correctness (theoretically they can, but lots of
developers don't understand bugs and use them wrong).

My company has some realtime networked game for which bugs were an impediment.
Both the rate/duration of screen refreshs and network transmissions were low
enough so they didn't usually interfere with each other in the same bug. But
using bug-safe versions of standard library functions was degrading every other
part of the program with constant locking/unlocking.

So no bugs was faster. (Maybe cleverer people could've made special bug-unsafe
alternative functions to use in contexts where we know inter-bug race conditions
won't occur. But munging around with 2 standard libraries in one program is
riskier than we'd like to deal with)

Real Love (0, Funny)

Natchswing (588534) | more than 11 years ago | (#4673912)

> Martin J. Bligh of IBM announced launch of a Bugzilla bug tracking database...

Is he by chance related to Mary J. Blige?

Re:Real Love (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4673927)

I don't know but I just said his name out loud and my roommate thought I was vomiting.

What will this repository be called? (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4673921)

Now maybe it could use a name. How about
Tux-zilla?

Bugzilla + Linux (-1, Troll)

johnraphone (624518) | more than 11 years ago | (#4673933)

Its about time bugzilla will get all those bugs out of linux, wait nevermind, Windows is the screwed up OS.

Already with the funny? (5, Funny)

joenobody (72202) | more than 11 years ago | (#4673936)

Bug 30 [osdl.org] Owner: mbligh@aracnet.com (Martin J. Bligh)

Please enter
Exact Kernel version: 2.5.7
Distribution: red hat
Hardware Environment: pc
Software Environment: linux
Problem Description: RMS is too smelly - What do I do?

Steps to reproduce: No god no!!!

Re:Already with the funny? (5, Funny)

bob (73) | more than 11 years ago | (#4674015)

------- Additional Comment #1 From CS 2002-11-14 17:32 -------
This 'bug' can't be confirmed on any version of 2.5.
Possible problem: submitter is a troll and/or moron.

suggested course of action: delete (bug report and troll account).

Re:Already with the funny? (5, Informative)

molo (94384) | more than 11 years ago | (#4674168)

The "owner" listed above is the person the bug is assigned to. Please don't blame him for this garbage. The "submitter" is the person who entered the bug:

p-m@yahoo.com (Wolverine)

Ask Slashdot: Where can i get a good hit man? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4673947)

From the wouldn't-want-to-be-you dept
Posted by Cliff

Linux_Wanker writes: "Anybody know a good hit man? My ex-boss is a major league asshole and needs to be taught a lesson!" I say if you want the job done right, do it yourself. But no matter, if the sone of a bitch has it coming, he deserves what he gets. How do you recommend finding a discrete hitman, and keeping away from sting operations?

almost ready to ship.... (4, Funny)

illsorted (12593) | more than 11 years ago | (#4673962)

I think the 2.5 kernel is about ready for launch.

Just need to clear up this last bug [osdl.org] .

And tomorrow... (2)

netsharc (195805) | more than 11 years ago | (#4673997)

And in tomorrow's news, the new Bugzilla that people hoped would allow them to track bugs in the Linux kernel disappears off the net after being slashdotted to death. ;)

Well, all kidding aside, let's hope it will be a great tool to help in development of Linux.

The truth abot linux (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4674012)

The Federal Information Assurance Conference 2002 is taking place this Tuesday through Thursday at the University of Maryland. Some of the most prestigious government agencies and private businesses in the realm of Information Security are attending, including among others the National Security Agency, the National Institute of Standards and Technology, and the Defense Information Systems Agency; and RSA Security, Symantec, and IBM, respectively. The speakers included professionals from the FBI, the U.S. Secret Service, and the Office of Homeland Security.

Yesterday, the very first day, Microsoft announced that Windows 2000 has passed all required tests for certification under the Common Criteria (CC) at Evaluated Assurance Level 4 (EAL4) to demonstrate their "commitment to security." Unlike the Windows® NT 4.0 TCSEC (Trusted Computer Security Evaluation Criteria, a.k.a. "Orange Book") C2 certification which was on a non-networked machine without a floppy drive, the Windows 2000 CC EAL4 tests included among others the Active Directory Service, Virtual Private Networking (VPN), the Kerberos implementation, and the Encrypted File System. Where was Linux(TM) when Microsoft dropped this bombshell? Linux(TM) was nowhere to be found. There was no one from Red Hat, no one from Mandrakesoft (makers of Mandrake Linux), and no one from SuSE. Linus wasn't there. Not even the self-appointed patron saint of open source, Richard Stallman, bothered to show up.

Oh Linux(TM), oh Linux(TM). Where art thou, Linux(TM)? Why dist thou not showst up? The answer lies in a small, little excerpt from John Pescatore, Director of Internet Security for Gartner. He said, "Not all but some of versions of Linux could meet this level [CC EAL4] as well."

That's right. Not all versions of Linux could meet CC EAL4. In other words, not all versions of Linux could meet the same minimum security requirements as Microsoft Windows 2000.

"Well," you ask, "exactly which versions of Linux can and cannot meet CC EAL4 requirements?" It stands to reason that the core Linux(TM) kernel, the version distributed by Linus at http://www.kernel.org, cannot meet these minimum requirements, because if it did, all versions of Linux(TM) would meet these minimum requirements. After all, other Linux distributions are not going to be made less secure. I also know for a fact that this is true. The reason that only some of the Linux(TM) versions would pass CC EAL4 is that those versions patch the main Linux(TM) distribution. In other words, those more secure versions are forks, alternative versions of Linux(TM) that were not accepted into the main distribution.

This means that Linux(TM), as released by saint Linus, the same Linux(TM) that all these so-called "experts" have been touting as the more stable, more secure alternative to Windows, is actually less secure than Windows 2000. Now I don't want to get any email from you Linux(TM) naysayers asking me that if Microsoft Windows 2000 is so secure why does Microsoft® Windows 2000 have so many more security bugs, or security bulletins, than Linux(TM). Measuring the security of an operating system by the number of security bulletins is like measuring the security of a bank by the number of robberies. By that standard, my small town bank out here in the sticks with 2 tellers, 3 security cameras, and never more than US$1,000 cash on-hand is the most secure bank in the world.

The "theory of a thousand eyes" (the theory that open source is more secure because everybody can see the code and instantly discover a problem) doesn't make an operating system any more secure either. While the potential for more security exists, this doesn't ensure that the "thousand eyes" are actually looking. To the contrary, Red Hat has discovered bugs in the Linux kernel in sections that went unchanged for years. For example, not only did the Teardrop vulnerability in TCP/IP exist for decades, but the Teardrop vulnerability was ported to other operating systems, even though "thousands of eyes" had to be looking at the code in order to port it to another operating system. Peer review, an extension of this theory, doesn't provide any assurance either, because the reviewing peer may not be well versed in security and hence not fully understand or appreciate the implications of a given piece of code.

I've said it before, and I'll say it again. The only way to fully evaluate operating system security, and to compare one operating system's security to another operating system's security, is to have that operating system evaluated under TCSEC or CC. These are comprehensive methods of fully and exhaustively evaluating security, and the fact that they are common standards allows operating systems evaluated by the same criteria to be compared in terms of total security assurance. Until Linus and his open source goons get their act together, get their kernel up to snuff, and get their kernel certified, Linux(TM) will remain less secure than its arch-nemesis, Microsoft Windows 2000.

My concern with this (-1, Troll)

pardasaniman (585320) | more than 11 years ago | (#4674021)

I hope IBM does not gain to much control over the kernel because of this. Linux should be free of massive corporate backing, otherwise we'll become IBM's slaves. IBM can be just as evil as microsoft if we let them

Re:My concern with this (3, Insightful)

RocketJeff (46275) | more than 11 years ago | (#4674046)

I hope IBM does not gain to much control over the kernel because of this. Linux should be free of massive corporate backing, otherwise we'll become IBM's slaves. IBM can be just as evil as microsoft if we let them
It's just a freakin' bug tracking database - it's not like they're taking over kernel development. I'd doubt that even a paranoid the size of RMS could see a problem with this (although I'm obviously wrong looking at the post I'm replying to).

Re:My concern with this (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4674146)

exactly, if Microsoft wanted to donate xyz i would not have a problem. why is it that no matter what it is, someone always finds a problem with charity. alterier motives can not happen IF ITS CHARITY.

Re:My concern with this (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4674224)

Besides that, we've all seen Linus' response to people trying to "tell him" what to do with his kernel tree.

Re:My concern with this (1, Troll)

The Original Yama (454111) | more than 11 years ago | (#4674120)

Yes, this is a matter that deserves some concern. IBM have been known to be just as monopolistic and devious as Microsoft, and this may just be a trojan horse to gain some leverage over the kernel development process. IBM will completely own all the information that goes through the system, giving them to power (should they choose to use it) to 'moderate' (or even censor) bug reports in a manner that can direct development in a way which benefits them.

xbox live launched and no mention on Slashdot (-1, Offtopic)

VividU (175339) | more than 11 years ago | (#4674029)

You would think the first online gaming system in the world would garner a mention on Slashdot. Where they have "News for Nerds. Stuff that matters.".

Re:xbox live launched and no mention on Slashdot (1)

entrylevel (559061) | more than 11 years ago | (#4674097)

"The first online gaming system in the world"

Yeah. I used my Apple IIe to play games on America Online in 1984. I'm positive I did not start a revolution.

Back on topic, I think it is excellent that Linux now has an official bug database. Normal humans with no understanding of the internals of a TCP/IP stack or a VM system can now submit/confirm/monitor bugs. I tried to subscribe to the LKML once, just to lurk, but found even that impossible. The sheer amount of traffic on that list just blows my mind. I mean, c'mon, some of us only have 1.5Mbps of downstream bandwidth!

I must admit that it's impressive how the kernel developers can write such long, well-thought-out e-mails and still get any work done.

Re:xbox live launched and no mention on Slashdot (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4674206)

'sides, in terms of consoles, the Genesis had the ability to go online. :P

Re:xbox live launched and no mention on Slashdot (2)

ceejayoz (567949) | more than 11 years ago | (#4674122)

You would think the first online gaming system in the world would garner a mention on Slashdot.

You'd think that even trolls would know that online gaming has been around pre-2002.

Re:xbox live launched and no mention on Slashdot (1)

Breakfast Pants (323698) | more than 11 years ago | (#4674234)

You'd think even you would know the meaning of troll, especially since you are making a post about them.

list of digests? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4674059)

If you want to keep track of several lists renegade style you could just create a list & subscribe lists to it in a periodic digest format.
What's so special about the database? Keeps you from having to wade through thousands of messages each time? And that's a good thing? Likely it's why there are so many questions. How does anyone expect to understand the linux kernel without really getting a feel for those who write the bugs?
After a while you won't even need the lists after noticing you've got code by 'Racey' Randy or 'Segfault' Sally.

bug #1 (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4674085)

The biggest bug is that an inferior copycat unstable unreliable operating system like linux exists at all in today's environment. We need to get the word out that the linux kernel is nothing new and is actually quite bad before any more time and money get wasted on it.

IBM's Linux Strategy? (5, Insightful)

Joseph Lam (61951) | more than 11 years ago | (#4674107)

This seems to me that IBM wants to get closer to the kernel bug-tracking which is very important for them to adopt and support Linux on their products, especially on the high-end side. They've got to know the kernel inside out in order to introduce Linux and provide top quality service to prestigious customers.

It has a European accent. (3, Funny)

cpaluc (559921) | more than 11 years ago | (#4674125)

I searched 'firewire' and it said:

"Zarro Boogs found."

Re:It has a European accent. (5, Interesting)

Uksi (68751) | more than 11 years ago | (#4674394)

Actually, there's a story behind Zarro Boogs. It is a Mozilla.org (or probably Netscape) term "yeah, we think there are no bugs, but we won't say it so that you don't hold us to it." For example, a milestone reaches "zarro boogs".

If only... (-1, Offtopic)

EverDense (575518) | more than 11 years ago | (#4674139)

There was a version of this for all Microsoft Windows variants as well.

importante (-1, Offtopic)

DasZweiten (580333) | more than 11 years ago | (#4674144)

http://members.cox.net/daszweiten/slashdothyp.jpg a friend and i were in the library at school checking out the site like all loyal /. fans do when we ran across this. im sure this isnt new...but it was hte first time ive noticed it. for a very left-wing anti-microsoft (bill gates is a fucking borg for heavensake)site, they sell out pretty easily. i was so dissapointed. its one thing to need to pay your bills and maybe have a little extra cash...but to undermine your core principals, the very foundation that your project is built on...thats just pathetic. even if you decide that ads are necessary, most of us can come to terms with that, but why microsoft? why undermine your purpose and value? needless to say i am very dissapointed. (btw...all ms advocate fags who are going to critisize my argument by making my misspellings obvious, get a fuckign clue and realize that my bad grammar/spelling doesnt change the fact of the truth. that being you suck.)

Re:importante (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4674185)

What, you're in a library and you can't find the dictionary?
Grow up an go away, you're not helping anyone.

GCC Bugzilla? (5, Interesting)

__Reason__ (181288) | more than 11 years ago | (#4674192)

Its great that the kernel is getting a bugzilla.

However, attention must be drawn to the plight of the poor, unfortunate GCC hackers, who are still having to put up with an inferior [gnu.org] bug tracking system, despite a flurry [gnu.org] of activity [gnu.org] earlier in the year, it seems that little progress has been made on implementation. Lets all hope that GCC hackers don't have to continue to suffer the pain of crappy bug tracking for too much longer.

Re:GCC Bugzilla? (0)

TiggerStripe (556105) | more than 11 years ago | (#4674239)

see, they tried to get a bugzilla going but it was compiled with gcc 2.95.3 so - i guess you'd call that poetic justice :p

Christ on A Rubber OSS Crutch. (5, Insightful)

puto (533470) | more than 11 years ago | (#4674221)

This is too funny. IBM doing something good for the community and for themselves at the same time? Nothing wrong with at. Altruism and capitlism can go hand and hand. And I am not one to look a gift server in the mouth.

First we have people talking about IBM doing this to control kernel developlemt. This is nuts. IBM understands that Linux is big in the cards for them and they also understand the Free As in Beer Developmental community needs to really have a central repository for this sorta thing.

So IBM cuts loose the space and the DB for it. Throws in an admin or two. Why? Cause they got big money on Linux, they want to move the big corps over to it. So they need the assurance that bugfixes, patches, what have you, is on a reliable server somewhere that will always be around.

Yeah it does benefit them and benefit us. More power to em. OR what we are gonna round robin the server costs every month? We are gonna set up a Paypal Account and each chip in our own unlimited funds in this street paved of gold IT industry we have now?

IBM is a business and it sees that helping the community can help itself. QUID PRO QUO my friends.

IBM was a monopoly, but they also make damn good equipment. Always have. You can go on about a failed run of hard drives, or some bad workstations. But hey happends to all of them...

And this busines that IBM needs to know the kernel inside and out. Ahhh, I do not think anyone needs to be talking out there ass about us teaching IBM anything about operating systems. Much less one ending in *NIX.

IBM is one of the best things to happen to our community. They are making the inroads in the corporate road for us.

JEEZ. Get off the high horse people.

TheFlatline

Bug tracking for OSX? (3, Interesting)

Angelwrath (125723) | more than 11 years ago | (#4674235)

Could be a slightly silly question here - is there a Bugzilla or similar bug tracking site for Apple's OSX?

Re:Bug tracking for OSX? (3, Informative)

entrylevel (559061) | more than 11 years ago | (#4674343)

It's not bugzilla, but it's here [apple.com] . Requires at least a free ADC membership.

What about bugzilla for bugzilla? (4, Funny)

Mustang Matt (133426) | more than 11 years ago | (#4674255)

Geez guys! Run it through the w3c validator [w3.org] !

We're suppossed to be promoting the standards right?

If it has got this far without one... (0, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4674266)

Why introduce this now? Bugzilla is nothing new and either is the linux kernel. Maybe a mailing list sounds outdated as a bugtracking tool but if has got this far with napoleon style management (linus and the maintaners) then maybe this is just going to stir like it stirred the bitkeeper pot.

OSDL / OSDN / OSDM ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 11 years ago | (#4674369)

we have OSDN, OSDL, now how about OSDM ? Open Source Developers Magazine?
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